Login now

Not your profile? Login and get free access to your reports and analysis.

Tags

Sign in

No tag added here yet.
You can login on CircleCount to add some tags here.

Are you missing a tag in the list of available tags? You can suggest new tags here.

Login now

Do you want to see a more detailed chart? Check your settings and define your favorite chart type.

Or click here to get the detailed chart only once.

Alvin Stearns has been at 1 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Ryan Van Sickle780,666ON AIR Hangout Concert  Tuesday, August 7th @ 8PM ESTRyan Van Sickle Pre NYC HIRL2 Hangout CONCERT w/ Matthew Rappaport2012-08-08 02:00:0027  

Shared Circles including Alvin Stearns

Shared Circles are not available on Google+ anymore, but you can find them still here.

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

5
comments per post
0
reshares per post
13
+1's per post

1,012
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 19

posted image

2015-06-26 22:42:08 (19 comments, 0 reshares, 53 +1s)Open 

Fried chicken. It's what's for supper.

Most reshares: 4

posted image

2015-06-26 18:52:05 (2 comments, 4 reshares, 67 +1s)Open 

Most plusones: 67

posted image

2015-06-26 18:52:05 (2 comments, 4 reshares, 67 +1s)Open 

Latest 50 posts

2015-07-02 20:03:05 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Her: You said I should do it!

Me: Actually, I slightly inclined my head and made an "Mm" sound.

Her: You didn't say not to do it.

Me: Neither am I caring that you did do it.

Her: Why do I even talk to you?

Me: (Slight inclination of head.) Mm.

//

Her: You said I should do it!

Me: Actually, I slightly inclined my head and made an "Mm" sound.

Her: You didn't say not to do it.

Me: Neither am I caring that you did do it.

Her: Why do I even talk to you?

Me: (Slight inclination of head.) Mm.

//___

2015-07-02 18:05:12 (8 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

A common misconception of many bosses is that their support people share the boss' responsibilities, accountability and all of their motivations.

Once or twice a year I find myself in the situation where I must pause with the boss and explain the relationship. The transactional relationship. I provide quality services, s/he compensates me with money and benefits.

Thinking out loud around me is fine, but try not to project boss pressures onto me. I care to the extent that in good faith I've agreed to give hours of my life to another's goals in exchange for the aforementioned stuff. I do not misplace my care when a boss protests to me that the s/he cannot do his/her duty, as if that reason is my responsibility or I will be held somehow accountable for it.

Welcome to Anglo-Saxon Capitalism in the 21st century. Let's all do our jobs, bosses and... more »

A common misconception of many bosses is that their support people share the boss' responsibilities, accountability and all of their motivations.

Once or twice a year I find myself in the situation where I must pause with the boss and explain the relationship. The transactional relationship. I provide quality services, s/he compensates me with money and benefits.

Thinking out loud around me is fine, but try not to project boss pressures onto me. I care to the extent that in good faith I've agreed to give hours of my life to another's goals in exchange for the aforementioned stuff. I do not misplace my care when a boss protests to me that the s/he cannot do his/her duty, as if that reason is my responsibility or I will be held somehow accountable for it.

Welcome to Anglo-Saxon Capitalism in the 21st century. Let's all do our jobs, bosses and support, and try to avoid thinking about what doing our jobs says about all of us and the weird dysfunctional world we create together.

//___

posted image

2015-07-02 00:22:00 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

I do believe this says more about me than about that character.  The new Colonel Sanders characterization for KFC?  If I met that guy in my neighborhood and he acted and laughed like that?  I'd be checking for that guy's name on my state's sex offender registry.  Doesn't at all inspire me to want to go to KFC.  (shiver)

I do believe this says more about me than about that character.  The new Colonel Sanders characterization for KFC?  If I met that guy in my neighborhood and he acted and laughed like that?  I'd be checking for that guy's name on my state's sex offender registry.  Doesn't at all inspire me to want to go to KFC.  (shiver)___

2015-07-01 15:39:46 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

(Waves north.)

Hi Canada. Have a nice day.

(Waves north.)

Hi Canada. Have a nice day.___

2015-06-29 20:21:02 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

Cat bite

Me: That's infected.

Her: It's just a little red.

Me: And swollen, and warm. Infected.

Her: I think it'll be OK.

Me: I think you go on vacation next week. Just in time to be ending oral antibiotics. Not getting intravenous antibiotics while on vacation because that generalized redness resolves into red threads of incipient blood poisoning . . .

Her: Oh my god! I'll call my doctor's office, shut up!

Sometimes I insist upon getting my way.

//

Cat bite

Me: That's infected.

Her: It's just a little red.

Me: And swollen, and warm. Infected.

Her: I think it'll be OK.

Me: I think you go on vacation next week. Just in time to be ending oral antibiotics. Not getting intravenous antibiotics while on vacation because that generalized redness resolves into red threads of incipient blood poisoning . . .

Her: Oh my god! I'll call my doctor's office, shut up!

Sometimes I insist upon getting my way.

//___

2015-06-29 19:58:17 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Him: Done anything interesting lately?

Me: (Pondering the question.) I'm in an informal self-imposed experiment to see how long an almost 50 year old body can live mostly on peanut butter, dark chocolate, pistachios and coffee.

I'm lazy about and forgetful of physical realities. If it weren't for the husband and convenient foods I'm likely to forget to eat. At one particularly stressful and busy point in my life I realized I hadn't eaten in over two days. So, the current diet is a great improvement upon forgetful and invisible starvation.

Still. Just how long do you think a human body can sustain on such a diet? Fun experiment, given that I love each of the foods.

//

Him: Done anything interesting lately?

Me: (Pondering the question.) I'm in an informal self-imposed experiment to see how long an almost 50 year old body can live mostly on peanut butter, dark chocolate, pistachios and coffee.

I'm lazy about and forgetful of physical realities. If it weren't for the husband and convenient foods I'm likely to forget to eat. At one particularly stressful and busy point in my life I realized I hadn't eaten in over two days. So, the current diet is a great improvement upon forgetful and invisible starvation.

Still. Just how long do you think a human body can sustain on such a diet? Fun experiment, given that I love each of the foods.

//___

2015-06-29 18:08:28 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Every human story ultimately ends with, "Then s/he died.

The personal ending has been on my mind since about age 11. The age when I understood not just the fact of death, but its universality.

Not long after that realization I learned that the dead have a kind of afterlife, though not the ones taught to me in years of Southern Baptist Sunday School.

We mythologize the dead. The perfect mother. The world's greatest dad. The brother who had courage and talent and such possibilities. We tend to idealize the (safely) dead, refining their history down to those parts we consider most essential to their memory, to serve the living. A few we vilify, the bogeymen among the (thankfully) dead, like Hitler and Stalin and Pol Pot.

None of them ever come back. Our dead. Unless you believe in reincarnation or ghosts, which are other forms of... more »

Every human story ultimately ends with, "Then s/he died.

The personal ending has been on my mind since about age 11. The age when I understood not just the fact of death, but its universality.

Not long after that realization I learned that the dead have a kind of afterlife, though not the ones taught to me in years of Southern Baptist Sunday School.

We mythologize the dead. The perfect mother. The world's greatest dad. The brother who had courage and talent and such possibilities. We tend to idealize the (safely) dead, refining their history down to those parts we consider most essential to their memory, to serve the living. A few we vilify, the bogeymen among the (thankfully) dead, like Hitler and Stalin and Pol Pot.

None of them ever come back. Our dead. Unless you believe in reincarnation or ghosts, which are other forms of mythologizing the dead to serve a need among some of the living.

We all die. A common ending to our common human story.

We don't come back.

Have you ever considered the choices you're making--today, right now--balanced against the universal and inevitable truth? It might make a difference.

How you love. Choosing to love, including yourself, flaws and all.

Relaxing a bit, maybe deciding that the wars you've been fighting don't mean that much after all. Maybe it's more admirable and certainly more purposeful to enjoy today, to create a field where enjoyment is possible.

Speaking out against wrongs, because though Hitler is dead we've got ample proof of what we're capable of when the living don't act to counterbalance voices racing us toward suffering and needless death.

Lost my train of thought . . .

The X-Files is currently in production for six episodes to air next January. It makes me happy to think about it, having that to look forward to in the cold and dark of another Northern New England winter.

In The X-Files episode "Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose" a middle-aged psychic had the dubious gift of being able to know the time and circumstances of people's deaths. Scully impulsively asks him, "OK. How do I die." The man smiles and replies, "You don't." He later commits an act of self sacrifice that changes the future, saving Mulder.

Each day we change the future. Not the fact of that one ultimate and inevitable and universal truth--we are not Dana Scully. But, we do create. Ourselves. Our relationships. Our home. Our world.

Don't worry about the inevitable.

In fact, why worry at all?

What will you be and do today? You have today, after all.

//___

2015-06-29 17:02:19 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Regarding God

Her: I'm so sick of religion. How can I believe in any of it?

Me: God has bothered to evolve for you. Will you do even less than that, or nothing?

Her: God doesn't evolve!

Me: I think we've identified the potential root of your problem. Study God's history and get to know God, early in history to present. Like a human face at age 50, some say we get the God that we deserve. We certainly get the God of our time.

Her: Don't you worry that you're going to Hell, talking like that?

Me: Not after studying the evolution of Hell.

Her: Let's talk about something else.

Me: Agreed.

Regarding God

Her: I'm so sick of religion. How can I believe in any of it?

Me: God has bothered to evolve for you. Will you do even less than that, or nothing?

Her: God doesn't evolve!

Me: I think we've identified the potential root of your problem. Study God's history and get to know God, early in history to present. Like a human face at age 50, some say we get the God that we deserve. We certainly get the God of our time.

Her: Don't you worry that you're going to Hell, talking like that?

Me: Not after studying the evolution of Hell.

Her: Let's talk about something else.

Me: Agreed.___

posted image

2015-06-29 04:37:36 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

There's no drama like MMO drama.  My guild's leader went mental and abandoned us.  I wasn't upset by any of this until he made me leader just before storming out.  A rotten thing to do.

Next, the former leader's ongoing mental breakdown led him into public anger rants against his former guild.  I didn't sign up for any of this.  But, I like many of the people in this guild and some of them mistake me for a leader, so I decided to make some effort.

It's moments like this when I ask myself:  What would The Dude do?

I mixed a virgin White Russian and wrote an email to the officers of the guild:  "First, relax.  This is still just a game and everybody keeps their birthday.  By the end of this week we will decide to keep going, break up, or merge with another guild.  No matter what, by Saturday I will go back to my casual doofy styleof game p... more »

There's no drama like MMO drama.  My guild's leader went mental and abandoned us.  I wasn't upset by any of this until he made me leader just before storming out.  A rotten thing to do.

Next, the former leader's ongoing mental breakdown led him into public anger rants against his former guild.  I didn't sign up for any of this.  But, I like many of the people in this guild and some of them mistake me for a leader, so I decided to make some effort.

It's moments like this when I ask myself:  What would The Dude do?

I mixed a virgin White Russian and wrote an email to the officers of the guild:  "First, relax.  This is still just a game and everybody keeps their birthday.  By the end of this week we will decide to keep going, break up, or merge with another guild.  No matter what, by Saturday I will go back to my casual doofy style of game play, no longer The Leader. If we stay together, first order of business is to elect my successor."

Now I just need a rug that really pulls the room together.

//___

posted image

2015-06-27 00:16:46 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

I probably need a British person older than 30 to answer this for me.  In the animated kids' show "Danger Mouse," what accent was Stiletto's in the original UK broadcasts?  In the USA in the 1980s the cable channel Nickelodeon aired the cartoons.  Stiletto had a Cockney accent.  Since then, he's got an Italian accent.  

Anybody know which came first:  Cockney Stiletto or Italian Stiletto?

Speaking of accents, I've read that Stephen Fry will voice Colonel K in the new episodes.  As the Colonel K would say, "Oh, jolly good show!"

I probably need a British person older than 30 to answer this for me.  In the animated kids' show "Danger Mouse," what accent was Stiletto's in the original UK broadcasts?  In the USA in the 1980s the cable channel Nickelodeon aired the cartoons.  Stiletto had a Cockney accent.  Since then, he's got an Italian accent.  

Anybody know which came first:  Cockney Stiletto or Italian Stiletto?

Speaking of accents, I've read that Stephen Fry will voice Colonel K in the new episodes.  As the Colonel K would say, "Oh, jolly good show!"___

posted image

2015-06-26 22:42:08 (19 comments, 0 reshares, 53 +1s)Open 

Fried chicken. It's what's for supper.

Fried chicken. It's what's for supper.___

2015-06-26 21:09:31 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

I'm making fried chicken this weekend. Goin' full on Southern roots. I'll use lard as the frying fat.

Whatever fat you choose, for frying always choose one that can take a high temperature without going smoky. For instance, you don't use olive oil for frying. For frying chicken your thermometer should max out at 325 F.

I'm making fried chicken this weekend. Goin' full on Southern roots. I'll use lard as the frying fat.

Whatever fat you choose, for frying always choose one that can take a high temperature without going smoky. For instance, you don't use olive oil for frying. For frying chicken your thermometer should max out at 325 F.___

posted image

2015-06-26 18:52:05 (2 comments, 4 reshares, 67 +1s)Open 

My pick for Posting of the Week.

Via +Michael Babcock. Thank you, Michael.

___My pick for Posting of the Week.

Via +Michael Babcock. Thank you, Michael.

2015-06-26 18:15:50 (12 comments, 2 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

Coworkers appear to congratulate me on the US Supreme Court's decision regarding same-sex marriage. One (who is a witch, whether she knows that or not) perceived the ambivalence under my smile and "Thank you." We chatted about that.

Social equality for gays and lesbians is the goal, yes. A worthy and truly American goal, certainly. To me, scoring points off of this particular state-controlled institution, marriage, is a false social economy. Why is the state deciding upon any American marriages? The answers, and many exist, get to the core of my issues.

Why does the state get to control the levers that open or close opportunities based upon sexuality, gender, race, age or origin? The state should be in the business of guaranteeing citizen rights, not defining them according to piecemeal categories that speak loudly of our prejudices while ignoring the ideals... more »

Coworkers appear to congratulate me on the US Supreme Court's decision regarding same-sex marriage. One (who is a witch, whether she knows that or not) perceived the ambivalence under my smile and "Thank you." We chatted about that.

Social equality for gays and lesbians is the goal, yes. A worthy and truly American goal, certainly. To me, scoring points off of this particular state-controlled institution, marriage, is a false social economy. Why is the state deciding upon any American marriages? The answers, and many exist, get to the core of my issues.

Why does the state get to control the levers that open or close opportunities based upon sexuality, gender, race, age or origin? The state should be in the business of guaranteeing citizen rights, not defining them according to piecemeal categories that speak loudly of our prejudices while ignoring the ideals of human liberty, regardless of our precious labels.

It's time to agree upon some basic principles about what makes a citizen emancipated, and then leave him or her alone. Then, responsibly and in the greatest interests of the republic dismantle and disengage the state from its legal, economic and social controls over the lives of its citizens.

Also, fix the nation's schools so that they raise generations of thinking and informed citizens. Throw in world peace and tigers and polar bears for the next 100,000 years.

I'm pleased with the Court's decision. I wish I lived in an America where the matter never needed judicial review.

Finally, when I called my coworker a witch I was stating a positive. Witchy women are cool and necessary.

//

___

2015-06-26 17:44:44 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

At last! The husband and I can plan that fabulous Kansas vacation.

At last! The husband and I can plan that fabulous Kansas vacation.___

posted image

2015-06-26 04:58:16 (12 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Risible

Adjective.  Refers to something that provokes laughter.  "It was a risible moment involving stiletto heels and a banana peel."  Droll is a word with a similar meaning, also infrequently used in contemporary English.

Risible

Adjective.  Refers to something that provokes laughter.  "It was a risible moment involving stiletto heels and a banana peel."  Droll is a word with a similar meaning, also infrequently used in contemporary English.___

posted image

2015-06-26 04:28:01 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

"After" (2012) is a suspense/paranormal/horror movie now showing on Netflix.  I liked the soundtrack, a lot.  The story is OK.  It's not spoiling the movie to say that it plays on the "they were dead the whole time!" plot twist.  That's addressed by the leads not long into the movie.

Mild to moderate spoilers follow.

What's most annoyingly unbelievable to me is the developing romantic bond between the lead characters.  At the start of the movie they seem mismatched and unlikely.  As the story develops, a key plot point would indicate that the two most certainly would not leap toward a romantic bond.  A shared struggle, sure.  A lifelong bond delivered after frightening trials and a painful revelation, yep.  The treacly romance ending felt forced and unsatisfying.

"After" (2012) is a suspense/paranormal/horror movie now showing on Netflix.  I liked the soundtrack, a lot.  The story is OK.  It's not spoiling the movie to say that it plays on the "they were dead the whole time!" plot twist.  That's addressed by the leads not long into the movie.

Mild to moderate spoilers follow.

What's most annoyingly unbelievable to me is the developing romantic bond between the lead characters.  At the start of the movie they seem mismatched and unlikely.  As the story develops, a key plot point would indicate that the two most certainly would not leap toward a romantic bond.  A shared struggle, sure.  A lifelong bond delivered after frightening trials and a painful revelation, yep.  The treacly romance ending felt forced and unsatisfying.___

posted image

2015-06-26 03:21:55 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

For +Tejas Richard.

And for our own resident Moose, +Dat Moose, who should be fast asleep by now.  (If you don't know, DM, Moose is the character name of the girl on the left.)

Clip from the 1980s kids' show "You Can't Do That On Television."  If you want to see a very young Alanis Morissette, check out her clips from the show on YouTube.

For +Tejas Richard.

And for our own resident Moose, +Dat Moose, who should be fast asleep by now.  (If you don't know, DM, Moose is the character name of the girl on the left.)

Clip from the 1980s kids' show "You Can't Do That On Television."  If you want to see a very young Alanis Morissette, check out her clips from the show on YouTube.___

posted image

2015-06-26 02:45:40 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

I watched the SyFy Channel mini series "Ascension" on Netflix.  It's just OK.  Assemble a pre-hippy 1960s American cultural ethos, put that onto a starship, add in a conspiracy and a murder, go heavy on class structure, just hint at race culture, sprinkle liberally with sexy-sexy, toss in a bit of the seemingly paranormal, garnish with a lesbian and you have "Ascension."  Features Tricia Helfer, who once played an important character on a much superior SyFy Channel science fiction drama that handled its characters and themes with greater interest and much better writing.  

I watched the SyFy Channel mini series "Ascension" on Netflix.  It's just OK.  Assemble a pre-hippy 1960s American cultural ethos, put that onto a starship, add in a conspiracy and a murder, go heavy on class structure, just hint at race culture, sprinkle liberally with sexy-sexy, toss in a bit of the seemingly paranormal, garnish with a lesbian and you have "Ascension."  Features Tricia Helfer, who once played an important character on a much superior SyFy Channel science fiction drama that handled its characters and themes with greater interest and much better writing.  ___

posted image

2015-06-26 02:32:21 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

Penfold.
Shush.

Now, if Netflix adds "You Can't Do That On Television" my 1980s guilty pleasures will be restored to me.

Penfold.
Shush.

Now, if Netflix adds "You Can't Do That On Television" my 1980s guilty pleasures will be restored to me.___

posted image

2015-06-26 02:22:46 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"Wayward Pines" asks too much of one's suspension of disbelief in setting up its surprises and twists.  It's pretty and stupid.  A combination I'm known not to mind from time to time.  

"Wayward Pines" asks too much of one's suspension of disbelief in setting up its surprises and twists.  It's pretty and stupid.  A combination I'm known not to mind from time to time.  ___

2015-06-25 19:53:42 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Her: How do you get away with that?

Me: With what?

Her: How you spoke to him!

Me: My tone was reasonable, calm and my words well enunciated. I think you wonder about what I said, not how it was said.

Her: What! Ever! You told him he's full of shit!

Me: No, I did not. I said that I accept that he does not believe what I told him. It's not my duty to convince him of anything, but I'd never say he's full of shit.

Her: Aren't you angry?

Me: No. But, if you'd like to be angry on my behalf, that's cool.

/

The older I get the less it seems that people listen. I'm often surprised at where and in what people invest their ego, and their frequent assumptions that I give similar shits.

It's not that I don't care. I'm choosy in where I place my... more »

Her: How do you get away with that?

Me: With what?

Her: How you spoke to him!

Me: My tone was reasonable, calm and my words well enunciated. I think you wonder about what I said, not how it was said.

Her: What! Ever! You told him he's full of shit!

Me: No, I did not. I said that I accept that he does not believe what I told him. It's not my duty to convince him of anything, but I'd never say he's full of shit.

Her: Aren't you angry?

Me: No. But, if you'd like to be angry on my behalf, that's cool.

/

The older I get the less it seems that people listen. I'm often surprised at where and in what people invest their ego, and their frequent assumptions that I give similar shits.

It's not that I don't care. I'm choosy in where I place my care. If it crossed my mind to say to another that he's full of shit, then I'd have to own that that person or their matter has some kind of claim on me. That doesn't happen a lot because it seems like a colossal waste of time and mental and emotional resources.

I'm open to arguments about that.

Sorry for the blue words.

//___

posted image

2015-06-19 22:56:35 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

I can't count how many times I've played this movie.  I can't say that I watched it countless times since it's often on as background in my day.  Usually at work.  "World War Z" and my job just complement each other.

I appreciate the humor of this "Everything Wrong with 'World War Z' in Six Minutes or Less," though some of the things called wrong are not really wrong to me.

But, the movie does require several moments of high suspension of disbelief.  Chief among these is a planet's willingness to bail out Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) at every critical moment in the movie.  Examples:

-- Nobody tries to take the Philadelphia RV and the family Lane have no trouble driving right out of the city.  So nice of a terrorized and panic-stricken population to make way for Gerry and his family;

--  He's so importantthat t... more »

I can't count how many times I've played this movie.  I can't say that I watched it countless times since it's often on as background in my day.  Usually at work.  "World War Z" and my job just complement each other.

I appreciate the humor of this "Everything Wrong with 'World War Z' in Six Minutes or Less," though some of the things called wrong are not really wrong to me.

But, the movie does require several moments of high suspension of disbelief.  Chief among these is a planet's willingness to bail out Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) at every critical moment in the movie.  Examples:

-- Nobody tries to take the Philadelphia RV and the family Lane have no trouble driving right out of the city.  So nice of a terrorized and panic-stricken population to make way for Gerry and his family;

--  He's so important that the UN seeks him out, personally, diverting material and personnel to find and bring him in;

--  A slacker pharmacist will pause during a zombie apocalypse to give Gerry Lane medicine for his kid, referencing his own kid, which he seems in no similar hurry to rescue, just pensively watching as Gerry races back to his own family;

--  He meets the one Latino family in a Trenton, New Jersey, tenement willing to open its door to strangers during a zombie apocalypse;

And so on and so forth through the entire movie.  Had Gerry Lane not been the luckiest man in the world, humanity may never figured how the ZA "disguised its weakness as strength" and brought humanity to the tide turning conclusion.

I may not have completely absorbed every sound effect, bit of dialogue and music cue, though.  (Punches up "World War Z" on Netflix.)___

posted image

2015-06-19 19:39:47 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

219 days . . .

I have such a gay fan boy crush on both Anderson and Scully. I'd enjoy talks over meals with Anderson, and work and talks about cases with Scully.

Then we all pile into Cher's helicopter to escape the city at the outbreak of the zombie apocalypse . . .

I really need to get some quality sleep tonight. Please, nobody get sick or hurt tonight.


219 days . . .

I have such a gay fan boy crush on both Anderson and Scully. I'd enjoy talks over meals with Anderson, and work and talks about cases with Scully.

Then we all pile into Cher's helicopter to escape the city at the outbreak of the zombie apocalypse . . .

I really need to get some quality sleep tonight. Please, nobody get sick or hurt tonight.
___

posted image

2015-06-19 18:11:04 (16 comments, 1 reshares, 31 +1s)Open 

Friday face. A little under-slept.

Did you know that there are islands in the southern Atlantic called Shag Rocks? At first I misread it as Shaq Rocks and considered that celebrity and corporate branding might finally be going too far.

Shag Rocks total combined area: 49 acres.
Human population: Zero.

Sounds idyllic.

//

Friday face. A little under-slept.

Did you know that there are islands in the southern Atlantic called Shag Rocks? At first I misread it as Shaq Rocks and considered that celebrity and corporate branding might finally be going too far.

Shag Rocks total combined area: 49 acres.
Human population: Zero.

Sounds idyllic.

//___

2015-06-19 15:34:25 (6 comments, 1 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Is race a lie agreed upon?

It's like asking what makes you American, or French, or any number of hyphenated identities as a subset of a national or state identity.

It's like asking what makes you Catholic, or atheist, or Protestant, and then filling in the appropriate discriminator that further defines how you stand with your group with regard to your relationships with your fellows and the gods.

Law is an idea agreed upon. Without law we wouldn't have societies as we know them. One can argue whether some ideas about law make them natural laws, obvious things based upon our experience of living a human life on planet Earth. Natural or not, we agree upon the idea of law, whether or not we are conscious that rule of law requires our willing agreement.

Where do ideas about race, the notions we have about each other based upon skin color and... more »

Is race a lie agreed upon?

It's like asking what makes you American, or French, or any number of hyphenated identities as a subset of a national or state identity.

It's like asking what makes you Catholic, or atheist, or Protestant, and then filling in the appropriate discriminator that further defines how you stand with your group with regard to your relationships with your fellows and the gods.

Law is an idea agreed upon. Without law we wouldn't have societies as we know them. One can argue whether some ideas about law make them natural laws, obvious things based upon our experience of living a human life on planet Earth. Natural or not, we agree upon the idea of law, whether or not we are conscious that rule of law requires our willing agreement.

Where do ideas about race, the notions we have about each other based upon skin color and origins intersect with our ideas about identity, and morality, and law? Should there be any intersections?

What is the boundary where ideas agreed upon become a hindrance rather than a help to all of us?

Do we need race at all? Are we all just perpetuating an idea that no longer serves anybody who seeks the greatest good for the most people?

Why do we keep checking the boxes that mark us out as this color of human, that brand of Homo sapiens, this style of talking ape?

//___

2015-06-18 20:50:43 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

Best left-handed compliment I've gotten in a while.

Her: Honey, I love that you're gonna turn 50 without having lost that optimistic assumption of intelligence in others. (Complete with two soft cheek pats.)

Eh, I'll take it.

Best left-handed compliment I've gotten in a while.

Her: Honey, I love that you're gonna turn 50 without having lost that optimistic assumption of intelligence in others. (Complete with two soft cheek pats.)

Eh, I'll take it.___

2015-06-18 18:52:31 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Feel free to chime in.

A female coworker insists that women are more prone than men to enable a male boss. Thoughts?

Context: A male boss had to scramble to meet a deadline despite my timely reminders to him of the approaching deadline. The female coworker insisted that I could have helped that situation by being more "politely forceful" in my reminders. I said that what she considers politely forceful I consider enablement on a level that demeans both me and the boss. Better to let a man scramble, I argued, and hopefully learn than to ever approach him as less than grown up and responsible for his choices, given the information and the facts.

She replied that mine is a typically male position. I reminded her that I'm also gay. She said that I still have a Y chromosome.

I don't believe her gender-based ideas on this, and I resist... more »

Feel free to chime in.

A female coworker insists that women are more prone than men to enable a male boss. Thoughts?

Context: A male boss had to scramble to meet a deadline despite my timely reminders to him of the approaching deadline. The female coworker insisted that I could have helped that situation by being more "politely forceful" in my reminders. I said that what she considers politely forceful I consider enablement on a level that demeans both me and the boss. Better to let a man scramble, I argued, and hopefully learn than to ever approach him as less than grown up and responsible for his choices, given the information and the facts.

She replied that mine is a typically male position. I reminded her that I'm also gay. She said that I still have a Y chromosome.

I don't believe her gender-based ideas on this, and I resist having my nature defined solely by a chromosome.

But, I am open to arguments.___

2015-06-17 16:33:23 (13 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

I don't understand Plus Collections. Does that matter?

I don't understand Plus Collections. Does that matter?___

posted image

2015-06-17 05:38:19 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

I love The Book of Revelation.  It has been a source of fear and fascination since my earliest memories of being alive.  Its imagery is a fever dream on vengeance.  A meditation on destruction.  It is a horror story to inspire terror and obedience.  It is wonderful.  Two thousand years since its creation, it still inspires.  People base their lives, their beliefs, their teaching of the next generation and all of their important decisions and certainties on the promises of the end of the world as floridly depicted in Revelation.

Belief is magical.  Believe something strongly enough and you change.  When you change the whole world changes.  God, we're told, created us in his image.  We extend the gesture in creating our spiritual life, and the society and politics and art that we call our world and take for granted.  All this through nothing more than the powerof words.  ... more »

I love The Book of Revelation.  It has been a source of fear and fascination since my earliest memories of being alive.  Its imagery is a fever dream on vengeance.  A meditation on destruction.  It is a horror story to inspire terror and obedience.  It is wonderful.  Two thousand years since its creation, it still inspires.  People base their lives, their beliefs, their teaching of the next generation and all of their important decisions and certainties on the promises of the end of the world as floridly depicted in Revelation.

Belief is magical.  Believe something strongly enough and you change.  When you change the whole world changes.  God, we're told, created us in his image.  We extend the gesture in creating our spiritual life, and the society and politics and art that we call our world and take for granted.  All this through nothing more than the power of words.  Wonderful, amazing, horrific words.  That you likely have never read, but which act upon your life.  Every day.  Right now.

Try some.

In the story, a man named John tells about his visions of the end of the world.  The story and the imagery echo older stories of prophecy and build upon them, taking humanity forward through a historical pause after the Christ's sacrifice and resurrection.  Finally, into the terror of the end days, the great annihilation, God's judgment upon his creation, and the coming again of Jesus in triumph over Satan and all of history's wicked.  The resumption of the order in the days when creation was new.  Those saved in Christ resurrected, perfected, in eternal communion with God in the new Eden.

Chapters 12 and 13 give us a symbolic story that reveal the nation of Israel, source of the church, those redeemed in Jesus.  We are shown Jesus' origin out of the body of Israel, the holy mother, the church.  We meet Satan and learn about his rebellion and the war in heaven.  We read about Satan's fall from heaven and his exile from the presence of God.  Then, Satan's ongoing war on Earth, this time against humanity, destroying the righteous and enslaving the weak.  We find Satan using grotesque parody of divine imagery to deceive and condemn humanity.  We meet the false prophet.  We approach the worst of Satan's grotesques:  the Anti-Christ.

Read the words that tell you of the coming of the end of the world.  And don't worry about my love of horror.  I can carry it.  I was weened on this stuff.

A great sign appeared in heaven: a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet and a crown of twelve stars on her head.  She was pregnant and cried out in pain as she was about to give birth.  Then another sign appeared in heaven: a great red dragon with seven heads and ten horns and seven crowns on its heads.  Its tail swept a third of the stars out of the sky and flung them to the earth. The dragon stood in front of the woman who was about to give birth, so that it might devour her child the moment he was born.  She gave birth to a son, a male child, who “will rule all the nations with an iron scepter.”  And her child was snatched up to God and to his throne.  The woman fled into the wilderness to a place prepared for her by God, where she might be taken care of for 1,260 days.  

Then war broke out in heaven. Michael and his angels fought against the dragon, and the dragon and his angels fought back.  But he was not strong enough, and they lost their place in heaven.  The great dragon was hurled down—that ancient serpent called the devil, or Satan, who leads the whole world astray. He was hurled to the earth, and his angels with him.  

Then I heard a loud voice in heaven say:  

“Now have come the salvation and the power  
    and the kingdom of our God,  
    and the authority of his Messiah.  
For the accuser of our brothers and sisters,  
    who accuses them before our God day and night,  
    has been hurled down.   
They triumphed over him  
    by the blood of the Lamb  
    and by the word of their testimony;  
they did not love their lives so much  
    as to shrink from death.  
Therefore rejoice, you heavens  
    and you who dwell in them!  
But woe to the earth and the sea,  
    because the devil has gone down to you!  
He is filled with fury,  
    because he knows that his time is short.”  

When the dragon saw that he had been hurled to the earth, he pursued the woman who had given birth to the male child.  The woman was given the two wings of a great eagle, so that she might fly to the place prepared for her in the wilderness, where she would be taken care of for a time, times and half a time, out of the serpent’s reach.  Then from his mouth the serpent spewed water like a river, to overtake the woman and sweep her away with the torrent.  But the earth helped the woman by opening its mouth and swallowing the river that the dragon had spewed out of his mouth.  Then the dragon was enraged at the woman and went off to wage war against the rest of her offspring—those who keep God’s commands and hold fast their testimony about Jesus.  

The dragon stood on the shore of the sea. And I saw a beast coming out of the sea. It had ten horns and seven heads, with ten crowns on its horns, and on each head a blasphemous name.  The beast I saw resembled a leopard, but had feet like those of a bear and a mouth like that of a lion. The dragon gave the beast his power and his throne and great authority.  One of the heads of the beast seemed to have had a fatal wound, but the fatal wound had been healed. The whole world was filled with wonder and followed the beast.  People worshiped the dragon because he had given authority to the beast, and they also worshiped the beast and asked, “Who is like the beast? Who can wage war against it?”  

The beast was given a mouth to utter proud words and blasphemies and to exercise its authority for forty-two months.  It opened its mouth to blaspheme God, and to slander his name and his dwelling place and those who live in heaven.  It was given power to wage war against God’s holy people and to conquer them. And it was given authority over every tribe, people, language and nation.  All inhabitants of the earth will worship the beast—all whose names have not been written in the Lamb’s book of life, the Lamb who was slain from the creation of the world.  

Whoever has ears, let them hear. 

“If anyone is to go into captivity,  
    into captivity they will go.  
If anyone is to be killed with the sword,  
    with the sword they will be killed.”   
This calls for patient endurance and faithfulness on the part of God’s people.  

Then I saw a second beast, coming out of the earth. It had two horns like a lamb, but it spoke like a dragon.  It exercised all the authority of the first beast on its behalf, and made the earth and its inhabitants worship the first beast, whose fatal wound had been healed.  And it performed great signs, even causing fire to come down from heaven to the earth in full view of the people.  Because of the signs it was given power to perform on behalf of the first beast, it deceived the inhabitants of the earth. It ordered them to set up an image in honor of the beast who was wounded by the sword and yet lived.  The second beast was given power to give breath to the image of the first beast, so that the image could speak and cause all who refused to worship the image to be killed.  It also forced all people, great and small, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hands or on their foreheads,  so that they could not buy or sell unless they had the mark, which is the name of the beast or the number of its name.  

This calls for wisdom. Let the person who has insight calculate the number of the beast, for it is the number of a man. That number is 666.  

You can find the rest.  Easily.

The image is William Blake's "The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed in Sun."  The painting was featured in Thomas Harris' novel "Red Dragon."  In the story, the serial killer, dubbed The Tooth Fairy, becomes obsessed with the image, eventually steals it and, like the great red dragon wished to do with the infant born of the woman clothed with the sun, he eats it.

Good stuff.

//___

posted image

2015-06-17 03:02:47 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Still one of the creepiest horror movie endings.  
WARNING  This clip will spoil the movie's ending.
"Sleepaway Camp" (1983) is just another in a long string of 80s camp/slasher movies.  But, it held a unique surprise about Angela, the quiet, withdrawn camper with a troubled past.  
WARNING  Contains full frontal nudity and a creepily frozen facial expression that can still inspire fear in me as I imagine seeing it upon turning the corner in a supermarket aisle.

Still one of the creepiest horror movie endings.  
WARNING  This clip will spoil the movie's ending.
"Sleepaway Camp" (1983) is just another in a long string of 80s camp/slasher movies.  But, it held a unique surprise about Angela, the quiet, withdrawn camper with a troubled past.  
WARNING  Contains full frontal nudity and a creepily frozen facial expression that can still inspire fear in me as I imagine seeing it upon turning the corner in a supermarket aisle.___

2015-06-16 20:03:47 (11 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Enjoyed a "foods of our childhood" discussion today with a fellow talking ape. Now I'm craving fried Spam, cured ham, fresh biscuits, grits, collards, and red-eye gravy. Yes, I grew up white trashy, and even if that's not OK to some it still tastes delicious to most.

What food have you missed from your childhood? It's OK to admit that you quietly miss the TV dinner Day-Glo green peas.

//

Enjoyed a "foods of our childhood" discussion today with a fellow talking ape. Now I'm craving fried Spam, cured ham, fresh biscuits, grits, collards, and red-eye gravy. Yes, I grew up white trashy, and even if that's not OK to some it still tastes delicious to most.

What food have you missed from your childhood? It's OK to admit that you quietly miss the TV dinner Day-Glo green peas.

//___

posted image

2015-06-16 19:49:31 (8 comments, 0 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Probably also opposed to schools allowing children access to condiments and its encouragement of sexuality among teens.

The sheer stupidity on Facebook is like...___Probably also opposed to schools allowing children access to condiments and its encouragement of sexuality among teens.

posted image

2015-06-16 19:45:45 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Happily, there's no Marvel action movie tie-in, sequel or spin-off for these gods.

I am looking forward to this.___Happily, there's no Marvel action movie tie-in, sequel or spin-off for these gods.

2015-06-15 17:55:34 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

I considered reconnecting with my childhood faith. Then I realized that I'm bored. Boredom is not a good foundation for deciding to believe in a personal god, a personal savior.

What was Paul's motivation? I wonder what his lunch conversation was like. Has to have been better than the conversations in my life. People are so needy. And angry. And boring. They need a pound of faith. Something.

The coincidence: If I could actually believe again as I believed when I was a child, I'd be so good at helping others fight neediness and anger through nothing more than words and the positive purpose-filled feelings that words can arouse in a human. At least find my fellows less boring through a mission to bring them to God and a deeper relationship with the Savior and their fallen human world, always with the vision of the joyous reunion and perfection to come. ... more »

I considered reconnecting with my childhood faith. Then I realized that I'm bored. Boredom is not a good foundation for deciding to believe in a personal god, a personal savior.

What was Paul's motivation? I wonder what his lunch conversation was like. Has to have been better than the conversations in my life. People are so needy. And angry. And boring. They need a pound of faith. Something.

The coincidence: If I could actually believe again as I believed when I was a child, I'd be so good at helping others fight neediness and anger through nothing more than words and the positive purpose-filled feelings that words can arouse in a human. At least find my fellows less boring through a mission to bring them to God and a deeper relationship with the Savior and their fallen human world, always with the vision of the joyous reunion and perfection to come. Later. After.

I need to read a book and wait for the wheel to turn some more.

Jesus loves you. This I know. And it's true. Nothing wrong with feeling connected via invisible, yet experienceable love. It's seldom boring, based on my memories of my childhood.

Read any good books?

//___

posted image

2015-06-13 00:48:34 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

High Definition Earth-Viewing System (HDEV)  

High Definition Earth-Viewing System (HDEV)  ___

2015-06-12 19:21:53 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

I enjoy the righteous certainty of the young. I smile at them. I admire them. I envy them. Soon-- no rush--they will learn that life works upon them far more than they work upon life. That time is constant, mostly, but our experience of time changes as time works upon us. That they live in a human world that has survived collapses and genocides and xenophobia, and that humanity today is just as ignorant of itself, or maybe more so than our nomadic and differently-troubled distant ancestors.

The young will have their passions and their great loves. If we all are fortunate, their inevitable victories and just as inevitable failures will arrive out of a foundation of morality and a growing consciousness that whatever becomes of the least of us is the potential fate of all of us.

Humanity. Youth. And the old man oddly smiling at youth before turning away to resume whatever... more »

I enjoy the righteous certainty of the young. I smile at them. I admire them. I envy them. Soon-- no rush--they will learn that life works upon them far more than they work upon life. That time is constant, mostly, but our experience of time changes as time works upon us. That they live in a human world that has survived collapses and genocides and xenophobia, and that humanity today is just as ignorant of itself, or maybe more so than our nomadic and differently-troubled distant ancestors.

The young will have their passions and their great loves. If we all are fortunate, their inevitable victories and just as inevitable failures will arrive out of a foundation of morality and a growing consciousness that whatever becomes of the least of us is the potential fate of all of us.

Humanity. Youth. And the old man oddly smiling at youth before turning away to resume whatever passes for a life among the old.

//___

2015-06-12 17:24:30 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Delightful.

+Fidem Turbāre   This is the longer version of the grammar post from this morning if you're interested. 

Courtesy of +Alex Feldstein ___Delightful.

posted image

2015-06-12 14:23:30 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

The mortal remains of Robert Lewis Evander were prepared to lay to rest in a grave dug into a gentle slope between the apple orchard and the forest.  Evander had chosen the spot.  He also managed the extraction of his bones from the cold Maine ground below the 240-year-old disused crawlspace under Revolution House, as the carefully preserved two-bedroom house is known to the residents of the Cove.

Charles "Chuck" Lefebvre, whose work had included helping to lift the floor boards and prying up and removing stones, uncovered the skeleton.  His work progressed from spade to garden shovel and awl.  Chuck had been chosen for his small wiry frame and lack of bother about damp and cobweb-infested spaces.  Chuck wiped off each gently dislodged bone and lifted it upward to Hank Romas current owner and landlord of Revolution House and eldest male member of the living residents of theexte... more »

The mortal remains of Robert Lewis Evander were prepared to lay to rest in a grave dug into a gentle slope between the apple orchard and the forest.  Evander had chosen the spot.  He also managed the extraction of his bones from the cold Maine ground below the 240-year-old disused crawlspace under Revolution House, as the carefully preserved two-bedroom house is known to the residents of the Cove.

Charles "Chuck" Lefebvre, whose work had included helping to lift the floor boards and prying up and removing stones, uncovered the skeleton.  His work progressed from spade to garden shovel and awl.  Chuck had been chosen for his small wiry frame and lack of bother about damp and cobweb-infested spaces.  Chuck wiped off each gently dislodged bone and lifted it upward to Hank Romas current owner and landlord of Revolution House and eldest male member of the living residents of the extended family.  

Evander monitored the progress of his disinterment, studying each bone with a mixture of fascination and expressions inspired by reminiscences upon his former life.  His ghost sighed over Hank's shoulder as the man gripped a rising arm bone.  "They look good, don't they," commented Evander in his customery clipped and fussy tone to Hank, who knelt upon the kitchen floor, his knees and back complaining.  "Not bad for over two hundred years," added Evander.  Hank nodded, grunted and handed a left humerus to Beth, his grand-niece, to fit into the pine box prepared by Hank and two of his nephews for the occasion.

Beth, at this time 12-years-old, who would later and with the blessing of her great-grandmother ask to be called Bette to respectfully distinguish her from the old matriarch, briefly examined each bone, turning each with her small nimble fingers, quietly puzzling out their placement in the box.  It was Beth, who had mediated the controversy over the bones.  Beth had been Evander's particular descendant-friend and protege, the latest in the generations of the family stretching back to the first child of the first Elizabeth to live and raise a family in Revolution House, when the building's wood was still freshly hewed and still redolent of the coastal forest.  That child's name had been Sarah Evander Romas, born on that very kitchen floor nine months after her father's strange death and odd burial.

It had been agreed that Evander's bones would be placed above his child's on the slope, symbolically watching over his child in death as he had watched over her mortal body and spirit during her long life.  Sarah had, of course, been consulted and after much focused reminding of her consciousness by Beth, her mother and great-grandmother that it had indeed once lived as Sarah Evander Romas, Sarah warmly recognized her once-father, childhood playmate and life mentor and consented to the plan to move his remains near to Sarah's.

Charlotte Lefebvre, née St. Pierre, known as Lottie, and new wife to Geoffrey Lefebvre, brother to Chuck-in-the-hole, hugged her chest and toed the moss growing between the paving stones.  It had been Lottie's horror over the bones under her kitchen and her insistence that they go that had sparked the events leading to this day.  Lottie's tearful hysterics commenced  the previous September when it was explained to her that Evander was not, in fact, a colorful neighbor who occasionally dropped by to give her advice that Lottie hadn't asked for. He was, actually, an over-two-hundred-year-old differently-abled, body-challenged blood ancestor to much of the family, a respected if not always well-tolerated-by-all presence among them.  Oh, and that his bones rested under the floorboards of the kitchen where she tested recipes and planned menus for the restaurant.  

Geoff's immediate family and a delegation of the family's elders met in early October to address Lottie's demand that Evander's bones be moved and that Evander keep away from Lottie.  Evander was invited to the meeting, of course.  Discussions broke down during the holidays when it appeared that the marriage of Lottie and Geoff might also fall apart.  Both discussion and marriage resurrected at the Easter season following a two hour summit-under-the-apple-trees between Lottie and Evander, along with Beth who could compel politeness from Evander and charm civility from Lottie.  At last, it was agreed that Evander would consent to the moving of his bones, and Lottie would consent to Evander's continued occasional presence as an only-incidentally-deceased member of her husband's family.

[And so on.  I suppose I should go to work.]___

posted image

2015-06-11 12:46:33 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

This morning's ear worm:  V.V. Brown's "Shark in the Water," from her 2009 album Traveling Like the Light.  An under-rated pop song from an under-rated British pop vocalist whose greatest surprise has been her willingness to chart her own musical path.  The video is a delight, too.  

Yes, I've posted this before, but some ear worms have greater mojo than others.  This one is about a woman's growing certainty that despite the pleasing image of her relationship and her doubts about herself, something is very wrong.  Baby, there's a shark in the water.

I wonder if any women out there can relate.

Sometimes I get my head in a dilly
Feeling so lost, ticking you off
Now boy, you know me well
Said, I’m that kind of feeling
That kind of soft, that kind of silly
But when I’m in doubt, I open my mouth
Andwords com... more »

This morning's ear worm:  V.V. Brown's "Shark in the Water," from her 2009 album Traveling Like the Light.  An under-rated pop song from an under-rated British pop vocalist whose greatest surprise has been her willingness to chart her own musical path.  The video is a delight, too.  

Yes, I've posted this before, but some ear worms have greater mojo than others.  This one is about a woman's growing certainty that despite the pleasing image of her relationship and her doubts about herself, something is very wrong.  Baby, there's a shark in the water.

I wonder if any women out there can relate.

Sometimes I get my head in a dilly
Feeling so lost, ticking you off
Now boy, you know me well
Said, I’m that kind of feeling
That kind of soft, that kind of silly
But when I’m in doubt, I open my mouth
And words come out, words come out like

Baby, there’s a shark in the water
There’s something underneath my bed
Oh, please believe I said
Baby, there’s a shark in the water
I caught them barking at the moon
Better be soon

High in the sky, the song that I’m singing
A sweet little lie, I cry wolf, cry
Rabbit out of the hat, yes, so that’s why I’m bringing
Some tricks up my sleeve, for noticing me
It wouldn’t cause you any harm, I just want you in my arms
I can’t help, I can’t help myself

Baby, there’s a shark in the water
There’s something underneath my bed
Oh, please believe I said
Baby, there’s a shark in the water
I caught them barking at the moon
Better be soon

(Do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do)
(Better be soon)
(Do, do, do, do, do, do, do, do [x2])

Right is right
Rules are rules
This is more like April Fool’s
I’m just winding you up, oh
Jack be nimble, Jack be quick
Please don’t make too much of it
It ain’t that serious

Baby, there’s a shark in the water
There’s something underneath my bed
Oh, please believe I said
Baby, there’s a shark in the water
I caught them barking at the moon
You better get here soon

Baby, there’s a shark in the water
Baby, there’s a shark in the water
Baby, there’s a shark in the water
I caught them barking at the moon
Better be soon

//___

2015-06-05 20:29:41 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

I'd say "How the mighty have fallen," but I was never that mighty and my symbolic altitude has never been that great.

Still, I ended up sighing upon realizing that for the last several hours my greatest excitement has been looking forward to getting a new lawn mower tomorrow.

I don't need a new mower, my lawn mower works, it cuts and bags grass. It's just that for the last two years the mower's self-propulsion has been broken. So, for two years I've been mowing an acre with an extra-heavy push mower.

So, yeah, I'm excited about getting a new mower.

Which is kinda sad . . ,

I'd say "How the mighty have fallen," but I was never that mighty and my symbolic altitude has never been that great.

Still, I ended up sighing upon realizing that for the last several hours my greatest excitement has been looking forward to getting a new lawn mower tomorrow.

I don't need a new mower, my lawn mower works, it cuts and bags grass. It's just that for the last two years the mower's self-propulsion has been broken. So, for two years I've been mowing an acre with an extra-heavy push mower.

So, yeah, I'm excited about getting a new mower.

Which is kinda sad . . ,___

posted image

2015-06-05 19:29:08 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Once in a blue moon.

An English idiom to indicate something that happens only rarely.

A lunar cycle, the amount of time it takes the moon to pass through its phases, is 29.53 days. 12.37 cycles of the moon happen in a calendar year. There are only 12 months, so there's always that .37 "extra" lunar cycle time, or about 11days in every calendar year.

So, every two to three years there comes a year with 13 full moons instead of 12. The blue moon is reckoned by the season that contains an "extra" moon. Traditionally, the blue moon is the third full moon in whatever season contains five full moons. The last blue moon appeared on August 20, 2013, and the next will appear on May 21, 2016.

Therefore, if taken literally, saying that something happens only once in a blue moon means it happens every two to three years.

A blue... more »

Once in a blue moon.

An English idiom to indicate something that happens only rarely.

A lunar cycle, the amount of time it takes the moon to pass through its phases, is 29.53 days. 12.37 cycles of the moon happen in a calendar year. There are only 12 months, so there's always that .37 "extra" lunar cycle time, or about 11days in every calendar year.

So, every two to three years there comes a year with 13 full moons instead of 12. The blue moon is reckoned by the season that contains an "extra" moon. Traditionally, the blue moon is the third full moon in whatever season contains five full moons. The last blue moon appeared on August 20, 2013, and the next will appear on May 21, 2016.

Therefore, if taken literally, saying that something happens only once in a blue moon means it happens every two to three years.

A blue moon is not actually blue in color. Blue may be our modern mangling of the archaic word belewe, which means "betrayer."

Back in the day many social and religious events and observations were (and some like Pentecost and Easter still are) reckoned by moon cycles. But, as we know, the lunar year is a bit shorter than our modern calendar. So, back in the day, every few years you had to tack an extra month--called an intercalary month--into your lunar calendar so things made sense. This occasional extra month made the moon the people's betrayer by causing their Lenten fast to last an extra month.

Naughty moon.

//___

posted image

2015-06-04 05:18:18 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Don't throw the baby out with the bath water!

Such an odd English idiom.  It means that one shouldn't make an avoidable error and get rid of something good just to be rid of something else.  But, has anybody in history ever thrown out a baby with its bath water?  I hope not.

A theory about the expression involves past bathing custom.  Bathing was more complicated in the past.  In Europe's Middle Ages, for example, most people didn't have access to piped in water.  Each home didn't have a water heater.  People had tubs, though.  Water would be heated and carried to the tub, bucket by bucket.  

This time-consuming process meant that a household would use the same tub of water to bathe.  First honors (and the warmest, cleanest water) went to the head of household.  Then others would use the tub, eldest to youngest.

Last of all? The young... more »

Don't throw the baby out with the bath water!

Such an odd English idiom.  It means that one shouldn't make an avoidable error and get rid of something good just to be rid of something else.  But, has anybody in history ever thrown out a baby with its bath water?  I hope not.

A theory about the expression involves past bathing custom.  Bathing was more complicated in the past.  In Europe's Middle Ages, for example, most people didn't have access to piped in water.  Each home didn't have a water heater.  People had tubs, though.  Water would be heated and carried to the tub, bucket by bucket.  

This time-consuming process meant that a household would use the same tub of water to bathe.  First honors (and the warmest, cleanest water) went to the head of household.  Then others would use the tub, eldest to youngest.

Last of all?  The youngest of all:  the baby.

So, after the baby's bath, you could throw out the bath water.   After taking out the baby.

Also, there may be no truth in the above.  Idioms don't always have origin in facts.  Sometimes they're just wonderfully colorful inventions.

//___

posted image

2015-06-03 21:40:35 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

It's not true that blond people, particularly females, are less intelligent than their non-blond counterparts.

That being said:

A man got onto the bus with both of his front trouser pockets full of golf balls and sat down next to a beautiful (you guessed it) blonde.

The puzzled blonde kept looking at him and his bulging pockets.

Finally, after many glances from her, he said "They're golf balls."

The blonde continued to look at him for a very long time, thinking deeply about what he had said. After several minutes, not being able to contain her curiosity any longer, she asked "Does it hurt as much as tennis elbow?"

[Via the Internets, probably an ancient joke, and my apology to offended blond people. -- Management]

[Value-added bonus:  The word "blond" is an adjective, as in "The... more »

It's not true that blond people, particularly females, are less intelligent than their non-blond counterparts.

That being said:

A man got onto the bus with both of his front trouser pockets full of golf balls and sat down next to a beautiful (you guessed it) blonde.

The puzzled blonde kept looking at him and his bulging pockets.

Finally, after many glances from her, he said "They're golf balls."

The blonde continued to look at him for a very long time, thinking deeply about what he had said. After several minutes, not being able to contain her curiosity any longer, she asked "Does it hurt as much as tennis elbow?"

[Via the Internets, probably an ancient joke, and my apology to offended blond people. -- Management]

[Value-added bonus:  The word "blond" is an adjective, as in "The blond puppy is calmer than the brown puppy."  The noun forms are distinct:  "blond" is the masculine form, "blonde" is the feminine form.  Mostly, though, nobody cares, and if you use either form we'll know what you mean.  If you use them wrong, we'll just assume you're a blond poster and love you no less.  ; )  ]

//___

posted image

2015-06-03 18:34:53 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

I'd say that a woman who lost her youth, her husband, and quality of life made a decision to reward a generous person who probably gave her the greatest possible peace, thrills and happiness before she slipped into dementia and death.

To me, the most relevant statement in the story:  "Ralph Holmes, the lawyer who revised her will over the course of eight months, says Webber was a sharp woman who knew about her holdings."

I suspect the bequests will be tied up in litigation for some time.  The sergeant's greatest pressures now may be keeping his job and continuing to provide for himself and his family.

As they say, no good deed goes unpunished.

//

I'd say that a woman who lost her youth, her husband, and quality of life made a decision to reward a generous person who probably gave her the greatest possible peace, thrills and happiness before she slipped into dementia and death.

To me, the most relevant statement in the story:  "Ralph Holmes, the lawyer who revised her will over the course of eight months, says Webber was a sharp woman who knew about her holdings."

I suspect the bequests will be tied up in litigation for some time.  The sergeant's greatest pressures now may be keeping his job and continuing to provide for himself and his family.

As they say, no good deed goes unpunished.

//___

posted image

2015-06-01 05:04:19 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Tweeted Lowe in response, "For those wondering, my bladder is gregarious."  

If you've noticed that you haven't lately noticed these DirecTV commercials, they were pulled in April after a business watchdog group complained about some of the commercials' claims.

Tweeted Lowe in response, "For those wondering, my bladder is gregarious."  

If you've noticed that you haven't lately noticed these DirecTV commercials, they were pulled in April after a business watchdog group complained about some of the commercials' claims.___

posted image

2015-05-29 15:20:48 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

Hanging in there until June 11

I'm a Virgo.  Which is a title, not a way of life.  I'm a Virgo because I was born at that point in the earth's revolution around its star that is associated with a particular constellation of stars, giving babies born during that time period the title of Virgo.  I'm born almost in the middle of the Virgo weeks, so I guess I'm ultra-Virgo?  Super Virgo?  Deeply Virgo afflicted?  

It's astrology, people.  Something to be smiled at and mostly ignored.  Except for the personal annoyances that arrive with predictable regularity associated with coincidental movements of objects in the sky.

As our planet spins through space on its journey around our star, other planets move too.  In the night sky you can see Venus, Jupiter and Mars, the easiest planets to spot.  Really, you can, just look them up to know wherethey'... more »

Hanging in there until June 11

I'm a Virgo.  Which is a title, not a way of life.  I'm a Virgo because I was born at that point in the earth's revolution around its star that is associated with a particular constellation of stars, giving babies born during that time period the title of Virgo.  I'm born almost in the middle of the Virgo weeks, so I guess I'm ultra-Virgo?  Super Virgo?  Deeply Virgo afflicted?  

It's astrology, people.  Something to be smiled at and mostly ignored.  Except for the personal annoyances that arrive with predictable regularity associated with coincidental movements of objects in the sky.

As our planet spins through space on its journey around our star, other planets move too.  In the night sky you can see Venus, Jupiter and Mars, the easiest planets to spot.  Really, you can, just look them up to know where they'll be in your sky at any given time of the year.  Sometimes they're very bright.  Mars can look like a large red star.  Jupiter a blue/white sapphire.  Venus can appear startlingly bright on the horizon just before dawn, or just after dusk.

And then there's Mercury.  The planet closest to our star.  Relative to Earth and the other planets, Mercury zips along in its journey around the star.  A year is the time a planet takes to travel from point A back to point A around its star.  Mercury's year is 88 days.

So, as we look up at the night sky and see Mercury, sometimes it appears to move along normally.  Then, it seems to back up, relative to our observation point on Earth.  That backing up appearance is called retrograde motion.  It's not that Mercury (or any other planet in its retrograde cycle) is going backward.  It only appears to go backward relative to our observation on the also-moving platform called planet Earth, which takes 365 days and change to go around the star.

Back to the Virgo thing.  According to lore, Mercury is the planet that rules Virgos.  I'm not sure of the protocols involved in that.  I've never bowed to Mercury, and I've heard no other Virgos call it "Your Majesty."  It's simply "our planet" if you're a Virgo.

The planet is named for the Roman god, whose Greek name is Hermes.  Mercury/Hermes is the son of the king of the gods, half brother to many other gods, and by all accounts is too smart for his own good.  He's easily bored with the banalities of humans and other gods, and he enjoys mind games that highlight the absurdity or gullibility of others.  He is not above making a quick buck at the expense of others, he finds it stimulating to get as much as something for himself from you at little or no cost to him.  He's a stimulating drinking or dinner companion, but mind your car keys, silver and secrets in his company.  He cannot help his nature. To his credit, once he's played out his nature and realizes the damages he's caused, he often bends over backwards to make amends and offer compensation.  Mercury/Hermes is a naughty god, not an evil god.

In keeping with the chaos that he brings, when his namesake planet goes retrograde, things tend to fall apart.  People become less contemplative, become more sensitive.  Objects go missing.  Sturdy things become inexplicably fragile.  Including human egos.  While Mercury appears to run backward across our night sky the gremlins run rampant in the material world and the bogeymen of our psyches rattle and roar.

If you're a Virgo, amplify the above by a factor of about three.  

Yes, astrology is pure hokum.  One cannot point to any proofs that offer any credence to astrological "science."  It is not a science at all.  It is a colorful human invention, a whimsy spun from threads of fancy, hung in the night sky and on pages of newsprint like prayer flags.  Pretty.  Amusing.  Worthless.

Except for Mercury.  Damned Mercury and its retrograde motion and all the things that happen during that time.

June 11 is coming and Mercury's retrograde cycle will end.  Hang in there until then, all of you, but particularly my fellow Virgos.  It ends.  It always ends.

And then we have to weather it all again from September 17 to October 9.  On the bright side, that cycle will end just in time for the resumption of "The Walking Dead."  While weathering a Mercury retrograde cycle, I find it helps to have things to look forward to.

//___

posted image

2015-05-21 13:03:34 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

The Very Best Of Billie Holiday

A must-have performer for the well-rounded music library, Billie Holiday is a legendary singer who helped define the sound of a generation.  These tracks are free-for-now in Google Play's Music store.  Get them.

//

The Very Best Of Billie Holiday

A must-have performer for the well-rounded music library, Billie Holiday is a legendary singer who helped define the sound of a generation.  These tracks are free-for-now in Google Play's Music store.  Get them.

//___

2015-05-15 21:22:18 (10 comments, 0 reshares, 30 +1s)Open 

WTF?

A coworker shared a personal anecdote on the misunderstandings that are part of our Internet Age.

The coworker recently visited family from away and helped her mother set up a Facebook account. The mother was taught how to find and "friend" her family, including her grandchildren. She read her grandchildren's postings and the comments of friends and, apparently, picked up some of the lingo.

The family became alarmed when this grandmotherly lady started posting, for example, "I had dinner last night with your Aunt June and we enjoyed delicious grilled hamburgers. WTF?"

The woman had read the acronym many times on her grandchildren's Facebook postings and had assumed it stands for "Wasn't that fun?"

At work we've decided to adopt the phrase "Wasn't that fun?" as code for the... more »

WTF?

A coworker shared a personal anecdote on the misunderstandings that are part of our Internet Age.

The coworker recently visited family from away and helped her mother set up a Facebook account. The mother was taught how to find and "friend" her family, including her grandchildren. She read her grandchildren's postings and the comments of friends and, apparently, picked up some of the lingo.

The family became alarmed when this grandmotherly lady started posting, for example, "I had dinner last night with your Aunt June and we enjoyed delicious grilled hamburgers. WTF?"

The woman had read the acronym many times on her grandchildren's Facebook postings and had assumed it stands for "Wasn't that fun?"

At work we've decided to adopt the phrase "Wasn't that fun?" as code for the other, online meaning of the initials; e.g.. "I just saw Bob use some of my mayonnaise from the staff fridge. Wasn't that fun?"

Happy Friday, everybody. I hope you all build a memory this weekend that inspires a WTF posting, in either sense.

//___

2015-05-13 19:32:17 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

Me: (Upon realizing I'd wasted two minutes working on the wrong document.)
Oh, fudgeadoodle.

Coworker: Wow, you rarely use such extreme fake vulgarity. You must be really upset over there.

Me: (Punching up the right document, eyes on the screen.)
Flip off.

Coworker: (Sounds of giggling.)

//

Me: (Upon realizing I'd wasted two minutes working on the wrong document.)
Oh, fudgeadoodle.

Coworker: Wow, you rarely use such extreme fake vulgarity. You must be really upset over there.

Me: (Punching up the right document, eyes on the screen.)
Flip off.

Coworker: (Sounds of giggling.)

//___

Buttons

A special service of CircleCount.com is the following button.

The button shows the number of followers you have directly in a small button. You can add this button to your website, like the +1-Button of Google or the Like-Button of Facebook.






You can add this button directly in your website. For more information about the CircleCount Buttons and the description how to add them to another page click here.

Alvin StearnsCircloscope