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Sarah Rios has been at 1 events

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Sarah Rios42,205*WHOVIANS* Mark your calendars... and your arms. http://imgur.com/lP0i5Xj (Original post: https://plus.google.com/u/0/101453162215777563254/posts/ED4yBRm41su) *Edit:* Facebook event - https://www.facebook.com/events/150522868436180THE SILENCE2013-04-23 08:00:001295  

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Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

5
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2
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25
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931
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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 25

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2015-08-22 15:37:09 (25 comments, 2 reshares, 102 +1s)Open 

Sarah Is Weird

I am now officially that parent. Apparently the gate wasn't closed all the way, so when I let The Puddin' out to go play in the backyard, he took the dog with him and went two houses down to go check the mailbox.

At least he was trying to be helpful?

When I ran out from the side of the house the neighbor across the street helpfully pointed out the direction they went, and let me know the dog was guarding him. No idea how long they were out.

Most reshares: 7

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2015-08-19 22:14:05 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

This man is incredible. I didn't think it was possible to like him any more than I already did, but I was mistaken.

Via +Daniel Rice​

Most plusones: 104

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2015-08-16 14:27:12 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 104 +1s)Open 

Latest 50 posts

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2015-09-01 13:03:24 (6 comments, 1 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

ACTIVE MINIONS

So here's a thing. As I haven't worked out since the spring I may need to give this a go.

Age of Pandora - Post-Apocalyptic Fitness Quest

Age of Pandora is the world’s first, fully immersive fitness quest. You get to be the hero in a post-apocalyptic, fully realized world that really needs heroes. Your workouts reflect the activities of the central character. You are given the opportunity to fight monsters, forge alliances and save the world. You get to do it at your level of fitness and progress at a pace you find works for you. Are you ready to enter, Pandora and mark the beginning of a new age? 

The 30 day program is essentially a muscle activation program that allows you to begin to get back control of your body. It is the perfect springboard to greater things.  

DOWNLOAD & PRINT or PLAY ONLINE
http://darebee.com/programs/age-of-pandora.html___ACTIVE MINIONS

So here's a thing. As I haven't worked out since the spring I may need to give this a go.

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2015-08-30 22:57:59 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

PSA

All of this.

You Are Not Stupid

“So what do you do for a living?” I always cringe a bit when that question comes up among strangers, because when I reveal that I’m an astrophysics professor the response is almost always the same. “Um…wow…. You must be really smart!”

While it’s often intended as a compliment, it really isn’t. Smart didn’t allow me to become an astrophysicist. Hard work, dedication and the support of family and friends did. It’s also one of the most deeply divisive misconceptions about scientists that one can have: scientists are smarter than you. Part of this stems from the idolization of brilliant scientists. Albert Einstein was so smart that fictitious quotes are attributed to him. Media buzzes whenever Stephen Hawking says something about black holes. Any quote by Neil Tyson is a sure way to get likes on Facebook. We celebrate their genius and it makes us feel smart by association. But this stereotype of the “genius scientist” has a dark side.

For one there’s expectation that to do science you must be super smart. If you struggle with math, or have to study hard to pass chemistry, you must not have what it takes. The expectation to be smart when you don’t feel smart starts to foster a lack of self confidence in your abilities. This is particularly true if you’re a girl or minority where cultural biases presume that “your kind” aren’t smart, or shouldn’t be. Lots of talented children walk away from science because they don’t feel smart.

Then there’s the us vs. them mentality that arises from the misconception. Scientists (and fans of science) are smart. Smarter than you. You are stupid. But of course, you’re not stupid. You know you’re not stupid. The problem isn’t you, it’s the scientists. Scientists are arrogant. For example, when I criticized a particular science website for intentionally misleading readers, the most popular rebuttal was that I (as a scientist) was being elitist.

Where this attitude really raises its head is among supporters of fringe scientific ideas. Some of the strongest supporters of alternative scientific ideas are clearly quite intelligent. Presidential hopeful and evolution denier Ben Carson is a neurosurgeon. Pierre Robitaille made great advances in magnetic resonance imaging, but adamantly believes that the cosmic microwave background comes from Earth’s oceans. Physicist and Nobel laureate Ivar Giaever thinks global warming is a pseudoscience on the verge of becoming a “new religion.” None of these folks are stupid.

If there’s one thing most people know about themselves it’s that they’re not stupid. And they’re right. We live in a complex world and face challenges every day. If you’re stupid, you can quickly land in a heap of unpleasantness. Of course that also means that many people equate being wrong with being stupid. Stupid people make the wrong choices in life, while smart people make the right ones. So when you see someone promoting a pseudoscientific idea, you likely think they’re stupid. When you argue against their ideas by saying “you’re wrong,” what they’ll hear is “you’re stupid.” They’ll see it as a personal attack, and they’ll respond accordingly. Assuming someone is stupid isn’t a way to build a bridge of communication and understanding.

One of the things I love about science is how deeply ennobling it is. Humans working together openly and honestly can do amazing things. We have developed a deep understanding of the universe around us. We didn’t gain that understanding by being stupid, but we have been wrong many times along the way. Being wrong isn’t stupid.

Sometimes it’s the only way we can learn.___PSA

All of this.

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2015-08-29 17:18:57 (6 comments, 1 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

PSA

:(

Via +Amanda Rachelle Warren​

Yeah, I can relate. I've done most of these, just to put white people at ease around me. ___PSA

:(

Via +Amanda Rachelle Warren​

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2015-08-28 20:59:56 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so are super smart teenagers that do the sciencing!

Via +Ben Hibben​

"Faiad discovered a cheap and plentiful catalyst called aluminisilicate that drastically reduces the cost of converting plastic waste into gases like methane and propane, which can be turned into ethanol, what some scientists are calling “biofuel” because the organic chemicals from plastic polymers she extracts, are the same chemicals extracted from vegetation to create ethanol biofuel."

Well done Azza!

#smartgirls #STEMwomen #environmentalist___SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so are super smart teenagers that do the sciencing!

Via +Ben Hibben​

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2015-08-28 19:46:33 (9 comments, 5 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

Huh. I knew there was a reason I didn't like ballpoint pens.

Much like the changing physical design of the phone affected its use for calling people, the changing design of the pen has affected handwriting. You may not realize this, but it's significantly harder on the hands to write with a ballpoint pen than with a fountain pen.

I was personally very aware of this when I was a physicist, since most of the work I had to do was writing and working through page after page of equations, which to this day isn't easy to do on a computer. So it was pens and notebooks all the time, and I became extremely particular about which ones I used: a pen which either had too high a resistance or which dried too slowly, or paper that didn't absorb the ink well, and my work would actively suffer.

(Quite seriously: if your hands hurt too soon, you can't write for hours on end. If the ink smudges as you write -- especially if, like me, you're left-handed -- everything is a lost cause. If the paper doesn't absorb the ink and dry enough for you to flip pages in the notebook, you're lost. Any of these things take time, energy, and concentration, and you simply can't vanish into the flow of the science.)

This article isn't about doing science, but about how the ballpoint pen changed handwriting -- but it's through the exact same process. The various methods of cursive weren't popular primarily for their aesthetics; they were practical methods of writing quickly and legibly. As anyone who remembers having to do this in school can attest, that's always been kind of strange, because with modern pens, Palmer-method cursive is much slower and harder: people tend to develop their own semi-script handwriting for when they actually need to write day-to-day. (Except for handwriting enthusiasts who are doing it for fun)

So when you see the lack of handwriting, instead of crying "O tempora! O mores!," realize that what you're seeing isn't simply a move to computers: it's the evolution of the pen itself.

Via +Patricia Elizabeth ___MINIONS

Huh. I knew there was a reason I didn't like ballpoint pens.

2015-08-28 12:52:49 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

FLASHBACK FRIDAY

While looking for something else I inadvertently found either my first or second ever G+ post.

That was a long time ago, yo.

This is a little like facebook... minus the annoying. Must find more people!___FLASHBACK FRIDAY

While looking for something else I inadvertently found either my first or second ever G+ post.

That was a long time ago, yo.

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2015-08-28 10:33:58 (8 comments, 4 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

HYPNO TOAD

Guys. GUYS. This is not a drill. I repeat, this is not a drill.

Don't ask me how I got here, and I'm ashamed to admit my actual thoughts about this.___HYPNO TOAD

Guys. GUYS. This is not a drill. I repeat, this is not a drill.

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2015-08-27 21:44:29 (5 comments, 5 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

FOODIES

I uh. I need to get my drink on. Soon.

Liberated from a private share.

FOODIES

I uh. I need to get my drink on. Soon.

Liberated from a private share.___

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2015-08-27 15:49:31 (5 comments, 4 reshares, 56 +1s)Open 

THORSDAY THUNDERSTORMS

So many lightning. So many.

Thor, who you fighting up there man?

THORSDAY THUNDERSTORMS

So many lightning. So many.

Thor, who you fighting up there man?___

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2015-08-27 13:02:55 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

FOODIES

You can't have any. All your pickle flavored popcorn are belong to Rios.

(Holy shit you guys. Trader Joe's has the market on lockdown for weird food you can't stop eating. See also: chocolate covered potato chips.)

FOODIES

You can't have any. All your pickle flavored popcorn are belong to Rios.

(Holy shit you guys. Trader Joe's has the market on lockdown for weird food you can't stop eating. See also: chocolate covered potato chips.)___

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2015-08-27 12:33:15 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

WHOVIAN MINIONS

This is possibly the most adorable thing ever.

Via +Ayoub Khote​

Awesome parents are awesome.___WHOVIAN MINIONS

This is possibly the most adorable thing ever.

Via +Ayoub Khote​

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2015-08-26 17:41:58 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so is Quantum Field Theory!

I love to give simple explanations of complex ideas, and I love finding good explanations by other people, too. Here, physicist Brian Skinner has written a very simple explanation of the core ideas of quantum field theory. QFT is the thing that combines special relativity with quantum mechanics, and is the basis of particle physics, the Standard Model, and almost all of our best understandings of how the universe works -- so it's rather impressive that he managed to explain its core ideas using mattresses.___SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so is Quantum Field Theory!

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2015-08-26 15:05:38 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

Go forth and fling money!

+SuperHeroStuff is having an end-of-summer T-shirt sale. They have a great selection for your geekinesses. :)___MINIONS

Go forth and fling money!

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2015-08-26 15:01:12 (2 comments, 4 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

^_^

The Book: It is important to note that suddenly, and against all probability, a sperm whale had been called into existence, several miles above the surface of an alien planet. And since this is not a naturally tenable position for a whale, this innocent creature had very little time to come to terms with its identity. This is what it thought, as it fell:
The Whale: Ahhh! Woooh! What's happening? Who am I? Why am I here? What's my purpose in life? What do I mean by who am I? Okay okay, calm down calm down get a grip now. Ooh, this is an interesting sensation. What is it? Its a sort of tingling in my... well I suppose I better start finding names for things. Lets call it a... tail! Yeah! Tail! And hey, what's this roaring sound, whooshing past what I'm suddenly gonna call my head? Wind! Is that a good name? It'll do. Yeah, this is really exciting. I'm dizzy with anticipation! Or is it the wind? There's an awful lot of that now isn't it? And what's this thing coming toward me very fast? So big and flat and round, it needs a big wide sounding name like 'Ow', 'Ownge', 'Round', 'Ground'! That's it! Ground! Ha! I wonder if it'll be friends with me? Hello, Ground!

The Book: Curiously, the only thing that went through the mind of the bowl of petunias, as it fell, was, "Oh no, not again!" Many people have speculated that if we knew exactly why the bowl of petunias had thought that we would know a lot more about the nature of the universe than we do now.

#HHGttG

Get yours here:
https://teechip.com/nhn10___MINIONS

^_^

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2015-08-25 17:12:07 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so are fish!

Did you know that a handful of fish species are partially warmblooded, and at least one is fully warmblooded?___SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so are fish!

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2015-08-25 15:26:39 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 35 +1s)Open 

Random LOLs

::spit take::

Via +Doc Harvard​

#empowered  ___Random LOLs

::spit take::

Via +Doc Harvard​

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2015-08-25 13:26:13 (2 comments, 3 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so is psychology!

___SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so is psychology!

2015-08-25 13:20:43 (6 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

MOBILE MINIONS

How do you link to a collection on mobile? Or can you?

MOBILE MINIONS

How do you link to a collection on mobile? Or can you?___

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2015-08-25 13:13:24 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 35 +1s)Open 

Tuesday THORSDAY

Via +Evan Kelley​

When that tense moment comes....___Tuesday THORSDAY

Via +Evan Kelley​

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2015-08-24 18:02:52 (11 comments, 3 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

I'M NOT CRYING, YOU'RE CRYING.

MINIONS

I'M NOT CRYING, YOU'RE CRYING.___

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2015-08-23 05:07:19 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

Random LOLs

Real life LOL.

It's late. I've had a few Redd's Strawberry Ales. And I can't stop laughing at this. LOL!!___Random LOLs

Real life LOL.

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2015-08-23 04:22:08 (9 comments, 6 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

POLITICS

Read all of +Yonatan Zunger​'s post. It all.

I didn't used to take Trump seriously because I thought everyone sort of tolerated him, like you'd tolerate your old racist grandpa. But then he ran for president, and then he got popular??

I never thought Trump was funny, but I did think he was a joke. Now I side-eye coworkers and dread politics coming up among relatives. Not a joke. Not at all.

This article interests me most for what it misses. 

The body of this article -- which is well-written and worth reading, if you care about the subject -- is about how it's suddenly become evident that Trump's loudly touted and not particularly covert brand of racism, isolationism, and xenophobia isn't just harmless and funny, after two of his followers beat a homeless man into the hospital for being Latino and then praised Trump's speeches while they were being arrested. 

But the interesting thing they miss is hidden in plain sight, right in the headline. For Trump to have stopped being funny, he had to have been funny in the first place. And that joke only ever worked for people with a certain kind of privilege.

Donald Trump has never been subtle about his views. While his hair and his general egomania may be clownish, he was always showing these things off while preaching about how we need to crack down on Latinos, Blacks, immigrants, the Chinese, whoever he's on about on any particular day. He was doing this while calling for mass deportations of tens of millions of people, closing borders, engaging in ludicrously heavy-handed "negotiations" with other countries, and so on. And this has been working: Trump's popularity is because there are people who wonder, "well, why not?" and there is someone out there advocating solutions which sound (a) simple, (b) brutal, and (c) based on beating up people whom they don't see as part of their own society, from whom they can simply "take back" their power. (Although, as these other groups never actually had any such power, what's really meant here is "take")

It is only possible to see that as a joke if you have never had a reason to fear ethnic violence. But the US has just as long and bloody a history of ethnic violence as it has a history. Nothing Trump is suggesting is new; you could have heard it 150 years ago from the Know-Nothing Party, or 100 years ago from the more political branches of the Klan, or 50 years ago from the John Birch Society, each with their own variants.

Nor is it a coincidence that Trump is having these successes in the midst of Black Lives Matter, or in the aftermath of GamerGate; there are powerful movements afoot in our society where groups that were previously excluded are demanding their fair share of the floor, and powerful counter-movements of people who suddenly feel that the one thing they had of their own -- complete dominance of some spaces -- is suddenly being taken away. Trump is a natural mouthpiece for these groups, and he's quite good at it.

(There's some question about whether Trump came out openly in support of GamerGate a few weeks ago, or whether this was just a rogue autoresponder that he let stand, but I would by no means be surprised if he were to say something about it at some point; the complaints of GamerGate align surprisingly well with his rhetoric)

And anyone who watches these issues knows that there is profound violence immediately on deck in all of them. GamerGate was awash in death threats, and a few actual attempts. Black Lives Matter was born in the wake of shootings, and the rate of violence by whites (and especially police) against black youth in this country has hardly decreased. 

You can see another version of this in the part of the Republican press which is highly anti-Trump, not least because Trump is completely disconnected from the party's main political organs. Consider this article by Ben Domenech from The Federalist, which is quite far to the right but unconnected with Trump: http://thefederalist.com/2015/08/21/are-republicans-for-freedom-or-white-identity-politics/ The essential meat of the article is that the party has underestimated Trump's appeal, and in order to curb his lunatic candidacy, the Republican Party should find a better way to express his ideas and so pull his followers back into the mainstream.

And what are these ideas? "White identity politics." Note that the article does not fear that these become part of the Republican platform; it fears that they will become such a large part that they overwhelm the rest of the platform, and so these need to be addressed in a careful way. But there's nothing wrong with pulling them in, Domenech says: "'Identity politics for white people' is not the same thing as 'racism,' nor are the people who advocate for it necessarily racist."

Pro tip: "identity politics based on racial categories" is actually the dictionary definition of racism, and "identity politics for white people" is the prototype example of the category. Domenech's article isn't about rejecting Trump's racism: it's about finding more socially acceptable ways to express it, so that it can be folded into the party mainstream without taking it over.

For those wondering about Trump from the outside, I can give a simple explanation of his politics: Trump is a classical European far-right party leader. This is why he seems a bit exotic by recent American standards: especially since the 1980's, the American far right has been dominated by the "theological" far right, a very distinctly American political movement which focuses on making the country explicitly into a Fundamentalist Christian country. Trump, although he speaks to a similar (and overlapping) group of people, isn't talking about religion at all; instead, you'll find his politics very similar to that of European far-right politicians, of the sort who like to put "National" in their party names.

On the European spectrum, Trump falls somewhat to the right of Jean-Marie le Pen, perhaps a shade left of the Golden Dawn, and somewhat more populist than Jobbik. If we were running in a parliamentary, rather than presidential, system, he would currently be at the head of a far-right party that was polling in the high teens, and press coverage would be worried about how many seats he would get and whether he would be able to force a coalition to join him. In the US system, he's instead at the head of a far-right wing of a party, and the question is whether he will be able to force the party to adopt his policies wholesale to avoid electoral defeat next year.

So that's the secret thing which this headline hides: Trump was only ever funny if you had never had a reason to be aware of, or to fear, ethnic or sexual violence tacitly supported by the state. 

If you've ever had to be aware of that before, Trump was never a joke.

h/t to +Lauren Weinstein for pointing out the Federalist article.___POLITICS

Read all of +Yonatan Zunger​'s post. It all.

I didn't used to take Trump seriously because I thought everyone sort of tolerated him, like you'd tolerate your old racist grandpa. But then he ran for president, and then he got popular??

I never thought Trump was funny, but I did think he was a joke. Now I side-eye coworkers and dread politics coming up among relatives. Not a joke. Not at all.

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2015-08-22 15:37:09 (25 comments, 2 reshares, 102 +1s)Open 

Sarah Is Weird

I am now officially that parent. Apparently the gate wasn't closed all the way, so when I let The Puddin' out to go play in the backyard, he took the dog with him and went two houses down to go check the mailbox.

At least he was trying to be helpful?

When I ran out from the side of the house the neighbor across the street helpfully pointed out the direction they went, and let me know the dog was guarding him. No idea how long they were out.

Sarah Is Weird

I am now officially that parent. Apparently the gate wasn't closed all the way, so when I let The Puddin' out to go play in the backyard, he took the dog with him and went two houses down to go check the mailbox.

At least he was trying to be helpful?

When I ran out from the side of the house the neighbor across the street helpfully pointed out the direction they went, and let me know the dog was guarding him. No idea how long they were out.___

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2015-08-21 23:00:53 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 42 +1s)Open 

FLOWER A DAY

For +Anthony Deaver 

FLOWER A DAY

For +Anthony Deaver ___

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2015-08-21 18:28:42 (4 comments, 2 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

WRITER MINIONS

Okay we are doing a version of this for NaNoWriMo. It is happening. And I am buying a mask to wear for it.

Via +Kat Richardson​

Hey.. um... ya'll... Why haven't we done something like this? Surely there's a way we could do something like this. Because it is awesome. ___WRITER MINIONS

Okay we are doing a version of this for NaNoWriMo. It is happening. And I am buying a mask to wear for it.

Via +Kat Richardson​

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2015-08-21 16:57:56 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so is gravity!

How Does Gravity Escape a Black Hole?

Here’s the deal: nothing can travel faster than light. A black hole traps everything including light. So how does gravity escape a black hole? It’s a great question, and a perfectly reasonable one given most people’s understanding of gravity. The answer is that gravity doesn’t work the way you probably think it does.

The most common way to think of gravity is as a force between two masses. For example, the Earth exerts a gravitational force on the Moon, and the Moon pulls back on the Earth in return. This “force model” of gravity is what Newton used to develop his law of universal gravity, which stood as the definite theory of gravity until the early 1900s, and is still used to this day. But built into this model of gravity are some assumptions that we can explore by playing the “what if?” game.

Suppose we had a universe with a single mass. Imagine empty space extending as far as you like, with a single mass in the center (which we’ll call Bob). Would such a mass have gravity? If gravity is a force of one object on another object, then the answer would be no. There’s no other mass for Bob to pull on, so there’s no gravitational force. If we add another mass to our universe (call this one Alice), then Bob and Alice would each exert a force on each other, and gravity would exist. But gravity would only exist between Bob and Alice, and nowhere else in our empty universe.

One of the problems with this force model is that it requires masses to exert forces on other masses across empty space. This “action at a distance” problem was resolved in part by Pierre-Simon Laplace in the early 1800s. His idea was that a mass must reach out to other masses with some kind of energy, which he called a field. Other masses would sense this field as a force acting upon them. So if we again imagine our Bob mass in a lonely universe, we would say that Bob has a gravitational field surrounding it, even if there were no other masses in the universe. This eliminates the need for action-at-a-distance, because when we put our Alice mass into the universe, it simply detects whatever gravitational field is at its location, and experiences a force. We know the gravitational field is due to Bob some distance away, but Alice simply knows there is a gravitational field at its location.

Both the force model and field model of Newtonian gravity give the same predictions, so experimentally there’s no real way to distinguish one from the other. However fields are often an easier concept to work with mathematically, and fields are also used to describe things like electricity and magnetism, so we generally think of Newtonian gravity as a field.

But this raises another question. Suppose in our Bob and Alice universe we suddenly shift Bob’s position. How long will it take for Alice to recognize the change? In other words, if we change the position of Bob, at what speed does the change propagate through the gravitational field? When Laplace looked at this idea he found that changes in a gravitational field had to happen instantly. The “speed of gravity” would have to be infinite. For example, if gravity travelled at the speed of light, the Earth would try to orbit the point where the Sun was 8.3 minutes ago (the time it takes light to travel from the Sun to Earth). As a result, Earth’s orbit would become unstable over time.

At the time, the idea of gravity acting at infinite speed wasn’t seen as a problem. In fact it was used as an argument against alternative gravity ideas proposed at the time. But in the early 1900s Einstein developed his special theory of relativity, which (among other things) required that nothing could travel faster than light. If that’s the case, then there’s something wrong with our theory of gravity. By 1915 Einstein had developed a new model of gravity known as general relativity, which satisfied both Newton’s gravitational model and special relativity.

Decay of a pulsar orbit compared to general relativity (dotted line).
According to theory, for example, when two large masses such as neutron stars orbit each other, they should produce gravitational waves that radiate away from them. These gravitational waves should travel at the speed of light. There have been experimental attempts to detect such gravitational waves, but they have been unsuccessful so far. We have, however, found indirect evidence of gravitational waves. By observing a binary pulsar, we have observed its orbit decay slightly over time. This orbital decay is due to the fact that gravitational waves carry energy away from the system. The rate of this decay matches the prediction of general relativity perfectly. Since this rate of decay depends crucially on the speed of gravitational waves, this is also indirect confirmation that gravitational waves move at the speed of light.

But if gravity moves at the speed of light, doesn’t that mean that planetary orbits should be unstable? Actually, no. When Laplace studied finite-speed gravity, he considered only the effect of the speed of gravity, which is what leads to his result, but in special and general relativity, the finite speed of light leads to other effects, such as time dilation due to relative motion, and the apparent change of mass due to relative motion. Mathematically these effects arise because of a property known as Poincaré invariance. Because of this invariance, the time delay of gravity and the velocity dependent effects of time and mass cancel out, so that effectively masses are attracted to where a mass is. This canceling effect means that for orbital motion it is as if gravity acts instantly.

But wait a minute, how can a gravitational field have a finite speed and act instantly at the same time? A gravitational field can’t, but in general relativity gravity is not an energy field.

Since long before Newton, it was generally assumed that objects and energy fields interacted in space at particular times. In this way, space and time can be seen as a background against which things happen. Space and time were seen as a cosmic grid against which anything could be measured. In developing special relativity, Einstein found that space and time couldn’t be an absolute background. In Newton’s view, two events seen to occur at the same time will be seen to be simultaneous for all observers. But Einstein found that the constancy of light required this concept of “now” to be relative. Different observers moving at different speeds will disagree on the order of events. Rather than a fixed background, space and time is a relation between events that depends upon where and when the observer is.

This principle carried forward into Einstein’s theory of gravity. In general relativity gravity is not an energy field. Instead, mass distorts the relations between space and time. If we go back to our earlier example, if we place mass Bob in an empty universe, the relations of space and time around it are distorted. When we place mass Alice nearby, the distortion of spacetime around it means that moves toward mass Bob. It looks as if Alice is being pulled toward Bob by a force, but it’s actually due to the fact that spacetime is distorted.

As physicist John Wheeler once said, “Spacetime tells matter how to move; matter tells spacetime how to curve.”

This is how gravity can seem to act instantly while gravitational waves seem to travel at the speed of light. Gravity isn’t something that travels through space and time. Gravity is space and time.

A black hole is an extreme distortion of space and time due to a very dense mass. Such a spacetime distortion can prevent light and matter from ever escaping. But the spacetime distortion is also gravity. It doesn’t need to escape the black hole, because it is the black hole.

That’s the thing about science. Sometimes a simple question will pull you toward an unexpected answer.___SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so is gravity!

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2015-08-21 10:28:04 (4 comments, 4 reshares, 35 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

The Cindy has put this up on redbubble for all your Deadpool needs. Go forth and fling money: http://www.redbubble.com/people/sedatedkoala/works/15965198-with-great-power

The Finished Product

I colored the tattoo. I love this. I want this right effing now! I can't wait until October!!___MINIONS

The Cindy has put this up on redbubble for all your Deadpool needs. Go forth and fling money: http://www.redbubble.com/people/sedatedkoala/works/15965198-with-great-power

2015-08-20 20:14:20 (6 comments, 1 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

PSA

Yes good.

So I was accused of having a caveman mentality because I think parents should accept their transgender kids rather than trying to brainwash them into pretending to be their assigned gender and told that I'm a reflection of the future, to which I responded:

I really hope I, and people like me, are a reflection of our future, because it's a bright one filled with compassion for others rather than mindless condemnation. It is a future in which traditions are examined, to be kept or discarded based on current needs rather than mindlessly clung to because they're tradition.___PSA

Yes good.

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2015-08-19 23:29:34 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

HYPNO TOAD

I'm guessing Sean Bean dies. I mean, you know. Just a hunch.

Okay.  This suddenly has my interest.___HYPNO TOAD

I'm guessing Sean Bean dies. I mean, you know. Just a hunch.

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2015-08-19 22:14:05 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

This man is incredible. I didn't think it was possible to like him any more than I already did, but I was mistaken.

Via +Daniel Rice​

MINIONS

This man is incredible. I didn't think it was possible to like him any more than I already did, but I was mistaken.

Via +Daniel Rice​___

2015-08-18 15:40:38 (8 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

TUMBLR MINIONS

Or anyone with superb google-fu, really:

A while back I reblogged a thing on Tumblr talking about political dog whistles, with a particularly damning quote from Richard Nixon about how you can't say the N-word anymore, but instead they could talk about cuts to welfare etc etc and it would appeal to the desired voting block.

Since I tag absolutely nothing on my blog (why??? why do I do this to myself??) I can't find it.

Help?

TUMBLR MINIONS

Or anyone with superb google-fu, really:

A while back I reblogged a thing on Tumblr talking about political dog whistles, with a particularly damning quote from Richard Nixon about how you can't say the N-word anymore, but instead they could talk about cuts to welfare etc etc and it would appeal to the desired voting block.

Since I tag absolutely nothing on my blog (why??? why do I do this to myself??) I can't find it.

Help?___

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2015-08-17 18:06:08 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

YES GOOD

Google's Project Sunroof will make it easy for you to get solar panels onto your roof
Sunroof is intended as a "treasure map" for future green energy projects, telling you how much of a saving you'd make and how long it'd take to make back your initial outlay.

To begin with, Project Sunroof will only be available in three locations: Boston, San Francisco and Fresno. If it turns out to be successful, however, then Google will roll the service out to the rest of the country and, possibly, the world. Once you've put in your address, you'll be told how much you're likely to save in energy costs, and then be put in touch with a local installer.
#Monday   #Sunroof   #Google  ___MINIONS

YES GOOD

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2015-08-16 14:27:12 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 104 +1s)Open 

Random LOLs

Via +John Mink​

___Random LOLs

Via +John Mink​

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2015-08-15 04:51:41 (8 comments, 3 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

This trailer makes me regret never reading the Shannara series.

I'm going to be buried in these books until January, aren't I?

Via +Jaime Cooper​

Well this one could almost be UF--sort of, kinda of, possibly...


But Oh Oh OH.... ___MINIONS

This trailer makes me regret never reading the Shannara series.

I'm going to be buried in these books until January, aren't I?

Via +Jaime Cooper​

2015-08-14 17:37:00 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

Should be fixed now! Let him know if it's not.

Quick FYI since many people have asked: There was a bug where if you subscribed to someone, but they posted to a collection, the notifications didn't go through. That bug should now be fixed. If you still aren't seeing those notifications, LMK.

If you're subscribed to me and did receive a notification for this post, I expect to see wild cheering in the comments. :)___MINIONS

Should be fixed now! Let him know if it's not.

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2015-08-14 15:18:31 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

COLORADO MINIONS

This is actually hella good marketing sense.

And is also hilarious.

___COLORADO MINIONS

This is actually hella good marketing sense.

And is also hilarious.

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2015-08-14 14:34:56 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

MARVEL MINIONS

Something new to read!

Via +Steven Schend​

"Wouldn't you want to ride a giant red dinosaur around New York City?"

Yes. Yes, I would.___MARVEL MINIONS

Something new to read!

Via +Steven Schend​

2015-08-14 13:19:41 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

PSA

Via +Becket Morgan​

Let's get something straight about racism.

I've seen more and more comments and discussions lately that argue that identifying and criticizing white privilege is racist, because it discriminates against white people.

A strictly literal understanding of the word "racism" makes it possible to interpret situations where we criticize someone on the basis of their race to be racism. Here's the reason why that rhetorical move is incorrect.

When we talk about racism, we are not talking about skin colors. We are talking about power and privilege. And, historically, the most powerful and privileged race in the West has been white people.

That means that what we're really talking about when we talk about racism is a system of asymmetrical power relations that are historically-grounded and culturally-enforced.

- "A system" means that we're not talking about what individuals do. We're talking about patterns in macro-groups. Individuals can say, do, or believe things that are racist, but it doesn't usually help us to say that individuals are racist. This is especially so because we all say, do, and believe racist things every day, and we have to accept that we are all caught in a system that has the power to make us say, do, and believe things.

- "Asymmetrical power relations" means here that the way that races interact has to do with who has power over whom, and that one race has more power than others. In our culture, it is white people who have more power, which can manifest as greater leniency when charged with crimes, more access to jobs due to preferential hiring practices, and exclusive access to certain resources. How did all of these racist power structures come about?

- "Historically-grounded" means that racism has a basis in historical events. In particular, it means that whites have enjoyed a high degree of advantage for centuries in the United States, largely on the basis of exploiting others on the basis of race, such as black people, Chinese people, and Native American people. Over time, advantage or disadvantage accumulate, yielding a sense that asymmetrical power relations between races are a natural part of our culture.

- "Culturally-enforced" means that we maintain and support cultural norms that perpetuate cumulative advantage or disadvantage. In particular, we have made the features of white identity into a norm and standard by which all others are to be measured and judged. One result is that sometimes when non-whites do something that seems normal to them, they are punished or rebuked for it. Another result is that we make other cultural traditions weird and/or force them into segregated communities (e.g., reservations, Chinatowns), which forces the people living within those traditions and segregated communities to recognize that they are weird and whiteness is normal.

Let's put all this together again.

After the Second World War, African Americans were actively prevented from buying homes in white suburbs by banks and financiers. We call this redlining. They were forced into African American communities, mostly in inner cities, and were effectively segregated from the predominantly wealthy white suburbs. When African Americans living in these segregated communities were not hired for good paying jobs, their communities came to lack a sufficient tax base to support the infrastructure and maintenance necessary to create a safe and attractive environment. African Americans were only allowed to occupy jobs that were not prestigious, nor that would lead to higher status. Meanwhile, whites, living on the outside, came to see these communities as dirty and dangerous, and they were not required to accept that they created the very conditions that led to deteriorating architecture and low-status occupations. Whites had that luxury, because they were enjoying good paying jobs that provided a strong tax base for their communities and did not require them to undertake more socially prestigious work.

After a time, this gave rise to false but comforting explanations like "black people are lazy" or "black people are criminals" or "black people are uncivilized." The reality was and is that black people, like all people, have always been doing the best they can with what is available and fighting for better. But they also objectively had less to start out with.

Flash forward to today. With 70 years of good jobs, prestige, education, and real estate equity behind them, white families have handed down tremendous amounts of cumulative advantage to their white children and grandchildren, while African American families have been actively excluded and so have instead handed down tremendous amounts of cumulative disadvantage.
Thus, we have a racist system, one that is based on asymmetrical power relations that are historically-grounded and culturally-enforced.

And saying so doesn't make someone racist against white people.___PSA

Via +Becket Morgan​

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2015-08-14 13:15:34 (11 comments, 0 reshares, 45 +1s)Open 

Random Post Is Random

I cleared my spam hangout invites. Apparently this was a sad event. lol

Random Post Is Random

I cleared my spam hangout invites. Apparently this was a sad event. lol___

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2015-08-14 12:57:02 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so is this concept omg we need this!

Very interesting concept. Imagine if Interstates in the US had a wireless charging infrastructure.___SCIENCE IS AWESOME

And so is this concept omg we need this!

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2015-08-13 18:44:58 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

+Torah Cottrill​ is right, you totally need to encircle +Jared von Hindman​ for the random surprises in oil :)

It's 6 AM & I can't find my hairdryer. Thusly, please enjoy a mere photo of the unfinished & very much still wet painting of the "Dingonek". You know, the walrus unicorn scorpion from the heart of Africa? 
...because the +Kobold Press Southlands Bestiary is something amazing to behold. So much so I couldn't crash without doing a little thing vaguely but totally not related to what I USED to do but haven't been able to in ages due to secret side effects of the chemo I haven't dare speak of. More on Southlands in the future but, well, yeah. Enjoy some rare Art, even if it is unfinished. It's been a while.
-Jared
"who has no idea what the currect RPG strata entails but will apparently is driving onward in the name of nerdity & creative momentum"___+Torah Cottrill​ is right, you totally need to encircle +Jared von Hindman​ for the random surprises in oil :)

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2015-08-13 13:49:29 (22 comments, 1 reshares, 50 +1s)Open 

Rios Updates

Haven't been posting a lot lately the last few several months because holy shit busy. Here's what's been going down in Riosland.

We have blown lots of money since June. Lots.

-- New house! In a new state! Moving is exhausting.

-- All new furniture for all new house! (Stupid mold!) Including this sweet couch set from NFM. (It does not look like that in our house. We don't have the spiky stabby mirror thing on the coffee table, for one. But the clock pillows came with it, so there's that.) So yeah. Like $6500 worth of furniture that we weren't planning on spending. Plus random extras like, yannow, curtains. Wee. (It's been a while since I've bought curtains apparently. When did those get so expensive?? Why do we have so many windows??)

-- All new appliances for all new house! Washer, dryer, refrigerator.... more »

Rios Updates

Haven't been posting a lot lately the last few several months because holy shit busy. Here's what's been going down in Riosland.

We have blown lots of money since June. Lots.

-- New house! In a new state! Moving is exhausting.

-- All new furniture for all new house! (Stupid mold!) Including this sweet couch set from NFM. (It does not look like that in our house. We don't have the spiky stabby mirror thing on the coffee table, for one. But the clock pillows came with it, so there's that.) So yeah. Like $6500 worth of furniture that we weren't planning on spending. Plus random extras like, yannow, curtains. Wee. (It's been a while since I've bought curtains apparently. When did those get so expensive?? Why do we have so many windows??)

-- All new appliances for all new house! Washer, dryer, refrigerator. We got a giant fridge. With the door in door thing. At least those were planned purchases, though.

-- Bought LEDs to replace every light bulb in the house to curb what I think will be an ouchy electric bill otherwise. This was a good plan, as the current ones are all traditional bulbs. Not even a CFL to be seen anywhere.

-- New car minivan! This was also planned, although originally planned for next year, and originally it was supposed to be used. But we decided instead to lease a brand new one, and talked down a Sienna XLE model with nav into the LE price range. Thank you, impatient kiddos, for helping us pressure the sales guy into dropping like a rock. "These kids are done. We need to go get dinner and think about it." Bonus: four years of maintenance (oil changes, inspections, etc) included. Which it better be for the amount of money we're throwing at them. Like seriously.

So. Much. Money.

But now I know what it's like to have a bunch of new stuff? It does make me happy/proud as long as I'm not thinking about the price tag. Which I do. A lot. But I try not to because technically we can afford it with money left over. I just hate having that many things to pay on.

And at my (new as of June!) job they're doing mid year reviews, which I get to participate in even though I've only been there 2 months. That happens today. Yay, anxiety.

Also, Little Man starts kindergarten (in a new state!) on the 19th. Got some sweet new school clothes and everything (moneeeeyyyyy). Exciting and concerning, since we'll have to relearn everyone on "please don't feed him wheat." Their entire menu, snacks and everything, is wheat. He can basically have the cartons of milk and that's about it. Poor kid. So I need to make my own menu plan and prepare ahead of time on lunches and snacks. Also it's full day and he's only done half day preschool, so we'll see how that goes.

A couple weeks ago I got to read the first three issues of the new Ms Marvel. They're pretty hella. Y'all need to read them. And I need to find the next three somewhere so I can keep reading up on my little inhuman Kamala. Love her!

Erm... I think that's it? As soon as I get time I want to do the accent video everyone else is doing.

Hi, how are you???___

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2015-08-12 17:25:57 (24 comments, 0 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

Little Man had homework in preschool (yes, really). I'm not looking forward to kindergarten.

I was amazed by the amount of homework handed out when my kids started school. Vastly more than I received as a child.

I have always held the belief that homework should mostly just be finishing up stuff that wasn't completed in class plus some additional memorization stuff (spelling or tables).___MINIONS

Little Man had homework in preschool (yes, really). I'm not looking forward to kindergarten.

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2015-08-12 14:31:21 (12 comments, 0 reshares, 46 +1s)Open 

Random Post Is Random

MFW Nedthing "I forgot to mention [coworker] knows Jim Butcher."

Like, not passing acquaintances. Dude plays Cards Against Humanity with him.

::flail:: (Also, oh my LOL at Jim playing CAH.)

So yeah. Now I can be all "well I know someone who knows him. Neener!"

(Jim is not a super social person so I'm not gonna go all fangirl on Nedthing's coworker trying to get in on a game night or anything, but yeah, still exciting. I KNOW SOMEONE THAT KNOWS THE JIM.)

Random Post Is Random

MFW Nedthing "I forgot to mention [coworker] knows Jim Butcher."

Like, not passing acquaintances. Dude plays Cards Against Humanity with him.

::flail:: (Also, oh my LOL at Jim playing CAH.)

So yeah. Now I can be all "well I know someone who knows him. Neener!"

(Jim is not a super social person so I'm not gonna go all fangirl on Nedthing's coworker trying to get in on a game night or anything, but yeah, still exciting. I KNOW SOMEONE THAT KNOWS THE JIM.)___

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2015-08-11 16:33:36 (4 comments, 2 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

ARROW MINIONS

YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAS!

The Rios is watching this. I will pay all the monies. All of them. And will block out this day on my calendar.

Pro Tip: Before taunting a guy that plays an action hero make damn sure he can't actually kick your ass.


(yea, it's probably staged but it's still fun and worth it)___ARROW MINIONS

YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAS!

The Rios is watching this. I will pay all the monies. All of them. And will block out this day on my calendar.

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2015-08-08 21:13:49 (10 comments, 5 reshares, 60 +1s)Open 

MINIONS

I also need this because of reasons.

I need this because of reasons.___MINIONS

I also need this because of reasons.

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2015-08-08 05:19:57 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Random LOLs

You got: Mr. Boddy

No one really knows your motives and that’s just the way you like it. You have enough gravitas to command everyone’s attention and even take the time out to help your dear boss. Wait, what do you mean he invited you to a dinner party tonight? DON’T GO!!!

Via +Katey Springle Lempka​

I got Wadsworth: Man oh man, no one ever wants to get on your bad side. You're too smart for this world, honestly - how do you sleep with such a big brain?  You're witty, charming, cunning, basically everything anyone could ever want in a person.  Just remember to use those qualities for good and not evil.___Random LOLs

You got: Mr. Boddy

No one really knows your motives and that’s just the way you like it. You have enough gravitas to command everyone’s attention and even take the time out to help your dear boss. Wait, what do you mean he invited you to a dinner party tonight? DON’T GO!!!

Via +Katey Springle Lempka​

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2015-08-07 15:37:18 (3 comments, 3 reshares, 31 +1s)Open 

POLITICS

Mmmm, semantics. Tasty, tasty semantics.

via +Katey Springle Lempka 

Abbott & Costello  Unemployement in 'Murica

COSTELLO : I want to talk about the unemployment rate in America .
ABBOTT: Good Subject. Terrible Times. It’s 5.6%.
COSTELLO: That many people are out of work?
ABBOTT: No, that’s 23%.
COSTELLO: You just said 5.6%.
ABBOTT: 5.6% Unemployed.
COSTELLO: Right 5.6% out of work.
ABBOTT: No, that’s 23%.
COSTELLO: Okay, so it’s 23% unemployed.
ABBOTT: No, that’s 5.6%.
COSTELLO: WAIT A MINUTE. Is it 5.6% or 23%?
ABBOTT: 5.6% are unemployed. 23% are out of work.
COSTELLO: If you are out of work you are unemployed.
ABBOTT: No, Congress said you can’t count the “Out of Work” as the unemployed. You have to look for work to be unemployed.
COSTELLO: BUT THEY ARE OUT OF WORK!!!
ABBOTT: No, you miss his point.
COSTELLO: What point?
ABBOTT: Someone who doesn’t look for work can’t be counted with those who look for work. It wouldn’t be fair.
COSTELLO: To whom?
ABBOTT: The unemployed.
COSTELLO: But ALL of them are out of work.
ABBOTT: No, the unemployed are actively looking for work. Those who are out of work gave up looking and if you give up, you are no longer in the ranks of the unemployed.
COSTELLO: So if you’re off the unemployment roles that would count as less unemployment?
ABBOTT: Unemployment would go down. Absolutely!
COSTELLO: The unemployment just goes down because you don’t look for work?
ABBOTT: Absolutely it goes down. That’s how it gets to 5.6%. Otherwise it would be 23%.
COSTELLO : Wait, I got a question for you. That means there are two ways to bring down the unemployment number?
ABBOTT: Two ways is correct.
COSTELLO: Unemployment can go down if someone gets a job?
ABBOTT: Correct.
COSTELLO: And unemployment can also go down if you stop looking for a job?
ABBOTT: Bingo.
COSTELLO: So there are two ways to bring unemployment down, and the easier of the two is to have people stop looking for work.
ABBOTT: Now you’re thinking like an Economist.
COSTELLO: I don’t even know what the hell I just said!
ABBOTT: Now you’re thinking like a Politician.___POLITICS

Mmmm, semantics. Tasty, tasty semantics.

via +Katey Springle Lempka 

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