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David Andrews has been at 2 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Science on Google+596,075*Be curious. Question assumptions. Explore the world from atoms to astrophysics with Veritasium*. Join +Derek Muller of popular +YouTube Channel Veritasium on a journey to the beautiful, viral side of physics, hosted by Science on Google+ in honor of *YouTube Geek Week* (Aug 4-10). Our +Amy Robinson, +Jason Davison and +Nic Hammond will host, along with +Joe Hanson of +It's Okay To Be Smart and a few members of the community who ask Derek interesting questions on the event page.   The hangout happens on *Wednesday, August 7th at 5 pm US PT / 8 ET*. Derek will share why he creates Veritasium and how it has evolved into one of YouTube’s favorite sources of answers to epic science questions. He’ll also answer your questions so leave them here on the event page. You may be selected to join the hangout live and ask him in person.   Check out *Veritasium* on YouTube at http://veritasium.com   This is the third hangout in a new series that brings science to life through conversations with the world's leading minds. Join +Science on Google+: A Public Database for the latest events.Veritasium: A Science on Google+ Conversation2013-08-08 02:00:00236  
Slooh166,793*Slooh Space Camera to Broadcast Annular Solar Eclipse with Ring of Fire live from Australia* Slooh Space Camera will broadcast a free, real-time view of the *Annular Solar Eclipse* from Australia.  Viewers can capture a first look of the eclipse on Slooh.com, Thursday, May 9th starting at 2:30 PM PDT / 5:30 PM EDT / 21:30 UTC as the Moon’s shadow begins its journey over Australia on its way to eastern Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, the Gilbert Islands, and finally over the Pacific Ocean. *Viewers can watch live on their PC/MAC or by downloading the free Slooh iPad app in the iTunes store and touching the broadcast icon.* The Slooh broadcast team, along with Bob Berman, author of numerous astronomy books, and contributing editor and monthly columnist for Astronomy magazine, will provide live commentary.  As a special treat, Slooh will broadcast an additional feed of the Sun from the Prescott Solar Observatory, a fantastic facility located in Arizona - giving viewers a unique look of the Sun from the other side of the world. *Download the free Slooh iPad App:* www.appstore.com/slooh *Slooh Annular Eclipse Video:* http://youtu.be/_MZQRFIxJiY #solareclipse   #ringoffire   #eclipse   #annulareclipse   #sun   #moon   #lunar   #slooh   #hangoutsonair  Slooh's Coverage of Annular Solar Eclipse2013-05-09 23:30:00357  

Shared Circles including David Andrews

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 17

posted image

2015-01-03 23:59:46 (17 comments, 3 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

High time our government took it's boot off of Cuba's throat

Most reshares: 4

posted image

2015-01-12 08:56:27 (9 comments, 4 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Fun with a plasma cutter

Latest project to emerge from my imagination, and subsequently my shop.
An Earthling's answer to the Klingon Bat'leth.
https://www.google.com/#q=klingon+bat%27leth

 48" X 12"x 3/16  mild steel.
 I am armed with a vision, a plasma cutter, a wire feed welder,  a 4" angle grinder/ 60 grit flapper disc, a 100 inch strip of harness leather... and a dust mask.

Maybe a month thinking about it, (bought the steel plate so it could call my name while it leaned against the wall.)
It took a week to get the drawing of the edge profile to my liking and transferring the design enlarged from an 8"x10" drawn image to the steel, and a day cutting and grinding it clean.
Another 2 days to edge it and finish the surface. A day to paint a clear on it and a day to soak the leather and wrap the handles.<... more »

Most plusones: 28

posted image

2015-05-28 21:05:03 (8 comments, 0 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

Stacked lenticular glory
#cloudwars  

Just before sunset looking South. It is the topography of the Colorado Rocky Mountains that sculpted this weather front, stretching about 100 miles to the horizon.
Unfortunately, I couldn't wait for the sunset to paint it.

Latest 50 posts

posted image

2015-06-25 04:53:11 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Like Father, like Son (poor kid)

An accomplished metallurgical and materials engineer, he apparently suffers the same affliction as his father - a restless creativity that begs expression. He finds that release in the form of steel and a plasma torch.

Cut from 1/16" steel, the detail is awesome! Great style that has a dramatic effect on an empty wall space.
Have an idea that needs to be released? He had this one, along with his others at:
https://www.etsy.com/shop/StormForgeSteelArt?ref=hdr_shop_menu

In spite of notification posted at the entrance of our community that solicitation is prohibited, it doesn't stop the guys at my door asking if I would be interested in...
I get it, It's tough. They are only trying to earn an honest living, but when the doorbell rings, my teeth clinch - and my inner Logan wants out. :)



Like Father, like Son (poor kid)

An accomplished metallurgical and materials engineer, he apparently suffers the same affliction as his father - a restless creativity that begs expression. He finds that release in the form of steel and a plasma torch.

Cut from 1/16" steel, the detail is awesome! Great style that has a dramatic effect on an empty wall space.
Have an idea that needs to be released? He had this one, along with his others at:
https://www.etsy.com/shop/StormForgeSteelArt?ref=hdr_shop_menu

In spite of notification posted at the entrance of our community that solicitation is prohibited, it doesn't stop the guys at my door asking if I would be interested in...
I get it, It's tough. They are only trying to earn an honest living, but when the doorbell rings, my teeth clinch - and my inner Logan wants out. :)

___

posted image

2015-06-17 16:58:19 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Twinkle Twinkle

Interesting to note that "bright" refers to the amount of detectable radiation, not visible light.
At such extreme distance, what was emitted as xray and ultraviolet is red shifted below the threshold of visible light down into the infrared and microwave.

Nothing there for our eyes - Without the instruments we have built to extend our senses, we wouldn't see them at all.

Thanks to William Herschel, investigating the spectrum displayed by a prism with a thermometer, he discovered that his thermometer registered a temperature increase in the dark, below the the red end - the infrared. A frequency we cannot see, but we sense as heat.

He proved the electromagnetic spectrum extended beyond visible light, and discovered a frequency that could "see" through obscuring dust and would show us much of the Universe that was... more »

CR7 - Best Observational Evidence of First Generation Stars in the Universe

Astronomers using ESO’s Very Large Telescope have discovered by far the brightest galaxy yet found in the early Universe and found strong evidence that examples of the first generation of stars lurk within it. These first generation stars were the creators of the first heavy elements, necessary to forge the stars around us today and the planets that orbit them. The newly found galaxy, labelled Cosmos Redshift 7 (CR7), is three times brighter than the brightest distant galaxy known up to now.

Full story here:
http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1524/

More on Cosmos Redshift 7 (CR7):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmos_Redshift_7

More on Metallicity:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metallicity

Paper:
http://arxiv.org/pdf/1504.01734.pdf

Image credit: Artist's impression of CR7 ESO/M. Kornmesser http://bit.ly/1N2A3qE CC BY 4.0 http://bit.ly/1Jtf3Jr

#science   #astronomy   #cr7   #cosmosredshift7   #galaxy   #metallicity   #starformation   #vlt   #space   #populationiii  ___Twinkle Twinkle

Interesting to note that "bright" refers to the amount of detectable radiation, not visible light.
At such extreme distance, what was emitted as xray and ultraviolet is red shifted below the threshold of visible light down into the infrared and microwave.

Nothing there for our eyes - Without the instruments we have built to extend our senses, we wouldn't see them at all.

Thanks to William Herschel, investigating the spectrum displayed by a prism with a thermometer, he discovered that his thermometer registered a temperature increase in the dark, below the the red end - the infrared. A frequency we cannot see, but we sense as heat.

He proved the electromagnetic spectrum extended beyond visible light, and discovered a frequency that could "see" through obscuring dust and would show us much of the Universe that was invisible to us - including galaxies so far away that their blazing energy is reduced to the lowest frequencies that we can barely detect.

Thanks to +Pierre Markuse

posted image

2015-06-04 22:14:07 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

The glow on the bottom shines through the void created by the rising thermal that is pushing moisture skyward.

#cloudwars  

The glow on the bottom shines through the void created by the rising thermal that is pushing moisture skyward.

#cloudwars  ___

posted image

2015-06-04 00:20:06 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

My emberglow '66

polished paint film - zero clear coat

My emberglow '66

polished paint film - zero clear coat___

posted image

2015-06-04 00:15:54 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Soft light in the evening sky

#cloudwars  

Soft light in the evening sky

#cloudwars  ___

posted image

2015-05-28 21:05:03 (8 comments, 0 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

Stacked lenticular glory
#cloudwars  

Just before sunset looking South. It is the topography of the Colorado Rocky Mountains that sculpted this weather front, stretching about 100 miles to the horizon.
Unfortunately, I couldn't wait for the sunset to paint it.

Stacked lenticular glory
#cloudwars  

Just before sunset looking South. It is the topography of the Colorado Rocky Mountains that sculpted this weather front, stretching about 100 miles to the horizon.
Unfortunately, I couldn't wait for the sunset to paint it.___

posted image

2015-05-26 20:00:54 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

The atmosphere of Colorado choreographs a new dance, often several times a day

The atmosphere of Colorado choreographs a new dance, often several times a day___

posted image

2015-05-26 18:30:56 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Australopithecus to Einstein. It was just a matter of time

 A journey of untold time, life "forever dying, to be born anew" - a new animal emerges.  

 For this creature, being capable of walking upright presents the opportunity that his powerful hands and arms are free to explore the possibilities.

 An event in our ancient history that led to more articulate use of our hands, inevitably leading to increased dexterity and larger brain development to support those functions. The toolmaker. 

This inquisitive, intrepid creature would relentlessly explore and strive to understand. It would learn to document it's discoveries that others of a different time might also know, and carry the exploration forward. It's children would claw from the Earth ore that it would refine, alloy and manipulate.

 Eventually it would harness theelectrom... more »

Space Shuttle Rising
Image Credit: +NASA
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150524.html

What's that rising from the clouds? The space shuttle. Sometimes, if you looked out the window of an airplane at just the right place and time, you could have seen something very unusual -- a space shuttle launching to orbit. Images of the rising shuttle and its plume became widely circulated over the web shortly after Endeavour's final launch in 2011 May. The above image was taken from a shuttle training aircraft by NASA and is not copyrighted. Taken well above the clouds, the image can be matched with similar images of the same shuttle plume taken below the clouds. Hot glowing gasses expelled by the engines are visible near the rising shuttle, as well as a long smoke plume. A shadow of the plume appears on the cloud deck, indicating the direction of the Sun. The US Space Shuttle program concluded in 2011, and Endeavour can now be visited at the California Science Center.

+Astronomy Picture of the Day (APoD)​___Australopithecus to Einstein. It was just a matter of time

 A journey of untold time, life "forever dying, to be born anew" - a new animal emerges.  

 For this creature, being capable of walking upright presents the opportunity that his powerful hands and arms are free to explore the possibilities.

 An event in our ancient history that led to more articulate use of our hands, inevitably leading to increased dexterity and larger brain development to support those functions. The toolmaker. 

This inquisitive, intrepid creature would relentlessly explore and strive to understand. It would learn to document it's discoveries that others of a different time might also know, and carry the exploration forward. It's children would claw from the Earth ore that it would refine, alloy and manipulate.

 Eventually it would harness the electromagnetic spectrum, and the power of the atom. Engineering elements of the periodic table into materials, devices and systems that would govern processes and perform according to the laws of physics it had discovered and described. 

Of it's acquired knowledge and understanding it would craft a great ship, climb aboard - and ride it into the heavens.

" Man will one day stand on the earth as one would stand on a stepping stool, and with laughter reach out amidst the stars." - H.G. Wells

Via +TOR WALKER​​​

posted image

2015-05-26 00:17:30 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Greetings.
I live on the Colorado front range, and the systems spilling over the Rockies encounter the thermals of the plains - and regularly put on a show.

Greetings.
I live on the Colorado front range, and the systems spilling over the Rockies encounter the thermals of the plains - and regularly put on a show.___

posted image

2015-05-25 23:49:55 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

We Remember

We Remember___

2015-05-24 21:14:37 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

(Looks like) I fished it out of the Mediterranean

Ended up with a 5'x5' 400lb. slab of travertine made into a tabletop, and needed to make a base for it.

Looking for some corroded steel, the scrap yard had just taken in a bunch of old boiler pipes from a coal fired power plant... it was perfect! 
3" pipe, 1/4 wall thickness.
Scanning the yard, there was a pile of steel rod in the same state.
I loaded a 10 foot piece of the pipe and several rods, 1/2" and 1/4".

The yard man watching me load this nasty scrap stood there scratching his head.
"You MUST be making some art..."

The first pic is the state I found it in, the second is the pipe after a 24 hour bath in muriatic acid, a dilute solution of hydrochloric.
Look at that wonderful texture!

This was one of those times when the finished... more »

(Looks like) I fished it out of the Mediterranean

Ended up with a 5'x5' 400lb. slab of travertine made into a tabletop, and needed to make a base for it.

Looking for some corroded steel, the scrap yard had just taken in a bunch of old boiler pipes from a coal fired power plant... it was perfect! 
3" pipe, 1/4 wall thickness.
Scanning the yard, there was a pile of steel rod in the same state.
I loaded a 10 foot piece of the pipe and several rods, 1/2" and 1/4".

The yard man watching me load this nasty scrap stood there scratching his head.
"You MUST be making some art..."

The first pic is the state I found it in, the second is the pipe after a 24 hour bath in muriatic acid, a dilute solution of hydrochloric.
Look at that wonderful texture!

This was one of those times when the finished product turned out even better than the mental image that inspired me.
Sometimes you get lucky...___

posted image

2015-05-24 21:07:44 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Looks like I fished it out of the Mediterranean

Ended up with a 5'x5' 400lb. slab of travertine made into a tabletop, and needed to make a base for it.
Looking for some corroded steel, the scrap yard had just taken in a bunch of old boiler pipes from a coal fired power plant... it was perfect! 
3" pipe, 1/4 wall thickness.
Scanning the yard, there was a pile of steel rod in the same state.
I loaded a 10 foot piece of the pipe and several rods, 1/2" and 1/4".

The yard man watching me load this nasty scrap stood there scratching his head.
"You MUST be making some art..."

The first pic is the state I found it in, the second is the pipe after a 24 hour bath in muriatic acid, a dilute solution of hydrochloric.
Look at that wonderful texture!

This was one of those times when the finished product... more »

Looks like I fished it out of the Mediterranean

Ended up with a 5'x5' 400lb. slab of travertine made into a tabletop, and needed to make a base for it.
Looking for some corroded steel, the scrap yard had just taken in a bunch of old boiler pipes from a coal fired power plant... it was perfect! 
3" pipe, 1/4 wall thickness.
Scanning the yard, there was a pile of steel rod in the same state.
I loaded a 10 foot piece of the pipe and several rods, 1/2" and 1/4".

The yard man watching me load this nasty scrap stood there scratching his head.
"You MUST be making some art..."

The first pic is the state I found it in, the second is the pipe after a 24 hour bath in muriatic acid, a dilute solution of hydrochloric.
Look at that wonderful texture!

This was one of those times when the finished product turned out even better than the mental image that inspired me.
One of a kind. Sometimes you get lucky...___

posted image

2015-05-23 02:07:18 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Where I spend a great deal of my time.

Where I spend a great deal of my time.___

posted image

2015-05-18 15:57:32 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Seeing it, and Understanding it are two entirely different perspectives

With a fundamental understanding, you will never see a sunset the same way again.
That comprehension enhances the beauty and wonder of the experience and adds a new dimension to an event we have grown to take for granted. We see it with new eyes now.

Thanks to our robotic explorers, I have seen what a sunset looks like on a distant planet, and how different it is from ours.
I have seen these pictures online for a while - But now they hold a new significance, thanks to this gift from +Brian Koberlein​​.
Those like he and +Ethan Siegel​​ who devote their valuable time for no other reason than to share their understanding, and introduce us to the inherent wonder we are immersed in and oblivious to.
Seeing it, and understanding it are two entirely different perspectives.

Ican'... more »

Two Worlds, One Sun

There’s an image going around of a blue sunset on Mars. Yes, it’s a real image, and yes, the colors are reasonably true to life. It was taken by the Curiosity rover in April. Given that sunsets on Earth are typically red, how does Mars get a blue sunset? It all has to do with the way light scatters in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars.

Earth has a relatively thick atmosphere, so most of the atmospheric scattering occurs when light strikes a molecule of air, known as Rayleigh scattering. Rayleigh scattering occurs when the object a photon scatters off (the air molecule) is much smaller than the wavelength of the photon. The closer the wavelength is to the size of the molecule, the more likely it is to scatter. This means that red wavelengths (which are the longer wavelengths of visible light) don’t scatter with air molecules much, while blue wavelengths (which are shorter) tend to scatter a lot. In fact blue light is almost 10 times more likely to scatter against air molecules than red light. This is why the sky appears blue, since so much of the blue light is scattered.

When the Sun is low in the sky, it’s light has to travel a long path through the atmosphere to reach you. As the light travels through the atmosphere some of the photons are scattered off the air molecules. When the photons scatter off air molecules, they scatter randomly in all directions, so usually when a photon scatters, it scatters away from your line of sight. Since blue photons scatter much more often than red ones, much of the blue light is scattered away. This leaves red photons to reach your eye. Hence the Sun looks red when low in the sky. When the Sun is overhead, the path it takes to reach you is much shorter, so only a bit of the blue light is scattered. So the Sun looks yellow.

Mars has a much thinner atmosphere, so the amount of Rayleigh scattering is much less. But Mars also has a dry, dusty surface, and a weaker surface gravity, so the atmosphere of Mars is often filled with fine dust particles. These particles are more comparable in size to the wavelengths of visible light, so most of the light is scattered by Mie scattering. One of the main differences between Rayleigh and Mie scattering is that Rayleigh scattering tends to occur in all directions, but Mie scattering varies with scattering angle. What this means is that longer wavelengths (reds) tend to scatter more uniformly, while shorter wavelengths (blues) tend to scatter at slight angles. This means that blue light tends to be deflected less than red light. This means Mars can have a dusty red daytime sky, and a blue sunset.

Mie scattering does occur on Earth as well, but since Mie scattering is less efficient than Rayleigh scattering it’s never strong enough to give us a blue sunset. It can (rarely) produce a blue moon. The most widespread incidence of modern history occurred after the eruption of Krakatoa in 1883, which sent so much ash into the atmosphere it produced brilliantly red sunsets and visibly blue moons all across the globe for nearly two years. As a result, the phrase “once in a blue moon” came to mean a rare occurrence.___Seeing it, and Understanding it are two entirely different perspectives

With a fundamental understanding, you will never see a sunset the same way again.
That comprehension enhances the beauty and wonder of the experience and adds a new dimension to an event we have grown to take for granted. We see it with new eyes now.

Thanks to our robotic explorers, I have seen what a sunset looks like on a distant planet, and how different it is from ours.
I have seen these pictures online for a while - But now they hold a new significance, thanks to this gift from +Brian Koberlein​​.
Those like he and +Ethan Siegel​​ who devote their valuable time for no other reason than to share their understanding, and introduce us to the inherent wonder we are immersed in and oblivious to.
Seeing it, and understanding it are two entirely different perspectives.

I can't help but feel privileged witnessing our progress. Even Carl Sagan never saw a sunset on Mars!

2015-05-12 16:59:57 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

There is your penny NASA

A friend of mine, +Roger Spaeth​​ mentioned the little check boxes on our federal income tax forms that allow you to contribute to organizations -
He thought adding one for NASA was a good idea. I think it's a great idea!



There is your penny NASA

A friend of mine, +Roger Spaeth​​ mentioned the little check boxes on our federal income tax forms that allow you to contribute to organizations -
He thought adding one for NASA was a good idea. I think it's a great idea!

___

posted image

2015-05-08 18:29:32 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Precession

One of the three Milankovitch cycles
Eccentricity (orbital shape) a 400,000 year cycle.
Obliquity (orbital tilt) a 41,000 year cycle.
Precession, this picture, (rotational axis wobble) around 26,000 year cycle.

Dynamics in the earth's orbit and rotation that affect climate, and the effects of resonance between them can range from ice ages to global tropics.

Thanks to +Tammy Gordin​

When Vega is North
Image Credit & Copyright: Miguel Claro | Dark Sky Alqueva
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150508.html

In only about 12,000 years Vega will be the North Star, the closest bright star to our fair planet's North Celestial Pole. By then, when you fix your camera to a tripod long exposures of the night sky will show the concentric arcs of star trails centered on a point near Vega as Earth rotates on its axis. Of course, presently the bright star conveniently near the North Celestial Pole is Polaris, but that will change as the Earth's axis of rotation precesses, like the wobble of a spinning top with a precession period of about 26,000 years. If your camera is ready now and you don't want to wait 12,000 years for Vega to be the North Star, consider this ingenious demonstration of contemporary star trails (left) versus star trails reminiscent of the year 14000 CE. Both were recorded this April at the Alqueva Dark Sky Reserve in Alentejo, Portugal. To produce the more Vega-centric star trails of the distant future, astronomer Miguel Claro combined the rotation of two startracking camera mounts to create the apparent shift in planet Earth's North Celestial Pole.___Precession

One of the three Milankovitch cycles
Eccentricity (orbital shape) a 400,000 year cycle.
Obliquity (orbital tilt) a 41,000 year cycle.
Precession, this picture, (rotational axis wobble) around 26,000 year cycle.

Dynamics in the earth's orbit and rotation that affect climate, and the effects of resonance between them can range from ice ages to global tropics.

Thanks to +Tammy Gordin​

posted image

2015-05-08 17:47:22 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Excellent science read

Cosmic rays, antimater, time dialation...

"You see, there might not be a limit to the energies we can give to protons in the Universe: you can accelerate charged particles using magnetic fields, and the largest, most active black holes in the Universe could give rise to protons with energies even greater than the ones we’ve observed!

But they have to travel through the Universe to reach us, and the Universe — even in the emptiness of deep space — isn’t completely empty. Instead, it’s filled with large amounts of cold, low-energy radiation: the cosmic microwave background!"

The most energetic particles we find are up to ten million times greater than the energies we make at the LHC, but no greater than that. Come find out why!___Excellent science read

Cosmic rays, antimater, time dialation...

posted image

2015-05-08 16:30:40 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Immune privileged

I had no idea there were organs that are insulated from immune response.

___Immune privileged

I had no idea there were organs that are insulated from immune response.

posted image

2015-05-07 18:37:26 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

I have used these little wonders in my shop/studio for a decade. That vice grip like hold is adjustable and you can put a serious hold down on something.

The best application I use it for is the bench pin on my jewelers bench. I have made platforms for my vices, mandrels and several other devices besides the different profile bench pins I use allowing quick change and reconfiguration of the work area.
They are great!

NEW PRODUCTS - Toggle Clamp - Medium Flip-up Style / Toggle Clamp - Small Flip-down Style

Toggle Clamp - Medium Flip-up Style - https://www.adafruit.com/products/2456

Toggle Clamp - Small Flip-down Style - https://www.adafruit.com/products/2459

Ka-thunk Pin down that little PCB with our Toggle Clamps, a sturdy and reliable way to quickly press and release with precision! A pogo-pin bed is a great way to connect and test boards without any soldering, but you have to somehow get that PCB aligned right and evenly pressed down on each pogo. After much experimenting, we settled on these toggle clamps and we them all the time in our testing processes.

These beauties are strong enough to grip onto a PCB, but the rounded rubber tip ensures that they won’t mar or damage any circuits. You’ll need to bolt it securely, then attach the rubber nub with the included hex nuts. The height of the nub can be adjusted, as can the location along the clamp.

Toggle Clamp - Medium Flip-up Style - https://www.adafruit.com/products/2456

Toggle Clamp - Small Flip-down Style - https://www.adafruit.com/products/2459

Both are in stock and shipping now!
#newproducts   #tools   #testequipment   #clamps  ___I have used these little wonders in my shop/studio for a decade. That vice grip like hold is adjustable and you can put a serious hold down on something.

The best application I use it for is the bench pin on my jewelers bench. I have made platforms for my vices, mandrels and several other devices besides the different profile bench pins I use allowing quick change and reconfiguration of the work area.
They are great!

posted image

2015-05-06 06:18:07 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

A reflection of what was, on the edge of being gone

So the furthest objects we will be able to see are the ones that were emitting in the highest frequencies - gamma. So red shifted that it is "seen" by our instruments as radio frequencies.
We are reaching the threshold of what is possible to detect...
Until super long wave radio allows us see even further into a diminishing, ever receding fossil radiation.

"Whereas Hubble struggles to get to wavelengths as long as one micron, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will get all the way down to about 30 microns with better sensitivity than anything else that’s come before, with better resolution and some six times the light-gathering power of Hubble!"

You might think that, when it comes to finding the most distant objects in the Universe, all we need is a good telescope, to leave the shutter open, and wait. As we accumulate more and more photons, we’re bound to find the most distant, faint objects out there. Sure, Hubble just broke its own cosmic distance record, but it's certainly not the most distant. Thinking so misses an important fact: the Universe is expanding! And with that expansion, the wavelength of the light we can see gets redshifted. Ultraviolet light winds up in the infrared, infrared light winds up in the microwave, and the most distant galaxies that are out there are invisible, even to Hubble. Here are Hubble's limits, and how the James Webb Space Telescope will overcome them.___A reflection of what was, on the edge of being gone

So the furthest objects we will be able to see are the ones that were emitting in the highest frequencies - gamma. So red shifted that it is "seen" by our instruments as radio frequencies.
We are reaching the threshold of what is possible to detect...
Until super long wave radio allows us see even further into a diminishing, ever receding fossil radiation.

posted image

2015-05-01 17:38:21 (3 comments, 2 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

The prophet of renewable energy

A higher ideal than a thinner smartphone and another round of profits for a massive company.
Utilities take note, evolve or perish beneath Tesla's heel as it blazes a trail into the future.
This guy is exemplary in how you spend a fortune - for the benefit of the entire planet and it's future.

H/to +Hudson Ansley​

Elon Musk is quite literally working to save the planet. 

http://www.theverge.com/2015/5/1/8527543/elon-musk-tesla-battery-feels___The prophet of renewable energy

A higher ideal than a thinner smartphone and another round of profits for a massive company.
Utilities take note, evolve or perish beneath Tesla's heel as it blazes a trail into the future.
This guy is exemplary in how you spend a fortune - for the benefit of the entire planet and it's future.

H/to +Hudson Ansley​

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2015-04-29 19:12:28 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

___

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2015-04-20 05:04:06 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

To Infinity and Beyond

"We’ve managed to zoom in by more than a factor of 10^200, or more than a googol squared, and we still find this same self-similarity, and the same remarkable, intricate structures. There are ideas that perhaps the Universe is self-similar like this, but if it is, there’s a finite limit: the largest observable scales are “only” 92 billion light years or so (from one edge of the observable Universe to the other), while the smallest theoretical scale, the Planck scale, is down at around 10^-35 meters. All told, this is just 62 orders of magnitude, which doesn’t even account for the fact that non-gravitational forces begin to play important roles on scales the size of galaxies and smaller."

Mandelbrot zooms now surpass the scale of the entire observable Universe, and show no signs of loss of complexity or detail as they do. Lose yourself in these visuals, or celebrate 4/20 a little early, as is your wont.___To Infinity and Beyond

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2015-04-10 00:06:06 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Fun with electricity - at 10,000 FPS
with a little fluid dynamics thrown in as a bonus. 

It would be neat to compare this to a gas shielded weld without the spatter of flux.

Fun with electricity - at 10,000 FPS
with a little fluid dynamics thrown in as a bonus. 

It would be neat to compare this to a gas shielded weld without the spatter of flux.___

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2015-03-27 18:12:33 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

A new tool maker

Via +Andrea Pavlovic​

___A new tool maker

Via +Andrea Pavlovic​

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2015-03-23 22:39:56 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

We are the same family, in the same house

From our friends at +SPACE.com: "This Astronaut's 'Orbital Perspective' Could Change The World"  [Video]

 http://dlvr.it/8wjdmw ___We are the same family, in the same house

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2015-03-20 17:07:45 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

"Your insurance payment will rise if you don't own one"

Google proved autonomous vehicles are safer than human controlled veihicles.
Think about a highway full of networked vehicles, each monitoring it's surroundings with an unblinking eye. Constantly aware.
A huge improvement over easily distracted humans, each in a different emotional state of mind performing what amounts to "formation flying" navigating a highway.
Accident investigation reveals you turned off autopilot - automatically your fault.
An expected evolution, just a lot sooner than we imagine.

Via +Ben Hibben​

Tesla basically just ignited the driverless car era

Just to be clear, we're not talking about some far-off future Tesla. We're not talking about Google driverless car prototypes or government road tests. This is a car you can buy today This is a car you can buy today, granted the ability to drive itself will come in a few months via the same kind of system that updates your iPhone. Automated automobiles, automatically activated.

#tesla  
#selfdrivingcars  ___"Your insurance payment will rise if you don't own one"

Google proved autonomous vehicles are safer than human controlled veihicles.
Think about a highway full of networked vehicles, each monitoring it's surroundings with an unblinking eye. Constantly aware.
A huge improvement over easily distracted humans, each in a different emotional state of mind performing what amounts to "formation flying" navigating a highway.
Accident investigation reveals you turned off autopilot - automatically your fault.
An expected evolution, just a lot sooner than we imagine.

Via +Ben Hibben​

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2015-03-17 06:40:44 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

OK, This is pretty amazing

3D printing just evolved

I think the 3D printing market just stepped up a notch. This looks like an order-of-magnitude improvement in the technology.___OK, This is pretty amazing

3D printing just evolved

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2015-03-14 16:50:33 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Microstructures

Mimicking the iridophores of a chameleon - controlling the distance between refracting structures to manipulate the reflected frequency.

The next lesson the chameleon can teach us will likely more difficult to replicate - how it manages to so accurately control the spacing to refract specific frequencies.
I'm pretty sure the chameleon doesn't have to think about it...

This ability is demonstrated by other color-shifting creatures, In the octopus it is chromatophores instead of iridophores, but the control mechanism would be the same, probably a function of the autonomic nervous system.
Achieving that degree of control over a physical structure will be a challenge.
The chameleon makes it look easy.

Another lesson for us from nature that worked it out over 3.5 billion years of trial and error.
The closer we look ... more »

"Borrowing a trick from nature, engineers have created an incredibly thin, chameleon-like material that can be made to change color -- on demand -- by simply applying a minute amount of force".___Microstructures

Mimicking the iridophores of a chameleon - controlling the distance between refracting structures to manipulate the reflected frequency.

The next lesson the chameleon can teach us will likely more difficult to replicate - how it manages to so accurately control the spacing to refract specific frequencies.
I'm pretty sure the chameleon doesn't have to think about it...

This ability is demonstrated by other color-shifting creatures, In the octopus it is chromatophores instead of iridophores, but the control mechanism would be the same, probably a function of the autonomic nervous system.
Achieving that degree of control over a physical structure will be a challenge.
The chameleon makes it look easy.

Another lesson for us from nature that worked it out over 3.5 billion years of trial and error.
The closer we look the more she teaches us.


Via +rasha kamel​​

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2015-03-11 19:34:05 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

This, Please

A right to free speech doesn't come with a right to be heard

Search Engines and Science

Truth, truthiness and the preponderance of evidence.

http://www.salon.com/2015/03/06/anti_science_advocates_are_freaking_out_about_new_google_truth_rankings/

First, I think that we all know that any knowledge base comes with some form of curation.  Obviously there is no way that everything can end up on top.  Somehow some sort of decision has to be made somewhere.  Those of us here are aware of the time and money expended to get websites to the top of search engine lists, and how little that has to do with search engines, at least search engine results, being "agnostic".

That said, I think that more careful consideration of the nature of science needs to be made here by Google.  The confusing fact for the public (and apparently Google) is that what scientists accept as valid information is based on the preponderance of current evidence.  These items are not labeled "facts", scientists call these "theories".    Unfortunately, that word "theory" has a tentativeness to it to the public, as in the phrase "it's only a theory".  Theories, like the theory of gravity, or evolution are highly documented and quite actionable.  But still, not as set in stone as the word "fact" would imply.

I think that this sort of content curation is something that has to be done.  But I also don't think that it is appropriate to think that the fact that anti-science groups are worried regarding how this affects their posts, doesn't mean we shouldn't be worried about how this is implemented also.___This, Please

A right to free speech doesn't come with a right to be heard

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2015-03-11 17:38:52 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Iridophores

Via+Asrat Gizachew​
New to me. I know of chromatophores and melanophores, but the manipulations of frequency by the spacing is a fascinating evolutionary adaptation.

Scientists Just Found Out How Chameleons Change Color

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/scientists-just-found-out-how-chameleons-change-color/ar-AA9Dad5___Iridophores

Via+Asrat Gizachew​
New to me. I know of chromatophores and melanophores, but the manipulations of frequency by the spacing is a fascinating evolutionary adaptation.

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2015-03-08 19:23:29 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Ever seen radioactive decay?

___Ever seen radioactive decay?

2015-03-01 20:09:11 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Cultural influence on Development
Why we need a focus on science in education

I recently attended a lecture by Neil deGrasse Tyson here in Denver. The subject of his lecture was culture, and what he presented was very educational.

He made an interesting point Regarding the Golden Age of Islam.
From about 800 to 1200 AD, Islam was at the forefront of all science. Mathematics, optics, medicine and astronomy.
Today we find their influence everywhere.
Algebra, algorithm and Arabic numerals. The first magnitude stars have names given to them by the desert dwellers.
Islam was their religion, but science was their culture.

Then around 1100 AD, there was an influential Imam who taught it was more pious to study theology rather than worldly goings on, and the focus began to change.

Tyson took off his shoe and placed it imbalanced on the edge... more »

Cultural influence on Development
Why we need a focus on science in education

I recently attended a lecture by Neil deGrasse Tyson here in Denver. The subject of his lecture was culture, and what he presented was very educational.

He made an interesting point Regarding the Golden Age of Islam.
From about 800 to 1200 AD, Islam was at the forefront of all science. Mathematics, optics, medicine and astronomy.
Today we find their influence everywhere.
Algebra, algorithm and Arabic numerals. The first magnitude stars have names given to them by the desert dwellers.
Islam was their religion, but science was their culture.

Then around 1100 AD, there was an influential Imam who taught it was more pious to study theology rather than worldly goings on, and the focus began to change.

Tyson took off his shoe and placed it imbalanced on the edge of the podium so that it fell as he stepped away.
He said " to a Muslim, that was the will of Allah."
He said "if that is as far as you were willing to go to understand what just happened here, you will never learn anything."

Muslims still practice Islam just as their science centered ancestors did, but the cultural focus shifted.
Tyson said "They still haven't recovered."

Tyson referenced European culture and how it reflects and influences national priorities.
Europe tends to feature scientists on their money. England has Newton, Italy has Galileo. He showed a German Deutsche mark that has Gauss, with a mathematical distribution diagram printed right on the bill.
He pointed out that German engineering was world renoun. The reason is it is part of their culture.

He went on to illustrate how during the cold war and race to the Moon, American culture was forward focused and led the world in technological development.
Everything was about " tomorrow". The house of tomorrow, the world of tomorrow. Disney's tomorrow land.

Compare that with our cultural focus today, and remember the lesson in the passing of the golden age of Islam.___

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2015-03-01 17:56:03 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Simply called "The Machine", it uses "electrons for processing, photons for communication, and ions for storage."

___Simply called "The Machine", it uses "electrons for processing, photons for communication, and ions for storage."

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2015-02-13 18:29:13 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Years ago National Geographic did a feature article that described historical mega drought conditions in the U.S.

The mysterious disintegration of cultures like the Maya and the Anasazi roughly coincide with an extended drought recorded by dendrochronology, the study of tree rings that accurately record growth rate in response to environmental moisture.
The data spanning thousands of years revealed that it was not unusual for the western United States to experience periods of extended drought that lasted decades. This study by NASA reaffirms earlier data.

The most sobering realization was that the entire western half of the U.S. had been settled during a period of above average moisture!

In other words, what we view as "normal" really isn't.
It is only the perspective we have through the lens of our short lifespan, and the tiny sample of less than... more »

Droughts in the U.S. Southwest and Central Plains at the end of this century could be drier and longer compared to drought conditions seen in those regions in the last 1,000 years, according to a new NASA study.
 
The study, published Feb 12 in the journal Science Advances, is based on projections from several climate models, including one sponsored by NASA. The research found the risk of severe droughts in those regions would increase if human-produced greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase. 
 
"Natural droughts like the 1930s Dust Bowl and the current drought in the Southwest have historically lasted maybe a decade or a little less," said Ben Cook, climate scientist at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University in New York City, and lead author of the study. "What these results are saying is we're going to get a drought similar to those events, but it is probably going to last at least 30 to 35 years."

Read more:http://bit.ly/nasa-megadroughts

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center ___Years ago National Geographic did a feature article that described historical mega drought conditions in the U.S.

The mysterious disintegration of cultures like the Maya and the Anasazi roughly coincide with an extended drought recorded by dendrochronology, the study of tree rings that accurately record growth rate in response to environmental moisture.
The data spanning thousands of years revealed that it was not unusual for the western United States to experience periods of extended drought that lasted decades. This study by NASA reaffirms earlier data.

The most sobering realization was that the entire western half of the U.S. had been settled during a period of above average moisture!

In other words, what we view as "normal" really isn't.
It is only the perspective we have through the lens of our short lifespan, and the tiny sample of less than two hundred years we have been keeping records.

In our industrial and technological adolescence we have introduced another variable in the dynamic, perhaps best described as a loose cannon - in the form of carbon and other petrochemical combustion by-products.
The climatic models should serve as a warning.

The availability of water has always influenced where civilization flourished. Survival dictated that the Ancestral Puebloans had to pack up and leave.
I suspect we will come to realize that living in what we already call the desert southwest will become a challenge for us as well.

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2015-02-11 20:01:14 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

ZAPPA

Acid etching on a bronze belt buckle done for a fan of this irreverent artist.
Pretty good likeness, and graphically representative of his style.

Painting a "resist" on the metal, in this case a film of asphalt impervious to the acid. A design is scratched through the resist to expose select areas and the piece is submerged in an acid bath. As the metal reacts to the acid, gas bubbles form that cling to the surface preventing further contact with the etchant. Using a brush to remove the bubbles helps produce an even cut. Neutralize the acid to stop the etch and remove the remaining resist mask with a solvent.
An oxide patina finished the piece.

ZAPPA

Acid etching on a bronze belt buckle done for a fan of this irreverent artist.
Pretty good likeness, and graphically representative of his style.

Painting a "resist" on the metal, in this case a film of asphalt impervious to the acid. A design is scratched through the resist to expose select areas and the piece is submerged in an acid bath. As the metal reacts to the acid, gas bubbles form that cling to the surface preventing further contact with the etchant. Using a brush to remove the bubbles helps produce an even cut. Neutralize the acid to stop the etch and remove the remaining resist mask with a solvent.
An oxide patina finished the piece.___ZAPPA

Acid etching on a bronze belt buckle done for a fan of this irreverent artist.
Pretty good likeness, and graphically representative of his style.

Painting a "resist" on the metal, in this case a film of asphalt impervious to the acid. A design is scratched through the resist to expose select areas and the piece is submerged in an acid bath. As the metal reacts to the acid, gas bubbles form that cling to the surface preventing further contact with the etchant. Using a brush to remove the bubbles helps produce an even cut. Neutralize the acid to stop the etch and remove the remaining resist mask with a solvent.
An oxide patina finished the piece.

posted image

2015-02-04 19:27:51 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

How infrared let's us see through the obscuring dust of the galaxy

William Herschel, while experimenting with the spectra from a prism and a thermometer, noticed before he slid the thermometer into the red end of the spectrum, that the temperature increased. He had just discovered the infrared.

Infrared Astronomy Defeats Trash Bags But Finds Glasses Challenging http://space.io9.com/infrared-astronomy-defeats-trash-bags-but-finds-glasses-1683670723___How infrared let's us see through the obscuring dust of the galaxy

William Herschel, while experimenting with the spectra from a prism and a thermometer, noticed before he slid the thermometer into the red end of the spectrum, that the temperature increased. He had just discovered the infrared.

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2015-01-29 05:09:35 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

As they ride their Great Ships into History
We salute the Astronaut Corps. who count among themselves the martyrs who made the ultimate sacrifice in our intrepid exploration of Human spaceflight.
We are honored and humbled.

Today #NASARemembers those who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to their fellow crewmates on Spaceship Earth http://go.nasa.gov/18u87NU___As they ride their Great Ships into History
We salute the Astronaut Corps. who count among themselves the martyrs who made the ultimate sacrifice in our intrepid exploration of Human spaceflight.
We are honored and humbled.

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2015-01-24 19:36:42 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

"instead of an individual, they are a multitude."

Being an introvert, left handed and creative- I recognize this in myself.
Different aspects all running around loose, but when inspiration strikes, they all seem to coordinate, and that flow is food for my soul.

___"instead of an individual, they are a multitude."

Being an introvert, left handed and creative- I recognize this in myself.
Different aspects all running around loose, but when inspiration strikes, they all seem to coordinate, and that flow is food for my soul.

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2015-01-15 19:29:03 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

+Ron Garan​, your post of returning to Earth aboard Soyuz gave me an understanding of the "Orbital Perspective".

You landed in Kazakhstan, fully halfway around the planet from
Where you live.
Looking through the Soyuz window seeing the soil and grass, your first thought was
"I am home"

"Home" went from being the house in a neighborhood of a town in a country, to anywhere within the biosphere!

A view shared only by a small club of individuals who had the courage and drive to step outside of their environment and experience an expansion of awareness and perspective.

Hoping your book and efforts to share that perspective come across to those of us who have been limited to scratching around down here in the dirt, occupied with our petty issues race and religion.

The Orbital Prospective: Lessons in Seeing the Big Picture from a Journey of 71 Million Miles by +Ron Garan 

Ron is a highly decorated Fighter Pilot and Test Pilot, Explorer, Entrepreneur and Humanitarian who believes that appropriately designed and targeted social enterprise can solve many of the problems facing our world. 

Ron is a retired NASA astronaut who has traveled 71,075,867 miles in 2,842 orbits of our planet during more than 178 days in space and 27 hours and 3 minutes of EVA during four spacewalks. He flew on both the US Space Shuttle and the Russian Soyuz spacecraft. Ron is also an aquanaut and participated in the joint NASA-NOAA, NEEMO-9 mission, an exploration research mission held in Aquarius, the world's only undersea research laboratory. During this mission he and the crew spent 18 continuous days living and working on the ocean floor.

Now Ron has a different focus in life and is sharing his wide perspective to help others look at the big picture.

Interested in space and astronauts? You might like Ron's new book
http://www.amazon.com/Orbital-Perspective-Lessons-Picture-Journey/dp/1626562466/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

#book  #astronaut #space   #science  ___+Ron Garan​, your post of returning to Earth aboard Soyuz gave me an understanding of the "Orbital Perspective".

You landed in Kazakhstan, fully halfway around the planet from
Where you live.
Looking through the Soyuz window seeing the soil and grass, your first thought was
"I am home"

"Home" went from being the house in a neighborhood of a town in a country, to anywhere within the biosphere!

A view shared only by a small club of individuals who had the courage and drive to step outside of their environment and experience an expansion of awareness and perspective.

Hoping your book and efforts to share that perspective come across to those of us who have been limited to scratching around down here in the dirt, occupied with our petty issues race and religion.

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2015-01-15 18:57:19 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

She is a fighter pilot and a mechanical engineer, she is fluent in Italian, English, German, French and Russian. And on top of that, she is an astronaut!

L+50: Logbook

My 50th day in space and certainly a big day here on ISS yesterday – as I’m sure you’ve heard, Dragon has arrived! We now have a new room attached to Node 2 nadir, right next to our crew quarters : all the time I’ve been up here there was a hatch to vacuum there, now I can make the turn and “dive down” into Dragon. Our home in space just got bigger!

Approach and capture happened in the morning and, at least from what we could tell from our perspective, everything went really well. It was quite touching to watch this vehicle approach ISS and to discern more and more details as it came closer, a messenger from Earth bringing supplies to the only six humans currently not on the planet. 

I was impressed at how steady it was as it came up from below us: you could hardly notice it controlling its position and attitude. As it stopped at the last holding point at 30 meters it felt already so close, I couldn’t believe that it would get still 20 meters closer before we could grapple it, but of course out there we don’t have many references to gauge distance. It arrived at the capture point, at 10 meters distance, during orbital night, with the red and green lights on the sides reflecting beautifully on the solar arrays. Just after sunrise we got a “GO for capture” from Houston and Butch smoothly maneuvered the robotic arm onto the grapple pin and pulled the trigger to initiate the capture sequence.  I had all the malfunction cue cards ready, but fortunately there was no need for them. Everything went perfectly!

After that we safed the arm and ground took control to maneuver the Dragon to its berthing position at the Node 2 nadir port. Once the bolts that create a solid mechanical connection were driven, I received a go to leak check the vestibule: if you’re wondering what that is, let’s say that it’s the space between the doors.

We have a hatch on our side, Dragon has a hatch on its side: when the hatches are open, we need a pressure-tight “corridor” in between that allows us to go through; that is called the vestibule. Just after berthing, the vestibule is at vacuum: if you think about it, it’s outside of the hatch on our side and outside of the hatch on the Dragon side. Before we equalize pressure and open the hatch, it’s important to make sure that the vestibule doesn’t leak. For that purpose I opened a patch between the vestibule and the ISS cabin atmosphere and pressurized the vestibule to 260 mmHg, then verified that the pressure remained stable for 20 minutes. At that point, I fully equalized pressure and Terry and Butch took over to open the hatch and work on reconfiguring the vestibule for the time Dragon will stay on ISS.

At some point, once the hatch on our side was open, Terry invited me to smell the “smell of space” in the vestibule. It’s sort of a joke, of course, space itself doesn’t smell. But it’s apparently the typical smell of hardware that has been exposed to vacuum. Not a pleasant odor, I tell you:  I’d say the dominant component is “burned” with a touch of “rotten”. But hey, if that means that a spaceship came to visit, I’ll take it anytime!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook #Futura42  

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiCAST qui:
http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici:
 https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES - Currently not updated) Tradducción en español aquí:
http://www.intervidia.com/category/bitacora___She is a fighter pilot and a mechanical engineer, she is fluent in Italian, English, German, French and Russian. And on top of that, she is an astronaut!

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2015-01-14 21:42:46 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

"what does he get? Things that money can't buy."

“Ever wondered, what is it we ​​want from life exactly? Why do some people have plenty of money, still no joy. This clip might not be the answer, but it may be a starting point for you to do something, to find the answer yourself.”___"what does he get? Things that money can't buy."

posted image

2015-01-14 18:44:50 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Exogeology
Interesting, how the rubble is alluvial in appearance, rounded like river rock... Suggesting transport and subsequent erosion.

10 years ago today - the first image of Titan's surface after the successful landing of the Huygens probe.

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Cassini-Huygens/First_images_from_Titan

Credit: ESA/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

#Huygens #Titan  ___Exogeology
Interesting, how the rubble is alluvial in appearance, rounded like river rock... Suggesting transport and subsequent erosion.

posted image

2015-01-13 23:52:21 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Long ago and far,far away

How many times has a biosphere arisen, flourished and then faded? A momentary blossom, that comes and goes, with the death of it's solar system announced by the distant flash of a supernova.

This stunning image shows a bright supernova in the Superwind galaxy taken on Jan. 2 by astrophotographer Justin Ng.___Long ago and far,far away

How many times has a biosphere arisen, flourished and then faded? A momentary blossom, that comes and goes, with the death of it's solar system announced by the distant flash of a supernova.

posted image

2015-01-13 01:45:55 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

This image from orbit shows an alga bloom, responding to nutrients delivered by the currents they outline

A heartbeat of the biosphere - the base of the ocean food chain.

Coloring the Sea Around the Pribilof Islands

The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured this view of a phytoplankton bloom near Alaska’s Pribilof Islands on Sept. 22, 2014. The Pribilofs are surrounded by nutrient-rich waters in the Bering Sea. The milky green and light blue shading of the water indicates the presence of vast populations of microscopic phytoplankton—mostly coccolithophores, which have calcite scales that appear white in satellite images. Such phytoplankton form the foundation of a tremendously productive habitat for fish and birds.

Blooms in the Bering Sea increase significantly in springtime, after winter ice cover retreats and nutrients and freshened water are abundant near the ocean surface. Phytoplankton populations plummet in summertime as the water warms, surface nutrients are depleted by blooms, and the plant-like organisms are depleted by grazing fish, zooplankton, and other marine life. By autumn, storms can stir nutrients back to the surface and cooler waters make better bloom conditions.

Image Credit: NASA/Landsat 8___This image from orbit shows an alga bloom, responding to nutrients delivered by the currents they outline

A heartbeat of the biosphere - the base of the ocean food chain.

posted image

2015-01-12 09:03:37 (8 comments, 1 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Fun with a plasma cutter

Latest project to emerge from my imagination, and subsequently my shop.
An Earthling's answer to the Klingon Bat'leth.
https://www.google.com/#q=klingon+bat%27leth

 48" X 12"x 3/16  mild steel.
 I am armed with a vision, a plasma cutter, a wire feed welder,  a 4" angle grinder/ 60 grit flapper disc, a 100 inch strip of harness leather... and a dust mask.

Maybe a month thinking about it, (bought the steel plate so it could call my name while it leaned against the wall.)
It took a week to get the drawing of the edge profile to my liking and transferring the design enlarged from an 8"x10" drawn image to the steel, and a day cutting and grinding it clean.
Another 2 days to edge it and finish the surface. A day to paint a clear on it and a day to soak the leather and wrap the handles.<... more »

Fun with a plasma cutter

Latest project to emerge from my imagination, and subsequently my shop.
An Earthling's answer to the Klingon Bat'leth.
https://www.google.com/#q=klingon+bat%27leth

 48" X 12"x 3/16  mild steel.
 I am armed with a vision, a plasma cutter, a wire feed welder,  a 4" angle grinder/ 60 grit flapper disc, a 100 inch strip of harness leather... and a dust mask.

Maybe a month thinking about it, (bought the steel plate so it could call my name while it leaned against the wall.)
It took a week to get the drawing of the edge profile to my liking and transferring the design enlarged from an 8"x10" drawn image to the steel, and a day cutting and grinding it clean.
Another 2 days to edge it and finish the surface. A day to paint a clear on it and a day to soak the leather and wrap the handles.

Then there was the mount... it rests in a leather surfaced cradle (to prevent scratches. The wrap-around tabs are visible at each end of the handles. (Yes, you can take it down and hurt yourself with it... I bled twice just making it. ) 

The light plays nicely across the surface in the video.___

posted image

2015-01-12 08:56:27 (9 comments, 4 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Fun with a plasma cutter

Latest project to emerge from my imagination, and subsequently my shop.
An Earthling's answer to the Klingon Bat'leth.
https://www.google.com/#q=klingon+bat%27leth

 48" X 12"x 3/16  mild steel.
 I am armed with a vision, a plasma cutter, a wire feed welder,  a 4" angle grinder/ 60 grit flapper disc, a 100 inch strip of harness leather... and a dust mask.

Maybe a month thinking about it, (bought the steel plate so it could call my name while it leaned against the wall.)
It took a week to get the drawing of the edge profile to my liking and transferring the design enlarged from an 8"x10" drawn image to the steel, and a day cutting and grinding it clean.
Another 2 days to edge it and finish the surface. A day to paint a clear on it and a day to soak the leather and wrap the handles.<... more »

Fun with a plasma cutter

Latest project to emerge from my imagination, and subsequently my shop.
An Earthling's answer to the Klingon Bat'leth.
https://www.google.com/#q=klingon+bat%27leth

 48" X 12"x 3/16  mild steel.
 I am armed with a vision, a plasma cutter, a wire feed welder,  a 4" angle grinder/ 60 grit flapper disc, a 100 inch strip of harness leather... and a dust mask.

Maybe a month thinking about it, (bought the steel plate so it could call my name while it leaned against the wall.)
It took a week to get the drawing of the edge profile to my liking and transferring the design enlarged from an 8"x10" drawn image to the steel, and a day cutting and grinding it clean.
Another 2 days to edge it and finish the surface. A day to paint a clear on it and a day to soak the leather and wrap the handles.

Then there was the mount... it rests in a leather surfaced cradle (to prevent scratches). The wrap-around tabs are visible at each end of the handles. (Yes, you can take it down and hurt yourself with it... I bled twice just making it. ) 

The light plays nicely across the surface in the video.___

posted image

2015-01-09 17:41:44 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

A heartbeat of the biosphere

The base of the ocean food chain.
Our fleet of Earth observing satellites look at the planet with an unblinking eye, and reveal connections across the biosphere that we would never have known otherwise.
You cannot solve a puzzle without all of the pieces.

Coloring the Sea Around the Pribilof Islands

The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured this view of a phytoplankton bloom near Alaska’s Pribilof Islands on Sept. 22, 2014. The Pribilofs are surrounded by nutrient-rich waters in the Bering Sea. The milky green and light blue shading of the water indicates the presence of vast populations of microscopic phytoplankton—mostly coccolithophores, which have calcite scales that appear white in satellite images. Such phytoplankton form the foundation of a tremendously productive habitat for fish and birds.

Blooms in the Bering Sea increase significantly in springtime, after winter ice cover retreats and nutrients and freshened water are abundant near the ocean surface. Phytoplankton populations plummet in summertime as the water warms, surface nutrients are depleted by blooms, and the plant-like organisms are depleted by grazing fish, zooplankton, and other marine life. By autumn, storms can stir nutrients back to the surface and cooler waters make better bloom conditions.

Image Credit: NASA/Landsat 8___A heartbeat of the biosphere

The base of the ocean food chain.
Our fleet of Earth observing satellites look at the planet with an unblinking eye, and reveal connections across the biosphere that we would never have known otherwise.
You cannot solve a puzzle without all of the pieces.

posted image

2015-01-06 17:32:18 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

She makes it look easy!

She makes it look easy!___

posted image

2015-01-03 23:59:46 (17 comments, 3 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

High time our government took it's boot off of Cuba's throat

High time our government took it's boot off of Cuba's throat___

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