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Shared Circles including Linus Torvalds

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The Google+ Collections of Linus Torvalds

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Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

61
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11
reshares per post
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1,389
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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 279

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2015-11-19 23:02:49 (279 comments; 253 reshares; 2,276 +1s)Open 

"What is this, a G+ for ants?"

The "new G+" seems to have dropped the support for more than two columns. So it's back to the bad old days of 50% gray horizontal space. Because clearly there is no better use for it.

Maybe google doesn't buy their engineers any good monitors, and so they haven't learnt about that whole 4k screen thing? But the old G+ at least gave me three columns.

Most reshares: 632

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2015-10-17 00:19:04 (89 comments; 632 reshares; 2,431 +1s)Open 

Wish I saw this #gif when I was in school #FourierTransform

Most plusones: 3451

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2015-07-19 21:36:12 (190 comments; 214 reshares; 3,451 +1s)Open 

I don't have the hi-res in-the-air pictures yet, but here's me looking cool.

Although apparently +Jim Zemlin was laughing so hard when I did the thumbs-up sign that the camera shake makes that picture a bit blurry. Thanks, Jim.

Latest 50 posts

2016-02-10 23:34:59 (71 comments; 7 reshares; 248 +1s)Open 

I'm looking at the Google Play Music family plan, because I'd like to make sure the kids end up listening to their music legally. 

However, that thing must be the absolutely worst documented thing ever. Either that, or it's the most mis-designed thing ever. So before I take that plunge, can somebody who uses it clarify which of the two it is, by answering this simple question for me:

Q: Can I actually sign up for the family plan (what $14.99/mo), without having to then worry about any mistaken purchases by the kids.

Don't get me wrong - it's no that I don't trust my kids (or my wife, heh) to behave. But every time I look at the FAQ for that thing, I end up struck by the fact that the whole "family payment plan" seems to be tragically misdesigned, and is a "family can randomly use the credit card information you put in" plan.more »

I'm looking at the Google Play Music family plan, because I'd like to make sure the kids end up listening to their music legally. 

However, that thing must be the absolutely worst documented thing ever. Either that, or it's the most mis-designed thing ever. So before I take that plunge, can somebody who uses it clarify which of the two it is, by answering this simple question for me:

Q: Can I actually sign up for the family plan (what $14.99/mo), without having to then worry about any mistaken purchases by the kids.

Don't get me wrong - it's no that I don't trust my kids (or my wife, heh) to behave. But every time I look at the FAQ for that thing, I end up struck by the fact that the whole "family payment plan" seems to be tragically misdesigned, and is a "family can randomly use the credit card information you put in" plan.

Yes, in-app purchases are restricted, but that seems to be the only thing. 

Maybe it's just the support pages that are garbage.  I can hardly complain about that, considering how much great documentation I write myself.

So please tell me it's just the docs that are crazy.

Because I can't imagine that anybody would be so stupid as to actually design a system the way it's documented.

I take that back. I can imagine that, which is why I'm not signing up without clarification..___

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2016-02-10 03:48:43 (21 comments; 12 reshares; 110 +1s)Open 

The android mobile version of Subsurface is currently mostly about being able to visualize your dives (think of it like taking your logbook with you on your phone or tablet - perhaps to show the dive shop, perhaps to look up what the conditions were last time), but even in that limited form it is quite useful.

Subsurface-mobile for Android -- first beta

The Subsurface developer team is thrilled to announce the first beta release of our mobile app for Android.

Subsurface-mobile connects to your Subsurface cloud storage account and allows you to access your dive list from your mobile device. You can scroll through your dives, look at dive details and dive profiles, edit dives, even add new dives on your phone or tablet. After an initial sync Subsurface-mobile works offline, so no worries about being on a dive boat and not able to connect to the network - the data will be synced at the next opportunity when you are back within signal range.

Subsurface-mobile also includes the GPS tracking functionality of the old Subsurface companion app which allows you to collect precise GPS fixes for your dive sites.

At this point Subsurface-mobile will be most useful when used together with the existing Subsurface desktop application. Most notably, downloading dives from your dive computer is so far not possible from Subsurface-mobile (but that is on our to-do list for at least some classes of dive computers).

In order to try Subsurface mobile on your Android device simply opt in at this link: https://play.google.com/apps/testing/org.subsurfacedivelog.mobile

And don't forget to take a look at the user manual___The android mobile version of Subsurface is currently mostly about being able to visualize your dives (think of it like taking your logbook with you on your phone or tablet - perhaps to show the dive shop, perhaps to look up what the conditions were last time), but even in that limited form it is quite useful.

2016-02-06 00:07:19 (70 comments; 19 reshares; 329 +1s)Open 

I just upgraded one of the kids' machines and decided to finally get one of the Intel NUCs (and the small M.2 version at that, because who wants rotational media? Certainly not me).. 

I have hardly even done more than installed things on it, but I'm already a big fan. I've always enjoyed the small desktop form factor, and used to use a Shuttle SFF for my own use and had several Mac Minis back when they were the smallest thing around.

The NUC is just a (much) better modern version of those. Add a M.2 SSD and some DDR4 RAM, and you have a really nice box that really has everything you need.

Ok, so I won't use it as a main desktop (I do want more CPU for my builds), and I'd love to see a version with two ethernet ports (for routing), so it's not like the NUC is ready to replace every box in the house.

But for a basic solid desktop with both... more »

I just upgraded one of the kids' machines and decided to finally get one of the Intel NUCs (and the small M.2 version at that, because who wants rotational media? Certainly not me).. 

I have hardly even done more than installed things on it, but I'm already a big fan. I've always enjoyed the small desktop form factor, and used to use a Shuttle SFF for my own use and had several Mac Minis back when they were the smallest thing around.

The NUC is just a (much) better modern version of those. Add a M.2 SSD and some DDR4 RAM, and you have a really nice box that really has everything you need.

Ok, so I won't use it as a main desktop (I do want more CPU for my builds), and I'd love to see a version with two ethernet ports (for routing), so it's not like the NUC is ready to replace every box in the house.

But for a basic solid desktop with both reasonable wired and wireless networking and perfectly fine graphics for non-gaming use, it really is a very lovely box.___

2016-01-31 23:29:07 (72 comments; 9 reshares; 286 +1s)Open 

I've been crawling around in our crawlspace for the last week or so, trying to clean up our networking. I long ago bought a structured media enclosure for the crawlspace that is right next to the access door, but it hasn't really seen active use apart from the coax cable junction.

Until this week. When I decided to actually terminate the network cabling at a proper punch-down patch board, and actually mount the network switch properly in the cabinet rather than have it randomly dangling from all the cables.

I'm a horrible network engineer, so when things go wrong, I just assume I wired something badly. But it turns out that just because I suck at wiring, doesn't necessarily mean that somebody else doesn't suck even more. So far I've had three disasters while redoing the networking, but none of them actually turned out to be due to me wiring things wrong.... more »

I've been crawling around in our crawlspace for the last week or so, trying to clean up our networking. I long ago bought a structured media enclosure for the crawlspace that is right next to the access door, but it hasn't really seen active use apart from the coax cable junction.

Until this week. When I decided to actually terminate the network cabling at a proper punch-down patch board, and actually mount the network switch properly in the cabinet rather than have it randomly dangling from all the cables.

I'm a horrible network engineer, so when things go wrong, I just assume I wired something badly. But it turns out that just because I suck at wiring, doesn't necessarily mean that somebody else doesn't suck even more. So far I've had three disasters while redoing the networking, but none of them actually turned out to be due to me wiring things wrong.

First I tried to figure out why one of my UniFi AC access points simply would not connect at gigabit speeds. It would show up as "Connected (100 FDX)" in the UniFi control applet, and I just couldn't figure out why.

Now, it doesn't really matter - the 100Mbps connection to the AP is perfectly fine, but it just annoyed the hell out of me that my newly done cable to the mudroom ceiling would be limited to 100Mb speeds. 

It turns out that what looked like 100% identical PoE injectors weren't. The cabling was fine, but one of the AC Lite AP's had come with a GP-A240-050 adapter, while the other one was a GP-A240-050G. That "G" was what made one connect at gigabit speeds while the other didn't.

While debugging that, I noticed that my office only connected at 100Mbps too. No PoE adapter there, but I had changed that cable to come in through a punch-down patch board too, so I re-did the punch-down because clearly I must have screwed up. No change.

It turns out that apparently I had never connected at gigabit speeds in the first place, because the cable from the wall to the switch in my office was to blame. And it wasn't even one of the cables I had made myself, so it was just about the last thing I decided to test.

And yesterday, I cleaned up the closet where all this crawlspace activity actually comes out to the cable modem, and in the process our phone stopped working. I haven't done phone wiring before, but how the hell could I screw up a single pair? That takes a special kind of skill - the "short bus" kind of special.

Our crawlspace phone wiring is a huge mess, with an ungodly mix of the old-style black-red-green-yellow wiring, and more modern CAT5/UTP wiring. I'm used to the 568A/B confusion, but have never really done BRGY before, so I checked and re-checked my connections and couldn't find the problem.

In the end, I knew everything but the new keystone jack had worked at an earlier point, and I just decided that the punch-down must have failed. That RJ25 jack really looked questionable anyway, not at all like the quality RJ45 jacks I'm used to from doing networking.

So I went to Home Depot and got a new jack with proper color-coded punch downs around the sides, and now our phone works again.

So now everything works, the closet that has our cable modems looks clean and has a proper shelf for the modems rather than having them hanging by the cables coming out of the wall, and I'm mostly happy.

Except now that I've done the telephone cable thing, and have a proper punch down panel in the media enclosure, I have a hankering for fixing the phone cables in the crawlspace too.

Because right now all the phone jacks connect to where the phone company used to bring in the wire probably 20 years ago, way in the back of the crawl. And I could instead just get it to all connect in that proper panel that I now have...

I'm just not sure how much more time I want to spend in that crawl space. Even if it would be for a good cause.___

2016-01-29 00:51:46 (76 comments; 10 reshares; 337 +1s)Open 

Judging by all the "worst company in America" stories, I was probably the only person in the country that didn't use to hate +XFINITY. They hadn't screwed up once.

Until now.

Because of the lack of problems with Internet and TV, about a month ago I switched over voice to them too, since the traditional landline phone service here has had the box at the street flooded pretty much every year, with resulting grounding problems and horrible hiss etc.

Our voice line works fine. But thanks to XFINITY apparently happily selling their number database to scammers, we're now absolutely inundated with scam calls. As in "several times a day".  Microsoft support, IRS, you name it.

Christ-on-a-stick how I hate phone scammers. And now, thanks to being an enabler, I hate your guts too, XFINITY. 

Judging by all the "worst company in America" stories, I was probably the only person in the country that didn't use to hate +XFINITY. They hadn't screwed up once.

Until now.

Because of the lack of problems with Internet and TV, about a month ago I switched over voice to them too, since the traditional landline phone service here has had the box at the street flooded pretty much every year, with resulting grounding problems and horrible hiss etc.

Our voice line works fine. But thanks to XFINITY apparently happily selling their number database to scammers, we're now absolutely inundated with scam calls. As in "several times a day".  Microsoft support, IRS, you name it.

Christ-on-a-stick how I hate phone scammers. And now, thanks to being an enabler, I hate your guts too, XFINITY. ___

2016-01-28 00:45:01 (85 comments; 16 reshares; 345 +1s)Open 

So, completely hypothetical question... 

Let's say that you were less than gifted, and had a UniFi AC Lite AP that you hadn't mounted in the ceiling because you're really lazy and didn't have your house wired to the right location.

But rather than attach the mounting plate to the back of the AP to keep track of it, you'd misplace it and probably throw it away.. Because, as mentioned, you're about as stupid as a doorknob.

Now, let's further imagine that you finally did the whole crawlspace and attic thing to get a cable where you wanted it to go.

How would you now mount it, having lost the mounting hardware?

This is all entirely hypothetical, of course. I wouldn't do something that stupid. I'm just asking for a good friend.

Edit: sticky velcro it is. Looks very professional, not at all like it was done by... more »

So, completely hypothetical question... 

Let's say that you were less than gifted, and had a UniFi AC Lite AP that you hadn't mounted in the ceiling because you're really lazy and didn't have your house wired to the right location.

But rather than attach the mounting plate to the back of the AP to keep track of it, you'd misplace it and probably throw it away.. Because, as mentioned, you're about as stupid as a doorknob.

Now, let's further imagine that you finally did the whole crawlspace and attic thing to get a cable where you wanted it to go.

How would you now mount it, having lost the mounting hardware?

This is all entirely hypothetical, of course. I wouldn't do something that stupid. I'm just asking for a good friend.

Edit: sticky velcro it is. Looks very professional, not at all like it was done by some birdbrained yokel. Thanks, people.___

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2016-01-19 00:31:49 (60 comments; 10 reshares; 748 +1s)Open 

Some people wanted video of the RC car in action.

It's a bit delayed - first by the merge window (which is still going on, but today I'm almost caught up), and by me being sick for a couple of days.

I decided to just put a GoPro on the car rather than ask a family member to try to take video of it. Of course, the grass is wet and that impacted the video more than I thought it would. Oh well.

.. and I realize that just driving around on grass is not very exciting. With a GoPro, the car should make incredible stunt jumps and soar over the environment. Tough. If you wanted that, you should have asked somebody competent.

Some people wanted video of the RC car in action.

It's a bit delayed - first by the merge window (which is still going on, but today I'm almost caught up), and by me being sick for a couple of days.

I decided to just put a GoPro on the car rather than ask a family member to try to take video of it. Of course, the grass is wet and that impacted the video more than I thought it would. Oh well.

.. and I realize that just driving around on grass is not very exciting. With a GoPro, the car should make incredible stunt jumps and soar over the environment. Tough. If you wanted that, you should have asked somebody competent.___

2016-01-18 00:14:30 (36 comments; 8 reshares; 241 +1s)Open 

Today's observation: I can get custom clip-on sunglasses for just about any pair of glasses I looked at. But can I get custom flip-down reading glasses? No.

#dorkworldproblems

Today's observation: I can get custom clip-on sunglasses for just about any pair of glasses I looked at. But can I get custom flip-down reading glasses? No.

#dorkworldproblems___

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2016-01-13 04:08:02 (89 comments; 17 reshares; 994 +1s)Open 

Nothing says "good taste" and "professional" quite like a bad paint job in iridescent purple/pink/gold.

Slap a couple of stickers on it, and you're done.

Nothing says "good taste" and "professional" quite like a bad paint job in iridescent purple/pink/gold.

Slap a couple of stickers on it, and you're done.___

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2016-01-10 02:16:00 (41 comments; 21 reshares; 685 +1s)Open 

You know the drill by now..

So it's all working. This is not necessarily all that tuned, but at least it's in fairly good driving shape. And with the throttle travel set to just 33%, I can even control it reasonably.

Fixed since yesterday: front right shock placement, getting rid of ridiculous toe-out, reasonable cable management and the ESC is now taped down and stable. Also, the sensor wire is now actually connected - the stock 200mm sensor wire was too short for the kitty-corner routing, so yesterday the motor was sensorless. Today I got a 300mm sensor wire and got that wired up too.

I also decided that I really couldn't live with the DX2E radio, and upgraded to a DX4C. Which allowed me to do a much better job of trimming the steering servo, and also made the whole throttle travel adjustment much more reasonable.

On the whole, I still suck as a RC... more »

You know the drill by now..

So it's all working. This is not necessarily all that tuned, but at least it's in fairly good driving shape. And with the throttle travel set to just 33%, I can even control it reasonably.

Fixed since yesterday: front right shock placement, getting rid of ridiculous toe-out, reasonable cable management and the ESC is now taped down and stable. Also, the sensor wire is now actually connected - the stock 200mm sensor wire was too short for the kitty-corner routing, so yesterday the motor was sensorless. Today I got a 300mm sensor wire and got that wired up too.

I also decided that I really couldn't live with the DX2E radio, and upgraded to a DX4C. Which allowed me to do a much better job of trimming the steering servo, and also made the whole throttle travel adjustment much more reasonable.

On the whole, I still suck as a RC driver, but I'm pretty happy with the build. I should paint the body, but I already know I never will. I might get some vinyl decals instead - I do need to cover things up (for when I lose control and the thing flies through the air and lands awkwardly), and the clear plastic body is just unforgivably ugly.

Comments on the parts:

- the kit itself (Team Losi 8IGHT-E 3.0) was quality parts.

- the build instructions were reasonable: I definitely remember much worse (think Japanese kits - often very good kits, but the instructions may be wonderful, but when you don't speak the language it can still get rather challenging). But there were places where the illustrations really weren't all that wonderful, and sometimes just downright wrong. Not unexpected.

- the kit tools are just nasty. If I really wanted to complain about something, it would be about the insane mix of imperial and metric hex nut choices. Please just make everything metric! When you have six different hex nut sizes, and some of them are metric, and others are not, it's just nasty. Torx would be even better, and not have the whole question of metric or crazy.

- The DX2E radio was a mistake. It's just not a good radio.

- the Tekin ESC and motor may be quality, but they reminded me how bad I am at soldering. Christ. That just made me feel bad. Put a soldering iron in my hands, and the end result looks like a monkey on crack had done it.

But a really fun build. I'll be able to play with it a bit tomorrow, before it's time to go back to kernel programming.___

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2016-01-09 08:01:28 (48 comments; 23 reshares; 893 +1s)Open 

RC Build - day three

I didn't have as much time as I'd want, since it's Friday before a release, and people sending me in the last few pull requests were harshing my RC mellow. 

Plus I went back to see what was wrong with the front assembly, and figured out that I hadn't tightened down the servo saver nut enough, causing it to drag on the base plate when turning the steering.

As a result, please ignore the lack of cable management, and the fact that the ESC is just flopping around rather than being safely fastened. Oh, and that neither the spoiler nor the body cover is in place.

But this was enough to verify that the car works. Yay!

Of course, as expected, it's inhumanly fast, despite my smaller pinion gear. Can't really test it indoors, and it's dark outside. But I got tires that should be ok on grass, so tomorrow I'll... more »

RC Build - day three

I didn't have as much time as I'd want, since it's Friday before a release, and people sending me in the last few pull requests were harshing my RC mellow. 

Plus I went back to see what was wrong with the front assembly, and figured out that I hadn't tightened down the servo saver nut enough, causing it to drag on the base plate when turning the steering.

As a result, please ignore the lack of cable management, and the fact that the ESC is just flopping around rather than being safely fastened. Oh, and that neither the spoiler nor the body cover is in place.

But this was enough to verify that the car works. Yay!

Of course, as expected, it's inhumanly fast, despite my smaller pinion gear. Can't really test it indoors, and it's dark outside. But I got tires that should be ok on grass, so tomorrow I'll hopefully have it calibrated, cables managed, ESC taped down, and ready to actually take for a run.

And I'll have to figure out what the manual setting for the ESC is for "go slow" mode.___

posted image

2016-01-08 06:27:51 (47 comments; 21 reshares; 684 +1s)Open 

RC Build - Day two.

Better tools made it less painful and faster. Of course, getting used to building again helps too. The front differential I built yesterday was a pain. Today I built the center and rear diffs (with motor mount and rear assembly respectively), and it all went much more smoothly. 

It wasn't just the build that was smoother. I think the end result is turning more smoothly too. So now I have a slight urge to go back and revisit the front differential, just to make it turn as smoothly as the rear one.

But I think I'll hold off, and try to get shocks and electronics done tomorrow. I'd like to see this thing run around and scare the pets.

RC Build - Day two.

Better tools made it less painful and faster. Of course, getting used to building again helps too. The front differential I built yesterday was a pain. Today I built the center and rear diffs (with motor mount and rear assembly respectively), and it all went much more smoothly. 

It wasn't just the build that was smoother. I think the end result is turning more smoothly too. So now I have a slight urge to go back and revisit the front differential, just to make it turn as smoothly as the rear one.

But I think I'll hold off, and try to get shocks and electronics done tomorrow. I'd like to see this thing run around and scare the pets.___

posted image

2016-01-07 20:04:11 (47 comments; 7 reshares; 452 +1s)Open 

I'm starting to hate tiny L-shaped Allen wrenches. They are vicious, and will attack you and bite your fingers with no provocation what-so-ever.

Today, I'll go out and buy a set of tiny hex bits for an electric screw driver. And a few longer ones for those hard-to-reach screws.

My fingers will thank me.

I'll go clean up the blood splatters from the walls now.

I'm starting to hate tiny L-shaped Allen wrenches. They are vicious, and will attack you and bite your fingers with no provocation what-so-ever.

Today, I'll go out and buy a set of tiny hex bits for an electric screw driver. And a few longer ones for those hard-to-reach screws.

My fingers will thank me.

I'll go clean up the blood splatters from the walls now.___

posted image

2016-01-07 00:37:39 (51 comments; 14 reshares; 750 +1s)Open 

A couple of weeks ago I murmured about how I hadn't done so well at my computer build.

But do I learn?

Hell no. This year for my birthday I decided I should re-create a modern version of a present I got twenty years ago from my then-GF (now wife). Instead of a few computer parts, I now have about a gazillion RC car parts that will need to be assembled next weekend.

I appreciate the fact that the parts are all bagged (and each bag sub-bagged) to make it easier to follow the build instructions.



A couple of weeks ago I murmured about how I hadn't done so well at my computer build.

But do I learn?

Hell no. This year for my birthday I decided I should re-create a modern version of a present I got twenty years ago from my then-GF (now wife). Instead of a few computer parts, I now have about a gazillion RC car parts that will need to be assembled next weekend.

I appreciate the fact that the parts are all bagged (and each bag sub-bagged) to make it easier to follow the build instructions.

___

posted image

2016-01-04 19:43:45 (26 comments; 1 reshares; 262 +1s)Open 

There's more ice than tree on our poor birch.

It's drooping right over our driveway, but since said driveway has turned from "drive" to "skate", I guess that doesn't much matter. We're not going anywhere without studs or chains, and I'm much too lazy to dick around with the chains.

It will melt today anyway.

Maybe.

There's more ice than tree on our poor birch.

It's drooping right over our driveway, but since said driveway has turned from "drive" to "skate", I guess that doesn't much matter. We're not going anywhere without studs or chains, and I'm much too lazy to dick around with the chains.

It will melt today anyway.

Maybe.___

2015-12-22 02:51:46 (54 comments; 65 reshares; 1,318 +1s)Open 

The best part of the successful SpaceX first stage landing? Watching the people in the control room jumping and hugging each other at the success. Brings a tear to your eye.

Congrats to all the SpaceX people.

The best part of the successful SpaceX first stage landing? Watching the people in the control room jumping and hugging each other at the success. Brings a tear to your eye.

Congrats to all the SpaceX people.___

2015-12-18 22:55:55 (132 comments; 30 reshares; 759 +1s)Open 

I used to think that I was good at building my own machines. I may have to re-think that.

I've pretty much always put together my own hardware, originally because it was cheaper to build your own system (which hasn't been true for a while now), and lately mainly because I end up having somewhat odd hardware - I've had access to development boards from Intel etc, so my machines tend to be these Frankenstein's monsters of random parts put together.

But recently I decided that I'd want to upgrade to a Skylake CPU and get rid of all my legacy stuff in favor of just a M.2 NVMe SSD. No more silly DVD drives, no more SATA disks.

And it turns out you can only take your Frankenstein hardware so far. My old power supply I was getting a bit suspicious of, and decided to finally upgrade for a fanless one, and my lovely old case with sound dampening panels didn't... more »

I used to think that I was good at building my own machines. I may have to re-think that.

I've pretty much always put together my own hardware, originally because it was cheaper to build your own system (which hasn't been true for a while now), and lately mainly because I end up having somewhat odd hardware - I've had access to development boards from Intel etc, so my machines tend to be these Frankenstein's monsters of random parts put together.

But recently I decided that I'd want to upgrade to a Skylake CPU and get rid of all my legacy stuff in favor of just a M.2 NVMe SSD. No more silly DVD drives, no more SATA disks.

And it turns out you can only take your Frankenstein hardware so far. My old power supply I was getting a bit suspicious of, and decided to finally upgrade for a fanless one, and my lovely old case with sound dampening panels didn't have USB3 ports, and honestly, without any rotational media the sound dampening probably didn't matter that much any more.

So I decided to pretty much upgrade everything. Go for really quiet fans etc. I went so far as even upgrade my mouse, because while I enjoy my Logitech MX Anywhere mouse, I decided that if I'm upgrading my machine, I'm getting the MX 2 Anywhere that is rechargeable rather than changing batteries every two months or whatever.

I'm now on week two of my upgrade, simply because I'm so completely disorganized. Just putting the machine together took something like four hours, because I noticed much too late that I couldn't actually mount the nice big (and quiet) fan with the motherboard in place, so I had to disassemble it all again and start from scratch, and in the meantime I misplaced one of the hex nuts for the fan.

And that was after I had delayed the build by several days just because I hadn't realized the USB issue with my old case, and then hadn't gotten a fan with my CPU, and...

But it's all good now. Almost. The mouse should arrive tomorrow, and my new machine should finally be all ready. I'm already using it with the old mouse, and refusing to change batteries despite the warning red light. It can damn well last one more day.

But next time I might just decide to go and get a pre-packaged machine rather than think I'm competent with hardware. Because I clearly am not.___

posted image

2015-12-10 00:20:57 (26 comments; 12 reshares; 324 +1s)Open 

This worked even better than I thought it would.

I got a firmware update on my Suunto EON Steel dive computer a couple of weeks ago, but I don't have any diving planned, and I wanted to verify that the downloader code I wrote works with the firmware changes.

Sure, I could have put it in the neighbors pool for a few minutes - I've done that before. But I wanted cylinder pressure sensor readings too, and that meant that just dangling the dive computer on a piece of string wouldn't do.

So instead, I present to you a marvel of redneck engineering: a pressure vessel for testing dive computers, made out of a water filter housing, a couple of plugs, and a bicycle valve.

The water filter housing was about $70 with the plugs, and you can get the bicycle valves for free (go to a bike store and they'll give you old tubes). I bought the tubeless valves new,... more »

This worked even better than I thought it would.

I got a firmware update on my Suunto EON Steel dive computer a couple of weeks ago, but I don't have any diving planned, and I wanted to verify that the downloader code I wrote works with the firmware changes.

Sure, I could have put it in the neighbors pool for a few minutes - I've done that before. But I wanted cylinder pressure sensor readings too, and that meant that just dangling the dive computer on a piece of string wouldn't do.

So instead, I present to you a marvel of redneck engineering: a pressure vessel for testing dive computers, made out of a water filter housing, a couple of plugs, and a bicycle valve.

The water filter housing was about $70 with the plugs, and you can get the bicycle valves for free (go to a bike store and they'll give you old tubes). I bought the tubeless valves new, because I wanted them shiny and they seemed to be exactly what I wanted.

And yes, my subsurface downloader seems to work with the new firmware.___

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2015-11-24 23:39:27 (82 comments; 60 reshares; 346 +1s)Open 

This is just very cool.

I finally got around to play with the "AppImage" version of +Subsurface, and it really does seem to "just work".

It not only allows for a project to create a complex Linux application (in the case of subsurface, one that uses very recent library versions that many distributions don't even have available yet) that works on multiple distributions, you don't even need to really even install it. Download a file, mark it executable, and run it.

It comes with its own little embedded compressed ISO filesystem that gets mounted and contains all the required libraries.

Sure, it means that the end result is much bigger than a distro-native binary would be, but if you want a way to build applications for your users without limiting them to a particular distribution, or having to build fifteen different images, it really... more »

This is just very cool.

I finally got around to play with the "AppImage" version of +Subsurface, and it really does seem to "just work".

It not only allows for a project to create a complex Linux application (in the case of subsurface, one that uses very recent library versions that many distributions don't even have available yet) that works on multiple distributions, you don't even need to really even install it. Download a file, mark it executable, and run it.

It comes with its own little embedded compressed ISO filesystem that gets mounted and contains all the required libraries.

Sure, it means that the end result is much bigger than a distro-native binary would be, but if you want a way to build applications for your users without limiting them to a particular distribution, or having to build fifteen different images, it really looks like it works very well.___

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2015-11-19 23:02:49 (279 comments; 253 reshares; 2,276 +1s)Open 

"What is this, a G+ for ants?"

The "new G+" seems to have dropped the support for more than two columns. So it's back to the bad old days of 50% gray horizontal space. Because clearly there is no better use for it.

Maybe google doesn't buy their engineers any good monitors, and so they haven't learnt about that whole 4k screen thing? But the old G+ at least gave me three columns.

"What is this, a G+ for ants?"

The "new G+" seems to have dropped the support for more than two columns. So it's back to the bad old days of 50% gray horizontal space. Because clearly there is no better use for it.

Maybe google doesn't buy their engineers any good monitors, and so they haven't learnt about that whole 4k screen thing? But the old G+ at least gave me three columns.___

2015-11-14 01:03:37 (36 comments; 8 reshares; 464 +1s)Open 

Portland got one of those indoor skydiving places this week. Yay! So obviously I had to try it out immediately.

I didn't get any video of myself in the wind tunnel, but it's easy enough to visualize. Just close your eyes, and imagine seeing a flounder flopping around in a clothes dryer. You won't be far off.

Portland got one of those indoor skydiving places this week. Yay! So obviously I had to try it out immediately.

I didn't get any video of myself in the wind tunnel, but it's easy enough to visualize. Just close your eyes, and imagine seeing a flounder flopping around in a clothes dryer. You won't be far off.___

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2015-10-29 21:33:40 (68 comments; 59 reshares; 402 +1s)Open 

Hey look. There's an actual study that says Sudafed PE is worthless junk.

Of course, you could have just asked any diver. The original Sudafed (without the "PE", and with pseudoephedrine - the one people make meth with and is thus often restricted) actually works, while the diving community knows that Sudafed PE is useless junk. Competent pharmacists I've spoken to seem to know it too.

So how about it, Johnson & Johnson - show some actual spine and remove that misleading junk from the shelves. It just makes you look bad.

Hey look. There's an actual study that says Sudafed PE is worthless junk.

Of course, you could have just asked any diver. The original Sudafed (without the "PE", and with pseudoephedrine - the one people make meth with and is thus often restricted) actually works, while the diving community knows that Sudafed PE is useless junk. Competent pharmacists I've spoken to seem to know it too.

So how about it, Johnson & Johnson - show some actual spine and remove that misleading junk from the shelves. It just makes you look bad.___

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2015-10-17 00:19:04 (89 comments; 632 reshares; 2,431 +1s)Open 

So I learnt the trigonometric functions as being relationships in right-angle triangles ("sine is opposite over hypotenuse"), and have been a bit disappointed that my kids too seem to be learning that old way.

Learning sine and cosine as the movement on the unit circle would be so much more useful, I think. And explains why the signs go like they do, why radians are more "natural" than degrees etc etc.

This visualization is more of that.

Wish I saw this #gif when I was in school #FourierTransform___So I learnt the trigonometric functions as being relationships in right-angle triangles ("sine is opposite over hypotenuse"), and have been a bit disappointed that my kids too seem to be learning that old way.

Learning sine and cosine as the movement on the unit circle would be so much more useful, I think. And explains why the signs go like they do, why radians are more "natural" than degrees etc etc.

This visualization is more of that.

2015-10-10 17:42:41 (61 comments; 57 reshares; 636 +1s)Open 

"On the internet, nobody can hear you being subtle"

.. and it turns out that apparently you can replace "internet" with "stage".

So I'm back home from LinuxCon EU in Dublin, and notice that most tech news sites who reported on me being on stage took the whole "Next year is the year of the ARM laptop" at face value. 

Which is fine, but it kind of misses the whole point I was trying to make (and clearly failed at). I've been waiting for widely available ARM kernel development machines for years now, but it seems to always be "next year".

So I'm really hoping that we'll actually see a real ARM (well, preferably ARM64) machine one of these days that you can actually develop on, rather than treat just as a development target. The Rasberry PI's, Beagleboards etc are all fun, and all the... more »

"On the internet, nobody can hear you being subtle"

.. and it turns out that apparently you can replace "internet" with "stage".

So I'm back home from LinuxCon EU in Dublin, and notice that most tech news sites who reported on me being on stage took the whole "Next year is the year of the ARM laptop" at face value. 

Which is fine, but it kind of misses the whole point I was trying to make (and clearly failed at). I've been waiting for widely available ARM kernel development machines for years now, but it seems to always be "next year".

So I'm really hoping that we'll actually see a real ARM (well, preferably ARM64) machine one of these days that you can actually develop on, rather than treat just as a development target. The Rasberry PI's, Beagleboards etc are all fun, and all the cellphones and chrome books are clearly sellign well, but as a developer I feel something is still missing in the market.

I guess the journalists in the audience weren't familiar with the "The year of the <select something that never seems to happen>" meme in the Linux community.___

2015-10-10 17:30:29 (30 comments; 36 reshares; 295 +1s)Open 

Let's see how the whole FCC vs router upgrading thing turns out, but I'm happy to have been contacted by Dave Taht & co about at least trying to clarify that locking down WiFi routers isn't the answer..

It's not just that the various open router projects allow people to play with - and fix - their routers: the upgradable WiFi routers have also been instrumental in making it much easier to experiment with queuing algorithms and IPv6 etc.

Let's see how the whole FCC vs router upgrading thing turns out, but I'm happy to have been contacted by Dave Taht & co about at least trying to clarify that locking down WiFi routers isn't the answer..

It's not just that the various open router projects allow people to play with - and fix - their routers: the upgradable WiFi routers have also been instrumental in making it much easier to experiment with queuing algorithms and IPv6 etc.___

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2015-10-05 16:30:27 (17 comments; 7 reshares; 240 +1s)Open 

I'm sitting next to +Steven Rostedt​​ at the kernel developer panel (in the audience - I'll be up there tomorrow).

Steven may have picked the wrong seat for getting any pictures. At least +Greg Kroah-Hartman​​ is tall, so you can see part of him (and Julia Lawall) over the big black block in front (speaker?).

I feel vindicated in not being the only incompetent photographer around.

Talking heads at LinuxCon EU. Julia Lawall being attacked by a shark.___I'm sitting next to +Steven Rostedt​​ at the kernel developer panel (in the audience - I'll be up there tomorrow).

Steven may have picked the wrong seat for getting any pictures. At least +Greg Kroah-Hartman​​ is tall, so you can see part of him (and Julia Lawall) over the big black block in front (speaker?).

I feel vindicated in not being the only incompetent photographer around.

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2015-10-04 18:22:50 (18 comments; 11 reshares; 320 +1s)Open 

So +Miika Turkia had some even more impressive pictures from under water.

Allegedly I was on pretty much all the same dives he was, but you'd never know it from the pictures. And I'd never actually realized that blennies (well, at least some of them) have "antlers". You basically don't see them without magnification. In Miika's case, that involved not only a macro lens but a wet diopter on top of that.

We had an enjoyable dive trip with +Dirk Hohndel and +Linus Torvalds in Bonaire. And here are my souvenirs from the trip for all to enjoy.

Shot with Olympus OM-D E-M5 and 60mm macro lens or 9-18mm wide angle. For some shots I had to use Nauticam's super macro converter to get required magnification. Lighting done by dual Inon strobes.___So +Miika Turkia had some even more impressive pictures from under water.

Allegedly I was on pretty much all the same dives he was, but you'd never know it from the pictures. And I'd never actually realized that blennies (well, at least some of them) have "antlers". You basically don't see them without magnification. In Miika's case, that involved not only a macro lens but a wet diopter on top of that.

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2015-10-03 15:00:56 (36 comments; 9 reshares; 342 +1s)Open 

Just to show the difference in photography skills, here are mine. 

I tried to annotate the pictures with explanations. Because let's face it, they all need explanations.

This is why I have given up on underwater photography.

Just to show the difference in photography skills, here are mine. 

I tried to annotate the pictures with explanations. Because let's face it, they all need explanations.

This is why I have given up on underwater photography.___

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2015-10-03 13:58:37 (25 comments; 15 reshares; 419 +1s)Open 

I'm sharing Dirk's pictures, because as usual, mine tend more to "blurry fish butt" than anything useful.

In fact, I have really given up on underwater photography, and only took my camera on one dive for comedic relief.

There were three serious photographers on the trip, all sending out their photos by email to the group at the end of the day, so I felt I had to participate to lighten the mood a bit and make everybody else feel better about themselves.

Pictures from the latest dive trip with +Linus Torvalds and +Miika Turkia (among others).
Thanks to Miika with a much stronger than usual bend towards macro photography... enjoy

And since people are always asking about this... All pictures were taken with an Olympus E-M5 and Olympus 12-50mm lens in a Nauticam housing with two Sea&Sea YS-D1 strobes.

We were diving at Divi Flamingo Bonaire +Divi Resorts with Serge and his wonderful team.___I'm sharing Dirk's pictures, because as usual, mine tend more to "blurry fish butt" than anything useful.

In fact, I have really given up on underwater photography, and only took my camera on one dive for comedic relief.

There were three serious photographers on the trip, all sending out their photos by email to the group at the end of the day, so I felt I had to participate to lighten the mood a bit and make everybody else feel better about themselves.

2015-09-08 19:27:01 (217 comments; 233 reshares; 966 +1s)Open 

Today's poll is in honor of the homeopathy conference attendees tripping balls in Germany. Apparently they weren't very good at what they do, and didn't dilute their drugs enough.

So in honor of these people finally having drugs that did something, please fill in the blank:

"I believe in homeopathy, because I'm .."

Today's poll is in honor of the homeopathy conference attendees tripping balls in Germany. Apparently they weren't very good at what they do, and didn't dilute their drugs enough.

So in honor of these people finally having drugs that did something, please fill in the blank:

"I believe in homeopathy, because I'm .."___

2015-09-04 17:06:26 (113 comments; 87 reshares; 914 +1s)Open 

Poor Samsung.

Even when they make a watch that is clearly better looking than the Apple thing, and get good reviews for how their bezel works well and is really functional and intuitive, they can't seem to catch a break.

Most of the reviews I've seen tippy-toe around the "better looking than Apple". I think my favorite euphemism so far is that the Gear S2 "compares favorably" with the Apple offerings.

Poor Samsung.

Even when they make a watch that is clearly better looking than the Apple thing, and get good reviews for how their bezel works well and is really functional and intuitive, they can't seem to catch a break.

Most of the reviews I've seen tippy-toe around the "better looking than Apple". I think my favorite euphemism so far is that the Gear S2 "compares favorably" with the Apple offerings.___

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2015-08-07 02:12:17 (53 comments; 13 reshares; 758 +1s)Open 

This one is possibly titled

"Dang, my laptop is slow to compile"

but that's maybe a bit unfair - I got that laptop because it's thin and light, not because it's the speediest thing ever.

This one is possibly titled

"Dang, my laptop is slow to compile"

but that's maybe a bit unfair - I got that laptop because it's thin and light, not because it's the speediest thing ever.___

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2015-08-07 02:05:48 (45 comments; 30 reshares; 1,181 +1s)Open 

I call this masterpiece

"Jetlagged and waiting for the kernel test compile to finish"

because I'm not the type to be up for sunrise for any other reason.

I call this masterpiece

"Jetlagged and waiting for the kernel test compile to finish"

because I'm not the type to be up for sunrise for any other reason.___

2015-07-23 20:04:08 (80 comments; 22 reshares; 432 +1s)Open 

My email spam situation seems to be all good.

But just to annoy me, we've had two calls today from the IRS phone scam (google "IRS phone scam" to get some news on it).

I wonder why those things are so hard to crack down on.  Phone companies really don't even check ID when you get a phone number? They sure wanted to get my credit history when I opened a line, but some low-life scammers who try to fool people can get one?

Anyway, if anybody wants to talk with the "federal agent" about their tax situation and how you want to give them money over the phone, the number is (276) 258-6019. 

Scammers like that piss me off. 

[ Edit: the number is apparently disconnected now. So don't call it - at some point that number will get re-used, and some poor sap will wonder why he gets all these people offering him their credit cardnu... more »

My email spam situation seems to be all good.

But just to annoy me, we've had two calls today from the IRS phone scam (google "IRS phone scam" to get some news on it).

I wonder why those things are so hard to crack down on.  Phone companies really don't even check ID when you get a phone number? They sure wanted to get my credit history when I opened a line, but some low-life scammers who try to fool people can get one?

Anyway, if anybody wants to talk with the "federal agent" about their tax situation and how you want to give them money over the phone, the number is (276) 258-6019. 

Scammers like that piss me off. 

[ Edit: the number is apparently disconnected now. So don't call it - at some point that number will get re-used, and some poor sap will wonder why he gets all these people offering him their credit card numbers ]___

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2015-07-19 21:36:12 (190 comments; 214 reshares; 3,451 +1s)Open 

I don't have the hi-res in-the-air pictures yet, but here's me looking cool.

Although apparently +Jim Zemlin was laughing so hard when I did the thumbs-up sign that the camera shake makes that picture a bit blurry. Thanks, Jim.

I don't have the hi-res in-the-air pictures yet, but here's me looking cool.

Although apparently +Jim Zemlin was laughing so hard when I did the thumbs-up sign that the camera shake makes that picture a bit blurry. Thanks, Jim.___

2015-07-18 17:47:28 (40 comments; 15 reshares; 716 +1s)Open 

Much better now.

Of the 100+ messages caught as spam over-night, only two were false positives (and I reported them). My email is getting back to normal.

Much better now.

Of the 100+ messages caught as spam over-night, only two were false positives (and I reported them). My email is getting back to normal.___

2015-07-17 19:58:36 (216 comments; 298 reshares; 1,867 +1s)Open 

Dear Google Mail Team,

  I've said very nice things about your spam filter in the past, but I'm afraid I am going to have to take it all back. I'm currently going through the spam for the last week, and have gone through about a third of it.

Something you did recently has been an unmitigated disaster. Of the roughly 1000 spam threads I've gone through so far, right now 228 threads were incorrectly marked as spam.

That's not the 0.1% false positive rate you tried to make such a big deal about last week. No. That's over 20% of my spambox being real emails with patches and pull requests.  Almost a quarter!

I don't know how to even describe the level of brokenness in those kinds of spam numbers. There were a few pages of email (I've got it set up so it shows me 50 threads per page) where more than half of the "spam"w... more »

Dear Google Mail Team,

  I've said very nice things about your spam filter in the past, but I'm afraid I am going to have to take it all back. I'm currently going through the spam for the last week, and have gone through about a third of it.

Something you did recently has been an unmitigated disaster. Of the roughly 1000 spam threads I've gone through so far, right now 228 threads were incorrectly marked as spam.

That's not the 0.1% false positive rate you tried to make such a big deal about last week. No. That's over 20% of my spambox being real emails with patches and pull requests.  Almost a quarter!

I don't know how to even describe the level of brokenness in those kinds of spam numbers. There were a few pages of email (I've got it set up so it shows me 50 threads per page) where more than half of the "spam" wasn't.

Quite frankly, that sucks. It's not acceptable. Whatever you started doing a few days ago is completely and utterly broken.

It's actually at the point where I'm noticing missing messages in the email conversations I see, because gmail has been marking emails in the middle of the conversation as spam. Things that people replied to and that contained patches and problem descriptions.

They didn't try to sell me a bigger penis or tell me about how somebody is cheating on me. Really.

You dun goofed. Badly. Get your shit together, because a 20% error rate for spam detection is making your spam filter useless.

[ Edit: looks like it started four days ago. As of July 13, it looks like a big swath of lkml has been marked as spam for me. ]

[ Edit 2: final numbers: out of around 3000 spam threads, I had to mark 1190 threads as "not spam". So the numbers actually got worse: about 30% of my spam-box wasn't actually spam. It started around 1pm on Monday, July 13th. The problem really is that clear, that I can tell pretty much when it started ]

[ Edit 3: it wasn't just patches, and it's not just lkml. There were things like Junio's recent git v2.5.0-rc2 announcement etc. The new gmail spam filter hates any mailing list emails, apparently. In the time I wrote the last note, I got seven more emails marked as spam, two of which weren't. ]___

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2015-07-16 23:24:46 (150 comments; 126 reshares; 2,296 +1s)Open 

Not many people know this about me, but in between kernel pulls I relax by doing fighter jet rides.

Not many people know this about me, but in between kernel pulls I relax by doing fighter jet rides.___

2015-07-08 16:45:04 (48 comments; 50 reshares; 1,184 +1s)Open 

The git people had their official 10-year anniversary earlier in the year, but today is another anniversary for the project.

Today is exactly ten years since I asked +Junio C Hamano to be the +Git maintainer. And what a maintainer he has been.

The git people had their official 10-year anniversary earlier in the year, but today is another anniversary for the project.

Today is exactly ten years since I asked +Junio C Hamano to be the +Git maintainer. And what a maintainer he has been.___

2015-07-06 23:38:22 (71 comments; 48 reshares; 1,021 +1s)Open 

Ugh. I despise systems that allow others to register your email for anything.

GitHub - today I'm looking at you. 

For some reason (probably just courtesy) people end up giving me write access to their github repositories. These people probably don't even realize that that makes GitHub spam me with their repo data, their commit notifications etc. I assume they do it as a gesture of "hey, I trust Linus with my repo", knowing full well that I won't actually do anything, but doing it as a funny courtesy.  I can't really blame them for the gesture.

But I can blame GitHub for turning that gesture into a source of spam.

Sure, the emails are easy to delete (and I do - sorry guys, I get too much email as-is), but it's an example of a deep flaw in the system. Letting others sign you up for things is really very annoying.

Is... more »

Ugh. I despise systems that allow others to register your email for anything.

GitHub - today I'm looking at you. 

For some reason (probably just courtesy) people end up giving me write access to their github repositories. These people probably don't even realize that that makes GitHub spam me with their repo data, their commit notifications etc. I assume they do it as a gesture of "hey, I trust Linus with my repo", knowing full well that I won't actually do anything, but doing it as a funny courtesy.  I can't really blame them for the gesture.

But I can blame GitHub for turning that gesture into a source of spam.

Sure, the emails are easy to delete (and I do - sorry guys, I get too much email as-is), but it's an example of a deep flaw in the system. Letting others sign you up for things is really very annoying.

I shouldn't need to unsubscribe to things I don't need filling up my inbox: you should check at registration point whether the email is willing and able to be contacted.

I'd much rather get  the occasional email saying "So-and-so has invited you to watch his repo xyzzy, please follow this link to activate, or ignore this email if you aren't interested". That kind of verification email I do not mind at all, because it shows that the service understands about this whole opt-in and email verification issue. It would also just be a once-per-repo thing.

Of course, GitHub is by no means the only offender. Lots of places are perfectly fine taking any random email address and registering that email address to their mailing lists etc, with no verification of "do you actually own that email" at any point.  

I generally mark all such email as spam. Because if you have a mailing list that allows others to sign up as me, you aren't a mailing list - you're an internet menace and a spam provider. If you are running a mailing list, please check that your subscription process has that kind of verification stage. Ok?___

2015-06-26 21:18:42 (47 comments; 24 reshares; 540 +1s)Open 

Not even halfway through the merge window, but I suspect that by the end of day today I will have merged more commits for 4.2 than we had during all of the 4.1 release.

4.0 was pretty small (by our modern standards, which is to say it was still a lot of changes), 4.1 was about average, and it looks like 4.2 may end up being the biggest release (in number of commits, at least) we've ever had.

So much for the summer slowdown (and no, it's not the Aussies and other southern hemisphere people picking up the slack).

[ Update: I don't think I'll beat the 4.1 numbers today. Partly because Greg's pull requests were smaller than I expected, but partly because I'm slowing down my merges because I think I just hit a jbd2 bug introduced in this merge window ]

Not even halfway through the merge window, but I suspect that by the end of day today I will have merged more commits for 4.2 than we had during all of the 4.1 release.

4.0 was pretty small (by our modern standards, which is to say it was still a lot of changes), 4.1 was about average, and it looks like 4.2 may end up being the biggest release (in number of commits, at least) we've ever had.

So much for the summer slowdown (and no, it's not the Aussies and other southern hemisphere people picking up the slack).

[ Update: I don't think I'll beat the 4.1 numbers today. Partly because Greg's pull requests were smaller than I expected, but partly because I'm slowing down my merges because I think I just hit a jbd2 bug introduced in this merge window ]___

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2015-06-26 20:51:37 (41 comments; 63 reshares; 492 +1s)Open 

I really like the updates on what went wrong.  With updates like this, even the failures are entertaining.

[ Side note: and how they name their barges by Iain M Banks culture ship names.. If you haven't read the novels, you're missing out. ]

I really like the updates on what went wrong.  With updates like this, even the failures are entertaining.

[ Side note: and how they name their barges by Iain M Banks culture ship names.. If you haven't read the novels, you're missing out. ]___

posted image

2015-06-21 06:34:14 (71 comments; 61 reshares; 804 +1s)Open 

So Google photos seems to want to make odd videos of the random movie clips I uploaded from last week.

And apparently, with dramatic music, some color tinting, and by making the cuts be frequent enough, you can make even my blurry fish butt videos entertaining.

There is a shark in there. And Daniela, who got certified last year and did very well as a dive buddy. But the real star is definitely Google photos.

So Google photos seems to want to make odd videos of the random movie clips I uploaded from last week.

And apparently, with dramatic music, some color tinting, and by making the cuts be frequent enough, you can make even my blurry fish butt videos entertaining.

There is a shark in there. And Daniela, who got certified last year and did very well as a dive buddy. But the real star is definitely Google photos.___

2015-06-01 22:42:07 (121 comments; 57 reshares; 521 +1s)Open 

I may have mentioned before that C++ isn't my favorite language. But for various reasons, it's what subsurface is written in these days. And it seems to trigger an annoying gdb bug.

Are there any gdb people out here that have a solution to this "feature" of gdb:

 - a C++ program that uses idiomatic C (because it started out that way):

    struct test test;

 - compile as C++, run under debugger, try to show the value of 'test':

    (gdb) p test
    Attempt to use a type name as an expression

Yeah, gdb, you're badly confused. I want the variable test, not the type test. And yes, it's confusion caused by silly C++ "improvements"  to C syntax, but still..

How do I disambiguate this to gdb?

I may have mentioned before that C++ isn't my favorite language. But for various reasons, it's what subsurface is written in these days. And it seems to trigger an annoying gdb bug.

Are there any gdb people out here that have a solution to this "feature" of gdb:

 - a C++ program that uses idiomatic C (because it started out that way):

    struct test test;

 - compile as C++, run under debugger, try to show the value of 'test':

    (gdb) p test
    Attempt to use a type name as an expression

Yeah, gdb, you're badly confused. I want the variable test, not the type test. And yes, it's confusion caused by silly C++ "improvements"  to C syntax, but still..

How do I disambiguate this to gdb?___

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2015-05-24 18:25:11 (86 comments; 260 reshares; 991 +1s)Open 

I'm not a fan of traditional AI (rule building and LISP/prolog etc), but am just waiting for neural nets to take over. 

This is a great example, and training on the Linux kernel sources just explains so much.

Sigh.

This is wonderful; neural network setup producing wonderful results; one example is training it on wikipedia and it ends up producing valid XML pseudo articles.  Another is training it on Linux kernel source, and it ends up producing C code that looks appealingly complex until you try and figure it out (even with bogus comments).
http://karpathy.github.io/2015/05/21/rnn-effectiveness/___I'm not a fan of traditional AI (rule building and LISP/prolog etc), but am just waiting for neural nets to take over. 

This is a great example, and training on the Linux kernel sources just explains so much.

Sigh.

2015-05-23 01:50:12 (141 comments; 25 reshares; 851 +1s)Open 

I've lived in the US for over eighteen years now, and it took me that long to realize that bitter lemon is just tonic water with lemon juice.

Seriously, how could I not have realized? Every time I flew to Europe or Australia, one of the highlights would be how I could finally find bitter lemon again. I would binge on the stuff, because I knew that when I got back to the US I wouldn't be able to find it any more.

No more. I always have lemon juice in the fridge anyway (not the disgusting stuff in plastic bottles: Santa Cruz organic lemon juice actually tastes like lemons). So now I can just buy tonic water when I get the craving.

I've lived in the US for over eighteen years now, and it took me that long to realize that bitter lemon is just tonic water with lemon juice.

Seriously, how could I not have realized? Every time I flew to Europe or Australia, one of the highlights would be how I could finally find bitter lemon again. I would binge on the stuff, because I knew that when I got back to the US I wouldn't be able to find it any more.

No more. I always have lemon juice in the fridge anyway (not the disgusting stuff in plastic bottles: Santa Cruz organic lemon juice actually tastes like lemons). So now I can just buy tonic water when I get the craving.___

posted image

2015-05-15 20:47:14 (33 comments; 46 reshares; 441 +1s)Open 

So I think this talk is interesting (well, if you're a kernel developer) for a couple of reasons.

First off, I just like how Arnd says that I take everything they send me these days.  It's true, and it's a good thing. The ARM situation has just improved tremendously over the last several years. It used to be a major pain to me, it has gone to almost being entirely painless.

The other (somewhat related) point is how this is a talk about a big subsystem that has both an upstream and a downstream, and talks about keeping upstream happy - with a part being about keeping me happy, but most of it being about keeping the ARM SoC maintainers happy.

And they end up being similar issues, and related to the above point. Arnd talks about how the most stressful part is the pull request you reject - or come close to rejecting. And yes, I'm really happy that ARMh... more »

One of the two presentations I did at ELC 2015 is now available as video. Slides have been public for a while already at http://elinux.org/images/f/f7/Maintaining_a_Large_Kernel_Subsystem.pdf

The other presentation was scheduled at short notice, maybe the video got lost on the way.___So I think this talk is interesting (well, if you're a kernel developer) for a couple of reasons.

First off, I just like how Arnd says that I take everything they send me these days.  It's true, and it's a good thing. The ARM situation has just improved tremendously over the last several years. It used to be a major pain to me, it has gone to almost being entirely painless.

The other (somewhat related) point is how this is a talk about a big subsystem that has both an upstream and a downstream, and talks about keeping upstream happy - with a part being about keeping me happy, but most of it being about keeping the ARM SoC maintainers happy.

And they end up being similar issues, and related to the above point. Arnd talks about how the most stressful part is the pull request you reject - or come close to rejecting. And yes, I'm really happy that ARM has gone from that "reject or come close to rejecting" state to that "Linus just puills everything we send him". Because yes, it really is a lot less strssful.

And finally - Arnd may have a picture of me flipping a finger, but then he talks about problems he has had with submaintainers. I guess he didn't want an "Arnd flipping the finger" picture to become as widely spread as the one of me. But yes, the problems he mentions are very much problems I have had too and that make me grumpy, so I think my finger is not irrelevant.

That in itself is, I think, important. The way we've handled scaling of development is by having multiple layers of maintainership. And the thing that really helped with ARM in particular (and x86 before it) was to have the submaintainers really be not just funnels to me, but do exactly what I do.

I think it's good to see how being a maintainer in the middle isn't really any different from being a maintainer at the top. 

2015-05-12 20:57:29 (37 comments; 42 reshares; 736 +1s)Open 

+Jon "maddog" Hall points out that today is the 21st anniversary of one of my early public talks about Linux (at DECUS in New Orleans). That trip (and maddog in particular) ended up then resulting in Linux being ported to the alpha, which is where we got the multi-architecture portability from.

(Yes, there was the earlier m68k port, but that one wasn't trying to actually support multiple architectures side-by-side from the same code base).

How time flies.

+Jon "maddog" Hall points out that today is the 21st anniversary of one of my early public talks about Linux (at DECUS in New Orleans). That trip (and maddog in particular) ended up then resulting in Linux being ported to the alpha, which is where we got the multi-architecture portability from.

(Yes, there was the earlier m68k port, but that one wasn't trying to actually support multiple architectures side-by-side from the same code base).

How time flies.___

2015-05-09 04:29:25 (131 comments; 46 reshares; 779 +1s)Open 

Both my tablet and my phone suddenly and for no obvious reason stopped syncing email for me yesterday. And after 24 hours of more or less being useless to me, the only way I could fix it was to completely remove my google account from the device, and then add it back in.

Which causes the phone/tablet to pretty much act as if you switched phone hardware (although app data doesn't go away). So it re-installs all the apps I had deleted (it's "backup", you know), and causes all my pinned music to go away and need to be re-downloaded.  Etc etc stupid small annoyances.

Am I the only one this happened to? It's not like it was a huge annoyance (ok, it was, but mainly because I spent 24 hours waiting for google to "fix" sync, until I just gave up blew my account away and signed in from scratch).

But I do have a request for the +Android team as ar... more »

Both my tablet and my phone suddenly and for no obvious reason stopped syncing email for me yesterday. And after 24 hours of more or less being useless to me, the only way I could fix it was to completely remove my google account from the device, and then add it back in.

Which causes the phone/tablet to pretty much act as if you switched phone hardware (although app data doesn't go away). So it re-installs all the apps I had deleted (it's "backup", you know), and causes all my pinned music to go away and need to be re-downloaded.  Etc etc stupid small annoyances.

Am I the only one this happened to? It's not like it was a huge annoyance (ok, it was, but mainly because I spent 24 hours waiting for google to "fix" sync, until I just gave up blew my account away and signed in from scratch).

But I do have a request for the +Android team as a result of it: can you make things like managing your music (and apps, but that's actually less painful) on the device be something you could do from somewhere else?

I've had this issue before when switching phones: it's just a pain to pin your music on the device (and yes, I really do want to pin it, and not stream over the data connection all the time).

I'd really prefer to manage my phone remotely from a big screen and with a good mouse and keyboard, rather than fat-fingering it directly..___

2015-04-14 21:30:45 (49 comments; 82 reshares; 838 +1s)Open 

Ever wonder about the habits of kernel developers? Who is a night-owl, and who has a 9-5 job? Who has kids?

Never fear, you can just ask 'git' (let's see how badly G+ screws up the formatting here - there seems to be no "block quote" formatting thing):

    git log --merges --committer=Torvalds --pretty="%cd" v3.19.. |
        cut -d' ' -f4 | cut -d: -f1 |
        sort -n |
        uniq -c

and there it is.

Now, look out a bit: my merge history says that I'm more active in the mornings, then take a breather around noon (recently that's my swimming) and then come back in the afternoon.

But if you skip the "--merges", it looks very different, and it looks like I do most of my commits in the afternoon, then take a break for dinner, and come back after 9pm.

Why?My non-merge ... more »

Ever wonder about the habits of kernel developers? Who is a night-owl, and who has a 9-5 job? Who has kids?

Never fear, you can just ask 'git' (let's see how badly G+ screws up the formatting here - there seems to be no "block quote" formatting thing):

    git log --merges --committer=Torvalds --pretty="%cd" v3.19.. |
        cut -d' ' -f4 | cut -d: -f1 |
        sort -n |
        uniq -c

and there it is.

Now, look out a bit: my merge history says that I'm more active in the mornings, then take a breather around noon (recently that's my swimming) and then come back in the afternoon.

But if you skip the "--merges", it looks very different, and it looks like I do most of my commits in the afternoon, then take a break for dinner, and come back after 9pm.

Why? My non-merge commits are hugely skewed by the patch-bombs from Andrew, which seem to happen in the afternoon. While a fair amount of my merge activity in the morning is because of all the pull requests that came in overnight from other parts of the globe.

Also note that the best statistics really depend on committer times, since author dates are often skewed by who forwards the emails and where in that sequence people added a date to it. So I wouldn't trust author dates to show the authorship dates as much - they might instead be showing the email patterns of people in the chain.

I'm sure you could make something cute with gnuplot and show different patterns of the top developers.

And if you're a developer and don't want the world to see how you seldom get up before noon, you might want to be aware of just how much these things can tell people about your work habits.. Although among sw people, I suspect the "not up before noon" is a badge of honor (as well as a indication that you don't have kids ;)

[ Edited to replace the sed-script with the 'cut' lines that G+ formatting won't eat ]___

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