Login now

Not your profile? Login and get free access to your reports and analysis.

Tags

Sign in

No tag added here yet.
You can login on CircleCount to add some tags here.

Are you missing a tag in the list of available tags? You can suggest new tags here.

Login now

Do you want to see a more detailed chart? Check your settings and define your favorite chart type.

Or click here to get the detailed chart only once.

Martin Gommel has been shared in 54 public circles

You can see here the 50 latest shared circles.
If this is your profile, you can check your dashboard to see all shared circles you have been included.

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Marinella Charlotte van ten Haarlen4,727Some people for you #Circle #Marii No.52015-04-07 14:41:59456000
I-Butler international972Mein Deutscher Kreis No. 2 mit Top Leuten! Vielen Dank!Als Dankeschön ein kostenlose Preisvergleich-App http://www.i-butler.software #geteiltekreise   #circleshare   #circle   #geteiltekreise   #geteilterkreis   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday  #круги   #обмен   #кругляши #круглим  2015-02-10 09:44:06201112
John Sean12,552This circle contains people who really are interesting and active people on Google Plus.If you would like to be included in the next Circle Share, you only have to do these simple steps:1 - Include me in your circles2 - Share the circle (Publicly)3 - Add +1 to the post.4 - Leave a comment if you like.I will thankful if you plus and share this circle!#publiccircle #circleshare #circlesharing #philadelphia #phoenix #san_antonio #san_diego #san_francisco #san_jose #seattle #tampa #washington #american_samoa #american_samoa #pago_pago #fiji #fiji #nadi #fiji #suva #argentina #argentina #buenos_aires #argentina #cordoba #argentina #iguaza #argentina #mendoza #argentina #rosaio #argentina #san_carlos_de_bariloche #bolivia #bolivia #cochabamba 2015-02-06 11:25:57366151927
John Sean11,366This circle contains people who really are interesting and active people on Google Plus.If you would like to be included in the next Circle Share, you only have to do these simple steps:1 - Include me in your circles2 - Share the circle (Publicly)3 - Add +1 to the post.4 - Leave a comment if you like.I will thankful if you plus and share this circle!#publiccircle #circleshare #circlesharing #philadelphia #phoenix #san_antonio #san_diego #san_francisco #san_jose #seattle #tampa #washington #american_samoa #american_samoa #pago_pago #fiji #fiji #nadi #fiji #suva #argentina #argentina #buenos_aires #argentina #cordoba #argentina #iguaza #argentina #mendoza #argentina #rosaio #argentina #san_carlos_de_bariloche #bolivia #bolivia #cochabamba 2015-01-23 06:13:254935615
Brian Harrod10,634Great Circle of Photojournalists, Photographers and Real-Time Sharers (Breaking News) #circle   #circles   #public   #publiccircle   #circleshare   #circlesharing #sharedcircles     #sharedcircle   #morefollowers   #sharingcircles #circleshare   #sharedpubliccircles   #photography   #photographer   #AddCircle   2014-12-28 02:55:44104012
Noah Wesley10,754This is a public circle of Photographers and Photography loversTo increase your chances of inclusion in future circles please leave a comment when sharing the circle. If you received a notification, please reshare to your circlesIf you’d like to be added to the next circle share: • +1 this circle • Share this circle to PUBLIC • Include +ORIGINAL AUTHENTIC PHOTOGRAPHERS  • Comment on this post#circle #publiccircle #Liechtenstein #sharedcircles #sharedcircle #morefollowers #sharingcircles #circleshare #circlesharing2014-11-18 07:17:52411233036
Cristian Teodoridis2,869This is a great circle if you are interested in Street Photography. Enjoy! :)2014-02-19 14:13:00472003
Tracy Sydor661Hey just wanted to share this circle with you guys.2012-12-11 16:13:2250013011
Ben Peter1,453lt is Sunday and a good time for some picture experts and their works. Photographers, Digital Artist and more. Habe fun and share! #sharedcircles  2012-11-11 17:29:01122000
Margaret Tompkins30,121>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Great Photographers With < 25,000 Followers>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>The photographers here are all in my personal circles.  The choices are mine and mine alone.  No one asked, begged, or pleaded to belong.  No bribes were offered or accepted.  These are the people that I follow because I appreciate their great quality photography and their interaction.  Most I have met as I help curate several of the photography themes.  *There are NO requirements to share this circle*.  I would appreciate the people in this circle plus the post, leave a comment, and share the circle as public.  Each profile has been verified by me.  Each has < 25,000 followers (when they were put into the circle), and most have between 10,000 and 25,000 followers.  They each have high quality original photography content.  You won’t find many animated gifs!  Landscape Photography:  I invite everyone to check out the +Landscape Photography  #LandscapePhotography  theme.  If you want to impress me, that’s the place to do it!!  Post a great landscape that will get my attention.  See the About tab for all the details.I wasn’t included, what do I do?  If you meet the criteria, weren’t included, but think you should be, then leave me a comment.  Maybe I don’t know about you.  There are millions of people on G+ and I don’t know everyone.  However, I’ll be happy to have a look at your work if you will call it to my attention.  Start posting landscapes that get my attention (see above)!!There’s a really great photographer XXX that you didn’t include.  Please feel free to recommend qualified people.  I discover new people every day and would be happy to look at their work.  Please make sure that the recommended person meets the criteria.  If they don’t then that tells me a lot about you! #Circleshare   #Sharedcircles  2012-10-08 18:04:38500335113261
Sergey Bidun1,957Circle of inspiring photographers.Ever since I created a Google+ account, I've had a privilege to see so much amazing images, meet new people and also share my own work! I like to follow great photographers who inspire me and help me be more creative in what I do. Here is a circle that I have put together, and I'm sure that other members of Google+ can learn a lot from!Reshare this circle so more people can see their work!2012-07-13 23:02:45264414
Jamie Furlong12,393Dear all,I'm sharing this Street Photographers From Around the World circle for my new friends in the +Cochin Photowalk and +Viewfinder  group, but I figured I may has well make this a public share too. The Viewfinder group made up the majority of photographers on the Cochin GooglePlus 1st Anniversary photowalk yesterday... we had almost 100 people in the end!Viewfinders - to those who are new to G+, add this circle to your collection of circles and marvel as your stream comes to life with photography from some of the best street photographers from around the world. Don't forget to +1, comment or share their work if you like what you see.Thanks to all who participated yesterday. What a cracking afternoon!2012-07-01 17:26:144903010
Rainer M. Ritz10,614Es ist soweit, inzwischen habe ich etwa 1000 Leute eingekreist die Deutsch verstehen und eine Kamera in der Hand halten können ;-)Dies ist der erste Kreis davon2012-04-21 22:00:4349429716
Andy Q.17,877#streetsaturday +Street Saturday As I don´t have any new photographs to post for my fave daily theme I thought I´d share my circle of street/documentary-photogs with you. I hope you will enjoy their work as much as I do.And here´s an interesting article on Street Photography by Dave Beckerman:http://www.picturecorrect.com/tips/street-photography-tips-and-techniques/As you can see there are many ways to define "street", and many ways to do street photography. Don´t try too hard to follow any rules you may be uncomfortable with, just go out there, open your eyes and have fun.Oh, and as I´ve only said it twice today here´s another HAPPY ST. PADDYS.2012-03-17 09:50:1840512515
Chris Courselle8,800#GermanPhotographer Weekly Update!!!I started this list http://gpc.fm/l/germanphoto and here is a updated circle of it's members. If you would like to join, please leave a comment and share this post.Thanks, ChrisP.s I started a hashtag to go with the list #GermanPhotographer2012-03-11 17:14:193291048
Roman Tripler29,150"the great feedback-circle"198 helping hands and me...with this circle i want to say thank you! for including me in your many circles, for your many many reshares of posts and circles, for the daily visits on my stream, for critical and helpful comments under my posts.if i forgot someone, i am very very sorry, but you will comment this circle, i know ;)2012-03-06 16:06:38100511538
Chris Courselle8,718Weekly Update!!!I started this list http://gpc.fm/l/germanphoto and here is a updated circle of it's members. If you would like to join, please leave a comment and share this post.Thanks, Chris2012-03-04 10:34:55324957
Roman Tripler27,631Time to share circlesI reorganized my Photographer circles and share it now. If someone is missing, don't be sad, I still have a second circle.PHOTOGS 01/02 to add and reshare!2012-02-24 17:39:2449810015
Ralph de Pagter2,948Hi G+ Community! I just want to share 500 of my 5000 ones which I have in my RalphArtPhotoCircle.2012-02-23 19:12:16501316
Joe Vallee5,740*Good morning / good afternoon / good evening where ever you are in the world*TOP +PE PhotogsThis circle is one that is worth having in your circles.(1 of 2) (due to 500 person circle limit)See the info belowIt is a very good one for new people to jump-start their selves if they are fans of good photography and helpful photographers! Re-share it with your own friends.There are some must haves like +Trey Ratcliff +Thomas Hawk +Mike Shaw +Alan Shapiro +Klaus Herrmann +Austin Thomas +Benjamin Chase +Patrick Di Fruscia +Darren White +Joe Azure +Hengki Koentjoro +Jesse Estes +Peter From +Olivier Du Tré +Alvin Ing +Alexander Safonov +Mihailo Radičević +Johan Swanepoel2012-02-21 17:30:184951487
Joe Vallee3,221*Good morning / good afternoon / good evening where ever you are in the world*TOP +PE Photogs*This circle is one that is worth having in your circles.(1 of 2) (due to 500 person circle limit)It is a very good one for new people to jump start their selves if they are fans of good photography and helpful photographers! Re-share it with your own friends.*There are some must haves like +Trey Ratcliff +Thomas Hawk +Mike Shaw +Alan Shapiro +Klaus Herrmann +Scott Jarvie +Benjamin Chase +Patrick Di Fruscia +Darren White +Joe Azure +Hengki Koentjoro +Jesse Estes +Peter From +Olivier Du Tré +Alvin Ing +pats0n +Mihailo Radičević and many other incredible photographers that share their photos and knowledge.If you have not yet experienced the daily dose of what +Jarek Klimek has created with his #PlusPhotoExtra2012-01-17 23:07:35495012
Joe Vallee3,108*Good morning / good afternoon / good evening where ever you are in the world*TOP +PE Photogs*This circle is one that is worth having in your circles.(1 of 2) (due to 500 person circle limit)It is a great one for new people to jump start their selves if they are fans of good photography and helpful photographers! Re-share it with your own friends.*There are some must haves like +Trey Ratcliff +Thomas Hawk +Mike Shaw +Alan Shapiro +Klaus Herrmann +Scott Jarvie +Benjamin Chase +Patrick Di Fruscia +Darren White +Joe Azure +Hengki Koentjoro +Jesse Estes +Peter From +Olivier Du Tré +Alvin Ing +Alexander Safonov +Mihailo Radičević and many other incredible photographers that share their photos and knowledge.If you have not yet experienced the daily dose of what +2012-01-10 15:44:02495021
MAURIZIO PONTINI5,991Worldwide Best Art & Photography III - CIRCLE III* Reviewed and updated *https://plus.google.com/113718775944980638561/about (Information for all Circles)Worldwide Best Art & Photography IV - CIRCLE IV - In progress!Worldwide Best Art & Photography III - CIRCLE III - 500 Members *Worldwide Best Art & Photography II - CIRCLE II - 500 MembersWorldwide Best Art & Photography I - CIRCLE I - 500 Members --------------Look for your name in the 4 circles.If you want, Leave a message in the circle in which you are a memberThanks to these 4 great circles, you can know, learn, discover, travel the world, nature, people and art through beautiful photographs and amazing different works.Feel FREE to Share!Great shots to all of You dear friends!2012-01-08 20:48:22500837
Joe Vallee3,002*Good morning / good afternoon / good evening where ever you are in the world! *TOP +PE Photogs*This circle is worth having in your circles.(1 of 2) (due to 500 person circle limit)It is also a very good one for new people to jump start their selves if they are fans of good photography and helpful photographers! *There are some must haves like +Trey Ratcliff +Thomas Hawk +Mike Shaw +Alan Shapiro +Klaus Herrmann +Scott Jarvie +Benjamin Chase +Patrick Di Fruscia +Darren White +Joe Azure +Hengki Koentjoro +Jesse Estes +Peter From +Olivier Du Tré +Alvin Ing +Alexander Safonov +Mihailo Radičević and many other incredible photographers that share their photos and knowledge.If you have not yet experienced the daily dose of what +2012-01-03 19:06:42495635
Jalaj Jha2,026Here is my selection of 244 Photographers in this shared circle. What makes this circle different is that these photographers are the ones who allow you to download their shared photos. Respect their copyrights and the trust they put in us by allowing download, and watch this circle grow... (stats: they are around 31.8% of all photographers categorized so far, 172 photographers are still pending, so expect the circle to grow)2012-01-01 02:33:11244004
MAURIZIO PONTINI5,163(LAST UPDATE)Worldwide Best Art & Photography III - CIRCLE III Today 1500 members in 3 circles-------------See https://plus.google.com/113718775944980638561/about for the FIRST and SECOND Circle:Worldwide Best Art & Photography II - CIRCLE II - 500 MembersWorldwide Best Art & Photography I - CIRCLE I - 500 Members--------------Thanks to these 3 great circles, you can know, learn, discover, travel the world, nature, people and art through beautiful photographs and amazing different works.Feel FREE to Share!Great shots to all of You dear friends!2011-12-27 00:05:51500017
MAURIZIO PONTINI4,585(9th UPDATE)Worldwide Best Art & Photography III - CIRCLE III First 450 Members Next and last update at 500 MembersToday 1450 members in 3 circles-------------See https://plus.google.com/113718775944980638561/about for the FIRST and SECOND Circle:Worldwide Best Art & Photography II - CIRCLE II - 500 MembersWorldwide Best Art & Photography I - CIRCLE I - 500 Members--------------Thanks to these 3 great circles, you can know, learn, discover, travel the world, nature, people and art through beautiful photographs and amazing different works.Feel FREE to Share!Great shots to all of You dear friends!2011-12-23 22:49:02451203
Joe Vallee2,508*Good morning / good afternoon / good evening where ever you are in the world! *TOP +PE PhotogsThis circle is one that is worth having in your circles.It is also a very good one for new people to jump start their selves if they are fans of good photography and helpful photographers!There are some must haves like +Trey Ratcliff +Thomas Hawk +Mike Shaw +Alan Shapiro +Klaus Herrmann +Scott Jarvie +Benjamin Chase +Patrick Di Fruscia +Darren White +Joe Azure +Hengki Koentjoro +Jesse Estes +Peter From +Olivier Du Tré +Alvin Ing +Alexander Safonov +Mihailo Radičević and many other incredible photographers that share their photos and knowledge.If you have not yet experienced the daily dose of what +Jarek Klimek has created with2011-12-20 16:13:11493241511
MAURIZIO PONTINI4,370(8th UPDATE)Worldwide Best Art & Photography III - CIRCLE III First 400 Members Next update at approx 450 MembersToday 1400 members in 3 circles-------------See https://plus.google.com/113718775944980638561/about for the FIRST and SECOND Circle:Worldwide Best Art & Photography II - CIRCLE II - 500 MembersWorldwide Best Art & Photography I - CIRCLE I - 500 Members--------------Thanks to these 3 great circles, you can know, learn, discover, travel the world, nature, people and art through beautiful photographs and amazing different works.Feel FREE to Share!Great shots to all of You dear friends!2011-12-20 00:57:35401005
Alexander Kensy107I want to share part one of my "photography" circle with you guys. 500 amazing people you really should add to your circles! #photography #circlesharing2011-12-19 08:56:22501001
MAURIZIO PONTINI3,966(7th UPDATE)Worldwide Best Art & Photography III - CIRCLE III First 350 Members Next update at approx 400 MembersToday 1350 members in 3 circles-------------See https://plus.google.com/113718775944980638561/about for the FIRST and SECOND Circle:Worldwide Best Art & Photography II - CIRCLE II - 500 MembersWorldwide Best Art & Photography I - CIRCLE I - 500 Members--------------Thanks to these 3 great circles, you can know, learn, discover, travel the world, nature, people and art through beautiful photographs and amazing different works.Feel FREE to Share!Great shots to all of You dear friends!2011-12-18 19:50:373501324
Stephen Candler14,773Circle of Photographers as shared by +Damien Grillat2011-12-14 14:35:58451815
Joe Vallee2,263*Good morning / good afternoon / good evening where ever you are in the world!*TOP +PE PhotogsIf you have not yet experienced the daily dose of what +Jarek Klimek has created with his #PlusPhotoExtract project, I would highly recommend it. You can get to it here http://www.photoextract.com/plus-extractThis is my current weekly update for pictures “chosen as of 12/10” (the pictures are chosen from two days prior)I will be re-sharing this circle two more times today to cover the time zones.These are the photographers that have had their pictures chosen to be in it.I incorporated it into a circle to share with others, please feel free to share it with your own circles if you wish. If you are a fan of good photography, this is a great group of people to add to your circles.There are some must haves like +Trey Ratcliff +Thomas Hawk +Mike Shaw +Alan Shapiro +Klaus Herrmann +Scott Jarvie +Benjamin Chase +Patrick Di Fruscia and many other incredible photographers that share their photos and knowledge.I update it weekly on Tuesday PST. *Interesting stats for all the selected pictures and photographers can be found in the “About” section here:https://plus.google.com/106294256084866963706/aboutThose stats are usually updated daily on the page.~Enjoy2011-12-13 16:42:37475226
Andy Q.0Hello to all the new folks who were so kind to circle me. For you (and everbody else of course) I´d like to re-share my street/documentary-photographer-circle.Some peeps in this circle are "purely" street, some shoot (many) other things aswell.2011-12-07 01:41:163489111
Daniel Sandstein2,715The Cream of the Crop of November 2011What's this?On +CircleCount everyday some very interesting persons are choosen and recommended. These are persons without hunders of thousands of followers but with a lot interesting content. You won't find silent people leading the rankings like +Mark Zuckerberg here, but interesting people that are worth to be followed.You can find the Cream of the Crop daily here:http://www.circlecount.com/daily/Past Cream of the Crop circles:October 2011: http://goo.gl/2xVn92011-11-30 14:29:07296182011
KM G0Photographers, I wanted to share my photography circle with all of you. Some amazing people in this group, you won't regret adding them!2011-11-12 04:58:18500242
Jus Vun18,706Here is my Street and Documentary photographer circle. Please add to your circles if you like this genre and if I missed you , let me know!Its been a while since I shared this circle. Ive just noticed +Roman Tripler being very passionate about sharing this group so I thought I'd do my bit too.Sharing is caring.www.ontoshiki.comOntoshiki, Photographer based in Tokyo, Japan.2011-11-08 16:46:4136725924
David Cleland4,660My Street Photography CircleDavid Cleland shared a circle with you.2011-10-30 10:34:20163202
Sylvain Besson74I just shared a circle of street photographer, here's another one.Again, some very impressive stuff here.Enjoy and reshare if you wish.Night.Sylvain Besson shared a circle with you.2011-10-29 22:24:1364303
Frank Schillinger159Updated: my Street Photography / Social Documentary circle. Feel free to share.Not all people included in this list are calling themselves a street photographer, but all of them have a portfolio with shots in this genre.Please comment if you think you should be included. Thanks.#ff #FollowFridayFrank Schillinger hat einen Kreis mit Ihnen geteilt.2011-10-28 00:13:393361759
Paul Meriweather1,111Here is my photography circle, feel free to share!Paul Meriweather shared a circle with you.2011-10-26 13:11:25501403
Daniel Harrington0Awesome Nature Photographers CircleDaniel Harrington shared a circle with you.2011-10-19 16:57:26106030
Dirk Poxdoerfer667..dirk poxdoerfer hat einen Kreis mit Ihnen geteilt.2011-10-17 23:11:02149001
Daniel Harrington119Circle Sharing! Great Circle of Photojournalists, Photographers and Real-Time Sharers (Breaking News)Daniel Harrington shared a circle with you.2011-10-17 07:24:43109164
Martin Gindl51fotografenMartin Gindl hat einen Kreis mit Ihnen geteilt.2011-10-16 16:32:46304000
Martin Gindl51Martin Gindl hat einen Kreis mit Ihnen geteilt.2011-10-14 06:41:2686500
Dirk Poxdoerfer549dirk poxdoerfer hat einen Kreis mit Ihnen geteilt.2011-10-11 08:51:12157001
Mario Thiel70Mario Thiel hat einen Kreis mit Ihnen geteilt.2011-10-09 10:29:0966200
Javier Carrete0A circle of photographersJavier Carrete shared a circle with you.2011-10-08 23:22:2391000
Andreas Rades534nice pictures circleAndreas Rades hat einen Kreis mit Ihnen geteilt.2011-10-07 17:55:45253203

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

0
comments per post
1
reshares per post
31
+1's per post

2,403
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 13

posted image

2015-02-10 16:29:05 (13 comments, 5 reshares, 71 +1s)Open 

Fofana stellt sich an die Wand, schaut mich an, und ich mache ein Foto. Dann geht er in sein Zimmer, er möchte alleine sein.

Eine halbe Stunde zuvor fahre ich zuhause los, um Yassanew und Ibrahim zu besuchen. Mein Herz pocht laut, denn ich habe zwei ausgedruckte Portraits von den beiden dabei, die ich ihnen geben will. Ich bin so gespannt, wie sie reagieren werden!

Schnell eingeparkt, klemme ich die beiden 20x30 Prints unter den Arm. Durch die Fenster des weißen Hauses sehe ich einen Flüchtling, der mit freiem Oberkörper am Fenster steht - frisch geduscht. Seine stählernen Muskel spiegeln sich im Zimmerlicht (es stellt sich später heraus, dass der feine Kerl Ibrahim ist, den ich Wochen später fotografieren werde).

Im Erdgeschoss duftet es nach frischer Suppe - ich genieße das jedes Mal. Ich klopfe kurz an und mir wird geöffnet. Ibrahim und Yassanew sind da, sieschauen ... more »

Most reshares: 9

posted image

2015-01-21 11:35:58 (9 comments, 9 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

Today I witnessed three things: A refugee from Gambia, a brutal brawl and police aggression. 

At 9 o’clock I met this man, named Lamin from Gambia before a petrol station near the pickup office for refugees (it is called LEA) and we had a little chat.

Lamin told me that out of difficulties with his father and no option to find any work. You may remember what Mnebni from Kosovo so: “No work, no money, no food.” So Lamin came here to us and he misses his mother very badly. 

Lamin had this warmth that I could sense. He was desperate, yes. But also full of hope. And love for his mother. We talked about 5 or 10 minutes and Lamin agreed that I could take some photographs. 

~

Suddenly, while we were talking a group of about 20 refugees ran to the petrol station you can see in the background. Two of three man chasing the others had big, white clubs intheir ha... more »

Most plusones: 71

posted image

2015-02-10 16:29:05 (13 comments, 5 reshares, 71 +1s)Open 

Fofana stellt sich an die Wand, schaut mich an, und ich mache ein Foto. Dann geht er in sein Zimmer, er möchte alleine sein.

Eine halbe Stunde zuvor fahre ich zuhause los, um Yassanew und Ibrahim zu besuchen. Mein Herz pocht laut, denn ich habe zwei ausgedruckte Portraits von den beiden dabei, die ich ihnen geben will. Ich bin so gespannt, wie sie reagieren werden!

Schnell eingeparkt, klemme ich die beiden 20x30 Prints unter den Arm. Durch die Fenster des weißen Hauses sehe ich einen Flüchtling, der mit freiem Oberkörper am Fenster steht - frisch geduscht. Seine stählernen Muskel spiegeln sich im Zimmerlicht (es stellt sich später heraus, dass der feine Kerl Ibrahim ist, den ich Wochen später fotografieren werde).

Im Erdgeschoss duftet es nach frischer Suppe - ich genieße das jedes Mal. Ich klopfe kurz an und mir wird geöffnet. Ibrahim und Yassanew sind da, sieschauen ... more »

Latest 50 posts

posted image

2015-05-12 13:31:30 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

„Ich hoffe auf Freunde, die mich so respektieren, wie ich bin.“

Flok steht lässig am Geländer vor der Kantine des Flüchtlingsheimes und hat in beiden Ohren Kopfhörer, als ich ihn spontan anspreche. Er war mir schon von weitem aufgefallen und antwortet direkt in sauberem Hochdeutsch.

Damit habe ich nicht gerechnet. Doch Flok erklärt mir den Zusammenhang. Im Alter von zwei Monaten kam der in Montenegro geborene mit seinen Eltern nach Deutschland. Sie blieben, bis Flok 10 Jahre alt war.

Eines Tages, so erzählt mir der große Mann mit kugelförmigen, schwarzen Augen, meinten seine Eltern, dass sie in den Urlaub fahren würden. Der „Urlaub“ entpuppte sich für Flok als etwas ganz anderes, denn die Familie wurde nach Prishtina abgeschoben.

Als er mit seinen Eltern dort ankam, war „alles Staub und Asche vom Krieg“. Auch dort konnte die Familie nichtbleiben und zog wiede... more »

„Ich hoffe auf Freunde, die mich so respektieren, wie ich bin.“

Flok steht lässig am Geländer vor der Kantine des Flüchtlingsheimes und hat in beiden Ohren Kopfhörer, als ich ihn spontan anspreche. Er war mir schon von weitem aufgefallen und antwortet direkt in sauberem Hochdeutsch.

Damit habe ich nicht gerechnet. Doch Flok erklärt mir den Zusammenhang. Im Alter von zwei Monaten kam der in Montenegro geborene mit seinen Eltern nach Deutschland. Sie blieben, bis Flok 10 Jahre alt war.

Eines Tages, so erzählt mir der große Mann mit kugelförmigen, schwarzen Augen, meinten seine Eltern, dass sie in den Urlaub fahren würden. Der „Urlaub“ entpuppte sich für Flok als etwas ganz anderes, denn die Familie wurde nach Prishtina abgeschoben.

Als er mit seinen Eltern dort ankam, war „alles Staub und Asche vom Krieg“. Auch dort konnte die Familie nicht bleiben und zog wieder nach Montenegro, lebte dort in widrigen Verhältnissen in einer Baracke.

Nun ist er 23 Jahre alt und seit Januar wieder „hier“. Diesmal ohne Eltern, sondern ganz alleine. Während ich schnell in mein iPhone tippe, erklärt Flok, er hoffe auf eine Chance in Deutschland . Auf Freunde. Die ihn „so respektieren, wie ich bin.“

Im Flüchtlingsheim teilt sich Flok ein Zimmer mit 4–6 Personen und wartet auf das, was kommen mag. Doch er weiß nicht einmal, ob er überhaupt in Deutschland bleiben darf. Wie er diese erneute Ungewissheit aushält, ist mir ein Rätsel.

Herzlich willkommen in Deutschland, Flok! Ich wünsche Dir so sehr, dass Du hier eine neue Bleibe finden kannst und nicht noch einmal fliehen musst. Mögest Du Freunde finden, die Dich so respektieren, wie Du bist. Friede mit Dir!___

posted image

2015-05-09 14:28:02 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

Nachdem ich diese Woche mit Migräne vier Tage im Bett verbracht habe, kann ich es kaum erwarten, endlich wieder ins Flüchtlingsheim zu radeln und so treffe ich heute Morgen um 11 Uhr in der Landeserstaufnahmestelle für Flüchtlinge ein.

Karlsruhe ist heute von einer düsteren Wolkendecke umgeben und es fühlt sich so an, als ob es jeden Moment losregnen könnte. So schlendere ich mit meiner Kameratasche über das Gelände des Gebäudekomplexes, in der Hoffnung, nicht gleich nass zu werden und jemanden kennenzulernen.

Kinder ziehen an mir vorbei, manche grüßen schon von weitem mit Akzent: „Hallo wie gehts?“. Die meisten Leute laufen zur Kantine, um für sich und ihre Zimmergenossen ein Mittagessen abzuholen und kehren mit zwei vollen Plastiktellern heißer Suppe zurück.

Heute bin ich etwas unentschlossener als sonst. Ich weiß nicht recht, wen ich ansprechen sollund bin in Gedanken... more »

Nachdem ich diese Woche mit Migräne vier Tage im Bett verbracht habe, kann ich es kaum erwarten, endlich wieder ins Flüchtlingsheim zu radeln und so treffe ich heute Morgen um 11 Uhr in der Landeserstaufnahmestelle für Flüchtlinge ein.

Karlsruhe ist heute von einer düsteren Wolkendecke umgeben und es fühlt sich so an, als ob es jeden Moment losregnen könnte. So schlendere ich mit meiner Kameratasche über das Gelände des Gebäudekomplexes, in der Hoffnung, nicht gleich nass zu werden und jemanden kennenzulernen.

Kinder ziehen an mir vorbei, manche grüßen schon von weitem mit Akzent: „Hallo wie gehts?“. Die meisten Leute laufen zur Kantine, um für sich und ihre Zimmergenossen ein Mittagessen abzuholen und kehren mit zwei vollen Plastiktellern heißer Suppe zurück.

Heute bin ich etwas unentschlossener als sonst. Ich weiß nicht recht, wen ich ansprechen soll und bin in Gedanken bei Alban, den ich - wäre er noch da – jetzt besucht hätte. Doch er fehlt, weil er zurück nach Kosovo abgeschoben wurde und mir schlägt das jetzt ganz besonders auf die Magen.

Nachdem ich mit zwei Menschen aus Montenegro ein angergendes Gespräch hatte und Richtung Ausgang laufe, fällt mir ein junger Mann auf, der am Rande in sich zusammengekauert sitzt. Ich gebe mir einen Ruck, setze mich neben ihn, spreche ihn an und ein weiterer Mann setzt sich neben ihn und lauscht unserer Konversation.

Hussein und freut sich offenbar, dass er nun nicht mehr alleine sitzt. Vor drei Tagen ist er in Karlsruhe angekommen und – so scheint es – denkt viel über die vergangenen Wochen nach.

Zuhause in Afghanistan hat er nicht viel Freude gehabt. Er erzählt, dass sein Vater tot ist und seine Mutter noch in Kabul sei, aber bei einem Onkel wohnt. Eines Tages möchte er sie auch nach Deutschland holen.

Hussein floh, weil er in Afghanistan unter dem Terror der Taliban sehr litt. Er ist Christ, und das bedeutete Zuhause ständig, unter Lebensgefahr zu sein. Für ihn sind islamische Terroristen keine Muslime. Es sind Terroristen.

Mittem im Gespräch kommen zwei Leute vom Sicherheitsunternehmen zu unserem Gespräch und fragen interessiert, warum ich hier fotografiere. Nachdem ich erklärt habe, wer ich bin und die zwei kurz telefonierten, ist alles geklärt und ich bekomme grünes Licht.

So unterhalte ich mich noch einwenig und scheinbar vergesse ich die Zeit, denn als ich mich umdrehe, ist Hussein schon weg. Wahrscheinlich hat auch er Hunger bekommen und ist in die Kantine gegangen.

Hussein, Friede mit Dir. Ich wünsche Dir, dass Du in Deutschland ein neues Zuhause finden wirst und Dir die Umstellung gelingt. Ich hoffe, dass Du immer Menschen an Deiner Seite haben wirst, die Dich und Deine Erfahrungen verstehen können. Es ist gut, dass Du hier bist.___

posted image

2015-05-08 15:42:34 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 34 +1s)Open 

Fazal stellt sich vor mir hin wie ein Fußballspieler. Seine Körperhaltung ist aufrecht und würdevoll. Kein Schimmer von Angst oder Unsicherheit, sondern Kraft und Entschlossenheit. 

Ich erinnere mich sehr gut. Fazal war einer der ersten Flüchtlinge, die ich Ende Dezember des letzten Jahres traf. Ich war noch so unorganisiert, dass ich mir nur Namen, Alter und Herkunftsland notierte – und so kommt es dazu, dass ich heute nur noch diese Fotografie und meine Erinnerungen an die Begegnung habe.

Doch bevor ich die in meinem Gedächtnis festgehaltenen Bilder vergesse, möchte ich Dir Fazal vorstellen. Sein Alter war im Dezember 25 und er stammt wie die kleine Nadia aus Togo.

Heute weiß ich nicht mehr, warum er zu uns nach Deutschland kam. Ich weiß auch nicht, wo er untergekommen ist und wie es ihm gerade geht. Ob er Kummer oder Grund zur Freude hat. Wie gerne würde iches wissen. ... more »

Fazal stellt sich vor mir hin wie ein Fußballspieler. Seine Körperhaltung ist aufrecht und würdevoll. Kein Schimmer von Angst oder Unsicherheit, sondern Kraft und Entschlossenheit. 

Ich erinnere mich sehr gut. Fazal war einer der ersten Flüchtlinge, die ich Ende Dezember des letzten Jahres traf. Ich war noch so unorganisiert, dass ich mir nur Namen, Alter und Herkunftsland notierte – und so kommt es dazu, dass ich heute nur noch diese Fotografie und meine Erinnerungen an die Begegnung habe.

Doch bevor ich die in meinem Gedächtnis festgehaltenen Bilder vergesse, möchte ich Dir Fazal vorstellen. Sein Alter war im Dezember 25 und er stammt wie die kleine Nadia aus Togo.

Heute weiß ich nicht mehr, warum er zu uns nach Deutschland kam. Ich weiß auch nicht, wo er untergekommen ist und wie es ihm gerade geht. Ob er Kummer oder Grund zur Freude hat. Wie gerne würde ich es wissen. Doch ich habe ihn nie wieder getroffen.

Was ich aber weiß ist, dass Fazal mir gegenüber so ganz selbstbewusst und sicher auftrat. Dass Fazal wenige Worte verlor und sofort bereit war, sich von mir fotografieren zu lassen. Dass er den direkten Augenkontakt nicht gemieden hat und ohne Umschweife zu dem stand, wer er zu diesem Zeitpunkt war:

Ein Flüchtling.

Und dieses Wort hat sich in den letzten fünf Monaten in meinem Kopf und Herzen ganz neu geformt und ist für mich kein Fremdwort mehr. Wenn Du heute mit mir über Flüchtlinge sprichst, dann kann ich nicht mehr nur an Zahlen und Statistiken denken.

Dann denke ich an Menschen mit einer Lebensgeschichte, die mich zutiefst berührt und traurig macht. Ich denke an Menschen, die sind wie Du und ich. Nein, nicht im Sinne der Konformität, sondern im Sinne ihrer Verletzlichkeit, ihrer Gefühle und Humanität.

Ich denke auch an Fazal. Der so ganz klar und würdevoll vor mir stand – und gerade deshalb ein gegenüber war, das mich nicht verunsicherte oder mir gar (wie von Pegida und anderen Gruppierungen immer wieder gepredigt) Angst machte.

Nein. Im Gegenteil. Jemand, der zu sich stehen kann, macht mir keine Angst. Niemals. So jemand gibt auch mir ein Gefühl von Sicherheit. Von Klarheit und Offenheit. 

Ach Fazal. Wir haben uns nur kurz getroffen und doch war es jede Sekunde wert. Mögest Du sicher in Deutschland sein, mögen wir Dir die besten Freunde sein, mögest Du hier eine wunderbare Zukunft haben. Das wünsche ich Dir von Herzen. Friede und Mut mit Dir.___

posted image

2015-04-27 10:59:13 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

Heute Morgen treffe ich im Flüchtlingsheim diesen Mann mit dem Namen Ibrahim. Er steht lässig am Geländer und hört ein bisschen Musik. Ich gehe spontan auf ihn zu, denn er wirkt – obwohl er leicht in sich gekehrt ist – sympathisch.

Ibrahim trägt heute eine Sonnenbrille, weil er in der Nacht nicht schlafen konnte. Er habe sich viele Gedanken gemacht – und das höre ich von vielen Flüchtlingen. So frage ich nicht weiter nach und lenke das Thema auf seine Heimat.

Zuhause in Constantine, einer Großstadt in Algerien, arbeitete Ibrahim bei der Polizei, als sein Freund, der auch als Polizist arbeitete getötet wurde. Ibrahim macht ein symbolisches Zeichen, das zeigt, wie man jemandem den Hals durchschneidet.

Was das wohl mit einem Menschen macht, wenn er mitbekommt, dass sein (vielleicht bester) Freund getötet wird? Ich weiß es nicht. Doch ich weiß, dass auch ichnicht schlafen kö... more »

Heute Morgen treffe ich im Flüchtlingsheim diesen Mann mit dem Namen Ibrahim. Er steht lässig am Geländer und hört ein bisschen Musik. Ich gehe spontan auf ihn zu, denn er wirkt – obwohl er leicht in sich gekehrt ist – sympathisch.

Ibrahim trägt heute eine Sonnenbrille, weil er in der Nacht nicht schlafen konnte. Er habe sich viele Gedanken gemacht – und das höre ich von vielen Flüchtlingen. So frage ich nicht weiter nach und lenke das Thema auf seine Heimat.

Zuhause in Constantine, einer Großstadt in Algerien, arbeitete Ibrahim bei der Polizei, als sein Freund, der auch als Polizist arbeitete getötet wurde. Ibrahim macht ein symbolisches Zeichen, das zeigt, wie man jemandem den Hals durchschneidet.

Was das wohl mit einem Menschen macht, wenn er mitbekommt, dass sein (vielleicht bester) Freund getötet wird? Ich weiß es nicht. Doch ich weiß, dass auch ich nicht schlafen könnte. Dass ich mir Gedanken machen würde, vielleicht sogar Schuldgefühle hätte. Ich möchte nicht mit Ibrahim tauschen.

Der Mord an seinem Freund war auch der Grund für seine Flucht nach Deutschland, die er unter anderem mit einem Boot bewältigte. Ibrahim ist einer der Glücklichen, die es geschafft haben und erklärt mir, dass er für die ganze Reise aus seiner Heimat ca. 22 Tage gebraucht habe.

Ibrahim glaubt an Gott, er ist Muslim. Ich erzähle ihm, dass ich Christ bin und er lächelt. Wir sind beide der Meinung, dass der Islam und das Christentum viele Gemeinsamkeiten teilen.

Auf die Frage, ob er häufig bete, zeigt er auf die Gegend des Herzens und erklärt mir: „My God is in my heart“. Ich verabschiede mich mit einem Handschlag und sage ihm, dass ich finde, dass er „ein guter Mann“ sei. Und das glaube ich auch.

Ibrahim, willkommen in Deutschland. Ich bin froh, Dich heute kennengelernt zu haben und wünsche Dir, dass Du niemals die Hoffnung verlieren wirst. Mögest Du Ruhe finden und schlafen können. Mögest Du all das verarbeiten, was Du erlebt hast. Mögest Du Hilfe und Freunde finden – hier in unserer Gesellschaft. Friede mit Dir.___

posted image

2015-04-23 15:32:59 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 33 +1s)Open 

Emiliano heißt dieser Mensch, den ich an einem sonnigen Tag im Flüchtlingsheim treffe. Er ist groß, schlank und hat ein markantes Gesicht.

Auf meine Ansprache reagiert er schüchtern und still, hat aber kein Problem damit, sich von mir fotografieren zu lassen.

Leider versteht Emiliano keines meiner Worte und so übersetzt ein weiterer Flüchtling auf Englisch, damit ich mich mit ihm unterhalten kann.

Ich erfahre, dass der junge Mann seine Heimat Albanien in der Hoffnung verließ, hier ein lebenswürdiges Leben zu erlangen. Die Flucht bewältigte er im Bus – gemeinsam mit seiner Mutter.

Mit wenigen Worten umschreibt er den Grund seiner Flucht: „Keine Arbeit“. Aus Berichten von Flüchtlingen aus Balkanstaaten weiß ich, dass Arbeitslosigkeit direkt zur Bedrohung des eigenen Lebens wird.

In diesen Momenten erinnere ich mich an die zynischen Wortevieler CDU/CSU-P... more »

Emiliano heißt dieser Mensch, den ich an einem sonnigen Tag im Flüchtlingsheim treffe. Er ist groß, schlank und hat ein markantes Gesicht.

Auf meine Ansprache reagiert er schüchtern und still, hat aber kein Problem damit, sich von mir fotografieren zu lassen.

Leider versteht Emiliano keines meiner Worte und so übersetzt ein weiterer Flüchtling auf Englisch, damit ich mich mit ihm unterhalten kann.

Ich erfahre, dass der junge Mann seine Heimat Albanien in der Hoffnung verließ, hier ein lebenswürdiges Leben zu erlangen. Die Flucht bewältigte er im Bus – gemeinsam mit seiner Mutter.

Mit wenigen Worten umschreibt er den Grund seiner Flucht: „Keine Arbeit“. Aus Berichten von Flüchtlingen aus Balkanstaaten weiß ich, dass Arbeitslosigkeit direkt zur Bedrohung des eigenen Lebens wird.

In diesen Momenten erinnere ich mich an die zynischen Worte vieler CDU/CSU-Politiker, die Menschen wie Emiliano als „Wirtschaftsflüchtlinge“ bezeichnen. Ich erinnere mich daran, dass Menschen wie er in Deutschland selten oder gar nicht aufgenommen werden.

Ich schau diesem Mann in die Augen und frage ihn, wie es für ihn hier ist. „Not okay“. Wenige Flüchtlinge reagieren so, wie er, denn wenige haben den Mut, offen zuzugeben, wie es ihnen geht. An dieser Stelle frage ich nicht weiter nach, denn ich möchte ihn nicht in Bedrängnis bringen.

Die Umstände in Flüchtlingsheimen sind schlimm genug, das weiß ich. Denn ich habe es gesehen. Viel zu kleine Zimmer, in denen Flüchtlinge zu acht leben müssen. Das Warten auf die Abschiebung, die minimale Hoffnung, doch aufgenommen werden und ein klares Verbot, zu arbeiten machen depressiv, traurig und frustriert.

Ich packe meine Kamera ein und verabschiede mich. Es war ein kurzes Gespräch, doch es war ein wichtiges.

Friede mit Dir, Emiliano. Sei herzlich willkommen in Deutschland, wenn auch Dein Aufenthalt wahrscheinlich nur kurz sein wird. Ich wünsche Dir und Deiner Mutter das Beste. ___

posted image

2015-04-17 11:43:00 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

„Ich habe zu Vater gesagt: Ich möchte gehen.“

Das ist Elmi, ein kosovarischer Flüchtling. Ich treffe ihn in einem Zimmer, das er sich mit 3 anderen Flüchtlingen (u. A. Alban) teilt. 

Ich betrete das Zimmer und Elmi liegt in seinem Bett, scheinbar ist er gerade aufgewacht. Nachdem wir vereinbart haben, dass ich seine Geschichte erzählen und ihn fotografieren darf, setzt er sich an den Rand seines Bettes. 

Elmi hat einen athletischen Körper, ein feines Gesicht und tiefblaue Augen. Seine Arme sind durchzogen mit deutlichen erkennbaren Adern. 

Aus der kosovarischen Stadt Suharek stamme er, erzählt Elmi auf Deutsch und Englisch. Die Situation dort wäre unerträglich. Er habe weder Geld noch Arbeit besessen, die Korruption des Landes sei nicht zu übersehen. 

Eines Tages habe er es nicht mehr ausgehalten, beschreibt er mit tiefer,melancholischer ... more »

„Ich habe zu Vater gesagt: Ich möchte gehen.“

Das ist Elmi, ein kosovarischer Flüchtling. Ich treffe ihn in einem Zimmer, das er sich mit 3 anderen Flüchtlingen (u. A. Alban) teilt. 

Ich betrete das Zimmer und Elmi liegt in seinem Bett, scheinbar ist er gerade aufgewacht. Nachdem wir vereinbart haben, dass ich seine Geschichte erzählen und ihn fotografieren darf, setzt er sich an den Rand seines Bettes. 

Elmi hat einen athletischen Körper, ein feines Gesicht und tiefblaue Augen. Seine Arme sind durchzogen mit deutlichen erkennbaren Adern. 

Aus der kosovarischen Stadt Suharek stamme er, erzählt Elmi auf Deutsch und Englisch. Die Situation dort wäre unerträglich. Er habe weder Geld noch Arbeit besessen, die Korruption des Landes sei nicht zu übersehen. 

Eines Tages habe er es nicht mehr ausgehalten, beschreibt er mit tiefer, melancholischer Stimme. „Ich habe zu Vater gesagt: Ich möchte gehen.“ So zog der schöne Junge los. Und wusste nicht, dass er in Deutschland keine Chance haben werde.

Die Flucht bewältigte er mit Bussen, Taxen, Zug und zu Fuß. Unterwegs gab es Stress mit zwei anderen Flüchtlingen und Elmi hatte immer wieder nichts zu essen. 950 Euro habe er dafür bezahlt. „Alles.“ 

Nun ist Elmi seit einem Monat in Deutschland und weiß, dass er wieder zurück muss. Er hat keine Angst vor der Abschiebung, doch er verdrängt es auch nicht. Wenn er bleiben dürfe, würde er natürlich bleiben, aber das ist nicht realistisch. Das weiß er - und das weiß auch ich. 

Unter anderem erzählt er mir, dass er den christlichen Glauben gut findet. Als Muslim fühlt es sich sehr unwohl, weil so viel Terror im Namen seiner Religion ausgeübt werde. 

Wir sprechen noch eine ganze Weile über die Gemeinsamkeiten des jüdischen, muslimischen und christlichen Glauben – und ich fühle mich auf diese Weise mit ihm verbunden. 

Elmi, Du starker Kosovare, herzlich willkommen in Deutschland. Wenn auch Deine Verweildauer hier nur kurz sein wird, wünsche ich Dir, dass Du nicht umsonst hierher gekommen bist. Bleibe stark und Friede sei mit Dir und Deiner Familie. ___

posted image

2015-04-16 10:35:06 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 38 +1s)Open 

„How can you put 400 people on a boat that was made for 100?“

Es ist Samstag und der Frühling lässt mich mit breitem Lächeln zum Flüchtlingsheim radeln. Ich genieße die Sonne und bin gespannt, wen ich heute treffen werde.

Von weitem sehe ich einen Mann mit Narbe im Gesicht, der lässig am Geländer angelehnt in sein Handy schaut. Ich spreche ihn an und nach kurzem Zögern öffnet sich mir ein Mensch, der an dieser Stelle nicht mit Namen genannt werden möchte.

Er stammt aus der gambischen Hauptstadt Banjul, hat leicht gerötete Augen und musste aus religiösen Gründen das Land verlassen – auch hier möchte er, dass ich meinen Lesern keine Details preisgebe. Das respektiere ich natürlich.

Je länger ich diesem Mann zuhöre, desto mehr vertraut er mir an. Scheinbar wurde er des Öfteren in seinem Leben enttäuscht und ist deshalb aus Eigenschutz einbisschen distanziert. Ic... more »

„How can you put 400 people on a boat that was made for 100?“

Es ist Samstag und der Frühling lässt mich mit breitem Lächeln zum Flüchtlingsheim radeln. Ich genieße die Sonne und bin gespannt, wen ich heute treffen werde.

Von weitem sehe ich einen Mann mit Narbe im Gesicht, der lässig am Geländer angelehnt in sein Handy schaut. Ich spreche ihn an und nach kurzem Zögern öffnet sich mir ein Mensch, der an dieser Stelle nicht mit Namen genannt werden möchte.

Er stammt aus der gambischen Hauptstadt Banjul, hat leicht gerötete Augen und musste aus religiösen Gründen das Land verlassen – auch hier möchte er, dass ich meinen Lesern keine Details preisgebe. Das respektiere ich natürlich.

Je länger ich diesem Mann zuhöre, desto mehr vertraut er mir an. Scheinbar wurde er des Öfteren in seinem Leben enttäuscht und ist deshalb aus Eigenschutz ein bisschen distanziert. Ich wäre es an seiner Stelle auch.

Nach ein bisschen Smalltalk spricht dieser Mann über seine Flucht von Libyen nach Italien. Mit dem Boot. Sie wären 400 gewesen. Familien. Kinder. Und Babies.

Mit klarer Stimme berichtet mir der Gambier, dass auf dem Boot fast kein Platz für ihn war und die Flüchtlinge übereinandergestapelt werden mussten. Der große Gambier lag ganz unten und konnte sich die ganze Fahrt über kaum bewegen. Und bekam stellenweise nur wenig Luft zum Atmen. Einen Nacht und einen Tag lang.

Doch dann hätten die Flüchtlinge, die weiter oben waren, Rettungswachen gesehen und vor Freude jubiliert. In diesem Moment überkam ihn eine unbeschreibliche Freude und Erleichterung - obwohl er sich immer noch bewegen konnte. Alle wurden gerettet. 

Mein Gesprächspartner erzählt, dass Libyen für ihn das schlimmste Land ist. Als Flüchtling müsste man sehr viel Geld für eine Überfahrt bezahlen – und das Risiko, unterwegs zu sterben, wäre sehr groß.

„How can you put 400 people on a boat that was made for 100?“ fragt er mich mit großen Augen. Ich kann nur den Kopf schütteln und ihm gratulieren, dass er es geschafft habe.

Erzähle ihm, dass ich darüber nachdenke, mal nach Italien zu fahren und dort das Übersetzen von Flüchtlingen zu fotografieren. Das hört er gerne und meint, die Welt müsse dringend erfahren, wie schlimm die Situation dort unten sei.

Lieber Mensch aus Gambia, wie gut es doch ist, dass Du in Deutschland angekommen bist. Willkommen in unserer Gesellschaft – ich wünsche Dir, dass Du Dich hier niemals erdrückt fühlen wirst. Weder von Deutschen noch von unseren Regeln. Friede und Freiheit mit Dir.___

posted image

2015-04-11 14:25:50 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 64 +1s)Open 

Das ist Walesh. Sie ist 28 Jahre alt und aus Eritrea. Vor zwei Wochen saß sie auf dem Boden und Tränen kullerten über ihre Wangen, als ich mich zu ihr setzte. Sie erzählte mir in wenigen Worten, was sie bedrückte: ihre Eltern fehlten ihr sehr.

Heute Morgen stehe ich im Flüchtlingsheim und schaue in mein Handy, als sie direkt auf mich zuläuft und mich lächelnd begrüßt. Es geht ihr besser. Sie freut sich scheinbar, mich wieder zu sehen - und ich erst.

Sie wirkt ganz anders, offener. Sie strahlt, wenn sie lacht. Ich begleite Walesh zum Mittagessen in der Kantine des Heimes. Heute gibt es eine kleine Suppe im Plastikteller, Brötchen und Götterspeise als Nachtisch aus dem Becher.

Die kleine Frau mit dem lockigen Haar spricht nur ein kleines bisschen deutsch und genau soviel englisch. Ihre Muttersprache ist Tigrinya. Meine Übersetzungs-App kann Tigrinya nicht.
Doch... more »

Das ist Walesh. Sie ist 28 Jahre alt und aus Eritrea. Vor zwei Wochen saß sie auf dem Boden und Tränen kullerten über ihre Wangen, als ich mich zu ihr setzte. Sie erzählte mir in wenigen Worten, was sie bedrückte: ihre Eltern fehlten ihr sehr.

Heute Morgen stehe ich im Flüchtlingsheim und schaue in mein Handy, als sie direkt auf mich zuläuft und mich lächelnd begrüßt. Es geht ihr besser. Sie freut sich scheinbar, mich wieder zu sehen - und ich erst.

Sie wirkt ganz anders, offener. Sie strahlt, wenn sie lacht. Ich begleite Walesh zum Mittagessen in der Kantine des Heimes. Heute gibt es eine kleine Suppe im Plastikteller, Brötchen und Götterspeise als Nachtisch aus dem Becher.

Die kleine Frau mit dem lockigen Haar spricht nur ein kleines bisschen deutsch und genau soviel englisch. Ihre Muttersprache ist Tigrinya. Meine Übersetzungs-App kann Tigrinya nicht.

Doch wir schaffen es, zu kommunizieren. Es dauert alles einwenig länger, aber es geht. Walesh stammt aus Senafe, einer Marktstadt im Süden Eritreas. Mittels Zug und Boot floh sie nach Deutschland, als das Erschießen von Menschen Sie dazu zwang, ihre Eltern zu verlassen.

Nun ist seit 20 Tagen hier und teilt sich mit sieben weiteren Frauen aus Afrika ein kleines Zimmer. „I’m okay“, sagt die junge Frau - und ich glaube es ihr. Die Sprachbarriere verhindert, dass ich weitere Details über ihre jetzige wie damalige Situation erfahre - und für den Moment ist das auch in Ordnung.

Denn ich weiß: Jedes Nachfragen meinerseits nach den Ursachen der Flucht hat das Potential, einen Menschen emotional zurückzuwerfen. Und da es Walesh heute gut geht, möchte ich es auch dabei belassen.

Walesh, es ist gut, dass Du in Deutschland bist. Ich bin froh, Dich ein weiteres Mal getroffen zu haben und wünsche Dir, dass es Dir weiterhin besser geht und Du die Vergangenheit verarbeiten kannst. Bleib stark, Walesh, bleib stark.___

posted image

2015-04-09 08:18:28 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

Zohir sitzt auf einer Bank im kleinen Park des Flüchtlingsheimes. Nachdem ich mit einem sehr traurigen Flüchtling gesprochen und Zohir von weitem schon bemerkt habe, laufe ich zu ihm hinüber und setze mich neben ihn.

Ich begrüße ihn und bemerke schnell, dass Zohir kein Mensch ist, der viele Worte macht. So stelle ich ihm alle möglichen Fragen, die mir in den Sinn kommen. Nach seiner Heimat, wie es ihm geht und warum er nach Deutschland geflohen ist. 

Der junge Mann, geboren in Mascara, Algerien hatte schwerwiegende familiäre Probleme, die ihn zwangen, seine Heimat zu verlassen. Ein aggressiver Vater sorgte für massive Probleme, sodass er es nicht mehr aushielt. Seine Mutter starb an Herzversagen.

Die Flucht des Algeriers verlief jedoch unglücklich. Er blieb eine Weile hier und da, lebte wochenlang auf der Straße und wurde zwischenzeitlich sogar ins Gefängnisgesteckt. A... more »

Zohir sitzt auf einer Bank im kleinen Park des Flüchtlingsheimes. Nachdem ich mit einem sehr traurigen Flüchtling gesprochen und Zohir von weitem schon bemerkt habe, laufe ich zu ihm hinüber und setze mich neben ihn.

Ich begrüße ihn und bemerke schnell, dass Zohir kein Mensch ist, der viele Worte macht. So stelle ich ihm alle möglichen Fragen, die mir in den Sinn kommen. Nach seiner Heimat, wie es ihm geht und warum er nach Deutschland geflohen ist. 

Der junge Mann, geboren in Mascara, Algerien hatte schwerwiegende familiäre Probleme, die ihn zwangen, seine Heimat zu verlassen. Ein aggressiver Vater sorgte für massive Probleme, sodass er es nicht mehr aushielt. Seine Mutter starb an Herzversagen.

Die Flucht des Algeriers verlief jedoch unglücklich. Er blieb eine Weile hier und da, lebte wochenlang auf der Straße und wurde zwischenzeitlich sogar ins Gefängnis gesteckt. Aus Gründen, die ihm bis heute schleierhaft sind. Zohir müsste mir das gar nicht erzählen, doch der Umstand, dass er es dennoch tut, ist ein Hinweis auf seine Verzweiflung.

Ich schaue mir Zohir genau an. Sein schmales Gesicht hat einige Falten. Wenn er lacht, schmunzelt oder sich nur ein bisschen freut, strahlt der ganze Mann.

Bereitwillig zeigt mir der Algerier sein Zimmer, das er mit einem Mitflüchtling teilt. Dort mache ich ein paar Aufnahmen, während die beiden sich unterhalten.

Zohir hat große Ziele. Er möchte auf eine Schule gehen, will lernen, studieren. Und er verrät mir, dass er niemals aufgebe wird. Er hat Hoffnung. Egal was passiert. 

Und wieder passiert es: Zwischen Zohir und mir entsteht binnen kürzester Zeit etwas, das ich Freundschaft nenne. Ich mag Zohir - und ich habe den Eindruck, dass er auch mich mag. Zwar ist unser „Mögen“ auf sehr kurze Zeit beschränkt und ich weiß nicht, ob ich Zohir noch einmal sehen werde. Doch es ist dieser Umstand, der die Freundschaft umso wichtiger erscheinen lässt.

Nachdem ich ihm und seinem Mitbewohner die Aufnahmen auf dem Kameradisplay gezeigt habe, verabschiede ich mich. Schüttele seine Hand und laufe zur Tür. Drehe mich noch einmal um. Friede mit Dir.

Zohir, sei willkommen in Deutschland. Wie sehr ich Dir doch wünsche, dass Du hier ein neues Zuhause finden wirst. Mögen Dir Menschen begegnen, die Dir Freundin und Freund sind. Du warst es schon jetzt für mich.___

posted image

2015-04-07 15:49:03 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 39 +1s)Open 

Heute Morgen treffe ich im Flüchtlingsheim diesen jungen Mann mit dem Namen Khalid. 

Nach mehreren Anläufen, seinen Vor- und Nachnamen korrekt auszusprechen (wir lachen dabei sehr viel) und ein bisschen Smalltalk kommen wir auf seine Heimat zu sprechen: Mogadischu.

Die Hauptstadt Somalias verließ Khalid schon vor längerer Zeit. Seine Eltern wurden beide erschossen, erzählt er mir. Beide Eltern. Erschossen.

Manchmal fehlt mir in solchen Situationen einfach das richtige Wort, sodass ich nichts weiter dazu sage, außer mein Beileid zu bekunden, das nicht mehr als ein „I’m sorry“ ist.

Ich frage Khalid, wie er es nach Europa geschafft habe. Nach einigen Reisen habe er mit einem Schlauchboot übergesetzt. Mit 140 anderen Flüchtlingen. Sieben von Ihnen wären auf der 7-tätigen Fahrt gestorben.

Schon wieder solch krasse Erlebnisse. Klar, ich„weiß“ von solch... more »

Heute Morgen treffe ich im Flüchtlingsheim diesen jungen Mann mit dem Namen Khalid. 

Nach mehreren Anläufen, seinen Vor- und Nachnamen korrekt auszusprechen (wir lachen dabei sehr viel) und ein bisschen Smalltalk kommen wir auf seine Heimat zu sprechen: Mogadischu.

Die Hauptstadt Somalias verließ Khalid schon vor längerer Zeit. Seine Eltern wurden beide erschossen, erzählt er mir. Beide Eltern. Erschossen.

Manchmal fehlt mir in solchen Situationen einfach das richtige Wort, sodass ich nichts weiter dazu sage, außer mein Beileid zu bekunden, das nicht mehr als ein „I’m sorry“ ist.

Ich frage Khalid, wie er es nach Europa geschafft habe. Nach einigen Reisen habe er mit einem Schlauchboot übergesetzt. Mit 140 anderen Flüchtlingen. Sieben von Ihnen wären auf der 7-tätigen Fahrt gestorben.

Schon wieder solch krasse Erlebnisse. Klar, ich „weiß“ von solch schrecklichen Begebenheiten, mach andere Flüchtlinge haben mir davon berichtet. Jedoch vergesse ich meist diese Vorfälle schnell. Aus den Augen, aus dem Sinn.

Doch jetzt wird das alles wieder real. Ich sehe ich vor mir einen Mann, der diesen Horror miterlebt hat. Sein Name ist Khalid und er spricht mit mir. Und ich mit ihm.

Seit Oktober ist er nun in Deutschland und hofft hier auf eine bessere Zukunft. Das hoffe ich auch - und wenn ich an die Vorfälle von Tröglitz denke, wird mir ganz anders. Ich hoffe, dass er niemals Opfer eines rechten Übergriffes wird.

Willkommen in Deutschland, Khalid. Mögest Du sicher sein in diesem Land und niemals erneut fliehen müssen. Niemals sollst Du ein Opfer der Gewalt werden, im Gegenteil: Ich wünsche Dir, dass Du hier ein neues Zuhause finden und ein Leben leben kannst, von Frieden erfüllt ist.___

posted image

2015-04-04 09:51:39 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 34 +1s)Open 

„I respect all German people. You are so good.“

Es ist Karfreitag und ich mache einen Spaziergang zum Flüchtlingsheim. Die Sonne wärmt mein Gesicht und kühler Wind sorgt für Entspannung. Auf dem großen Platz am Rande der Stadt sind schon Marktgebäude aufgebaut, die wohl in den nächsten Tag öffnen werden, um den Karlsruher Menschen Vergnügen zu bereiten. 

Nach einem leichten Intermezzo mit den Securities des Flüchtlingsheimes treffe ich dort den 23-jährigen Alban aus Vushtrria, Kosovo. Er hat ein verschmitztes Gesicht, kleine Augen und trägt Hausschuhe, denn er ist auf dem Weg zum Mittagessen in der Kantine des Heimes. 

Auf dem Weg zur Kantine erzählt er mir, dass er den Kosovo liebe, es aber dort keine Zukunft für ihn gebe, denn er habe keine Arbeit gefunden. Sein Vater ist dort Leiter einer Elektrizitäts-Firma, doch für den jungen Sohn gab es keineStelle. Die Flucht mi... more »

„I respect all German people. You are so good.“

Es ist Karfreitag und ich mache einen Spaziergang zum Flüchtlingsheim. Die Sonne wärmt mein Gesicht und kühler Wind sorgt für Entspannung. Auf dem großen Platz am Rande der Stadt sind schon Marktgebäude aufgebaut, die wohl in den nächsten Tag öffnen werden, um den Karlsruher Menschen Vergnügen zu bereiten. 

Nach einem leichten Intermezzo mit den Securities des Flüchtlingsheimes treffe ich dort den 23-jährigen Alban aus Vushtrria, Kosovo. Er hat ein verschmitztes Gesicht, kleine Augen und trägt Hausschuhe, denn er ist auf dem Weg zum Mittagessen in der Kantine des Heimes. 

Auf dem Weg zur Kantine erzählt er mir, dass er den Kosovo liebe, es aber dort keine Zukunft für ihn gebe, denn er habe keine Arbeit gefunden. Sein Vater ist dort Leiter einer Elektrizitäts-Firma, doch für den jungen Sohn gab es keine Stelle. Die Flucht mit dem Bus hat Alban mit 1000 € bezahlen müssen. 

Ich stelle mich in der Schlange vor der Essensausgabe an und Alban fragt mich, ob ich auch etwas essen möchte. Ich lehne dankend ab. Zwar knurrt mein Magen ein bisschen, doch dies ist die Essensausausgabe für Flüchtlinge und ich bin nicht gekommen, um mich hier bedienen zu lassen. Wir setzen uns an einen der freien Tische - immer wieder winken mir Menschen, die gegenüber oder nebenan sitzen „Fotograf! Aaah!”

Alban führt mich zum Zimmer, das er mit 7 anderen Flüchtlingen aus dem Kosovo teilt. Die vollgekritzelten Wände geben dem Zimmer einen geschichtlichen Kontext, denn daran haben sich Flüchtlinge seit Jahren verewigt. Ich bekomme einen Stuhl angeboten während weitere Flüchtlinge ins Zimmer kommen und mich per Handschlag begrüßen. 

Seine Mitbewohner scheinen Alban aufgrund meiner Anwesenheit zu bewundern, da ich immer wieder Fotos von ihm mache. Der junge Kosovare erzählt mir, dass er in Berlin eine verheiratete Schwester hat, beide Brüder und die Eltern jedoch noch in der Heimat leben. 

„I respect all German people. You are so good.“ 

Für Alben ist das Leben in Deutschland ein Traum. Sein ganzes Gesicht erstrahlt, wenn er davon spricht, wie wohl er sich hier fühlt. Er weiß aber auch, dass sein Verbleib unwahrscheinlich ist. Doch auch die kurze Zeit in Deutschland lohnt sich. Eines Tages möchte er studieren.

Inmitten unseres Gespräches wünschen mir die Kosovaren ein gutes Fest. Überrascht frage ich nach, welcher Religion sie sich zugehörig fühlen. Sie sind Muslime. Flüchtlinge, die mit dem Christentum nichts anfangen können wünschen mir zu Ostern ein gutes Fest. Ist das nicht wunderbar?

Während meinem Besuch fühle ich eine innere Freude. Dieser junge Mann hat es mir innerhalb von Minuten angetan. Unter anderen Umständen wären wir sicher enge Freunde geworden. Doch nun ist es Zeit, mich zu verabschieden. Erneut schüttele ich seine Hand, schaue ihm tief in die Augen und verabschiede mich. Wie schwer mir dies heute doch fällt. 

Alban, sei herzlich willkommen in Deutschland. Deine Offenheit und Freundschaft haben mich heute sehr berührt. Danke, dass es Dich gibt. Friede mit Dir. ___

posted image

2015-04-01 12:03:52 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 35 +1s)Open 

Ich erinnere mich nur noch schwach an diesen Herren, den ich im Dezember, als ich mein Fotoprojekt über Flüchtlinge begann, auf der Straße traf.

Er wurde von Yuzef (http://j.mp/-yuzef) begleitet, denn er sollte an diesem Tag in eine andere Stadt reisen, da er offenbar nicht in Karlsruhe aufgenommen werden konnte.

Jedoch erinnere ich mich an sein Gesicht, als wäre es gestern gewesen. Die schmalen Wangenknochen und der schüchterne Blick hinterließen bei mir den Eindruck eines Mannes, der ein stiller Kämpfer war (und ist).

Dieser Mann konnte nur ein bisschen Englisch, lies sich aber geren von mir fotografieren. „No problem“, - ein Satz, den ich noch von vielen Menschen aus Afrika hören sollte.

Auch hier spürte ich einen starken Kontrast: Auf einer Seite Pegida-Nazis, die Ängste vor diesen „schlimmen Flüchtlingen, die sich an uns bereichern wollen“,auf der anderen Se... more »

Ich erinnere mich nur noch schwach an diesen Herren, den ich im Dezember, als ich mein Fotoprojekt über Flüchtlinge begann, auf der Straße traf.

Er wurde von Yuzef (http://j.mp/-yuzef) begleitet, denn er sollte an diesem Tag in eine andere Stadt reisen, da er offenbar nicht in Karlsruhe aufgenommen werden konnte.

Jedoch erinnere ich mich an sein Gesicht, als wäre es gestern gewesen. Die schmalen Wangenknochen und der schüchterne Blick hinterließen bei mir den Eindruck eines Mannes, der ein stiller Kämpfer war (und ist).

Dieser Mann konnte nur ein bisschen Englisch, lies sich aber geren von mir fotografieren. „No problem“, - ein Satz, den ich noch von vielen Menschen aus Afrika hören sollte.

Auch hier spürte ich einen starken Kontrast: Auf einer Seite Pegida-Nazis, die Ängste vor diesen „schlimmen Flüchtlingen, die sich an uns bereichern wollen“, auf der anderen Seite ein Mann, der keiner Fliege etwas zu Leide tun würde.

Ein Mensch, der sehr zurückhaltend reagierte, als ich ihn ansprach. Der viel lächelte - auch aus Verunsicherung heraus. Der scheuer nicht sein konnte. Der schon von seiner Statur her, niemals für irgendeinen Erwachsenen eine Bedrohung sein würde.

Unbekannter Mann aus Togo, auch heute möchte ich Dich willkommen in Deutschland heißen. Es ist gut, dass Du hier bist, gut, dass es Du es bis zu uns geschafft hast. Ich wünsche Dir eine Umgebung, in der Du Stärke und erneuten Rückhalt gewinnen kannst. Friede mit Dir.___

posted image

2015-03-28 11:49:59 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

„Boom boom“

Während ich an diesem Morgen über das von der Sonne erwärmte Gelände eines Flüchtlingsheim laufe, sehe ich eine kleine Familie auf dem Boden sitzen.

Ich laufe an Ihnen vorbei und suche das Zimmer von Keba und Job, denen ich ausgedruckte Portraits von dem Beiden vorbeibringen möchte. Zu meiner Enttäuschung ist das Zimmer neu besetzt. Keba und Job sind nicht mehr da.

Auf dem Rückweg Richtung Ausgang sehe ich die drei Kinder und Ihre Eltern immer noch dort sitzen und spreche den Vater an. Muhammed versteht mich kaum, doch etwas Englisch reicht aus, um zu verstehen, dass die junge Familie aus Pakistan geflohen ist.

„Boom boom“.

Für diese Familie hat „boom boom“ schlimme Konnotationen. Furchteinflößende. Lebensbedrohliche. Aggressive Boom Boom hat ihnen solche Angst gemacht, dass Muhammed und Nela sich entschlossen, mitsamtden Kindern zu fliehen... more »

„Boom boom“

Während ich an diesem Morgen über das von der Sonne erwärmte Gelände eines Flüchtlingsheim laufe, sehe ich eine kleine Familie auf dem Boden sitzen.

Ich laufe an Ihnen vorbei und suche das Zimmer von Keba und Job, denen ich ausgedruckte Portraits von dem Beiden vorbeibringen möchte. Zu meiner Enttäuschung ist das Zimmer neu besetzt. Keba und Job sind nicht mehr da.

Auf dem Rückweg Richtung Ausgang sehe ich die drei Kinder und Ihre Eltern immer noch dort sitzen und spreche den Vater an. Muhammed versteht mich kaum, doch etwas Englisch reicht aus, um zu verstehen, dass die junge Familie aus Pakistan geflohen ist.

„Boom boom“.

Für diese Familie hat „boom boom“ schlimme Konnotationen. Furchteinflößende. Lebensbedrohliche. Aggressive Boom Boom hat ihnen solche Angst gemacht, dass Muhammed und Nela sich entschlossen, mitsamt den Kindern zu fliehen. So weit weg, wie möglich.

Nun ist die pakistanische Familie gerade angekommen und wartet darauf, im Flüchtlingsheim unterzukommen. Deshalb sitzen sie auf dem Boden.

Mit dem Einverständnis der Eltern fotografiere ich die Familie. Die kleine einjährige Isabel spielt ein bisschen Fangen mit mir, und die Brüder Salvador und Adrian halten beinahe ganz still. Ein paar Klicks sind schnell gemacht.

Mitten im Gespräch stoßen zwei Flüchtlinge dazu, die mitbekommen haben, dass ich Fotograf bin. „Bekommt die Familie dann Spenden?“ Ich würde allzu gerne mit „Ja!“ antworten doch das entspricht nicht der Wahrheit.

Nun packe ich meine Kamera wieder ein, reiche den Eltern zum Abschied die Hand und versuche mit Winken und „bye“ auch den Kindern Lebewohl zu wünschen.

Die Sprachbarriere fühlt sich so trocken an. Und ich mich ohnmächtig, auch im Hinblick dessen, dass ich für diese Familie keine Spenden lockermachen kann, da sie ja erst angekommen ist und Spenden über die Landesbehörden geregelt werden.

Auf dem Nachhauseweg freue ich mich darüber, dieser Familie mit meinen Fotos ein Gesicht geben zu können. Doch gleichzeitig beschleicht mich dieses furchtbare Gefühl des Nichtstunkönnens. Wenn ich die Sprachbarriere schon so furchtbar finde, wie wird es dann den Eltern und Kindern gehen?

Muhammed, Nela, Isabal, Salvado und Adrian. Möge dieses Land Euch mit offenen Armen empfangen und eine sichere Unterkunft bieten. Möget Ihr Euch verstanden fühlen und Freunde finden, die Eure Situation nachempfinden können. Friede mit Euch. Friede.___

posted image

2015-03-26 09:41:05 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 43 +1s)Open 

Anfang dieser Woche stehe ich wieder vor der Erstaufnahmestelle für Flüchtlinge in Karlsruhe. Nachdem ich am Wochenende einen Vortrag gehalten und mit vielen Leuten über Flüchtlinge gesprochen habe, möchte ich wieder mit den Menschen sprechen, die nach Deutschland fliehen.

Nachdem ich eine Weile vor dem Gebäude verbracht und überlegt habe, wen ich ansprechen soll (heute brauche ich ein bisschen länger), begrüße ich diese zwei lächelnden Männer aus dem Kosovo.

Gjogaj (links im Bild) und Shemsedin (rechts im Bild) machen auf mich wie viele Kosovaren eine besonders offenen und freudigen Eindruck. Beide flohen vor drei Monaten gemeinsam nach Deutschland und deshalb verbindet die Beiden eine enge Freundschaft.

Der etwas kleinere Shemsedin spricht mit weicher Stimme und stockendem Deutsch: „Eine Leben in Kosovo - nicht möglich. Keine Arbeit. Ich Mechaniker.“Shemsedin hatte ... more »

Anfang dieser Woche stehe ich wieder vor der Erstaufnahmestelle für Flüchtlinge in Karlsruhe. Nachdem ich am Wochenende einen Vortrag gehalten und mit vielen Leuten über Flüchtlinge gesprochen habe, möchte ich wieder mit den Menschen sprechen, die nach Deutschland fliehen.

Nachdem ich eine Weile vor dem Gebäude verbracht und überlegt habe, wen ich ansprechen soll (heute brauche ich ein bisschen länger), begrüße ich diese zwei lächelnden Männer aus dem Kosovo.

Gjogaj (links im Bild) und Shemsedin (rechts im Bild) machen auf mich wie viele Kosovaren eine besonders offenen und freudigen Eindruck. Beide flohen vor drei Monaten gemeinsam nach Deutschland und deshalb verbindet die Beiden eine enge Freundschaft.

Der etwas kleinere Shemsedin spricht mit weicher Stimme und stockendem Deutsch: „Eine Leben in Kosovo - nicht möglich. Keine Arbeit. Ich Mechaniker.“ Shemsedin hatte in seiner Heimat eine Ausbildung zum Kfz-Mechaniker gemacht, doch dann vergeblich nach einer Stelle gesucht. „Keine interessieren.“

Es ist nicht das erste Mal, dass mir Kosovaren von den lebensfeindlichen Umständen in diesem Land erzählen. Ich erinnere mich daran, dass es dort kein Recht auf Arbeitslosengeld oder Hartz IV gibt. Arbeitslos zu sein bedeutet die unverzügliche Gefährdung des eigenen Lebens.

Weil er fliehen musste, war es ihm nicht möglich gewesen, die Beziehung zu seiner Freundin aufrecht zu erhalten. Shemsedin musste sich trennen.

Während ich die beiden interviewe, denke ich nicht darüber nach, doch im Nachhinein versuche ich mich einzufühlen. Stelle mir den schönen Mann vor, wie er sich von seiner Freundin verabschiedet. Stelle mir seine Tränen vor - und ihre. 

Vielleicht lief alles auch ganz anders, das weiß ich nicht. Eine Trennung von der Lebengefährtin ist, an diesem Gedanken komme ich nicht vorbei, sehr unschön und unter solchen Umständen deprimierend.

Für die Flucht nach Deutschland muss Shemsedin lange Zeit gespart haben, denn die Reise kosteten ihn 2000 €. „Zwei Tausend?“ Jedes Mal, wenn mir Flüchtlinge von den Kosten erzählen, kann ich es oft nicht fassen. Ich schüttele mit dem Kopf. Dass sich Reiseunternehmen an Flüchtlingen eine goldene Nase verdienen, macht mich wütend.

„Mir auch“ bestätigt Gjogaj, was in diesem Kontext heißt, dass er auch so viel bezahlen musste. Die beiden erklären mir die Route nach Deutschland und ich beginne erneut zu verstehen, wie gefährlich, unsicher und kompliziert solch ein Unterfangen ist.

Nun wende ich mich Gjogaj, ausgesprochen „Dschjogai“, zu. Acht Jahre arbeitete er als Facharbeiter für Entsorgungstechnik, landläufig auch als Müllmann bezeichnet. Die Arbeit wäre für ihn persönlich sehr herausfordernd und mit 150 € pro Monat äußerst schlecht bezahlt, so Gjogaj.

Die Beiden wissen ganz genau, dass ihre Chancen auf Asyl in Deutschland bei Null sind. Doch die Verzweiflung hatte sie gezwungen, zu fliehen. „In Kosovo alles schlecht“. Ich kann sie verstehen und würde sicher genauso handeln.

~

An Tagen wie diesen wird mir erneut der Kontrast bewusst, den auch ich vor der Landeserstaufnahmestelle für Flüchtlinge verkörpere. Locker stehe ich da mit meinen Dickies-Hosen, teuren Vans-Schuhen und dem iPhone 6 in der Tasche. Habe Familie, Freunde und Arbeit - und kann mich manchmal nicht entscheiden, ob ich nach Feierabend einen Film gucken oder doch lieber gemütlich in der warmen Wohnung mit einer heißen Schokolade in der Hand Fotobände schmökern soll.

Und dann stehen vor mir Shemsedin und Gjogaj, die gar nichts mehr haben. Die seit Jahren kämpfen, resignieren sich dann entschließen, alles - auch Beziehungen - aufzugeben, um in der Hoffnung auf ein besseres Leben nach Deutschland fliehen.

Wie - ich entschuldige mich für meine Wortwahl - scheiße ungerecht ist diese Welt?

Shemsedin und Gjogaj, seid willkommen in Deutschland. Möge Euch der Aufenthalt, und sei er noch so kurz, Kraft und innere Stärke geben, den Kampf gegen die Armut zuhause erneut aufzunehmen. Friede mit Euch. Friede und ein gutes Leben. Das wünsche ich Euch von Herzen.___

posted image

2015-03-24 09:08:51 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

Impressionen von der Nokargida-Demonstration vom 23. März 2015

Als ich mich gestern Abend gegen 18.30 auf den Weg zum Europaplatz aufmachte, war es bitterkalt. Die Wärme der Sonne hatte dem Einzug der Frühlingskälte Platz gemacht und ich bereute schon auf dem Hinweg, keine Handschuhe mitgenommen zu haben.

Am Europaplatz angekommen, füllte sich dieser innerhalb kürzester Zeit mit Vertretern diverser Unterstützergruppen der Menschenrechts-Szene und verschiedene Redner betonten ab 19 Uhr die Wichtigkeit einer offenen, bunten Gesellschaft und riefen zum Widerstand gegen rechte Tendenzen in Karlsruhe auf.

Ich nahm die Stimmung vor Ort als sehr positiv, aber deutlich gegen rechts positioniert war. Zwischendurch lief ich rüber zum Stephansplatz, auf dem um 19.30 Uhr von der Karlsruher Pegida (Kargida) eine Demonstration angekündigt wahr.

Der ganze Platz war mehroder min... more »

Impressionen von der Nokargida-Demonstration vom 23. März 2015

Als ich mich gestern Abend gegen 18.30 auf den Weg zum Europaplatz aufmachte, war es bitterkalt. Die Wärme der Sonne hatte dem Einzug der Frühlingskälte Platz gemacht und ich bereute schon auf dem Hinweg, keine Handschuhe mitgenommen zu haben.

Am Europaplatz angekommen, füllte sich dieser innerhalb kürzester Zeit mit Vertretern diverser Unterstützergruppen der Menschenrechts-Szene und verschiedene Redner betonten ab 19 Uhr die Wichtigkeit einer offenen, bunten Gesellschaft und riefen zum Widerstand gegen rechte Tendenzen in Karlsruhe auf.

Ich nahm die Stimmung vor Ort als sehr positiv, aber deutlich gegen rechts positioniert war. Zwischendurch lief ich rüber zum Stephansplatz, auf dem um 19.30 Uhr von der Karlsruher Pegida (Kargida) eine Demonstration angekündigt wahr.

Der ganze Platz war mehr oder minder abgeriegelt und eine große Anzahl von uniformierten Polizisten war vor Ort - die Polizei hatte einen Bereich eingerichtet, der Nopegida und Pegida gefühlte 100 Meter auseinanderhielt und so ein Aufeinandertreffen verhinderte.

Am Stephansplatz musste ich mehrmals hinsehen, denn ich sah lange Zeit No Kargdia - in Worten: Keine Kargida-Demonstranten. Irgendwann entdeckte ich eine kleine Truppe am anderen Ende des geschützten Bereiches.

Mit der Zeit füllte sich auch der Stephansplatz mit immer mehr Gegendemonstranten, die, aus meiner Sicht, alle rechten Parolen niederpfiffen und -sangen. Nicht ein einziges Wort von der anderen Seite gelang in mein Ohr.

Zwischendurch unterhielt ich mich mit einem jungen Polizisten, der im abgegrenzten Bereich Wache stand. Er war sehr nett, offen und keineswegs aufgestachelt.

Als ich aus terminlichen Gründen kurz nach 20 Uhr den Platz verließ, hatte ich insgesamt ein sehr gutes Gefühl. Die Gegendemonstration war friedlich verlaufen und Steine wurden nicht geworfen. Ein guter Abend. ___

posted image

2015-03-13 08:45:54 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 24 +1s)Open 

Der Tag ist schon fortgeschritten, als ich mich Mittags auf zur Landeserstaufnahme-Stelle für Flüchtlinge mache. Ich genieße die warme Luft, die durch die Fächerstadt Karlsruhe zieht - heute bin ich zu Fuß.

Ein junger Herr, groß und von kräftiger Statur läuft an mir vorbei und ich entscheide mich spontan, ihn anzusprechen. Sein junges Gesicht hat eine kindliche Ausstrahlung, unbedarft und voller Neugier.

Abdurahman (gesprochen: Abduh-Rach-Mahn) stellt seinen Namen vor und ich benötige mehrere Anläufe, bis ich mir a) diesen merken und b) ihn auch korrekt aussprechen kann.

Er sei aus Somalia geflohen, dort habe es „tribe problems“ gegeben, als eine neue terroristische Gruppe, Al-Shabaab, Ihr Unwesen trieb. Für Abdurahman ist es bis heute unverständlich, was die Motivation der Gruppe ist.

„I don’t know, what their problem is“.
Nebenbei sagt Abdur... more »

Der Tag ist schon fortgeschritten, als ich mich Mittags auf zur Landeserstaufnahme-Stelle für Flüchtlinge mache. Ich genieße die warme Luft, die durch die Fächerstadt Karlsruhe zieht - heute bin ich zu Fuß.

Ein junger Herr, groß und von kräftiger Statur läuft an mir vorbei und ich entscheide mich spontan, ihn anzusprechen. Sein junges Gesicht hat eine kindliche Ausstrahlung, unbedarft und voller Neugier.

Abdurahman (gesprochen: Abduh-Rach-Mahn) stellt seinen Namen vor und ich benötige mehrere Anläufe, bis ich mir a) diesen merken und b) ihn auch korrekt aussprechen kann.

Er sei aus Somalia geflohen, dort habe es „tribe problems“ gegeben, als eine neue terroristische Gruppe, Al-Shabaab, Ihr Unwesen trieb. Für Abdurahman ist es bis heute unverständlich, was die Motivation der Gruppe ist.

„I don’t know, what their problem is“.

Nebenbei sagt Abdurahman irgendwas von 14 Jahren, ich verstehe ihn nicht ganz und frage, wie alt er heute sei. „I’m still 14 years old“ und wir beide lachen. Ich kann es gar nicht glauben und sage ihm, dass ich ihn wesentlich älter geschätzt hatte.

Der Somali floh mit Mutter, Bruder und Vetter nach Deutschland und lebt seit drei Monaten in Karlsruhe. Ich bitte ihn, ehrlich zu sein, was die Räume und Verpflegung betrifft.

Adurahman erklärt, dass das Zimmer, in dem er mit seiner Familie lebt, recht klein sei. Das Essen sei in Ordnung, doch manchmal würde es nicht reichen. Ich bedaure das.

Was mich an diesem Jungen fasziniert, ist seine Gelassenheit. Während unserem Gespräch lacht er viel und unterhält sich zwanglos offen mit mir. Die ganze Zeit beschleicht mich ein Gefühl, das ich noch nie in meinen Gesprächen hatte:

Abdurahman ist wie ein Freund, den ich schon ein Leben lang kenne. Mir ist bewusst, dass diese Bemerkung kitschig wirkt, aber dennoch fühlt es sich genau so an.

Herzlich willkommen in Deutschland, Abdurahman. Ich wünsche Dir eine gute Zukunft in diesem Land und hoffe, dass Du Dich unter uns wohl fühlen wirst. Friede mit Dir. Es ist gut, dass es Dich gibt.___

posted image

2015-03-09 15:02:07 (6 comments, 3 reshares, 41 +1s)Open 

Das ist Keba aus Gambia. Er möchte Euch etwas sagen.

Letzte Woche lerne ich Job und Keba im Flüchtlingsheim kennen. Während ich mich mit Job unterhalte, sitzt Keba am Rand seines Bettes und hört gespannt zu. Keba ist ebenfalls aus Gambia und zeigt sofort Bereitschaft, sich fotografieren zu lassen.

„No problem“ schmunzelt er und sein Gesicht leuchtet, als ich ein paar Aufnahmen mache. Etwas unsicher hält er sich die Hand vors Gesicht, doch ich lasse ihn einfach so sein, wie er ist.

Während ich mich wieder auf den Stuhl am Tisch setze, berichtet mir Keba, dass er aus der Stadt Sukuta stammt, die am gambischen Meer liegt. Keba war in seiner Heimat „a fisherman“ und ich entnehme seiner Stimme, dass er seinen Beruf geliebt haben muss.

Und auf meine Frage, was das Schönste an Gambia sei, antwortet er mir „the seaside and the sun.“ Doch innerfamiliäreProbleme und örtlic... more »

Das ist Keba aus Gambia. Er möchte Euch etwas sagen.

Letzte Woche lerne ich Job und Keba im Flüchtlingsheim kennen. Während ich mich mit Job unterhalte, sitzt Keba am Rand seines Bettes und hört gespannt zu. Keba ist ebenfalls aus Gambia und zeigt sofort Bereitschaft, sich fotografieren zu lassen.

„No problem“ schmunzelt er und sein Gesicht leuchtet, als ich ein paar Aufnahmen mache. Etwas unsicher hält er sich die Hand vors Gesicht, doch ich lasse ihn einfach so sein, wie er ist.

Während ich mich wieder auf den Stuhl am Tisch setze, berichtet mir Keba, dass er aus der Stadt Sukuta stammt, die am gambischen Meer liegt. Keba war in seiner Heimat „a fisherman“ und ich entnehme seiner Stimme, dass er seinen Beruf geliebt haben muss.

Und auf meine Frage, was das Schönste an Gambia sei, antwortet er mir „the seaside and the sun.“ Doch innerfamiliäre Probleme und örtlicher Rassismus veranlassten Keba, alles zurückzulassen und sich auf die Flucht zu begeben. Auch er nennt die Armut als das Schlimmste in Gambia.

Nun ist Keba seit dem 12. Januar in Deutschland und hat schon ein paar Erfahrungen mit Deutschen gemacht. Im Gespräch will er mir eine Sache sagen, die ich an meine Leser weitergeben soll: Er findet es schlimm, dass er als Flüchtling unter Generalverdacht stehen würde, kriminell zu sein.

„If a person who is a refugee steals something, that person is a criminal. But that doesn't mean, that ALL refugees are 
criminals.“

Was Keba auch spürt, ist eine grundlege Ablehnung gegenüber ihn. Manche Menschen würden ihn nicht einmal ansehen, wenn er sich mit ihnen unterhalte - selbst wenn er besonders freundlich sei, so der Gambier.

Keba akzeptiert das, doch es macht ihm den Aufenhalt in Deutschland sehr unangenehm. Ich stimme Keba bedingungslos zu. Wir unterhalten uns noch lange über Fremdenfeindlichkeit und Rassismus, die in Deutschland gelebt werden und wie wenig wir uns damit anfreunden können. Die Zeit vergeht wie im Flug, doch ein mein Blick auf die Uhr lässt mich aufstehen und ich verabschiede mich.

Willkommen in Deutschland, Keba. Es ist so gut, dass Du hier bist. Du hast ein gutes Gespür für zwischenmenschliches und Deine Ehrlichkeit ist schon jetzt eine Bereicherung - für mich. Friede sei mit Dir, woauch immer Du hingehst. Ich wünsche Dir das Beste.___

posted image

2015-03-07 10:43:39 (3 comments, 2 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

Heute Morgen werde ich von einer Fotografin begleitet, die sich meine Arbeit ansehen und mir über die Schulter blicken will. Schon auf dem Hinweg unterhalten wir uns ausgiebig über die Lage der Flüchtlinge und den Missstand, dass viele nicht arbeiten dürfen, aber vorgehalten bekommen, dem Staat auf der Tasche zu liegen.

Nachdem wir mit einigen Flüchtlingen gesprochen haben, die jedoch nicht fotografiert werden wollen, läuft ein kräftiger Mann in heller Jacke auf uns zu.

Suleiman ist wie viele andere Flüchtlinge aus Gambia und ich schätze ihn auf 18 Jahre. Weit gefehlt, denn er ist 25 - und strahlt eine feste Entschlossenheit aus. Die Fotografin steht neben mir und lauscht unserem Gespräch.

Der kräftige Gambier mit den kugelförmigen, schwarzen Augen berichtet uns von seiner Reise. In Gambia sei er direkt nach Libyen geflohen, um mit über 300 weiterenFlüchtlingen... more »

Heute Morgen werde ich von einer Fotografin begleitet, die sich meine Arbeit ansehen und mir über die Schulter blicken will. Schon auf dem Hinweg unterhalten wir uns ausgiebig über die Lage der Flüchtlinge und den Missstand, dass viele nicht arbeiten dürfen, aber vorgehalten bekommen, dem Staat auf der Tasche zu liegen.

Nachdem wir mit einigen Flüchtlingen gesprochen haben, die jedoch nicht fotografiert werden wollen, läuft ein kräftiger Mann in heller Jacke auf uns zu.

Suleiman ist wie viele andere Flüchtlinge aus Gambia und ich schätze ihn auf 18 Jahre. Weit gefehlt, denn er ist 25 - und strahlt eine feste Entschlossenheit aus. Die Fotografin steht neben mir und lauscht unserem Gespräch.

Der kräftige Gambier mit den kugelförmigen, schwarzen Augen berichtet uns von seiner Reise. In Gambia sei er direkt nach Libyen geflohen, um mit über 300 weiteren Flüchtlingen auf dem Boot nach Italien überzusetzen.

Dort gab es weder Essen noch Arbeit, sodass er sich in die Schweiz aufmachte. In Zürich setzte er sich in den Zug und fuhr nach Deutschland. Nachdem er von Schaffnern kontrolliert und ihnen gesagt hatte, dass er weder Papiere noch Geld habe, hätten sie ihn sitzenlassen.

Seit letzten Donnerstag ist Suleiman nun in Karlsruhe. Die Menschen wären sehr nett zu ihm. „The food is okay, sometimes the chicken is good“. Ich spüre, dass sich Suleiman auf keinen Fall beschweren will, denn er ist überglücklich, hier in Deutschland zu sein.

Doch ich bohre etwas nach und frage, ob das Essen ausreiche. „Please be honest“. Ein wenig erleichtert gibt er zu, dass es eigentlich nicht genug wäre. 

Suleiman ist mit fünf anderen Flüchtlingen in einem Zimmer. Er verrät mir seine Zimmernummer und ich vereinbare mit ihm, dass ich ihn besuchen werde.

Suleiman, sei herzlich willkommen in Deutschland. Ich bin froh, Dich heute Morgen getroffen zu haben. Deine Stärke und Direktheit haben mich inspiriert. Du hast es über Kontinente hinweg bis zu uns geschafft und bist deshalb mein Held. Friede mit Dir.___

posted image

2015-03-05 11:54:49 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

Die Sonne strahlt eine angenehme Wärme auf das Gelände des Flüchtlingscamps, das ich heute besuche. Im dritten Stock eines Hauses treffe ich auf einen Mann mit schwarzer Zipfelmütze und weißem T-Shirt, der sich gerade eine Plastikflasche mit Wasser füllt.

Seine Augen funkeln im glänzenden Sonnenlicht, das den Gang durchflutet. Ich reiche ihm die Hand und Job betrachtet mich aufmerksam. Er ist offen und zuvorkommend – es wundert mich nicht, dass er aus Gambia kommt.

„My nickname is Job“ erläutert er, während er die Flasche zudreht. Job ist einen Kopf kleiner als ich, hat schmale Arme und ein rundes Gesicht mit feinem Stoppelbart um den Mund.

„You Gambian people are very friendly to me“, erwidere ich seine Freundlichkeit. Wir plaudern ein bisschen und Job zeigt mir das Zimmer, in dem er wohnt.

Ich schätze den Raum, in dem acht Betten stehen aufmaximal 12 Quadratm... more »

Die Sonne strahlt eine angenehme Wärme auf das Gelände des Flüchtlingscamps, das ich heute besuche. Im dritten Stock eines Hauses treffe ich auf einen Mann mit schwarzer Zipfelmütze und weißem T-Shirt, der sich gerade eine Plastikflasche mit Wasser füllt.

Seine Augen funkeln im glänzenden Sonnenlicht, das den Gang durchflutet. Ich reiche ihm die Hand und Job betrachtet mich aufmerksam. Er ist offen und zuvorkommend – es wundert mich nicht, dass er aus Gambia kommt.

„My nickname is Job“ erläutert er, während er die Flasche zudreht. Job ist einen Kopf kleiner als ich, hat schmale Arme und ein rundes Gesicht mit feinem Stoppelbart um den Mund.

„You Gambian people are very friendly to me“, erwidere ich seine Freundlichkeit. Wir plaudern ein bisschen und Job zeigt mir das Zimmer, in dem er wohnt.

Ich schätze den Raum, in dem acht Betten stehen auf maximal 12 Quadratmeter. Zusammen mit sechs Anderen wohnt Job auf engstem Raum. Ein Doppelbett ist gerade nicht belegt, was sich laut Job demnächst ändern wird.

Sofort wird mir Platz gemacht und es ein langes, intensives Gespräch zwischen Job und Keba, einem weiteren Flüchtling beginnt seinen Lauf. Je mehr ich mich öffne und meine Absichten erkläre, desto weiter öffnen sich auch die Beiden.

Jobs Tätigkeit in seiner Heimat Kaur hatte mehrere Etappen. Zuerst arbeitete der Gambier in einer privaten Sicherheitsfirma, wechselte danach zur Reinigungskraft und verkaufte schließlich Kleider.

„I didn’t feel secured, that’s why I fled my country“ beschreibt er den Grund seiner Flucht, die er 2010 beschloss. Das Schlimmste an Gambia sei die Armut - eine Beschreibung, die ich heute nicht zum ersten Mal höre.

Während ich ein paar Bilder von Job mache, fallen mir seine Augen erneut auf. Ich meine dort eine Trauer und Sehnsucht zu erkennen, die sich in Sekundenbruchteilen über seinem Gesicht verbreitet. Er sitzt ganz still auf seinem Stuhl, lässt mich machen, verliert kein Wort.

Nachdem ich die Fotos beisammen und auf dem Kameradisplay gezeigt habe, unterhalten wir uns noch eine lange Zeit. Ich fühle mich sehr wohl in der Gesellschaft dieser Herren, die einen doch so langen und gefährlichen Fluchtweg hinter sich haben.

„I think I made some friends today!“, sage ich lächelnd und bedanke mich für die Zeit, die mir die zwei schenken. Die Gesichter der Beiden leuchten auf und  auch sie bedanken sich.

Ich verspreche, so schnell wie möglich die Fotos zu bearbeiten, zu bestellen, vorbeizubringen und hoffe, dass ich bei meinem nächsten Besuch die freundlichen Gambier wieder antreffen werde. Denn ein Transfer in das nächste Flüchtlingsheim steht bald bevor.

Job, sei herzlich willkommen in Deutschland. Du bist ein wunderbarer Mensch, mit großartigen Eigenschaften, die unser Land dringend braucht. Es ist gut, dass Du da bist. Mögest Du Dich immer sicher fühlen und nie wieder vor der Armut fliehen müssen.___

posted image

2015-03-02 11:38:07 (3 comments, 3 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

Bei lauwarmen 8 Grad Celsius stehe ich heute vor der Landeserstaufnahmestelle für Flüchtlinge (LEA). Auf mich zu läuft ein junger, gutaussehender Syrer, sein Name ist Jamil.

Er tägt Jogginghose, Turnschuhe und Lederjacke, seine Augen glänzen im diffusen Licht des bewölkten Montags Wir einigen uns auf Englisch und Jamil berichtet mir bereitwillig über seinem Leben:

In Syrien wäre die Situation katastrophal und ständig würden Leute ermordet. Dabei wäre es unmöglich, festzustellen, wer eigentlich wen getötet habe. Er selbst wäre mit seiner Familie geflohen, bevor es für sie bedrohlich wurde.

Sie hätten schon ein Jahr in der Türkei gelebt, doch unter den Umständen (nur der Vater durfte arbeiten) könnten sie nicht bleiben. So hätte sich die Familie erneut aufgemacht und floh über Bulgarien nach Deutschland - weiter Strecken davon zu Fuß.

Jamil hatgroße Ansprüche an si... more »

Bei lauwarmen 8 Grad Celsius stehe ich heute vor der Landeserstaufnahmestelle für Flüchtlinge (LEA). Auf mich zu läuft ein junger, gutaussehender Syrer, sein Name ist Jamil.

Er tägt Jogginghose, Turnschuhe und Lederjacke, seine Augen glänzen im diffusen Licht des bewölkten Montags Wir einigen uns auf Englisch und Jamil berichtet mir bereitwillig über seinem Leben:

In Syrien wäre die Situation katastrophal und ständig würden Leute ermordet. Dabei wäre es unmöglich, festzustellen, wer eigentlich wen getötet habe. Er selbst wäre mit seiner Familie geflohen, bevor es für sie bedrohlich wurde.

Sie hätten schon ein Jahr in der Türkei gelebt, doch unter den Umständen (nur der Vater durfte arbeiten) könnten sie nicht bleiben. So hätte sich die Familie erneut aufgemacht und floh über Bulgarien nach Deutschland - weiter Strecken davon zu Fuß.

Jamil hat große Ansprüche an sich selbst und erzählt von seinem Bachelor-Abschluss. Auch hier möchte er studieren, sobald es ihm möglich ist, erklärt er selbstbewusst.

Auf die Frage, wie es seiner Familie hier in Deutschland gehe, antwortet er zurückhaltend. Die Umstände in der LEA wären schlimm. Ich frage ihn, ob ich ihn mit hinein begleiten könne, um mir selbst ein Bild zu machen. „Of course“, antwortet er mir.

So packe ich meine Kamera ein, stelle ich mich an der Pforte an und tausche meinen Personalausweis gegen einen Besucherausweis mit der Nummer 12. Am 10 Meter Metallgitter und mindestens 5 Securities vorbei betrete ich mit Jamil zum ersten Mal diesen Komplex, als ob nichts gewesen wäre.

Jamil führt mich durchs Gelände. Überall stehen und unterhalten Menschen aus unterschiedlichsten Nationen vor dreistöckgen Häusern. Jamil geht voran. Kaum sind wir durch die Tür eines der Gebäude, kriecht mir ein ekelhafter Gestank in die Nase.

Wir schauen uns eine der Toiletten-Anlagen an. Diese sind alles, nur nicht sauber. Wir öffnen eine Tür, hinter der die Toilette steht, die von eine dreckigen, stinkenden Urinlache umgeben ist. Ich halte mir die Nase zu, es ist unerträglich.

Mein Begleiter führt mich - vorbei an einem Kindergarten, der zur LEA gehört - zum Zimmer der Familie. Er klopft an und es wird uns geöffnet. Ich sehe vier Betten in einem Raum, den ich 10 Quadratmeter schätze . Jamils Mutter, Vater und zwei Geschwister haben gerade geschlafen.

Sie setzen sich auf, nur der kleine Junge im Eck bleibt liegen. Sofort wird mir Tee und ein Stuhl zum Sitzen angeboten. Die kleinste Schwester ist im Kindergarten, wie Jamils Mutter erklärt. Ich versuche, das ganze zu erfassen.

„You are 6 people and you have only 4 beds?“ „Yes.“

Ich traue meinen Augen nicht. Wie kann das sein? Jamil erklärt mir, dass es auch unter den Flüchtlingen nicht immer einfach ist, da es Diebe gebe. Jetzt verstehe ich, warum die Tür abgeschlossen war.

Der Vater macht einen traurigen und resignativen Eindruck auf mich. Jamil erzählt mir, dass er an Nacken und Rücken erkrankt sei, die Sprachbarriere verhindert, dass ich mehr darüber erfahre. Doch kein Arzt würde ihn behandelt, er bekäme lediglich ein Medikament.

Das Essen der Hauskantine sei für die syrische Familie ungenießbar, da sie die deutsche Küche nicht kennen und damit nichts anfangen können. Deshalb würden Sie sich von den 900€, die für alle sechs reichen müssen stets selbst etwas. Eine Küche habe ich bisher nicht gesehen.

Ich frage, ob ich ein paar Aufnahmen machen dürfe, doch der Vater möchte das nicht. Es wird ihm unangenehm sein, in dieser bloßstellenden Situation fotografiert zu werden. Ich zeige Verständnis dafür, verspreche, dass ich über die Situation berichten werde und wünsche ihnen das allerbeste.

Doch ich bleibe noch einen Moment sitzen und schweige. Denke nach. Es schmerzt, dass ich nicht mehr tun kann. Ich würde so gern helfen. Doch alles, was ich kann ist schreiben und fotografieren. So verabschiede ich mich herzlich und Jamil begleitet mich zum Ausgang der LEA.

Wir adden uns auf Facebook - denn ich möchte ihm das Portrait schicken. Schütteln die Hände und ich schaue ihm noch einmal tief in die Augen. „I wish you the very best and a very good future“ sind meine letzten Worte. An der Pforte tausche ich wieder die Ausweise und laufe zurück zum Auto.

Auf der Rückfahrt rufe ich meine Frau an und erzähle ihr, was ich erlebt habe. Ich kann es immer noch nicht ganz glauben und muss das erst mal verarbeiten.

Liebe Familie aus #Syrien, seid willkommen in Deutschland. Mögen die körperlichen Wunden des Vaters geheilt werden und Jamil die Möglichkeit zu studieren bekommen. Möge Deutschland eine Herberge sein, die Eure Trauer, Verzweiflung und Resignation in Freiheit, Frieden und Freude verwandelt.___

posted image

2015-02-26 12:22:33 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

Anfang dieser Woche besuche ich Yassanew im Flüchtlingsheim. Ich halte es zuhause nicht mehr aus und muss immerzu an die Flüchtlinge denken. Frage mich, wie es ihnen geht. Ich will sie treffen.

Vor Ort treffe ich Yassanew, Ibrahim und Mohammed. Zu meinem Erstaunen lachen Sie viel und wirken ungewohnt entspannt. Ich fühle mich direkt wohl in Ihrer Gesellschaft und wie ein alter Freund, der mal eben zu Besuch ist.

Ich erinnere mich: Als ich zum ersten Mal im Heim war, fotografierte ich Yassanew in der Küche - ohne, dass sein Gesicht zu erkennen war.

Über die Zeit hat sich zwischen uns eine echte Freundschaft aufgebaut. Vertrauen zueinander. Wir scherzen, ziehen uns gegenseitig auf, können aber auch über ernste Themen sprechen.

Heute fordere ich Yassanew zum Armdrücken heraus und bitte ihn an den Tisch. Er lacht - und ich glaube nicht, dass ich eine Chancehaben w... more »

Anfang dieser Woche besuche ich Yassanew im Flüchtlingsheim. Ich halte es zuhause nicht mehr aus und muss immerzu an die Flüchtlinge denken. Frage mich, wie es ihnen geht. Ich will sie treffen.

Vor Ort treffe ich Yassanew, Ibrahim und Mohammed. Zu meinem Erstaunen lachen Sie viel und wirken ungewohnt entspannt. Ich fühle mich direkt wohl in Ihrer Gesellschaft und wie ein alter Freund, der mal eben zu Besuch ist.

Ich erinnere mich: Als ich zum ersten Mal im Heim war, fotografierte ich Yassanew in der Küche - ohne, dass sein Gesicht zu erkennen war.

Über die Zeit hat sich zwischen uns eine echte Freundschaft aufgebaut. Vertrauen zueinander. Wir scherzen, ziehen uns gegenseitig auf, können aber auch über ernste Themen sprechen.

Heute fordere ich Yassanew zum Armdrücken heraus und bitte ihn an den Tisch. Er lacht - und ich glaube nicht, dass ich eine Chance haben werde. Yassanew macht den rechten Arm frei und nimmt die linke Hand hinter den Rücken. Ah, stimmt. Das hätte ich fast vergessen.

Etwas überrascht gewinne ich die Partie. Hat er mich gewinnen lassen? Yassanew hat gefühlt 10 Mal mehr Kraft als ich. Vielleicht habe ich meinen Sieg auch meinem Handballer-Arm zu verdanken.

Wir tauschen Tricks aus und nächstes Mal wird es eine Revanche geben. Nun sitzt Yassanew ganz ruhig da und ich blicke ihn an. Frage ihn, ob ich ihn fotografieren darf. Er stimmt zu.

Nach den Klicks zeige ich ihm die Fotos und er sucht sich eines raus, das ich verwenden darf. Dieses ist hier zu sehen.

Yassanew erzählt mir, dass er bald arbeiten darf. Er möchte aber noch besser deutsch lernen, damit er auch eine Chance auf einen Arbeitsplatz hat. Jetzt meine ich zu erahnen, warum er so gute Laune hat.

Auf dem Nachhauseweg bin ich vor lauter Freude überwältigt. Diese Jungs haben keinen Besitz, doch mit ihrem unbändigen Überlebenswillen und dem Drang, die Hoffnung niemals aufzugeben, inspirieren sie mich gewaltig.

Yassanew, danke, dass es Dich gibt.___

posted image

2015-02-24 10:16:02 (5 comments, 3 reshares, 33 +1s)Open 

Es ist Montagabend und ich besuche Muhammed, Yassanew und Ibrahim in Ihrem kleinen Zimmer des Flüchtlingsheimes. Sie sind gut gelaunt und sehen erstaunlich fit aus - im Vergleich zu den Wochen zuvor.

Ich witzele einwenig mit Yassanew herum, dass ich jetzt wieder einen Bodyguard gebrauchen könnte, der mich durchs Haus führt und den anderen Flüchtlingen vorstellt (Yassanew vertraute mir vor ein paar Wochen an, dass Security sein Traumjob wäre).

Er nimmt sich sofort Zeit für mich. Nachdem im ersten Stock des Heimes niemand die Türe öffnet, versuchen wir es im dritten. Dort treffen wir auf Omar, der zu Besuch bei einem Freund ist.

Omar ist schmal, ein bisschen kleiner als ich und spricht mit zurückhaltender Stimme ein sauberes, aufgeräumtes Deutsch.

Der junge Algerier ist 20 Jahre alt und schon seit 2 1/2 Jahren in Deutschland. Omar erzählt mir, dass er vonTunesien m... more »

Es ist Montagabend und ich besuche Muhammed, Yassanew und Ibrahim in Ihrem kleinen Zimmer des Flüchtlingsheimes. Sie sind gut gelaunt und sehen erstaunlich fit aus - im Vergleich zu den Wochen zuvor.

Ich witzele einwenig mit Yassanew herum, dass ich jetzt wieder einen Bodyguard gebrauchen könnte, der mich durchs Haus führt und den anderen Flüchtlingen vorstellt (Yassanew vertraute mir vor ein paar Wochen an, dass Security sein Traumjob wäre).

Er nimmt sich sofort Zeit für mich. Nachdem im ersten Stock des Heimes niemand die Türe öffnet, versuchen wir es im dritten. Dort treffen wir auf Omar, der zu Besuch bei einem Freund ist.

Omar ist schmal, ein bisschen kleiner als ich und spricht mit zurückhaltender Stimme ein sauberes, aufgeräumtes Deutsch.

Der junge Algerier ist 20 Jahre alt und schon seit 2 1/2 Jahren in Deutschland. Omar erzählt mir, dass er von Tunesien mit einem Boot nach Italien geflohen war. Dieser Vorgang sei gefährlich und illegal gewesen.

Während ich mit diesem Mann spreche, fällt mir auf, wie klar seine Augen sind. Doch ich konzentriere mich weiter auf seine Worte.

„10 Stunden, ungefähr“ dauerte die Bootsfahrt. 1000 Euro hat es gekostet. Omar floh anschließend über die Schweiz nach Deutschland.

Bis heute hat Omar keine Arbeitserlaubnis. „Ich würde gerne eine Ausbildung machen, aber die haben es mir nicht erlaubt“, erläutert Omar weiter. Elektromechaniker oder Chemielaborant, das wäre er gerne.

„Ich möchte ein besseres Leben.“ Wie sehr ich ihm dies wünsche. Zuhause in Algerien hatte er keine Arbeit und „die Schule war schwierig“.

Ich kenne Omar erst seit ein paar Minuten, doch seine enormen sprachlichen Fähigkeiten deuten auf eine sehr große Lernbereitschaft und Disziplin hin.

Omars Mutter ist noch in Algerien, sein Vater sei schon tot. Auf ein vorsichtiges Nachfragen ergänzt er, dass sein Vater schon 80 gewesen sei.

Ich möchte mehr über Algerien erfahren und die Arbeitslosigkeit wird sofort zum Thema. „Du merkst das, wenn Du nur durch die Straße läufst. Weil da so viele junge Leute stehen. Kiffen, Drogen.“

Im Vergleich zu Algerien ist es für Omar in Deutschland ein bisschen besser. Ich erinnere: Omar darf auch nach 2 1/2 Jahren Aufenthalt immer noch nicht arbeiten.

Wir tauschen Kontaktdaten aus und ich verspreche Omar, ihn zu besuchen. Ich bin froh, ihn getroffen zu haben. Beinahe fällt mir der Abschied schwer, doch jetzt ist es Zeit zu gehen.

Omar, herzlich willkommen in Deutschland. Es ist gut, dass Du hier bist. Ich wünsche Dir das Beste.___

posted image

2015-02-20 11:43:27 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

„I said no, I don't want to die.“

Heute Morgen begleitet mich ein Journalist, der an einer Reportage arbeitet, zur Landeserstaufnahme-Stelle für Flüchtlinge (LEA): Jonathan Hadem.

Wir verstehen uns blendend und merken schnell, dass wir beide der Hardcore-Szene zugetan sind. So tauschen wir uns über gute Bands und Konzerte aus. Unterwegs kramt Jonathan sein Aufnahmegerät aus und ab sofort wird alles auf Ton dokumentiert.

Vor der LEA begegnet uns Fina aus Gambia. Er ist 24 Jahre alt, etwas größer als ich und strahlt ein starkes Selbstbewusstsein aus. Auf seine Nachfrage hin zeige ich ihm meine Webseite und erkläre ich, wer ich bin und stelle Jonathan vor.

Fina antwortet erst etwas zögerlich, doch nach und nach wächst sein Vertrauen zu uns - so auch das, was er über sich offenbart. Der Gambianer hatte in seiner Heimat einen kleinen Straßenkiosk,über den Secon... more »

„I said no, I don't want to die.“

Heute Morgen begleitet mich ein Journalist, der an einer Reportage arbeitet, zur Landeserstaufnahme-Stelle für Flüchtlinge (LEA): Jonathan Hadem.

Wir verstehen uns blendend und merken schnell, dass wir beide der Hardcore-Szene zugetan sind. So tauschen wir uns über gute Bands und Konzerte aus. Unterwegs kramt Jonathan sein Aufnahmegerät aus und ab sofort wird alles auf Ton dokumentiert.

Vor der LEA begegnet uns Fina aus Gambia. Er ist 24 Jahre alt, etwas größer als ich und strahlt ein starkes Selbstbewusstsein aus. Auf seine Nachfrage hin zeige ich ihm meine Webseite und erkläre ich, wer ich bin und stelle Jonathan vor.

Fina antwortet erst etwas zögerlich, doch nach und nach wächst sein Vertrauen zu uns - so auch das, was er über sich offenbart. Der Gambianer hatte in seiner Heimat einen kleinen Straßenkiosk, über den Second-Hand-Kleidung verkaufte. Das Geschäft lief sehr gut.

Als er beide Eltern verlor, half ihm ein Freund nach Libyen Dort arbeitete Fina 20 Monate. Eines Nachts wurde er von Männern geweckt. Er solle sofort mitkommen und hätte eine dreistündige Bootsfahrt vor sich.

Fina wehrte sich. „I said no, I don't want to die.“ „Eather we kill you or you go.“ Fina wollte nie nach Italien, „that was never my intention.“ Er wurde gezwungen.

Die Bootsfahrt sei gefährlich gewesen und hätte ganze zwei Tage gedauert. Gemeinsam mit 200 anderen Menschen wäre er so nach Italien übergesetzt.

„I never want to experience this again.“ In Italien war es schlimm, kein Geld, kein Essen. Fina schlief eine Woche auf der Straße. Kannte niemanden. Als er von Deutschland hörte, wurde ihm gesagt, dass es hier besser sei. So machte er sich auf und kam gestern in Karlsruhe an.

Ich kann Fina nur bewundern. Was hat dieser Kerln nicht alles ausgehalten und überstanden. Fina ist ein Held.

Fina zeigt mir seinen Zettel, auf dem sein eigentlicher Bestimmungsort in Deutschland geschrieben steht: Mannheim. Gegen 14 Uhr werde er mit anderen Flüchtlingen dorthingebracht, mit dem Bus.

Jonathan und ich verabschieden uns von Fina und wünschen ihm viel Glück. „Maybe one day you'll open up a second hand shop in Germany“ sage ich Fina und ein breites Lächeln erfüllt sein Gesicht.

„Then I'd stay in Germany forever“.

Fina, sei willkommen in Deutschland! Mögest Du für immer bleiben und eines Tages ein Geschäft eröffnen dürfen. Mögest Du unter uns neue Freunde finden und eine sichere Zukunft. Mögest Du nie wieder dazu gezwungen werden, zu fliehen. Friede mit Dir.___

posted image

2015-02-10 16:29:05 (13 comments, 5 reshares, 71 +1s)Open 

Fofana stellt sich an die Wand, schaut mich an, und ich mache ein Foto. Dann geht er in sein Zimmer, er möchte alleine sein.

Eine halbe Stunde zuvor fahre ich zuhause los, um Yassanew und Ibrahim zu besuchen. Mein Herz pocht laut, denn ich habe zwei ausgedruckte Portraits von den beiden dabei, die ich ihnen geben will. Ich bin so gespannt, wie sie reagieren werden!

Schnell eingeparkt, klemme ich die beiden 20x30 Prints unter den Arm. Durch die Fenster des weißen Hauses sehe ich einen Flüchtling, der mit freiem Oberkörper am Fenster steht - frisch geduscht. Seine stählernen Muskel spiegeln sich im Zimmerlicht (es stellt sich später heraus, dass der feine Kerl Ibrahim ist, den ich Wochen später fotografieren werde).

Im Erdgeschoss duftet es nach frischer Suppe - ich genieße das jedes Mal. Ich klopfe kurz an und mir wird geöffnet. Ibrahim und Yassanew sind da, sieschauen ... more »

Fofana stellt sich an die Wand, schaut mich an, und ich mache ein Foto. Dann geht er in sein Zimmer, er möchte alleine sein.

Eine halbe Stunde zuvor fahre ich zuhause los, um Yassanew und Ibrahim zu besuchen. Mein Herz pocht laut, denn ich habe zwei ausgedruckte Portraits von den beiden dabei, die ich ihnen geben will. Ich bin so gespannt, wie sie reagieren werden!

Schnell eingeparkt, klemme ich die beiden 20x30 Prints unter den Arm. Durch die Fenster des weißen Hauses sehe ich einen Flüchtling, der mit freiem Oberkörper am Fenster steht - frisch geduscht. Seine stählernen Muskel spiegeln sich im Zimmerlicht (es stellt sich später heraus, dass der feine Kerl Ibrahim ist, den ich Wochen später fotografieren werde).

Im Erdgeschoss duftet es nach frischer Suppe - ich genieße das jedes Mal. Ich klopfe kurz an und mir wird geöffnet. Ibrahim und Yassanew sind da, sie schauen Fernsehen.

Ich freue mich sehr, sie zu sehen. Doch Ibrahim wirkt sehr bedrückt. Ich gebe ihm das Foto, er bedankt sich, doch er ist zu traurig. Ich frage ihn, was los ist, und er gibt mir in wenigen Worten zu verstehen, dass er immer noch keine Arbeit habe und er das enge Zusammensein mit den anderen Flüchtlingen leid hat.

Er tut mir so leid. Yassaweh ist ähnlich gestimmt, doch er bekommt ein breites Lächeln, als er das Foto sieht. Ich bitte ihn, mich einwenig durchs Heim zu begleiten. Vor ein paar Wochen erzählte er mir noch, dass sein Traumjob „Security“ sei.

„Yassanew, ich brauche jemand, der mich beschützt!“ scherze ich ein bisschen und sein Gesicht erhellt sich wieder. Auch Ibrahim lächelt ein bisschen. Yassanew begleitet mich ins Nebenzimmer, dort leben seit 15 Monaten sieben Flüchtlinge aus Gambia in einem sehr engen, abgedunkelten Raum.

Ihr Zimmer ist geschmückt mit einer großen Afrika-Karte, Stoffen, Postern, die an ihre Heimat erinnern. Zwei sitzen vor einem Fernseher und gucken Nachrichten, in denen über globalen Terrorismus berichtet wird.

Ich versuche, irgendwie mit den Männern ins Gespräch zu kommen, doch heute habe ich kein Glück. Yassanew begleitet mich in die hell beleuchtete Küche. Am alten Herd steht ein großer, kräftiger Mann, der mit einem Holzlöffel einen roten Topf bedient.

Sein Name ist Fofana Senesie und ich brauche ganze drei Anläufe, um mir seinen Namen zu merken, der mir im Gespräch immer wieder entfällt. Ich mache Scherze über mich selbst und Fofana lächelt einwenig.

Doch sein Lächeln ist überzogen von Trauer. Ich entscheide mich dafür, ihn nicht zu fragen, warum er hier ist, das wäre jetzt zu viel. Doch er ist bereit, sich kurz von mir fotografieren zu lassen - zieht sich ein anderes T-Shirt an und stellt sich in den Gang.

Fofana stellt sich an die Wand, schaut mich an, und ich mache ein Foto. Dann geht er in sein Zimmer, er möchte alleine sein. Es ist jetzt nicht an der Zeit, ihm hinterherzulaufen. So packe ich meine Kamera und verabschiede mich in der Küche.

-

Meine naive Vorfreude, ihnen ein Foto zu bringen traf direkt auf die Lebensrealität der Flüchtlinge. Diese Jungs kommen aus der deprimierenden Lage nicht heraus. Sie führen doch so ein anderes Leben, wie ich. Sie sind diejenigen, die dringend Hilfe brauchen.

Doch ich kann das nicht leisten. Ich bin der „Foto-Mann“. Ich kann nichts ändern, doch ich kann versuchen, wenigstens ein paar Minuten für diese Jungs da zu sein. Zuzuhören.

Und mit den Bildern, die ich von Ihnen mache, das Bild, das meine Freunde im Netz von Flüchtlingen haben, ein bisschen verändern. Das ist meine Hoffnung.

Fotofana Senesie, sei willkommen in Deutschland. Möge dieses Land Deine Trauer lindern. Mögest Du Freunde finden und Arbeit. Wegbegleiter, die Dich unterstützen und aufmuntern, wenn Du nicht mehr weiter weißt. Friede mit Dir.___

posted image

2015-02-05 13:10:54 (4 comments, 7 reshares, 52 +1s)Open 

Freunde für zehn Minuten

Es ist kurz vor halb 10, bitterkalt und meine Fingerspitzen frieren selbst unter den dicken Termohandschuhen. Ich frage mich, ob heute Morgen überhaupt jemand mit mir sprechen wird, da es so kalt ist. Kein gutes Wetter für Plaudereien.

Ob es in den Flüchtlingsheimen auch so kalt ist? Sind die Räume dort gut beheizt? Ich hoffe, dass ich dies in den nächsten Wochen herausfinden werde.

Ich stehe an der Kreuzung vor der Landes-Erstaufnahme-Stelle für Flüchtlinge. Ein Mann starrt mich aus seinem Auto heraus an, meine Kamera provoziert wohl ein bisschen.

Ich treffe zwei Jungs, Ibrahim und Achmad aus Gambia. Sie begegnen mir sehr nett, müssen aber dringend weiter. Auch die Autos rauschen vorbei.

Keine Minute später läuft ein Mann namens Baladoku auf mich zu und wir verständigen uns auf Englisch. Baladoku ist ein schmalerMann mit Ka... more »

Freunde für zehn Minuten

Es ist kurz vor halb 10, bitterkalt und meine Fingerspitzen frieren selbst unter den dicken Termohandschuhen. Ich frage mich, ob heute Morgen überhaupt jemand mit mir sprechen wird, da es so kalt ist. Kein gutes Wetter für Plaudereien.

Ob es in den Flüchtlingsheimen auch so kalt ist? Sind die Räume dort gut beheizt? Ich hoffe, dass ich dies in den nächsten Wochen herausfinden werde.

Ich stehe an der Kreuzung vor der Landes-Erstaufnahme-Stelle für Flüchtlinge. Ein Mann starrt mich aus seinem Auto heraus an, meine Kamera provoziert wohl ein bisschen.

Ich treffe zwei Jungs, Ibrahim und Achmad aus Gambia. Sie begegnen mir sehr nett, müssen aber dringend weiter. Auch die Autos rauschen vorbei.

Keine Minute später läuft ein Mann namens Baladoku auf mich zu und wir verständigen uns auf Englisch. Baladoku ist ein schmaler Mann mit Kappe, gleichförmigem Gesicht und fein ausrasiertem Bart.

Auf die Frage, woher er sei, antwortet er „from Karlsruhe“. Für Baladoku ist es eine Selbstverständlichkeit. Ich muss nachhaken, um herauszufinden, was seine ursprüngliche Heimat ist. Ein kleines Missverständnis führt zu seiner Antwort: „My country is no good, is war, fights…“ Baladokus Heimat ist aus Nigeria, wie sich herausstellt.

„Because of Bokoh Haram. That's why I come here.“ Baladoku hat keine Familie und lebt seit zwei Wochen in Karlsruhe. Mit klarer Stimme erzählt er mir, dass er von Nigeria nach Frankreich geflogen sei, dort zwei Tage geblieben und anschließend nach Karlsruhe gekommen ist.

Auch Baladoku wurde von Boko Haram angegriffen. Auch er sollte getötet werden. Baladoku verlor Familie und Freunde, konnte dem sicheren Tod jedoch entrinnen. Wir sprechen darüber, wie er es geschafft hatte, zu entkommen und ich sage ihm, „you are a strong man“.

Wir wissen beide, dass Stärke nicht immer das Entscheidende ist, doch ich sehe in diesem Mann eine Entschiedenheit, wie sie mir selten begegnet. Und dies sage ich ihm auch.

„If you catch me, you are going down.“ Das klingt nun etwas übertrieben, doch er würde alles tun, um zu überleben. Und das ist auch der Grund, warum er es bis nach Deutschland geschafft hat. Dafür bewundere ich ihn. Das macht ihn für mich zum Helden.

Ich zeige ihm meine Webseite auf dem iPhone, um ihm zu verdeutlichen, was ich mache - denn Baladoku möchte sehen, was ich bisher gemacht habe. Je mehr Bilder ich ihm zeige, umso größer wird sein Vertrauen und schließlich willigt er ein, dass ich ihn fotografieren dürfe.

Und wie ich mich darüber freue! „You made my day!“ Ich kann nicht anders, als ihm zu sagen, dass ich ihn mag. „You like me?“ fragt Baladoku etwas ungläubig. „Yes. I like you.“ Und das stimmt auch. In den vergangenen zehn Minuten habe ich diesen Mann schätzen gelernt.

Allade Shoue Baladoku (das ist sein vollständiger Name), bedankt sich höflich „I'm very happy to you“ und wir verabschieden uns. Am liebsten würde ich mit ihm mitgehen und weiter ein Freund für ihn bleiben. Doch jetzt muss ich ihn ziehen lassen. Zwei Leben haben sich für zehn Minuten getroffen und dann geht die Reise weiter.

Es mag vielleicht blöd klingen, aber ich werde Baladoku vermissen. Ich verspreche ihm, dass ich über ihn schreiben werde.

Baladoku, sei herzlich willkommen in Deutschland. Ich hoffe, dass Du hier ein sicheres Zuhause finden und nicht immer vom letzten Groschen leben musst. Dass Du neue Freunde finden wirst, die Dir zur Seite stehen und Dich unterstützen. Danke, dass es Dich gibt.___

posted image

2015-02-03 16:15:10 (11 comments, 6 reshares, 36 +1s)Open 

Es ist Ende Dezember. Ich fahre mit meinem Auto zum Parkplatz in der Nähe der Landes-Erstaufnahmestelle für Flüchtlinge. Bevor ich einbiege, sehe ich einen Mann, der etwas trägt, das aussieht wie eine große Puppe. Die Beine baumeln leblos hin und her. Ich habe ein komisches Gefühl bei der Sache, doch ich parke erst mal ein.

Kaum ausgestiegen sehe ich linker-hand den Mann auf mich zulaufen. Er händigt mir einen Zettel aus, auf dem eine kleine Karte der Oststadt in Karlsruhe eingezeichnet und die Adresse eines Arztes markiert ist. Der Mann versteht mich kaum und er ist verzweifelt. Hält den Finger immer wieder auf die Karte.

Um seine Situation zu verdeutlichen, dreht es sich zur Seite und ich sehe, was er auf seinen Schultern trägt. Es ist ein kreidebleiches Mädchen, vielleicht 3 Jahre alt. Sie hat viel zu große Kleider an an und die kastanienbraunen Haare wehen durch ihrfeines Ges... more »

Es ist Ende Dezember. Ich fahre mit meinem Auto zum Parkplatz in der Nähe der Landes-Erstaufnahmestelle für Flüchtlinge. Bevor ich einbiege, sehe ich einen Mann, der etwas trägt, das aussieht wie eine große Puppe. Die Beine baumeln leblos hin und her. Ich habe ein komisches Gefühl bei der Sache, doch ich parke erst mal ein.

Kaum ausgestiegen sehe ich linker-hand den Mann auf mich zulaufen. Er händigt mir einen Zettel aus, auf dem eine kleine Karte der Oststadt in Karlsruhe eingezeichnet und die Adresse eines Arztes markiert ist. Der Mann versteht mich kaum und er ist verzweifelt. Hält den Finger immer wieder auf die Karte.

Um seine Situation zu verdeutlichen, dreht es sich zur Seite und ich sehe, was er auf seinen Schultern trägt. Es ist ein kreidebleiches Mädchen, vielleicht 3 Jahre alt. Sie hat viel zu große Kleider an an und die kastanienbraunen Haare wehen durch ihr feines Gesicht. 

Sofort frage ich, ob ich ein Foto machen darf, doch der Mann möchte das nicht. Ich versuche, ihn zu überreden, denn ich möchte diese schreckliche Situation zeigen können. Doch er wimmelt mich ab. Verständlich. Er hat gerade ganz andere Sorgen.

Stelle Dir mal vor: Du hast Deine geliebte Heimat verlassen und bist weit weg in ein fremdes Land geflüchtet, dessen Regeln und Gepflogenheiten nicht kennst. Die Reise ist anstrengend, Du bist erschöpft, wirst mit vielen anderen in einer Aufnahmestelle kurzfristig beherbergt.

Doch Deine Tochter ist krank. Ihr Zustand verschlimmert sich, so dass sie sich nicht mehr bewegen kann und auf keines Deiner Worte reagiert. 

Aufgeregt suchst Du nach einem Arzt in der Aufnahmestelle, 1000 fremde Stimmen wirbeln durch Dein Ohr, doch alles, was Du bekommst, ist ein Zettel mit einer Karte drauf. Die Beschriftungen sind krumme, komische Zeichen, die Du nicht entziffern kannst. 

So schickt man Dich los. Du weißt nicht, wo Du bist und Du weißt nicht, wo Du hinmusst. Legst Dir Dein geliebtes Töchterlein um die Schultern und läufst einfach los, in der Hoffnung, doch den Arzt zu finden. 

Deine Tochter reagiert nicht mehr, doch Du spürst das Klopfen des kleinen Herzchen auf der Schulter. Du weißt, dass Du es schaffen musst, doch Du weißt auch, dass Du in einem Labyrinth bist, dessen Ausgang Du nicht kennst.

Du hast Angst um Deine Tochter. Sie jetzt zu verlieren würde Dein Leben zermürben. Es wäre das Wahrwerden aller Ängste, die Du als Vater ohnehin schon hast. Du würdest Dir Dein restliches Leben Vorwürfe machen - wenn es denn dann überhaupt noch lohnenswert ist, weiterzuleben. 

-

Nun steht dieser Mann mit seiner Tochter vor mir. Ich versuche ihm, zu erklären, wie er zum Arzt kommt, doch es ergibt keinen Sinn. Er versteht mich ja nicht. Ich weiß: Er würde nie ankommen. Er ist verloren.

Ich entschließe mich schnell, die Beiden zum Arzt zu fahren. Wir laufen schnell zum Auto und legen seine Tochter in den Kindersitz. Ich habe auch Kinder. Quietschlebendig, neugierig und voller Leben.

Nicht so dieses Kind. Das Mädchen sackt regungslos in sich zusammen und öffnet seine Augen, die gen Himmel verdreht sind. Ich glaube, dass in diesem Mädchen nicht mehr viel Leben ist. Nur ein klitzekleiner Hauch. Viellicht irre ich mich auch. Die Angst um dieses Kind durchfährt meinen ganzen Körper.

Bitte stirb nicht, kleines Mädchen. Nicht jetzt. Du hast es so weit geschafft. Bleib stark.

Hastig tippe ich die Adresse ins Navi und rase los. Unterwegs sagt der Mann das erste Wort und einzige Wort, das ich verstehen kann. „Epilepsie“. Bleib stark, Mädchen. Ihr Mund steht offen und sie verliert Spucke.

Ich konzentriere mich aufs Fahren. Keine 3 Minuten später bremse ich vor der Arztpraxis. „Here we are!“ rufe ich, der Mann öffnet die Tür, schnallt seine Tochter ab und legt sie sich um.

Ich schaue ihm hinterher und schnaufe durch.

Dann fahre ich nach Hause. Doch im Auto kommen mir die Tränen. Ich rufe meine Frau an und erzähle ihr aufgeregt, was mir gerade passiert ist. Ich kann das alles gar nicht fassen, das ging so schnell. Zu schnell.

Meine Frau tröstet mich und sagt, dass sie stolz auf mich ist und ich das Richtige getan hätte. Diese Worte sind wie Honig. Im Büro angekommen spreche ich noch mit meinem Freund Daniel darüber. Ich muss das loswerden. Ich muss... ich muss... ich bin... alles und nichts auf einmal. 

Im Redaktions-Chat des Foto-Magazines, für das ich Herausgeber bin, fragt mich eine Redakteurin, der ich auch davon erzählt habe, wie es jetzt wohl weitergehen wird mit dem Mädchen. 

Da fällt mir auf: Ich werde die beiden nicht mehr sehen. Flüchtlinge, die in die Erstaufnahmestelle kommen, bleiben meist nur kurz. 

Das Mädchen wird mir die folgenden Tage nicht aus dem Kopf gehen. Ich werde immer wieder daran denken müssen. Bleib stark, kleines Mädchen.___

posted image

2015-02-02 12:23:21 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

Es ist Montag, der 2. Februar und ich bin wieder mit der Kamera unterwegs. Es ist kalt und nass. Ekelhaftes Wetter.

Vor der Landes-Erstaufnahme-Stelle treffe ich eine Gruppe von sieben Menschen aus dem Kosovo. Ein Ehepaar mit Kind, ein junger Kollege mit Undercut, zwei etwa gleichaltrige Herren mit markantem Gesicht und ein etwas älterer Mann.

Bisher bin ich größeren Gruppen stets aus dem Weg gegangen, weil ich leichter mit einzelnen Menschen ins Gespräch komme. Doch die sympathischen Gesichter nehmen schon von weitem Blickkontakt mit mir auf.

Unser Gespräch kommt schnell in Gang und der Jüngste mit Zopf und Undercut übernimmt das Übersetzen. Enis ist 17 Jahre alt und erzählt mir, dass die Gruppe schon eine Weile in Deutschland sei.

Enis ist schlank, hat ein feines Gesicht und vertraut mir schnell die Probleme an, denen die Gruppe in ihrer Heimatausgeset... more »

Es ist Montag, der 2. Februar und ich bin wieder mit der Kamera unterwegs. Es ist kalt und nass. Ekelhaftes Wetter.

Vor der Landes-Erstaufnahme-Stelle treffe ich eine Gruppe von sieben Menschen aus dem Kosovo. Ein Ehepaar mit Kind, ein junger Kollege mit Undercut, zwei etwa gleichaltrige Herren mit markantem Gesicht und ein etwas älterer Mann.

Bisher bin ich größeren Gruppen stets aus dem Weg gegangen, weil ich leichter mit einzelnen Menschen ins Gespräch komme. Doch die sympathischen Gesichter nehmen schon von weitem Blickkontakt mit mir auf.

Unser Gespräch kommt schnell in Gang und der Jüngste mit Zopf und Undercut übernimmt das Übersetzen. Enis ist 17 Jahre alt und erzählt mir, dass die Gruppe schon eine Weile in Deutschland sei.

Enis ist schlank, hat ein feines Gesicht und vertraut mir schnell die Probleme an, denen die Gruppe in ihrer Heimat ausgesetzt war. Er selbst habe auf der Baustelle gearbeitet. 2 Monate hier, 1 Monat da, immer irgendwo anders.

Dann fällt das Wort Mafia zu ersten Mal. Die Mafia den Kosovo in kürzester Zeit umgekrempelt und die ganze Gesellschaft mit Drogenhandel unterwandert. Dann wäre die Armut gekommen und die Arbeitsloskeit auch. Enis sagt, er habe mehrere Tage weder Essen, Trinken noch Strom gehabt.

Schlimme Bilder steigen mir zu Kopfe. Ich stelle mir Enis vor, wie er ausgehungert und nach Wasser lechzend um sein Leben kämpft. Im Dunkeln. 

Muhammed, ein hagerer Mann mit dem weißen Schal erzählt, dass er 15 Jahre als Kellner gearbeitet habe. Auch hier: Von einem zum nächsten Moment überfiel Muhammed die Arbeitslosigkeit. Kein Geld, nichts mehr.

Lerim, ein weiterer junger Herr war Musikproduzent, übersetzt Enis. Hier frage ich nicht mehr nach, denn ich kann mir den Ausgang seiner Geschichte denken. Weder Arbeit noch Geld zu haben bedeutet eine direkte Bedrohung des eigenen Lebens. Und sie kommt ohne Vorwarnung. 

Enis und die anderen sind sichtlich deprimiert - während sie erzählen, scheinen sie noch blasser zu sein, als sie sowieso schon sind. Doch - bis auf die kleine Familie, die leider weiter muss - bleiben alle bei mir stehen. Sie wollen erzählen, sie wollen gehört werden.

Enis erwähnt immer wieder, dass er sich wünsche, einmal im Fernsehen ein Interview zu bekommen. Diese Männer wollen unbedingt, dass die Welt erfährt, wie es ist, im Kosovo zu (über-)leben.

Enis meint, dass Deutschland ein gutes Land sei. "Hier hast du alles. Schule, Essen, alles. Hier ist es perfekt. Normal."

Wie ich ihnen doch wünsche, die Normalität einmal genießen zu können. Doch dieser Wunsch wird wohl erstmal ein Wunsch bleiben. 

Als ich sie frage, wie es ihnen in Deutschland bisher ergangen sei, verrät Enis sichtich besorgt, dass es in ihrem FLüchtlingsheim fürchterlich sei. Die Gruppe sei mit 700 (!) anderen Menschen in einem Raum. Überall wären Securities, das Essen sei ungenießbar und die Sanitäranlagen in einem Container.

Mit klarer Stimme betont Enis: "Die Toiletten sind eine perfekte Katastrophe. Perfekte Katastophe."

Dann mache ich noch ein paar Einzelportraits und fotografiere auch den 46-jährigen Ibus. Er wirkt vom Leben gezeichnet. Armer Mann. 

Ich verspreche Enis, dass ich ihn besuchen und die Fotos vorbeibringen werde. Wir tauschen Telefonnummern und Facebook-Profile aus. Enis hat ein kaputtes, altes iPhone. Wenigstens etwas, das halbwegs funktioniert. Auch diesen Beitrag wird er lesen.

Im Moment unserer Verabschiedung schaue ich den Jungs noch eine Weile hinterher. Ich fühle Trauer und bin beschämt für die Zustände, in denen sie hier in Karlsruhe leben müssen. Ich weiß, dass ich an ihrer Stelle längst durchgedreht wäre.

Ich packe meine Kamera ein und laufe zurück zum Auto. Auf dem Heimweg vergesse ich oft, was um mich herum passiert und muss immerzu an Enis denken. Teile seiner Worte springen auf, Bilder von Hunger und der Mafia.

Enis, Muhammed, Lerim und Ibus: Seid herzlich willkommen in Deutschland. Ich hoffe so sehr, dass Ihr hier Arbeit und eine Bleibe finden werdet - mit weniger Menschen um Euch herum und sanitären Anlagen die keine Katastrophe sind. Ihr habt es so weit geschafft. Seid stark. Bleibt stark. ___

posted image

2015-01-31 19:09:14 (1 comments, 8 reshares, 56 +1s)Open 

Es ist Freitag, der 23. Januar, als mich diese Nachricht von einem Stefan in meinem Posteingang überrascht:

"Hallo Martin,

seit ein paar Tagen nun verfolge ich deine Arbeit und heute Morgen glaube ich dich sogar gesehen zu haben.

Ich arbeite in der EnBW nur einen Steinwurf entfernt von dem Ort, an dem du deine Bilder machst.

Der Kontrast der beiden Welten, in denen wir beide täglich unterwegs sind, könnte wohl größer nicht sein.

Meine Neugierde, meine Scham und mein Interesse aber auch nicht.

Würdest du dir vielleicht die Zeit für einen Kaffee mit mir nehmen?"

Wir schreiben ein bisschen hin- und her und ein paar Tage später bin ich wieder mit der Kamera unterwegs, um Flüchtlinge zu treffen. Doch ich entscheide mich kurzfristig um, da ich direkt vor dem EnBW-Gebäude stehe, welches sich schräg gegenüber von derLandes-Erst... more »

Es ist Freitag, der 23. Januar, als mich diese Nachricht von einem Stefan in meinem Posteingang überrascht:

"Hallo Martin,

seit ein paar Tagen nun verfolge ich deine Arbeit und heute Morgen glaube ich dich sogar gesehen zu haben.

Ich arbeite in der EnBW nur einen Steinwurf entfernt von dem Ort, an dem du deine Bilder machst.

Der Kontrast der beiden Welten, in denen wir beide täglich unterwegs sind, könnte wohl größer nicht sein.

Meine Neugierde, meine Scham und mein Interesse aber auch nicht.

Würdest du dir vielleicht die Zeit für einen Kaffee mit mir nehmen?"

Wir schreiben ein bisschen hin- und her und ein paar Tage später bin ich wieder mit der Kamera unterwegs, um Flüchtlinge zu treffen. Doch ich entscheide mich kurzfristig um, da ich direkt vor dem EnBW-Gebäude stehe, welches sich schräg gegenüber von der Landes-Erstaufnahme-Stelle für Flüchtlinge befindet.

Es handelt sich hierbei um einen prächtigen Bau, groß und verglast und mit einem Blick nicht zu erfassen. Automatische Schiebetüren, ein großräumiges Foyer und spiegelnde Oberflächen. Nach Wikipedia ist die EnBW ein börsennotiertes Energieversorgungsunternehmen mit Sitz in Karlsruhe. Das Unternehmen ist nach E.ON und RWE das drittgrößte Energieunternehmen in Deutschland.

Ich krame die Telefonnummer von Stefan aus dem Smartphone und rufe ihn an. "Gib mir 2 Minuten, ich komme runter." Also laufe ich zum Eingang und warte. Das Foyer hallt mehr, als ich es vermutet habe und ringsum sitzen Männer in Anzügen und sprechen kaum wahrnehmbar über wichtige Dinge.

Ich erkenne Stefan von weitem, denn er ist der einzige, der mir entgegenläuft und zulächelt. Ein schmaler Mann mit kurzen Haare, Dreitagebart, Turnschuhen und einem schicken Winterpulli. Stefan holt sich einen Kaffee und bezahlt: Ohne Geld. Mit einer Karte, die sein Konto belastet.

Wir setzen uns in der Nähe der hauseigenen Cafeteria und beginnen zu plaudern. Was Stefan brennend interessiert ist, wie ich auf die Idee gekommen bin, meine Serie zu machen. Und: Ob ich wirklich einfach die Menschen zugehe.

Stefan ist mir sehr sympathisch und wir verstehen uns auf Anhieb. Wir lachen viel und die Chemie stimmt. Wunderbar. Doch Stefan ist auch verzweifelt. "Ich halte es fast nicht aus. Wir sitzen hier in diesem riesigen Gebäude, die EnBW hat einen Jahresumsatz von 19,2 Mrd. und da drüben sind diese Flüchtlinge, die gar nichts haben."

Wir kommen zum Kern des Treffens. Stefan will unbedingt etwas tun, aber er weiß nicht, was. Er hat ein gutes Gehalt und es geht ihm - eigentlich - bestens. Doch dieser Kontrast zwischen reich und arm zermürbt ihn. Als er mir erzählt, dass er DJ ist und ab und auflegt, frage ich ihn, ob er nicht Lust hätte, für ein paar Flüchtlinge aufzulegen.

Seine Augen glitzern. Das wäre geil. Doch wie anfangen? Und vor allem wo? Stefan hat noch zu viele Fragen. Ich erzähle ihm, dass die Flüchtlinge hier in Karlsruhe morgens keinen Kaffee bekämen, weil das nicht im Versorgungsplan vorgesehen wäre.

Wieder glitzern seine Augen. "Das mach ich. Nehme morgens ein paar Kaffeekannen mit und biete Flüchtlingen den Kaffee an." Wir sprechen darüber, wie oft kleine Gesten einen großen Unterschied machen können und graben noch ein paar weitere Ideen aus. Es ist ein wunderbares Gespräch, die Zeit vergeht unmerklich.

Wir schmunzeln und erzählen uns Geschichten über unsere Erfahrungen, sind wütend auf die soziale Ungerechtigkeit und wissen beide: Wir wollen etwas verändern. Jeder auf seine Art, jeder, mit dem, was er hat.

Als ich aufbreche und ich ihn spontan umarme, ist uns beiden klar, dass wir uns nicht das letzte Mal gesehen haben. "Hey, komm doch mal, wenn ich in einer Disco auflege!" ruft er mir zu, als ich schon am Ausgang stehe. "Klar! Gerne!" rufe ich zurück und winke ihm zu.

In den folgenden Tagen denke ich immer wieder über unser Treffen nach. Und folgender Gedanke schießt mir in den Kopf: Wenn Menschen sich aufgrund meiner Bilder fragen, was sie tun können, um Flüchtlingen zu helfen und das dann auch tun, dann hat mein Projekt tatsächlich Sinn. Dann lohnt es sich.

Danke, Stefan.___

posted image

2015-01-29 12:05:41 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 24 +1s)Open 

„40 Jahre keine Arbeit.“

Assan und sein 11jähriger Sohn kommen aus Mazedonien Beide lächeln mir schon aus der Ferne zu und so ist es denkbar einfach, mit ihnen ins Gespräch zu kommen.

Die beiden strahlen eine Freude aus, die ich bei Flüchtlingen selten zu sehen bekommen habe, denn die meisten leiden sehr unter ihrer Geschichte und können so gar nicht genießen, „angekommen“ zu sein.

Doch zu meiner Verwunderung sprechen beide ein mittelgutes Deutsch. Assan hat Augen wie ein leuchtender Kristall, sie funkeln lichterloh im trüben Sonnenlicht des Morgens.

Ich mache ihm einige Komplimente und wir beginnen ein intensives Gespräch, das jetzt schnell eine Wendung nimmt. Assans Wut und Verzweiflung ist deutlich zu spüren und sein Lächeln ist auf einmal verschwunden.

Er habe 40 Jahre keine Arbeit gefunden, was bedeutet, dass er in diesen Jahrenkein Geld hatte. ... more »

„40 Jahre keine Arbeit.“

Assan und sein 11jähriger Sohn kommen aus Mazedonien Beide lächeln mir schon aus der Ferne zu und so ist es denkbar einfach, mit ihnen ins Gespräch zu kommen.

Die beiden strahlen eine Freude aus, die ich bei Flüchtlingen selten zu sehen bekommen habe, denn die meisten leiden sehr unter ihrer Geschichte und können so gar nicht genießen, „angekommen“ zu sein.

Doch zu meiner Verwunderung sprechen beide ein mittelgutes Deutsch. Assan hat Augen wie ein leuchtender Kristall, sie funkeln lichterloh im trüben Sonnenlicht des Morgens.

Ich mache ihm einige Komplimente und wir beginnen ein intensives Gespräch, das jetzt schnell eine Wendung nimmt. Assans Wut und Verzweiflung ist deutlich zu spüren und sein Lächeln ist auf einmal verschwunden.

Er habe 40 Jahre keine Arbeit gefunden, was bedeutet, dass er in diesen Jahren kein Geld hatte. Assan ist 54. Seine Familie wäre zu fünft und sie hätten kein Zimmer gehabt. Sie waren obdachlos. Ramadan sei nicht zur Schule gegangen.

Das übersteigt mein Vorstellungsvermögen. Mit meinen 34 Jahren habe ich nichtmal so lange gelebt, wie dieser Mann arbeitslos war. Aber eines weiß ich: Dass mich eine solche Zeit erdrücken würde und ich erst Recht keine Kraft dazu hätte, eine Flucht zu organisieren, geschweige denn, durchzuführen. So muss der Leidensdruck enorm für diese Familie gewesen sein. 

Assan macht wiederholt deutlich, dass er den Präsidenten von Mazedonien für einen Mafiosi halte. Ich kenne mich in der mazedonischen Politik nicht aus, und kann die Richtigkeit seiner Einschätzung nicht überprüfen - doch ich bin nicht hier, um Fakten zu validieren.

Ich bin hier, um zuzuhören. Ramadan, der Sohn, hört unserem Gespräch gespannt zu, ohne sich einzumischen. Als er mir ein bisschen über sich erzählt, funkeln auch seine Augen. Ramadan hat sein gutes deutsch von seinem Vater gelernt - worauf Assan offensichtlich stolz ist. 

Ob das Erlernen der Fremdsprache zur Vorbereitung auf eine lange geplante Flucht geschah, kann ich nur vermuten. Ich möchte den Vater nicht länger mit der Vergangenheit belasten - da er ohnehin aufgebracht  ist, ohne unfreundlich zu sein. 

Zwei Männer aus dem Kosovo stellen sich zu uns und lauschen der Konversation. Sie nicken verständnisvoll und sind interessiert an der Geschichte Assans. Diese Menschen sind in ihrem Leid vereint.

Ich schließe meine Notizen ab, verneige mich und wünsche allen das Beste für ihr Leben.

Assan und Ramadan, seid herzlich willkommen in Deutschland. Mögest Du, Assan die Erlaubnis, zu arbeiten, schnell bekommen. Mögest Du, Ramadan eine Schule besuchen dürfen. Möget Ihr in Deutschland warm und freundlich empfangen werden und Eure Familie ein Dach über dem Kopf finden, das Euch Schutz und Sicherheit bieten kann.___

posted image

2015-01-27 16:21:03 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 48 +1s)Open 

„Ich werde um mein Leben kämpfen. Bis mir die Kraft ausgeht. Deshalb bin ich hier.“

Das ist Muhammed aus Gambia. Ein Mann wie ein Berg, kräftige Schultern und Arme wie ein Baum. Ein humorvoller Kerl, mit dem ich sofort ins Gespräch kam.

Doch Muhammed ist schüchtern und es braucht eine Weile, bis er mir erzählt, wer er ist. Seine Familie ist immer noch in Gambia und er kam hierher, um für sein Leben zu kämpfen „until my power is finished“.

Dieser Satz kann viel bedeutet, auch seinen Tod. Doch ich bohre nicht weiter nach. Muhammed ist seit 11 Monaten in Deutschland.

Wir sprechen über seine Heimat, Banjul in Gambia. Ich frage ihn, ob er zuhause eine Freundin hatte.
„Nein“, sagt Muhammed. „Niemals.“ Er habe kein Geld gehabt und habe immer noch keines. Wenn man heirate und Kinder habe, dann würde das ohne Geld nicht funktionieren.
Mir wird klar, dass da... more »

„Ich werde um mein Leben kämpfen. Bis mir die Kraft ausgeht. Deshalb bin ich hier.“

Das ist Muhammed aus Gambia. Ein Mann wie ein Berg, kräftige Schultern und Arme wie ein Baum. Ein humorvoller Kerl, mit dem ich sofort ins Gespräch kam.

Doch Muhammed ist schüchtern und es braucht eine Weile, bis er mir erzählt, wer er ist. Seine Familie ist immer noch in Gambia und er kam hierher, um für sein Leben zu kämpfen „until my power is finished“.

Dieser Satz kann viel bedeutet, auch seinen Tod. Doch ich bohre nicht weiter nach. Muhammed ist seit 11 Monaten in Deutschland.

Wir sprechen über seine Heimat, Banjul in Gambia. Ich frage ihn, ob er zuhause eine Freundin hatte.
„Nein“, sagt Muhammed. „Niemals.“ Er habe kein Geld gehabt und habe immer noch keines. Wenn man heirate und Kinder habe, dann würde das ohne Geld nicht funktionieren.

Mir wird klar, dass das Dasein als Flüchtling auch bedeutet, dass ein starker und hübscher Mann wie Muhammed keine Beziehung führen kann. Muhammed hat jedoch damit abgeschlossen.

Des weiteren erzählt er mir, dass er Muslim ist und 5 mal am Tag bete. Muhammed hat keinen Koran, aber einen Teppich, den ich auf seinem Spind entdecke. Er bete auf „koranisch“ und zitiert ein paar Zeilen aus seinem Gebet.

Ich mache Muhammed Komplimente. Doch er streitet alles ab. Und seine Muskeln wären „only water“ - doch dann muss ich einwenig lachen, necke ihn und er kichert mit. Muhammed ist ein toller Mensch.

Doch zum Fotografieren erlaubt mir Muhammed nur ein einiges Mal abzudrücken. Ich also meine Chance nutzen. Das Licht ist denkbar schlecht, doch wenn nicht jetzt, dann nie. So mache ich einen Schritt zur Seite und versuche mein Glück.

Jetzt habe ich Lust auf mehr, doch Muhammed bleibt hart. „One photo“. Und das hat sich gelohnt. Mal sehen, was er sagt, wenn ich ihm den Druck des Bildes vorbeibringe.

Auf diesen Moment freue ich mich, wie ein kleines Kind.

Muhammed, willkommen in Deutschland. Ich wünsche Dir, dass Dir Dein Leben irgendwann erlaubt, eine Frau zu finden und Kinder zu haben. Mögest Du immer die Freiheit haben, Deine Religion auszuüben.___

posted image

2015-01-26 09:23:44 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 24 +1s)Open 

Kurze Begegnungen mit Flüchtlingen erlebe ich selten, denn meistens unterhalte ich mich mindestens 5 bis 10 Minuten mit ihnen.

Nicht so bei diesem Mann aus Serbien, der mir am letzten Tag des Jahres 2014 flüchtig seinen Namen sagte, mit einem Foto einverstanden war, jedoch keine Zeit für ein Gespräch hatte. 

Da mein Projekt von Bildern und dem Text lebt, stellt sich mir die Frage, ob ich ein Foto wie dieses überhaupt veröffentlichen soll. Ich habe mich dafür entschieden.

Denn: Ein Foto wie dieses spiegelt für mich auch das wider, was die meisten „Deutschen“ erleben: Sie sehen einen Flüchtling, der an ihnen vorbeiläuft, doch sie kennen seine Geschichte nicht.

Und das ist eigentlich auch das Schwierige: Es ist leicht zu glauben, dass asylsuchende Leute einfach so zu uns kommen. Dass sie einfach da sind, weil sie grade Lust dazu haben.

Dasist jedoch nic... more »

Kurze Begegnungen mit Flüchtlingen erlebe ich selten, denn meistens unterhalte ich mich mindestens 5 bis 10 Minuten mit ihnen.

Nicht so bei diesem Mann aus Serbien, der mir am letzten Tag des Jahres 2014 flüchtig seinen Namen sagte, mit einem Foto einverstanden war, jedoch keine Zeit für ein Gespräch hatte. 

Da mein Projekt von Bildern und dem Text lebt, stellt sich mir die Frage, ob ich ein Foto wie dieses überhaupt veröffentlichen soll. Ich habe mich dafür entschieden.

Denn: Ein Foto wie dieses spiegelt für mich auch das wider, was die meisten „Deutschen“ erleben: Sie sehen einen Flüchtling, der an ihnen vorbeiläuft, doch sie kennen seine Geschichte nicht.

Und das ist eigentlich auch das Schwierige: Es ist leicht zu glauben, dass asylsuchende Leute einfach so zu uns kommen. Dass sie einfach da sind, weil sie grade Lust dazu haben.

Das ist jedoch nicht wahr. Flüchtlinge fliehen vor etwas. Sie fliehen, weil ihnen der Krieg, die Armut oder heftige Konflikte eine derartige Angst einflößen, dass sie um ihr Leben (davon-) laufen.

Sie wollen so weit weg, wie möglich und nehmen dafür einiges auf sich, da eine Flucht kein Kinderspiel ist und in den meisten Fällen sogar sehr gefährlich.

Iviza, willkommen in Deutschland. Ich hoffe, dass Du hier nicht vor etwas davonlaufen musst und wir als Gesellschaft Dir ein Gefühl des Angekommenseins geben können.___

posted image

2015-01-23 11:27:32 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 27 +1s)Open 

"Je vais bien. Par la grâce de Dieu."

Today I walked to the refugee camp and passed this big German advertisement that says “Morgenmeyer - pays your bill”. 

The irony of ads near the camp sometimes is too obvious. I went on and met David, a refugee from Cameroun. 

David was very open and friendly, but didn’t understand English, let alone any German, because his mother tongue is French.

In order to communicate we used my translation app, which worked… well, not so good. But better than nothing, right? 

I couldn’t really understand, why David fled from his homeland, but after checking out, where Cameroun actually is, I guess that he must have serious reasons. 

David described his route to Germany: The biggest part of his trip was from Cameroun to Morocco, from there he (I do not now how) found his way to Spain, then toFrance and fin... more »

"Je vais bien. Par la grâce de Dieu."

Today I walked to the refugee camp and passed this big German advertisement that says “Morgenmeyer - pays your bill”. 

The irony of ads near the camp sometimes is too obvious. I went on and met David, a refugee from Cameroun. 

David was very open and friendly, but didn’t understand English, let alone any German, because his mother tongue is French.

In order to communicate we used my translation app, which worked… well, not so good. But better than nothing, right? 

I couldn’t really understand, why David fled from his homeland, but after checking out, where Cameroun actually is, I guess that he must have serious reasons. 

David described his route to Germany: The biggest part of his trip was from Cameroun to Morocco, from there he (I do not now how) found his way to Spain, then to France and finally to Germany. 

The 20-year old boy said that he was very happy, thanks to the Grace of God. There was almost no sadness in his eyes, but a huge gratitude for being able to live in Germany. 

David, welcome to Germany. May you be blessed where ever you go and actually, find a way in our society. Thank you, David, for being here.  ___

posted image

2015-01-21 11:35:58 (9 comments, 9 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

Today I witnessed three things: A refugee from Gambia, a brutal brawl and police aggression. 

At 9 o’clock I met this man, named Lamin from Gambia before a petrol station near the pickup office for refugees (it is called LEA) and we had a little chat.

Lamin told me that out of difficulties with his father and no option to find any work. You may remember what Mnebni from Kosovo so: “No work, no money, no food.” So Lamin came here to us and he misses his mother very badly. 

Lamin had this warmth that I could sense. He was desperate, yes. But also full of hope. And love for his mother. We talked about 5 or 10 minutes and Lamin agreed that I could take some photographs. 

~

Suddenly, while we were talking a group of about 20 refugees ran to the petrol station you can see in the background. Two of three man chasing the others had big, white clubs intheir ha... more »

Today I witnessed three things: A refugee from Gambia, a brutal brawl and police aggression. 

At 9 o’clock I met this man, named Lamin from Gambia before a petrol station near the pickup office for refugees (it is called LEA) and we had a little chat.

Lamin told me that out of difficulties with his father and no option to find any work. You may remember what Mnebni from Kosovo so: “No work, no money, no food.” So Lamin came here to us and he misses his mother very badly. 

Lamin had this warmth that I could sense. He was desperate, yes. But also full of hope. And love for his mother. We talked about 5 or 10 minutes and Lamin agreed that I could take some photographs. 

~

Suddenly, while we were talking a group of about 20 refugees ran to the petrol station you can see in the background. Two of three man chasing the others had big, white clubs in their hands hammering down the others. 

I was quite shocked, but Lamin stayed very cool. I didn’t know what to do, because the mob soon disappeared. We ended our conversation, as at least 5 police cars drove by to chase the attackers and 3 stopped at the petrol station.

I wished Lamin the very best and he went on. I packed my camera in my bag.

~

But as I started to walk back to the car, 30 meters away I saw 3 policemen around a refugee and one of the officers yelled at him, while gripping the boy very hard at his jacket and shaking him hard, too. 

I thought I was dreaming. This could not be true. 

I had to look twice to get that it was Lamin they had. Three police officers around the boy I just talked to. And they were in a bad, aggressive state of mind, I could see that.   

I went there as fast as I could and told the policemen that I was with Lamin and that we both witnessed the brawl and that he didn’t have anything to do with it. The officer asked who I was and why I was there in a very unfriendly tone. 

In the meantime, they had let go of him. At least. 

~

So I went to another officer and told him that I was a witness and that I could identify the attackers. And that I was confused about how Lamin was treated. 

This officer noted my information (+ my address and stuff). He said that maybe the aggressive police officer acted out of self-protection.

I managed to talk to Lamin in the meantime. He was confused. I asked him, if he’d be okay. Lamin didn’t have his (three) papers anymore. The police had confiscated them.

I saw those papers earlier and they were everything he had. With his picture, name and status on them. With addresses where he had to go. 

So I asked other police officers (at that time there were at least 10 of them at the petrol station), if Lamin could get his papers back and why he was treated in such a bad manner. 

One of them said that Lemin refused to show is ID card. Of course! Lamin has no ID card!  He is a refugee! Adding to that: Lamin doesn’t speak German and understands English only a little bit. 

The officer continued that “this was a misunderstanding, but not our problem”. 

"So this is his problem?" I asked, pointing toward Lamin. The police officer was getting a bit angry. I asked if someone could apologize to Lamin. The only thing what I heard was again:

“This is not our problem”. 

~

I went to Lamin, asking if he was okay. He was not. He had tears rolling down his cheeks. I looked him in the eyes and said that I was sorry, that I should have protected him and that there was a misunderstanding with the police. And that he surely would get his papers back. 

He nodded, but his eyes were filled with tears. Short after that a police officer came back with the papers. Lamin was still confused about what happened. 

Lamin had to go the pickup office and I wished him the best for his life. I still feel sorry for what happened. 

Lamin, even now, Welcome to Germany. May you be safe and never, ever be treated like this again. May you find people that can protect you and help you grow into the man you want to be. ___

posted image

2015-01-16 22:34:50 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

No, this empty picture is not a mistake. I uploaded it on purpose. And I will tell you why. 

Half an hour ago I sat in our living room, listening to the humming sounds of a band playing downstairs in our house. My thoughts drifted away and suddenly I remembered a photo I didn’t upload. A photo of a sad refugee.

I couldn’t stop thinking of it, this picture and the commemoration what I saw that day kept bugging me. Some weeks ago I decided not to upload it, because it is to sensitive. Today I decide to write about this encounter. 

Right now I’m sitting here in front of my computer. Already the sadness of what I saw creeps into my soul. But this story is important.

Let’s skip back 3 weeks. 



On a dark, cloudy day of December (it was that dark and cloudy, I’m not making this up for dramatic reasons) I walked to the processingoffice for ref... more »

No, this empty picture is not a mistake. I uploaded it on purpose. And I will tell you why. 

Half an hour ago I sat in our living room, listening to the humming sounds of a band playing downstairs in our house. My thoughts drifted away and suddenly I remembered a photo I didn’t upload. A photo of a sad refugee.

I couldn’t stop thinking of it, this picture and the commemoration what I saw that day kept bugging me. Some weeks ago I decided not to upload it, because it is to sensitive. Today I decide to write about this encounter. 

Right now I’m sitting here in front of my computer. Already the sadness of what I saw creeps into my soul. But this story is important.

Let’s skip back 3 weeks. 



On a dark, cloudy day of December (it was that dark and cloudy, I’m not making this up for dramatic reasons) I walked to the processing office for refugees to meet some stateless people and to take some pictures. As I walked to the building, a German-speaking man runs to me, inviting me to take a photograph of his cousin. 

Of course I agree, unknowing of the next minutes. A few feet away is a man sitting on a wall, his hands crossed before his face. I know that this man is broken. 

I get closer. His cousin tells me, that the sad mans name is Yilmaz. And Yilmaz is from Turkey. He lived at the border to Syria and: lost many relatives on both sides of it.

Yilmaz is weeping.

There is this deep, deep grief and sorrow. 



Yilmaz does not speak. Sadness has eaten him up, and he is in pain. Pain for his lost ones. Maybe his closest ones. 

I tell his cousin, if he could translate something to Yilmaz. I tell Yilmaz that I do not know what happened to him, but that somehow I could relate. That I had very bad times in my life, too. 

There is nothing I can do, besides being there. Sitting. I lay my hand on his shoulder, asking myself, if this is a step too far. But Yilmaz is too deep in his grief and does not respond in any way. 

I let his cousin translate to Yilmaz, that I would make a few photographs. 

And I do. Right beside Yilmaz is this big, smirking clown on an advertisement for the circus in town.

Yilmaz and the clown. To worlds collide. 

But while I take the photographs, I do not feel good about it. Somewhere I know that THIS is a step too far. But I ignore my doubts, because I want to witness and show what Yilmaz is going through. What war and murder is doing to people. 

Then his cousin and a friend of them take Yilmaz to a car. They have to go. I ask them, if it is okay to publish the image, while ignoring the pulsating message in side me that says: “Martin, stop. Stop now. Let them go, the image doesn’t matter right now!” 



Finally they give their “OK” and drive away, bringing Yilmaz to a doctor. 

Somehow I curse my need to photograph. To click. To do what I do. 

I get to my office, push the CF-card in and see what’s there. As always I edit the images, and one of them is Yilmaz sitting beside the clown.

I secure the image and let time do what time does best: Put distance between me and today. 

Then, many days later, I’ve almost forgotten the encounter. And I’ve forgotten the message in me to stop caring about the images. Here and there I ask myself if I should publish the image.

I don’t. And I decide that I will never do it. Because Yilmaz was in such a bad shape and couldn’t decide if he would like me to take a photograph - or not. 



Last week I met the cousin before the processing office. Again he catched Yilmaz to visit a doctor. And he had good news: Yilmaz was doing a little, tiny bit better. I was relieved. There is hope.

After talking for a little while I told him in a few words that I’d not publish the image. He agrees. And I know that this is the right thing to do.

Sometimes not to publish a photograph can be the best thing one can do. 

And next time I will listen to that voice inside me. And not click the shutter. 



Every time I think if Syria’s border to Turkey, I think of Yilmaz. Of his pain. Of his inner wounds. And I hope that he will recover. 

Welcome to Germany, Yilmaz. I hope that in this country you will find peace and healing. Friends to lean on, people to rely on. May you be safe. ___

posted image

2015-01-15 11:30:44 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

Story of a blind father and his daughter

What you are seeing is a sightless man (72) with the name of Isse and his daughter (32), Luuil. They are from Somalia and live in a small room in a refugee camp. They are Muslims.

I met Juuil in the kitchen of the camp while she was playing with other refugee kids, laughing and having fun with them. As we began to have a little chat, she immediately told me about her father. 

Juuil led me to their room and introduced me to his old man, who didn’t speak very much. Isse is blind. I do not know why. 

This almost breaks my heart. Imagine being in a foreign land, with foreign rules, languages, everything. And THEN you can’t even see a single thing.

Juuil told me that they had to flee because of “boom boom - the Islamists”. That way Juuil lost two of her siblings three years ago. That means that the blindfather lo... more »

Story of a blind father and his daughter

What you are seeing is a sightless man (72) with the name of Isse and his daughter (32), Luuil. They are from Somalia and live in a small room in a refugee camp. They are Muslims.

I met Juuil in the kitchen of the camp while she was playing with other refugee kids, laughing and having fun with them. As we began to have a little chat, she immediately told me about her father. 

Juuil led me to their room and introduced me to his old man, who didn’t speak very much. Isse is blind. I do not know why. 

This almost breaks my heart. Imagine being in a foreign land, with foreign rules, languages, everything. And THEN you can’t even see a single thing.

Juuil told me that they had to flee because of “boom boom - the Islamists”. That way Juuil lost two of her siblings three years ago. That means that the blind father lost two children of his own.

I cannot encompass how hard this must be. As a father myself, a short imagination of losing my two kids through a killing is one of the most hurtful things I can think of. 

For Isse, this is life. It’s a reality that will never go away.

Juuil didn’t seem to be sad or broken by what happened. But while talking to her, she gave me to understand that she is a silent, but very strong woman. A woman that is fighting for a better life. For her and her father.

Juuil and Isse, welcome to Germany. May you always be welcomed in this country. May you - some day - a good life without fear, without death and without wounds.  ___

posted image

2015-01-13 16:37:33 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

„No work, no money, no food.”

No life.

This is Mnebi from Istog in the Republic of Kosovo and he is 36 years old. He walked right to me, mimiking the pose of a photographer, asking, if I’d take a photo of him. He smiled.

Of course I said YES!, smiled back and we started a little chat. Mnebi was very open to answer every question I had.

1997 Mnebi came to Germany, stayed for 15 years - and went back to Kosovo. But he couldn’t find any work there. „It’s very bad. In Kosovo, there is peace. But no work, no money, no food.”

3 weeks ago he had to flee to Germany, again. This time, he brought his wife with him. Mnebi told me, in which refugee camp he lives and maybe I’m going to visit him in the near future.

Mnebi, welcome back to Germany. Keep on fighting, I hope, that our country can give you these three things: work, money, andfood.

more »

„No work, no money, no food.”

No life.

This is Mnebi from Istog in the Republic of Kosovo and he is 36 years old. He walked right to me, mimiking the pose of a photographer, asking, if I’d take a photo of him. He smiled.

Of course I said YES!, smiled back and we started a little chat. Mnebi was very open to answer every question I had.

1997 Mnebi came to Germany, stayed for 15 years - and went back to Kosovo. But he couldn’t find any work there. „It’s very bad. In Kosovo, there is peace. But no work, no money, no food.”

3 weeks ago he had to flee to Germany, again. This time, he brought his wife with him. Mnebi told me, in which refugee camp he lives and maybe I’m going to visit him in the near future.

Mnebi, welcome back to Germany. Keep on fighting, I hope, that our country can give you these three things: work, money, and food.

And therefore a good life.___

posted image

2015-01-08 13:30:04 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

"There is war in my country." 

Godstime (which is an awesome name in my opinion) is from Nigeria. He fled his homeland out of security reasons: “There is war in my country”, he says with a firm look into my eyes. 

It is Boko Haram he talks about, and as he names the militant movement, a few things click inside my head. I’ve heard about Bokoh Haram alot, but this is the moment I meet a fellow who actually knows what that means through his life. 

Godstime first fled to Italy overseas, with a boat. Again, a few things click in my head. I’ve heard about that, too. “It’s very dangerous”, Godstime adds. 

After two months in Italy, he found his way to Germany. And he is obviously very glad that he made it.

But with a few words, he explains to me that he has no family anymore. No family. I have to pause. These words pierce their wayinto my heart in ... more »

"There is war in my country." 

Godstime (which is an awesome name in my opinion) is from Nigeria. He fled his homeland out of security reasons: “There is war in my country”, he says with a firm look into my eyes. 

It is Boko Haram he talks about, and as he names the militant movement, a few things click inside my head. I’ve heard about Bokoh Haram alot, but this is the moment I meet a fellow who actually knows what that means through his life. 

Godstime first fled to Italy overseas, with a boat. Again, a few things click in my head. I’ve heard about that, too. “It’s very dangerous”, Godstime adds. 

After two months in Italy, he found his way to Germany. And he is obviously very glad that he made it.

But with a few words, he explains to me that he has no family anymore. No family. I have to pause. These words pierce their way into my heart in seconds. 

Without further needing to explain, I do not ask how that happened. I think I know it. And I do not want to push our conversation too far. But I look into his eyes and respond, that I am very sorry. Godstime nods.

_

Welcome to Germany, Godstime. May you be safe. May you find people in our country, that give you warmth. May you find a home, that feels safe. May we help you, as much as we can.  ___

posted image

2015-01-06 15:01:13 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

“The area where my family lives is sorrounded by military from the government. They can't get out.“

This is Tamim from Syria. He just arrived the same morning when I met him. Tamim was very kind and open to me, but I saw what the past had done to him. 

But he had no option. Had to leave his country, because either is family could get out of their neighborhood to him, nor could he get back in.

So the very shy boy from Syria he gave up everything he had, to come to us. At least to be secure. No military.

Tamim misses his family very bad.

And how much I would! 

Tamim, welcome to Germany. May this country give you a safe place and a future that can heal your inner wounds. Stay strong. Stay strong.  

“The area where my family lives is sorrounded by military from the government. They can't get out.“

This is Tamim from Syria. He just arrived the same morning when I met him. Tamim was very kind and open to me, but I saw what the past had done to him. 

But he had no option. Had to leave his country, because either is family could get out of their neighborhood to him, nor could he get back in.

So the very shy boy from Syria he gave up everything he had, to come to us. At least to be secure. No military.

Tamim misses his family very bad.

And how much I would! 

Tamim, welcome to Germany. May this country give you a safe place and a future that can heal your inner wounds. Stay strong. Stay strong.  ___

posted image

2015-01-02 18:14:09 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

"I had nothing. I've come here to survive."

This is Ibrahim, 18 years from Gambia. He has found a place to live, but he shares his room in the refugee camp with 5 others since 10 months. 

Being together with those others is very stressful for Ibrahim, because being so close all the time is too much for him (and conflicts arise on a regular basis).

But the most sad part for him is, that he has no place to work. He came to survive, he says, because he had nothing back in Gambia.

As I look in his eyes again, I hope, that Ibrahim, who is still so young, can find a way into our society. That he may be embraced with open arms, so he can one day have something. 

"I had nothing. I've come here to survive."

This is Ibrahim, 18 years from Gambia. He has found a place to live, but he shares his room in the refugee camp with 5 others since 10 months. 

Being together with those others is very stressful for Ibrahim, because being so close all the time is too much for him (and conflicts arise on a regular basis).

But the most sad part for him is, that he has no place to work. He came to survive, he says, because he had nothing back in Gambia.

As I look in his eyes again, I hope, that Ibrahim, who is still so young, can find a way into our society. That he may be embraced with open arms, so he can one day have something. ___

posted image

2014-12-31 12:00:48 (9 comments, 0 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

May I present to you: The brothers Bujar (12) and Alberto (14) from the country of Montenegro. 

I met these two, very friendly boys today on their way to the super store. Both didn't understand much of what I said, so we used an translation app. So that worked out pretty good.
 
Both boys are here since 30 days and had to flee from their homeland, becaused they and their family suffered racial defamation back there. 

As I know that in these days a great deal of Germans like #Pegida (and many others, that don't go to demonstrations) are against refugees in our country, I hope that Bujar and Alberto won't have to flee again. From here. 

Keep on, guys. You are the best. Stay strong, whatever may come.  

May I present to you: The brothers Bujar (12) and Alberto (14) from the country of Montenegro. 

I met these two, very friendly boys today on their way to the super store. Both didn't understand much of what I said, so we used an translation app. So that worked out pretty good.
 
Both boys are here since 30 days and had to flee from their homeland, becaused they and their family suffered racial defamation back there. 

As I know that in these days a great deal of Germans like #Pegida (and many others, that don't go to demonstrations) are against refugees in our country, I hope that Bujar and Alberto won't have to flee again. From here. 

Keep on, guys. You are the best. Stay strong, whatever may come.  ___

posted image

2014-12-29 15:00:25 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

"I’m not allowed to work here."

This is Lassanew from Gambia. Lassanew is 21 years old and lives as a refugee in Germany since 9 months. I visited him at the camp, cooking rice for a meal. 

Lassanew tries to learn our language every day, attending a school. He lives with six other men in a room.

And is not allowed to work yet. If he is lucky, he’ll get permission in one month, he told me, smiling a bit.  

When I asked him, what he would like to work if he could, I recognized, that he never thought about it. After a while Nassanew answered, that he would do anything – if he could, he’d work on the assembly line.

He agreed to me taking a picture, but didn’t want to show his face. I agreed, too. And so this photograph came to pass. I’ll print it and bring it back to him. 

Lassanew, I wish you the very best. Keep ongoing, you are... more »

"I’m not allowed to work here."

This is Lassanew from Gambia. Lassanew is 21 years old and lives as a refugee in Germany since 9 months. I visited him at the camp, cooking rice for a meal. 

Lassanew tries to learn our language every day, attending a school. He lives with six other men in a room.

And is not allowed to work yet. If he is lucky, he’ll get permission in one month, he told me, smiling a bit.  

When I asked him, what he would like to work if he could, I recognized, that he never thought about it. After a while Nassanew answered, that he would do anything – if he could, he’d work on the assembly line.

He agreed to me taking a picture, but didn’t want to show his face. I agreed, too. And so this photograph came to pass. I’ll print it and bring it back to him. 

Lassanew, I wish you the very best. Keep on going, you are a great man. ___

posted image

2014-12-27 13:21:38 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

"If I help other poeple, God will help me." 

This is Yusef, 25 years old, from Togo. I met him on the streets, escorting another refugee to the train station. Yusef was totally okay with me taking a photograph of him, but he was kind of wearily.

Because to him, nothing really mattered in the context of problems. So if as a consquence of the photographs he would become problems, he wouldn't care at all. 

I saw that resigning in his face. But, Yusef had faith in God. "If I help other people, God will help me". He said that over and over, and it was clear to me, that it gave him some strength and resilience. 

I wish Yusef all the strength he needs for the future. Welcome to Germany! 

"If I help other poeple, God will help me." 

This is Yusef, 25 years old, from Togo. I met him on the streets, escorting another refugee to the train station. Yusef was totally okay with me taking a photograph of him, but he was kind of wearily.

Because to him, nothing really mattered in the context of problems. So if as a consquence of the photographs he would become problems, he wouldn't care at all. 

I saw that resigning in his face. But, Yusef had faith in God. "If I help other people, God will help me". He said that over and over, and it was clear to me, that it gave him some strength and resilience. 

I wish Yusef all the strength he needs for the future. Welcome to Germany! ___

posted image

2014-12-23 14:31:48 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

This day started with alot of sunlight that kept me warm and gave a good vibe to this morning. I met people from three different places that are near to each other. 

First, I met Ado with his son and wife, who are from Bosnia and had to travel to Dortmund, where they’ll hopefully find a shelter. 

Second, I talked to a couple, named Ili and Bia from Albania. They were pretty shy, but had no problem being photographed by me. 

Third and last, I talked to a nurse, named Sadie, who is born 1961 in Kosovo. Shad had fled here home country already years ago, stayed in Germany and went back. 

But she told me, why so many people flee from there: It is almost impossible to find work, and if one does, the salary is very low. She and her family had 150€/month - and as health care is not available, to visit a doc ment +-50 € (at least). 

Sadie is mother of3 boys and... more »

This day started with alot of sunlight that kept me warm and gave a good vibe to this morning. I met people from three different places that are near to each other. 

First, I met Ado with his son and wife, who are from Bosnia and had to travel to Dortmund, where they’ll hopefully find a shelter. 

Second, I talked to a couple, named Ili and Bia from Albania. They were pretty shy, but had no problem being photographed by me. 

Third and last, I talked to a nurse, named Sadie, who is born 1961 in Kosovo. Shad had fled here home country already years ago, stayed in Germany and went back. 

But she told me, why so many people flee from there: It is almost impossible to find work, and if one does, the salary is very low. She and her family had 150€/month - and as health care is not available, to visit a doc ment +-50 € (at least). 

Sadie is mother of 3 boys and three girls, who also have children. She is a fighter, that’s for sure. 

To all of them: Welcome to Germany! ___

posted image

2014-12-22 12:21:06 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

This is Suad (21) from the Republic of Macedonia. Back home, Suad worked at building lots, but had more and more problems and was forced to flee.

Hemade it to Germany with his wife and daughter, who is one year old. Suad was very open and friendly to me. He had alot of humor, was very happy to be here and made a strong impression on me. 

To be honest, if I were in his shoes, I’m not sure if I’d have the strength, he has. I envy his calm and strength. 

Welcome to Germany, Suad! 

This is Suad (21) from the Republic of Macedonia. Back home, Suad worked at building lots, but had more and more problems and was forced to flee.

Hemade it to Germany with his wife and daughter, who is one year old. Suad was very open and friendly to me. He had alot of humor, was very happy to be here and made a strong impression on me. 

To be honest, if I were in his shoes, I’m not sure if I’d have the strength, he has. I envy his calm and strength. 

Welcome to Germany, Suad! ___

posted image

2014-12-19 11:40:46 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

This morning I met Nadia from Togo. She was out on the streets with her mother, her uncle and other refugees from Togo. As I talked to her and her mother, she couldn’t understand me, but one thing striked me right away: 

She never looked away. Even as I took 3-4 photographs of her, she looked straight into the camera. Not for a second she stopped to focus on what I was doing. 

Nadia is 2 years old and I wish her all the best. Welcome! 

This morning I met Nadia from Togo. She was out on the streets with her mother, her uncle and other refugees from Togo. As I talked to her and her mother, she couldn’t understand me, but one thing striked me right away: 

She never looked away. Even as I took 3-4 photographs of her, she looked straight into the camera. Not for a second she stopped to focus on what I was doing. 

Nadia is 2 years old and I wish her all the best. Welcome! ___

posted image

2014-12-16 11:41:37 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Today I met Muhammed and his younger Brother. Both are Somali and in Germany since a few days. Both looked very glad to be here and that joy  translated without interruption - contrary to the hard exchange of words, if one doesn't understand each other.

We met before this big sign that says "Christmas Market Of Karlsruhe". As I took the photographs I found it somehow funny and a bit strange, but well, it kind of fits that we celebrate love these days, right?

I hope Muhammed and his brother will find a warm and safe place to stay and that they'll feel welcomed in this country.  

#refugeeswelcome  

Today I met Muhammed and his younger Brother. Both are Somali and in Germany since a few days. Both looked very glad to be here and that joy  translated without interruption - contrary to the hard exchange of words, if one doesn't understand each other.

We met before this big sign that says "Christmas Market Of Karlsruhe". As I took the photographs I found it somehow funny and a bit strange, but well, it kind of fits that we celebrate love these days, right?

I hope Muhammed and his brother will find a warm and safe place to stay and that they'll feel welcomed in this country.  

#refugeeswelcome  ___

posted image

2014-12-15 10:56:45 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Today I left my film cameras at home, grabbed my 5D and went to a refugee camp in my home town. 

I've been chewing on this topic for a long time, but I never had the guts to do it. But today I made a choice. 

I wanted to see the faces to all that stuff that is in the news every day. I wanted to talk to actual people and wasn't any longer satisfied with numbers that are thrown around so very often. 

So went there and met two men very friendly (but also very sad) men from Iraq. Both came to the place to fetch family, which arrived today at the camp.

Kassem and Kheri, both are Yazidis (they didn't know each other) had one thing in common: They said, that they would never, ever go back to Iraq, because of ISIL and the war. 

And: Both are living here for some years, but are having a very hard time. Kassem has three Children and his wife inIra... more »

Today I left my film cameras at home, grabbed my 5D and went to a refugee camp in my home town. 

I've been chewing on this topic for a long time, but I never had the guts to do it. But today I made a choice. 

I wanted to see the faces to all that stuff that is in the news every day. I wanted to talk to actual people and wasn't any longer satisfied with numbers that are thrown around so very often. 

So went there and met two men very friendly (but also very sad) men from Iraq. Both came to the place to fetch family, which arrived today at the camp.

Kassem and Kheri, both are Yazidis (they didn't know each other) had one thing in common: They said, that they would never, ever go back to Iraq, because of ISIL and the war. 

And: Both are living here for some years, but are having a very hard time. Kassem has three Children and his wife in Iraq, who are living on the street. And Kheri was happy to fetch his father, who fled because of the war. 

Kassem showed me his passport, which clearly showed that his deportation has been intermitted, and that he is only tolerated in Germany. Kassem is not allowed to work.

I wish them all the best and hope, that they will be reunited with they beloved ones soon. ___

posted image

2014-12-09 17:35:43 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

___

posted image

2014-12-08 18:09:05 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

What you see today is one of my first developed photographs from the village project. It is one of the few that my lovely wife approved - and she has a very good sense to divide the keepers from the rest. 

So here you go.

What you see today is one of my first developed photographs from the village project. It is one of the few that my lovely wife approved - and she has a very good sense to divide the keepers from the rest. 

So here you go.___

posted image

2014-12-05 19:34:08 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

___

Buttons

A special service of CircleCount.com is the following button.

The button shows the number of followers you have directly in a small button. You can add this button to your website, like the +1-Button of Google or the Like-Button of Facebook.






You can add this button directly in your website. For more information about the CircleCount Buttons and the description how to add them to another page click here.

Martin GommelTwitterCircloscope