Test CircleCount PRO now!
Login now

Not your profile? Login and get free access to your reports and analysis.

Gideon Rosenblatt

Gideon Rosenblatt Verified in Google 

Grounded futurist.

Occupation: I write about the future of the human experience in an era of machine intelligence. (The Vital Edge)

Location: Seattle

Followers: 50,215

Following: 1,737

Views: 120,420,731

Cream of the Crop: 04/01/2012

Added to CircleCount.com: 12/25/2011That's the date, where Gideon Rosenblatt has been indexed by CircleCount.com.
This hasn't to be the date where the daily check has been started.
(Update nowYou can update your stats by clicking on this link!
This can take a few seconds.
)

Tags

Sign in

The following tags have been added by users of CircleCount.com.
You can login on CircleCount to add more tags here.

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Authors
  • GooglePlus
  • Social Change
  • Social Media
  • sustainability
  • Technology

Are you missing a tag in the list of available tags? You can suggest new tags here.

Login now

Do you want to see a more detailed chart? Check your settings and define your favorite chart type.

Or click here to get the detailed chart only once.

Gideon Rosenblatt has been at 3 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Yifat Cohen85,385*Why does the ex-head of American Express Chairman’s Innovation Fund think our future is in “producerism,” not consumerism?* What does it even mean?!? _This Hangout is public so feel free to share and invite your friends._ Using frameworks +Steve Faktor developed such as the 4C’s of Innovation™ - Creativity, Capabilities, Culture, and Context - and the Creativity Cube™, Mr. Faktor deconstructs the current economic environment to reveal innovation opportunities and growth sectors – health and education in particular. *Although his initial scenario suggests doom and gloom for the U.S. and other markets, the future he envisions is ripe with opportunity.* *SO - How do You Get Innovation Right?* Well, if we're lucky (and we usually are), Steve will dive into his latest book Econovation and share with us a future we've taken for granted. *It empowers readers to think big, dream big, and conquer economic conditions that will paralyze others.*  *WE WILL TOUCH ON HOW TO* Capitalize on a market that will go from making nothing to making everything . . . for China. Use psychological pricing and some crafty tricks from Google to reduce reliance on tapped-out consumers. Sell to consumers whose new identities will be based on what they create, not what they buy, click or super-size. Seduce a desperate government to finance your business, then feed you pancakes in the morning. Motivate tomorrow’s employees with social currency instead of the green, depreciating kind. Upgrade your business and your kids with a little help from Mormons and kindergartners with hacksaws. *WHO IS STEVEN?* Developing B2B startups at @109499489972846579596  and corporate speaking about emerging producerism opportunities that I wrote about in my book @116385844146363178305 and Forbes column.  --------------------- #hangoutsonair   #americanexpress   #econovation   #interview   #entrepreneur   #entrepreneurship   #economy   #goodbusiness   #amazon   #fortune500   #gplusgotogal  How Global Trends Will Shape the Future of Innovation.2013-01-17 18:00:0046  
Yifat Cohen85,385*Google+ changes the Truth about social media marketing.* _This is a public Hangout, feel free to share and invite_ Have you noticed the date? *Today the world is ending.* And it's a wonderful, wonderful thing. *Everything you know*, or think you know, about online marketing, social media, engagement and where's the money is online - *is no longer true*. *IN THIS HANGOUTS WE ARE GOING TO MAKE SOME TRULY CONTROVERSIAL CLAIMS* @116901017556394771817 is going to show you why you should pay attention to Google+ now, if you want to make money online.  He'll show you why the *money is no longer in the list* How the conversation have moved from one-to-many to *many-to-many* How you can *broadcast your Hangouts simultaneously on hundreds of sites* And most of all - *how to position yourself in front of this trend that is going to turn the social media world upside down.* *BUT WHO IS ALEX MANDOSSIAN TO BE CLAIMING THIS?* His colleagues and students acknowledge him as the Warren Buffet of the Internet because of his unique ability to teach his students how to make BIG money with very little risk.  Alex has generated $243 million in sales and profits for his small business students, clients and joint venture partners since 1993.   Many of the business strategies you'll learn today transformed his annual income in 2001 to be a monthly income in 2003; and eventually daily income by 2006. These marketing principles helped him grow his student data base from 200 people to 20,000 during his first 2 years in business ... and to over 200,000 during the following 3 years. He has engaged with best-selling authors such as Jack Canfield, @112439370122733503773  @105578574150809713602 and @113217646903708244617 (4-Hr Work Wk) Business leaders such as Donald Trump, Vic Conant of Nightingale Conant and Ivan Misner, CEO of Business Network International, and celebs such as Larry King and Mohammad Ali to name a few. *As a family-centered entrepreneur who works from home*, his goal is to become the world’s 1st "work-at-home" billionaire, not just in Net Worth, but by creating 1,000 other Internet millionaires …The money is no longer in the list, so where is it?2012-12-20 18:00:0059  
Yifat Cohen85,385*How the social revolution is changing the way we do business.* We all keep hearing about how important it is to engage and build relationships - what does it really mean, and what tools are out there to help us master it? When @105103058358743760661 spoke at DreamForce he saw *a vision for a future of business information systems that is entirely based on relationships.* *ENGAGE OR DIE.* In this Hangout On Air, we'll dive into the topic of engagement with @105103058358743760661   as he explains what he calls "engagement leverage." This framework bridges the kind of internal engagement you need with employees with the external engagement you need with customers, suppliers, partners and other external stakeholders. It's a simple, yet surprisingly powerful way for thinking about the way your organization gets work done.  Gideon writes at Alchemy of Change about helping companies bring purpose and technology together into a more powerful source of competitive advantage. Gideon just came back from leading a panel on engagement at Salesforce's Dreamforce Conference (now the biggest tech conference in the world) and so in addition to talking with us about the engagement leverage model, he'll also share some of what he saw at Dreamforce. (http://www.salesforce.com/dreamforce/DF12/)DreamForce: what I learned about the relationship revolution.2012-10-04 18:00:0064  

Shared Circles including Gideon Rosenblatt

Shared Circles are not available on Google+ anymore, but you can find them still here.

The Google+ Collections of Gideon Rosenblatt

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

10
comments per post
9
reshares per post
45
+1's per post

1,025
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 51

posted image

2016-04-27 04:13:38 (51 comments; 5 reshares; 70 +1s)Open 

Do Animals Dream?

I was in the depths of writing today and stumbled up on a question: do animals dream?

Having seen my fair share of leg twitching while watching dogs sleep, I assumed so, but I just couldn't let this sleeping dog of a question lie. 

It turns out, rats, cats and even squids seem to exhibit signs like Rapid Eye Movement (REM) while sleeping, and when this has been suppressed in cats (I don't want to know how), the cats started exhibiting behavior like arching their backs, stalking prey and getting in fights - all while they were sleeping. 

I'd assumed mammals dreamed, but it's thought-provoking to consider that squids seem to exhibit similar signs of dreaming. Squids and other cephalopods are highly intelligent creatures, but how far down the evolutionary stack might these signs of some sort of dreaming activityext... more »

Most reshares: 40

posted image

2016-04-24 23:54:22 (2 comments; 40 reshares; 78 +1s)Open 

Great Overview of Adoption of Machine Intelligence by Businesses

Companies are now re-orienting and re-organizing themselves to better understand how machine learning will change the way they work. At the same time, artificial intelligence developers are learning how to translate what to now has largely been algorithm-speak into the language of business: solutions. These are two of the ways that machine learning, over this last year, has started to make its way into businesses.

Another trend highlighted in this piece is the increased application of machine intelligence into particular industries. Another way of saying that in business speak is "vertical applications." And we're just getting started.

One of the best parts of this article by Shivon Zilis is the infographic (see below, but click through to the article for the larger image). It lays out... more »

Most plusones: 125

posted image

2016-03-15 22:27:54 (21 comments; 21 reshares; 125 +1s)Open 

The Economics of Artificial General Intelligence Takeoff

There is a corner of the web where super smart people debate the future of artificial intelligence, and in that corner, there is an ongoing debate about whether we will experience what is known as a fast takeoff scenario for Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), or what these folks call - "foom" (as in the sound effect for something sudden).

Artificial General Intelligence, for those who aren't familiar with the term, is the kind of AI we tend to see in movies - very human-like. It's not the kind of narrow AI that just beat Lee Sedol in the game of Go, or the kind that will drive a car or sort your pictures on Google Photos. Artificial General Intelligence is something quite remarkable. It doesn't exist (yet), but if and when it does, it will be a total game-changer. 

The question that I... more »

Latest 50 posts

posted image

2016-04-29 15:46:51 (7 comments; 10 reshares; 121 +1s)Open 

Rapid Eye Movement Found in Reptile Sleep

This week, I've been thinking about dreams, and how far back they go in our evolutionary history. Research being released today finds REM cycles in reptiles, which suggests that it goes back to our amniote ancestors (the common ancestor mammals share with birds and reptiles).

But do reptiles actually dream?

_In humans, REM sleep is closely associated with dreaming. So do Australian dragons dream? There's no way to be sure right now, Laurent said. The answer may also depend on how you define dreaming. Under a strict definition in which dreaming requires higher cognition, the answer might be no. But if dreaming were defined as a replay of brain activity during sleep that resembles brain activity during wakefulness, lizards might well dream, Laurent said._

Rapid Eye Movement Found in Reptile Sleep

This week, I've been thinking about dreams, and how far back they go in our evolutionary history. Research being released today finds REM cycles in reptiles, which suggests that it goes back to our amniote ancestors (the common ancestor mammals share with birds and reptiles).

But do reptiles actually dream?

_In humans, REM sleep is closely associated with dreaming. So do Australian dragons dream? There's no way to be sure right now, Laurent said. The answer may also depend on how you define dreaming. Under a strict definition in which dreaming requires higher cognition, the answer might be no. But if dreaming were defined as a replay of brain activity during sleep that resembles brain activity during wakefulness, lizards might well dream, Laurent said.____

posted image

2016-04-28 20:29:51 (6 comments; 12 reshares; 42 +1s)Open 

Why Open AI Matters

Here's +Miguel Rodriguez talking about why the Open AI project, founded by Elon Musk and others, is so important. Miguel happens to refer to some of the points in my talk in Singapore last month to support his point. I'm glad it resonated with him, particularly because he's right on about the need for projects like Open AI.

Key point:
The big players in the Deep Learning revolution are unexpectedly the big software companies that we all know: Google, Facebook, Microsoft, IBM, Baidoo. And while the current tenor among the Artificial Intelligence community is to share all they work on, it is not clear that:
A) They will keep doing it
B) They are really sharing everything.

Good points. It's always good to have a backup. 

Why Open AI Matters

Here's +Miguel Rodriguez talking about why the Open AI project, founded by Elon Musk and others, is so important. Miguel happens to refer to some of the points in my talk in Singapore last month to support his point. I'm glad it resonated with him, particularly because he's right on about the need for projects like Open AI.

Key point:
The big players in the Deep Learning revolution are unexpectedly the big software companies that we all know: Google, Facebook, Microsoft, IBM, Baidoo. And while the current tenor among the Artificial Intelligence community is to share all they work on, it is not clear that:
A) They will keep doing it
B) They are really sharing everything.

Good points. It's always good to have a backup. ___

posted image

2016-04-28 05:31:04 (8 comments; 15 reshares; 93 +1s)Open 

“That’s what is exciting here, because maybe this mechanism appeared really early in the history of life,” Boisseau said to the Los Angeles Times. “Probably learning abilities evolved first, before the evolution of neurons and nervous systems.”

HT +Paulo Silveira​

“That’s what is exciting here, because maybe this mechanism appeared really early in the history of life,” Boisseau said to the Los Angeles Times. “Probably learning abilities evolved first, before the evolution of neurons and nervous systems.”

HT +Paulo Silveira​___

posted image

2016-04-27 04:13:38 (51 comments; 5 reshares; 70 +1s)Open 

Do Animals Dream?

I was in the depths of writing today and stumbled up on a question: do animals dream?

Having seen my fair share of leg twitching while watching dogs sleep, I assumed so, but I just couldn't let this sleeping dog of a question lie. 

It turns out, rats, cats and even squids seem to exhibit signs like Rapid Eye Movement (REM) while sleeping, and when this has been suppressed in cats (I don't want to know how), the cats started exhibiting behavior like arching their backs, stalking prey and getting in fights - all while they were sleeping. 

I'd assumed mammals dreamed, but it's thought-provoking to consider that squids seem to exhibit similar signs of dreaming. Squids and other cephalopods are highly intelligent creatures, but how far down the evolutionary stack might these signs of some sort of dreaming activityext... more »

Do Animals Dream?

I was in the depths of writing today and stumbled up on a question: do animals dream?

Having seen my fair share of leg twitching while watching dogs sleep, I assumed so, but I just couldn't let this sleeping dog of a question lie. 

It turns out, rats, cats and even squids seem to exhibit signs like Rapid Eye Movement (REM) while sleeping, and when this has been suppressed in cats (I don't want to know how), the cats started exhibiting behavior like arching their backs, stalking prey and getting in fights - all while they were sleeping. 

I'd assumed mammals dreamed, but it's thought-provoking to consider that squids seem to exhibit similar signs of dreaming. Squids and other cephalopods are highly intelligent creatures, but how far down the evolutionary stack might these signs of some sort of dreaming activity extend? 

Also, just because these animals are exhibiting REM signals doesn't necessarily mean that they're dreaming in the way we humans experience dreaming. Cracking that nut, to understand their experience is going to be tough (if not impossible, without actually becoming a rat - or even a squid). ___

posted image

2016-04-27 01:25:03 (20 comments; 14 reshares; 48 +1s)Open 

The Coming Chat Bot Revolution A pretty good overview of what's happening with the coming chat bot revolution.  It breaks my heart that the promise of chat bot technology is getting locked up in proprietary messaging services like Facebook's Messenger, Slack, etc. I'm hoping that a big player like Google will disrupt this by targeting chat bot technology at plain old SMS. 

Yeah, yeah, I know it'll be missing all the bells and whistles of the kinds of forms and interactivity of what Facebook will be able to do - initially at least. But dammit, we should be trying to keep this next wave of innovation as open as possible so that multiple AI solutions can target the same SMS client. 

OK. I'll stop my ranting now. ;)

The Coming Chat Bot Revolution A pretty good overview of what's happening with the coming chat bot revolution.  It breaks my heart that the promise of chat bot technology is getting locked up in proprietary messaging services like Facebook's Messenger, Slack, etc. I'm hoping that a big player like Google will disrupt this by targeting chat bot technology at plain old SMS. 

Yeah, yeah, I know it'll be missing all the bells and whistles of the kinds of forms and interactivity of what Facebook will be able to do - initially at least. But dammit, we should be trying to keep this next wave of innovation as open as possible so that multiple AI solutions can target the same SMS client. 

OK. I'll stop my ranting now. ;)___

posted image

2016-04-25 23:01:39 (4 comments; 11 reshares; 32 +1s)Open 

Just in case you want a cool looking poster that explores the Mandelbrot set. This is what I love about people: that one us would make something like this.

___Just in case you want a cool looking poster that explores the Mandelbrot set. This is what I love about people: that one us would make something like this.

posted image

2016-04-24 23:54:22 (2 comments; 40 reshares; 78 +1s)Open 

Great Overview of Adoption of Machine Intelligence by Businesses

Companies are now re-orienting and re-organizing themselves to better understand how machine learning will change the way they work. At the same time, artificial intelligence developers are learning how to translate what to now has largely been algorithm-speak into the language of business: solutions. These are two of the ways that machine learning, over this last year, has started to make its way into businesses.

Another trend highlighted in this piece is the increased application of machine intelligence into particular industries. Another way of saying that in business speak is "vertical applications." And we're just getting started.

One of the best parts of this article by Shivon Zilis is the infographic (see below, but click through to the article for the larger image). It lays out... more »

Great Overview of Adoption of Machine Intelligence by Businesses

Companies are now re-orienting and re-organizing themselves to better understand how machine learning will change the way they work. At the same time, artificial intelligence developers are learning how to translate what to now has largely been algorithm-speak into the language of business: solutions. These are two of the ways that machine learning, over this last year, has started to make its way into businesses.

Another trend highlighted in this piece is the increased application of machine intelligence into particular industries. Another way of saying that in business speak is "vertical applications." And we're just getting started.

One of the best parts of this article by Shivon Zilis is the infographic (see below, but click through to the article for the larger image). It lays out some of the verticals as well as the "horizontal" platform investments necessary for machine intelligence to fully embed itself in business.

Definitely a worthwhile read.

#machineintelligence #machinelearning #business #artificialintelligence
___

posted image

2016-04-24 06:08:23 (4 comments; 1 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Bearcat urine doesn’t just smell like buttered popcorn, it's made from the exact same chemical compound.

http://www.sciencealert.com/researchers-finally-understand-why-bearcats-smell-like-buttered-popcorn

An odd science story to get your Sunday going.
+ScienceSunday +ScienceSunday

(via http://www.compoundchem.com/2016/04/17/twic17042016/ )___Bearcat urine doesn’t just smell like buttered popcorn, it's made from the exact same chemical compound.

posted image

2016-04-23 04:49:27 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 46 +1s)Open 

Artificial Intelligence to help protect the planet.

Artificial Intelligence to help protect the planet.___

posted image

2016-04-23 04:11:13 (0 comments; 4 reshares; 32 +1s)Open 

These reefs might serve as steppingstones between the Brazil reefs and the Caribbean reefs and might serve as a temporary refuge for some of the animals that live between them, Yager said. They might also reveal how coral reefs survive in less than optimal conditions – and thus might offer insight into how reefs behave in the future, as the oceans become increasingly unfriendly to them. Coral reefs around the world are under threat as ocean temperatures and acidity levels rise thanks in large part to human activity.


These reefs might serve as steppingstones between the Brazil reefs and the Caribbean reefs and might serve as a temporary refuge for some of the animals that live between them, Yager said. They might also reveal how coral reefs survive in less than optimal conditions – and thus might offer insight into how reefs behave in the future, as the oceans become increasingly unfriendly to them. Coral reefs around the world are under threat as ocean temperatures and acidity levels rise thanks in large part to human activity.
___

posted image

2016-04-22 02:55:22 (4 comments; 5 reshares; 19 +1s)Open 

A Faltering Infrastructure for Democracy

Most of us are well aware of the crumbling infrastructure that continues to plague the United States. What's becoming increasingly clear is that our infrastructure for ensuring a high-functioning democracy is also faltering. No doubt there is suppression and fraud happening as well, but in addition to that, we just aren't putting our money where our mouths are when it comes to keeping the gears of democracy well oiled. 

A Faltering Infrastructure for Democracy

Most of us are well aware of the crumbling infrastructure that continues to plague the United States. What's becoming increasingly clear is that our infrastructure for ensuring a high-functioning democracy is also faltering. No doubt there is suppression and fraud happening as well, but in addition to that, we just aren't putting our money where our mouths are when it comes to keeping the gears of democracy well oiled. ___

posted image

2016-04-20 17:34:21 (18 comments; 17 reshares; 75 +1s)Open 

Artificial Intelligence as Container of Our Collective Intelligence

For those who missed it last week, I'm now re-publishing this overview of my recent talk in Singapore - now on Medium. The focus was on reframing artificial intelligence, by connecting to back to on our long history of storing our knowledge in containers of collective intelligence. From perspective, I explore what makes these containers different from what came before them and some ways to think about what kinds of intelligence make sense to store there - and what kinds are best left in the container that is the human body and soul.

#artificialintelligence   #knowledge   #machinelearning  

Artificial Intelligence as Container of Our Collective Intelligence

For those who missed it last week, I'm now re-publishing this overview of my recent talk in Singapore - now on Medium. The focus was on reframing artificial intelligence, by connecting to back to on our long history of storing our knowledge in containers of collective intelligence. From perspective, I explore what makes these containers different from what came before them and some ways to think about what kinds of intelligence make sense to store there - and what kinds are best left in the container that is the human body and soul.

#artificialintelligence   #knowledge   #machinelearning  ___

posted image

2016-04-20 00:12:28 (5 comments; 4 reshares; 26 +1s)Open 

The growing pains of M and Facebook's bot strategy. Give them time though. There's something important here and Messenger is a ubiquitous platform to build it on.

The growing pains of M and Facebook's bot strategy. Give them time though. There's something important here and Messenger is a ubiquitous platform to build it on.___

posted image

2016-04-19 13:41:52 (10 comments; 2 reshares; 14 +1s)Open 

3D Immersive Storytelling

This short "story" will give you a pretty interesting 3D experience even just when viewed on your phone. Just move the phone around in the air as you're watching it to change the direction of the filming.

This has the potential to change story telling in ways that could really shift the way we experience narratives.

Here's a playlist of other demo videos to play with:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLU8wpH_LfhmvCvcBGui3LHC8DufjgvxNn

And more background on the latest changes with YouTube that being this about:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/youtube-gets-a-vr-makeover-with-live-360-degree-video-spatial-audio/

P.S. I've only tried this on Android. Can someone confirm whether this works on iPhone?

3D Immersive Storytelling

This short "story" will give you a pretty interesting 3D experience even just when viewed on your phone. Just move the phone around in the air as you're watching it to change the direction of the filming.

This has the potential to change story telling in ways that could really shift the way we experience narratives.

Here's a playlist of other demo videos to play with:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLU8wpH_LfhmvCvcBGui3LHC8DufjgvxNn

And more background on the latest changes with YouTube that being this about:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/youtube-gets-a-vr-makeover-with-live-360-degree-video-spatial-audio/

P.S. I've only tried this on Android. Can someone confirm whether this works on iPhone?___

posted image

2016-04-18 18:15:21 (3 comments; 4 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

Semantic Lighting

Not that you necessarily would change your lighting this way, but you could. :)

I share this because it's an interesting example of where we're headed with voice interfaces.

Semantic Lighting

Not that you necessarily would change your lighting this way, but you could. :)

I share this because it's an interesting example of where we're headed with voice interfaces.___

posted image

2016-04-18 02:14:05 (5 comments; 4 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

Moderation and It's Impact on Speech and Information

Long, but very interesting, read on the role that commercial content moderation policies and processes have on speech today. I've tried to capture what I thought were the most interesting portions below, but it's worth reading the full article if you have an interest in this topic. 

The moderators of these platforms — perched uneasily at the intersection of corporate profits, social responsibility, and human rights — have a powerful impact on free speech, government dissent, the shaping of social norms, user safety, and the meaning of privacy. What flagged content should be removed? Who decides what stays and why? What constitutes newsworthiness? Threat? Harm? When should law enforcement be involved?

While public debates rage about government censorship and free speech on college campuses, customercont... more »

Moderation and It's Impact on Speech and Information

Long, but very interesting, read on the role that commercial content moderation policies and processes have on speech today. I've tried to capture what I thought were the most interesting portions below, but it's worth reading the full article if you have an interest in this topic. 

The moderators of these platforms — perched uneasily at the intersection of corporate profits, social responsibility, and human rights — have a powerful impact on free speech, government dissent, the shaping of social norms, user safety, and the meaning of privacy. What flagged content should be removed? Who decides what stays and why? What constitutes newsworthiness? Threat? Harm? When should law enforcement be involved?

While public debates rage about government censorship and free speech on college campuses, customer content management constitutes the quiet transnational transfer of free-speech decisions to the private, corporately managed corners of the internet where people weigh competing values in hidden and proprietary ways. Moderation, explains Microsoft researcher Kate Crawford, is "a profoundly human decision-making process about what constitutes appropriate speech in the public domain."
...
But as hidden as that army  (of moderators) is, the orders it follows are often even more opaque — crafted by an amalgam of venture capitalists, CEOs, policy, community, privacy and trust and safety managers, lawyers, and engineers working thousands of miles away.
...

The obvious costs of keeping such a significant, quasi-governmental function under wraps rarely rank as a corporate concern. "How," asks Roberts, the content moderation researcher, "do you or I effect change on moderation practices if they’re treated as industrial secrets?"
...
Anne Collier, the founder of iCanHelpline, a social media tool for schools, suggests that users have not yet recognized their collective power to fix the harms users have themselves created in social media. "They’re called ‘users’ for a reason," she said, "and collectively still think and behave as passive consumers." By obfuscating their role, she argues, the industry delays users’ recognition of their agency and power.
...
Section 230 (of the Communications Decency Act’s Section 230(c), known as the Good Samaritan Act) is widely cherished as the "most important law on the Internet," credited with making possible a "trillion or so dollars of value" according to David Post, legal scholar and fellow at the Center for Democracy and Technology. He calls Section 230,  a "rather remarkable provision." It reads: "No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider." These 26 words put free speech decisions into private hands, effectively immunizing platforms from legal liability for all content that does not violate federal law, such as child pornography. All the checks and balances that govern traditional media would not apply; with no libel risk there were, in effect, no rules.
...
Content management is rarely dealt with as a prioritized organizational concern — centrally bringing together legal, customer service, security, privacy, safety, marketing, branding, and personnel to create a unified approach. Rather, it is still usually shoehorned into structures never built for a task so complex.
...
The sharp contrast between Facebook, with its robust and long-standing Safety Advisory Board, and Reddit, with its skeletal staff and dark pools of offensive content, offers up a vivid illustration for how content moderation has evolved in isolated ways within individual corporate enclaves. The fragmentation means that content banned on one platform can simply pop up on another, and that trolling can be coordinated so that harassment and abuse that appear minor on a single platform are amplified by appearing simultaneously on multiple platforms.
...
Several content moderation experts point to Pinterest as an industry leader. Microsoft’s Tarleton Gillespie, author of the forthcoming Free Speech in the Age of Platform, says the company is likely doing the most of any social media company to bridge the divide between platform and user, private company and the public. The platform’s moderation staff is well-funded and supported, and Pinterest is reportedly breaking ground in making its processes transparent to users. For example, Pinterest posts visual examples to illustrate the site’s "acceptable use policy" in an effort to help users better understand the platform’s content guidelines and the decisions moderators make to uphold them.
...
In May 2014, Dave Willner and Dan Kelmenson, a software engineer at Facebook, patented a 3D-modeling technology for content moderation designed around a system that resembles an industrial assembly line. "It’s tearing the problem [of huge volume] into pieces to make chunks more comprehensible," Willner says. First, the model identifies a set of malicious groups — say neo-Nazis, child pornographers, or rape promoters. The model then identifies users who associate with those groups through their online interactions. Next, the model searches for other groups associated with those users and analyzes those groups "based on occurrences of keywords associated with the type of malicious activity and manual verification by experts." This way, companies can identify additional or emerging malicious online activity. "If the moderation system is a factory, this approach moves what is essentially piecework toward assembly," he said. "And you can measure how good the system is."

And for another interesting take on using technology for moderation, read this story on how Riot Games is using artificial intelligence drawn from the collective intelligence of its users in order to curb toxic behavior in its League of Legends game:
http://www.the-vital-edge.com/artificial-intelligence-behavior/___

posted image

2016-04-17 22:22:06 (4 comments; 7 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

The Rise of Metropolis Regions and Regional Geographies

To an extent, America is already headed toward a metropolis-first arrangement. The states aren’t about to go away, but economically and socially, the country is drifting toward looser metropolitan and regional formations, anchored by the great cities and urban archipelagos that already lead global economic circuits.

We don’t have to create these regions; they already exist, on two levels. First, there are now seven distinct super-regions, defined by common economics and demographics, like the Pacific Coast and the Great Lakes. Within these, in addition to America’s main metro hubs, we find new urban archipelagos, including the Arizona Sun Corridor, from Phoenix to Tucson; the Front Range, from Salt Lake City to Denver to Albuquerque; the Cascadia belt, from Vancouver to Seattle; and the Piedmont Atlantic cluster, fromAtlan... more »

A New Map for America?

THESE days, in the thick of the American presidential primaries, it’s easy to see how the 50 states continue to drive the political system. But increasingly, that’s all they drive — socially and economically, America is reorganizing itself around regional infrastructure lines and metropolitan clusters that ignore state and even national borders. The problem is, the political system hasn’t caught up. America faces a two-part problem. It’s no secret that the country has fallen behind on infrastructure spending. But it’s not just a matter of how much is spent on catching up, but how and where it is spent. Advanced economies in Western Europe and Asia are reorienting themselves around robust urban clusters of advanced industry. Unfortunately, American policy making remains wedded to an antiquated political structure of 50 distinct states.

link: http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/04/17/opinion/sunday/a-new-map-for-america.html?_r=1___The Rise of Metropolis Regions and Regional Geographies

To an extent, America is already headed toward a metropolis-first arrangement. The states aren’t about to go away, but economically and socially, the country is drifting toward looser metropolitan and regional formations, anchored by the great cities and urban archipelagos that already lead global economic circuits.

We don’t have to create these regions; they already exist, on two levels. First, there are now seven distinct super-regions, defined by common economics and demographics, like the Pacific Coast and the Great Lakes. Within these, in addition to America’s main metro hubs, we find new urban archipelagos, including the Arizona Sun Corridor, from Phoenix to Tucson; the Front Range, from Salt Lake City to Denver to Albuquerque; the Cascadia belt, from Vancouver to Seattle; and the Piedmont Atlantic cluster, from Atlanta to Charlotte, N.C.


HT +Lisa Frankenberg and +Ward Plunet 

posted image

2016-04-17 03:36:18 (10 comments; 2 reshares; 39 +1s)Open 

Beautiful & Cute Wooden Robots

ZeGoBeast is a cool idea - an Arduino-based system for building a cute, little wooden robot. Still in funding stage on KickStarter. 

Beautiful & Cute Wooden Robots

ZeGoBeast is a cool idea - an Arduino-based system for building a cute, little wooden robot. Still in funding stage on KickStarter. ___

posted image

2016-04-17 01:55:59 (7 comments; 6 reshares; 26 +1s)Open 

Balancing Social and Financial Returns

Many of the articles you read about business acting as a force for good in the world tend to be a bit light. Not this one. It's quite thoughtful. Here's the highlight if you can't spare the time to read the full piece: 

It may be that if we want better companies, we have to change the way we invest in them. Our expectations for good are only worth as much as what we're prepared to suffer as investors. If we expect bigger and faster returns all of the time, it's not surprising that we end up with companies that are less good than we want.

"It's immensely fulfilling for people to come into contact with what their money is doing," he says. "People think investors want higher returns and the borrowers would rather have lower rates of interest to pay. But that doesn't happen. Often, it's... more »

Balancing Social and Financial Returns

Many of the articles you read about business acting as a force for good in the world tend to be a bit light. Not this one. It's quite thoughtful. Here's the highlight if you can't spare the time to read the full piece: 

It may be that if we want better companies, we have to change the way we invest in them. Our expectations for good are only worth as much as what we're prepared to suffer as investors. If we expect bigger and faster returns all of the time, it's not surprising that we end up with companies that are less good than we want.

"It's immensely fulfilling for people to come into contact with what their money is doing," he says. "People think investors want higher returns and the borrowers would rather have lower rates of interest to pay. But that doesn't happen. Often, it's the opposite. Invariably, the investors stand up and say, 'This environmental and social impact you're having is so compelling that if you want less return, I can probably do that.'"

Personal connection changes the nature of transaction and leads to a more cooperative, human-sized arrangement, Shaffer says. In other words, it's the exact opposite of what happens when you invest in a mutual fund, and you're 10 steps away from what a company does with your money. In the future, we need to build more direct, accountable relationships into investing, so we knew where our capital is going. Replicating something like RSF's pricing meetings on a larger scale—say, in agreeing on the size of shareholder dividends—would lead to a more responsive type of enterprise. Could Wall Street organize quarterly forums where companies and investors would discuss the ratio of financial to social returns?___

posted image

2016-04-14 23:47:17 (2 comments; 22 reshares; 61 +1s)Open 

Artificial Intelligence as Container of Our Collective Intelligence

Humans excel at embedding individual intelligence in shareable constructs. Our early knowledge sharing relied on speech and other social behaviors, but over time we augmented this capacity for collective intelligence with writing, publishing and other technologies. This silent transformation – this long-term shift from the social to the technological – has led to a world where machines now play an increasingly dominant role as our containers of collective intelligence. Today’s explosive growth in machine learning marks a turning point as we now prioritize the teaching of machines over the teaching of humans. As this happens, knowledge becomes increasingly abstracted from individual human minds and machines transition from mere containers of our collective intelligence to agents capable of using that information onour b... more »

Artificial Intelligence as Container of Our Collective Intelligence

Humans excel at embedding individual intelligence in shareable constructs. Our early knowledge sharing relied on speech and other social behaviors, but over time we augmented this capacity for collective intelligence with writing, publishing and other technologies. This silent transformation – this long-term shift from the social to the technological – has led to a world where machines now play an increasingly dominant role as our containers of collective intelligence. Today’s explosive growth in machine learning marks a turning point as we now prioritize the teaching of machines over the teaching of humans. As this happens, knowledge becomes increasingly abstracted from individual human minds and machines transition from mere containers of our collective intelligence to agents capable of using that information on our behalf. This transformation changes humanity’s relationship to knowledge and raises profound implications for the future of the human experience.


#knowledge   #collectiveintelligence   #artificialintelligence  ___

posted image

2016-04-14 22:37:55 (9 comments; 4 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 

Darwin, the Dad

Just think about what kind of father would let his kids draw all over his most important manuscript. A side of Darwin, I did not know.

Darwin, the Dad

Just think about what kind of father would let his kids draw all over his most important manuscript. A side of Darwin, I did not know.___

posted image

2016-04-14 14:35:30 (15 comments; 9 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

Machine-based Collective Intelligence and the Human Experience

A few weeks ago, I was in Singapore to give this talk at a complexity conference at Nanyang Technological University. The focus is on how humanity relates to the fast-approaching era of artificial intelligence:

Humans excel at embedding individual intelligence in shareable constructs. Our early knowledge sharing relied on speech and other social behaviors, but over time we augmented this capacity for collective intelligence with writing, publishing and other technologies. This silent transformation – this long-term shift from the social to the technological – has led to a world where machines now play an increasingly dominant role as our containers of collective intelligence. Today’s explosive growth in machine learning marks a turning point as we now prioritize the teaching of machines over the teaching ofhumans... more »

Machine-based Collective Intelligence and the Human Experience

A few weeks ago, I was in Singapore to give this talk at a complexity conference at Nanyang Technological University. The focus is on how humanity relates to the fast-approaching era of artificial intelligence:

Humans excel at embedding individual intelligence in shareable constructs. Our early knowledge sharing relied on speech and other social behaviors, but over time we augmented this capacity for collective intelligence with writing, publishing and other technologies. This silent transformation – this long-term shift from the social to the technological – has led to a world where machines now play an increasingly dominant role as our containers of collective intelligence. Today’s explosive growth in machine learning marks a turning point as we now prioritize the teaching of machines over the teaching of humans. As this happens, knowledge becomes increasingly abstracted from individual human minds and machines transition from mere containers of our collective intelligence to agents capable of using that information on our behalf. This transformation changes humanity’s relationship to knowledge and raises profound implications for the future of the human experience.

The talk is long (52 minutes for the talk itself, with another 38 minutes of Q & A), but for those interested in the topics I explore, I think you will find it well worth the investment of time. And by the way, you should be able to safely digest this talk at 1.25, 1.5, or possibly 2.0 speed. Simply click on the gear icon in the lower right corner of the YouTube screen, select “Speed” and choose your tempo.

More info on this conference and it's amazing participants: http://goo.gl/VdBftg 



#artificialintelligence   #machinelearning   #knowledge  ___

posted image

2016-04-14 05:48:46 (8 comments; 18 reshares; 84 +1s)Open 

Facebook's Investments in Artificial Intelligence

In a keynote on Wednesday, Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer said that A.I. on Facebook makes 6 million predictions per second. More than 25% of the company's engineers have used A.I. to improve a system on the network.
...

"I predict a world where notifications are always relevant," Beltzner said. "Today, a lot of people complain that their phone buzzes and they don't know if it's important enough to bother taking their phone out of their pocket. It will know the difference between a kid posting a picture of their pet compared to a friend you haven't seen in 10 years at a coffee shop down the road where you could meet him in 10 minutes."



Facebook's Investments in Artificial Intelligence

In a keynote on Wednesday, Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer said that A.I. on Facebook makes 6 million predictions per second. More than 25% of the company's engineers have used A.I. to improve a system on the network.
...

"I predict a world where notifications are always relevant," Beltzner said. "Today, a lot of people complain that their phone buzzes and they don't know if it's important enough to bother taking their phone out of their pocket. It will know the difference between a kid posting a picture of their pet compared to a friend you haven't seen in 10 years at a coffee shop down the road where you could meet him in 10 minutes."

___

posted image

2016-04-09 03:30:12 (3 comments; 7 reshares; 26 +1s)Open 

Deep Learning Recreates a Rembrandt

This project extracted data from various Rembrandt paintings to find the core features typical in one of his portraits. With that in place, a new painting was created in the style of the Dutch master. 

+Susanne Ramharter​, you might find this interesting.  

-+-+-+-+-+-+-

An additional note from a comment I just left on +Kristin Drysdale​'s share of this post:

I sense and understand the unease and disappointment people are expressing with this work. It's worth clarifying a few things, just in case they're not completely obvious. The first is that, technically speaking, this isn't just a merger or morph of already existing Rembrandt paintings. The resulting painting - or more precisely, the resulting image - was generated from scratch. It would be analogous to someone studying a wholebunch of... more »

Deep Learning Recreates a Rembrandt

This project extracted data from various Rembrandt paintings to find the core features typical in one of his portraits. With that in place, a new painting was created in the style of the Dutch master. 

+Susanne Ramharter​, you might find this interesting.  

-+-+-+-+-+-+-

An additional note from a comment I just left on +Kristin Drysdale​'s share of this post:

I sense and understand the unease and disappointment people are expressing with this work. It's worth clarifying a few things, just in case they're not completely obvious. The first is that, technically speaking, this isn't just a merger or morph of already existing Rembrandt paintings. The resulting painting - or more precisely, the resulting image - was generated from scratch. It would be analogous to someone studying a whole bunch of certain types of Rembrandt paintings, and then being asked to create a new painting, based on that training. Do that's what we're seeing here: a mimic, an echo, if the original creativity that once stuffed in the soul of Rembrandt.

There are plenty of examples of images where a technique like this could, and most certainly will, be used quite effectively without leaving us with this uneasy sense of loss. In this case though, what's missing is that, like other great artists, Rembrandt was capable of using light in order to capture something of the essence, or soul, of a person. That's because the man was likely capable of seeing that soul in the first place, and then capable of translating what he saw into pigments that he left behind for us on a canvas.

What I love about this project is that it was able to help us draw out this distinction.


___

posted image

2016-04-06 23:30:01 (10 comments; 3 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

Robo Arousal

In a first for mechanical man, scientists have revealed that humans get aroused by touching robots. Researchers at Stanford University studying the physiological impact of human-on-bot contact found that "touching areas perceived as private made the skin more moist."

Robo Arousal

In a first for mechanical man, scientists have revealed that humans get aroused by touching robots. Researchers at Stanford University studying the physiological impact of human-on-bot contact found that "touching areas perceived as private made the skin more moist."___

posted image

2016-04-06 11:42:57 (14 comments; 7 reshares; 43 +1s)Open 

Desalinization is going to be a critical technology on the world to come, so this is welcome news.

Lockheed Martin's Perforene, on the other hand, is made from single atom-thick sheets of graphene. Because the sheets are so thin, water flows through them far more easily than through a conventional TFC (thin film composite).

That easier flow means less required pressure, which means less energy to generate that pressure, which means lower cost desalinization.

Next steps are preventing these thin films from tearing in production so that the process can be commercialized.


HT +Mike Murphy​

___Desalinization is going to be a critical technology on the world to come, so this is welcome news.

Lockheed Martin's Perforene, on the other hand, is made from single atom-thick sheets of graphene. Because the sheets are so thin, water flows through them far more easily than through a conventional TFC (thin film composite).

That easier flow means less required pressure, which means less energy to generate that pressure, which means lower cost desalinization.

Next steps are preventing these thin films from tearing in production so that the process can be commercialized.


HT +Mike Murphy​

posted image

2016-04-04 23:45:01 (33 comments; 13 reshares; 65 +1s)Open 


The Birth of a Mass Market for Electric Vehicles

Most of  the best selling cars in America, such as the Honda Accord or Nissan Altima, generally hit around 300,000 in sales every year.

Tesla saw 276,000 people sign-up to buy its newest all-electric Model 3 sedan — in two days.

Will they be able to meet the demand? That is the next question. An exciting time for the automotive sector, to be sure though.

#tesla



The Birth of a Mass Market for Electric Vehicles

Most of  the best selling cars in America, such as the Honda Accord or Nissan Altima, generally hit around 300,000 in sales every year.

Tesla saw 276,000 people sign-up to buy its newest all-electric Model 3 sedan — in two days.

Will they be able to meet the demand? That is the next question. An exciting time for the automotive sector, to be sure though.

#tesla
___

posted image

2016-04-04 02:52:37 (13 comments; 7 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

Understanding the Panama Papers

I'm still trying to make sense of this massive leak if information. This article provides some useful context around Mossack Fonseca, the Panamanian law firm at the center of the thousands of shell corporations used to shield wealthy clients from taxes and visibility.



Understanding the Panama Papers

I'm still trying to make sense of this massive leak if information. This article provides some useful context around Mossack Fonseca, the Panamanian law firm at the center of the thousands of shell corporations used to shield wealthy clients from taxes and visibility.

___

posted image

2016-04-03 16:19:31 (0 comments; 10 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

A Coding Language for Programming Biological Circuits

At first, I thought this might have been an April Fools joke - that's how revolutionary this seems to me. At MIT, researchers have now developed a programming language that can be used to build biological circuits within biological cells.

This is going to open up radical biological innovation.

With great power, comes great responsibility.

HT +Jon Lawhead​ and +Mark Bruce​

"It is literally a programming language for bacteria," says Christopher Voigt, an MIT professor of biological engineering. "You use a text-based language, just like you're programming a computer. Then you take that text and you compile it and it turns it into a DNA sequence that you put into the cell, and the circuit runs inside the cell."___A Coding Language for Programming Biological Circuits

At first, I thought this might have been an April Fools joke - that's how revolutionary this seems to me. At MIT, researchers have now developed a programming language that can be used to build biological circuits within biological cells.

This is going to open up radical biological innovation.

With great power, comes great responsibility.

HT +Jon Lawhead​ and +Mark Bruce​

posted image

2016-04-03 12:16:49 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 19 +1s)Open 

The Shift to Platforms

The key shifts:
* From resource control to orchestration.
* From internal optimization to external interaction.
* Value the ecosystem rather than the individual. 

The Shift to Platforms

The key shifts:
* From resource control to orchestration.
* From internal optimization to external interaction.
* Value the ecosystem rather than the individual. ___

posted image

2016-04-02 22:51:31 (6 comments; 11 reshares; 40 +1s)Open 

A Few Good Thoughts on Machine Learning in Business

On application of machine learning:
At a high level there are common kinds of tasks frequently seen in ML (machine learning): classification, regression and ranking. For instance, image recognition, such as in ImageNet, is a classification task where we have an input image and want to predict the primary subject matter of the image (a photo of a dog, car, etc.).

Regression is about predicting a real numerical value or values from an input, such as predicting the future value of a home or a stock portfolio. Ranking is about predicting an ordering of items which is “best” in a given setting; for instance, in search ranking, we want to order results that are most relevant for a given query and user profile and history.

On understanding metrics and their impact on business:
Unsurprisingly, this might bepar... more »

A Few Good Thoughts on Machine Learning in Business

On application of machine learning:
At a high level there are common kinds of tasks frequently seen in ML (machine learning): classification, regression and ranking. For instance, image recognition, such as in ImageNet, is a classification task where we have an input image and want to predict the primary subject matter of the image (a photo of a dog, car, etc.).

Regression is about predicting a real numerical value or values from an input, such as predicting the future value of a home or a stock portfolio. Ranking is about predicting an ordering of items which is “best” in a given setting; for instance, in search ranking, we want to order results that are most relevant for a given query and user profile and history.

On understanding metrics and their impact on business:
Unsurprisingly, this might be part of why Google invests so heavily in ML, because improvements are strongly correlated with key business and financial metrics. On the flip side, for Apple, a 1 percent improvement to Siri has a much weaker and tenuous relationship with how many iPhones are sold.___

posted image

2016-04-02 13:33:51 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

This is a worthwhile read from +John Newman​ on the dynamics of competition and collaboration that undergird capitalism and socialism. Topical given the political race in the U.S.

Related: Martin Nowark did some good research a few years back on the dynamics of collaboration and competition:
http://www.the-vital-edge.com/cooperation

The Social Capitalist Manifesto___This is a worthwhile read from +John Newman​ on the dynamics of competition and collaboration that undergird capitalism and socialism. Topical given the political race in the U.S.

Related: Martin Nowark did some good research a few years back on the dynamics of collaboration and competition:
http://www.the-vital-edge.com/cooperation

posted image

2016-03-30 18:22:07 (12 comments; 7 reshares; 44 +1s)Open 

Next Up: Poker

In some ways, Poker is harder even than Go for a computer to play, thanks to the lack of knowledge of what’s happening on the table and in player’s hands. While computers can relatively easily play the game probabilistically, accurately calculating the likelihoods that any given hand is held by their opponents and betting accordingly, they are much worse at taking into account their opponents’ behaviour.

....

Mathematicians love poker because it can stand in for a number of real-world situations; the hidden information, skewed payoffs and psychology at play were famously used to model politics in the cold war, for instance. The field of Game Theory, which originated with the study of games like poker, has now grown to include problems like climate change and sex ratios in biology.

Next Up: Poker

In some ways, Poker is harder even than Go for a computer to play, thanks to the lack of knowledge of what’s happening on the table and in player’s hands. While computers can relatively easily play the game probabilistically, accurately calculating the likelihoods that any given hand is held by their opponents and betting accordingly, they are much worse at taking into account their opponents’ behaviour.

....

Mathematicians love poker because it can stand in for a number of real-world situations; the hidden information, skewed payoffs and psychology at play were famously used to model politics in the cold war, for instance. The field of Game Theory, which originated with the study of games like poker, has now grown to include problems like climate change and sex ratios in biology.___

posted image

2016-03-29 23:01:30 (1 comments; 9 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

Very interesting exploration of developmental psychology, as applied to Robots. At the heart, is this important question of what we are aiming for: mimicking behavior or real emulation of emotion.

While still in its early stages, my research offers an approach to building emotional robots that follows Dennett’s “emergent” model. Rather than hard-coding emotions into a robot using fixed rules, we might be able to create a robot with an emotional architecture similar to a human’s, wherein first-hand experiences with emotions like happiness and love teach the robot how to express these emotions in the future.



HT +Hans Youngmann​

___Very interesting exploration of developmental psychology, as applied to Robots. At the heart, is this important question of what we are aiming for: mimicking behavior or real emulation of emotion.

While still in its early stages, my research offers an approach to building emotional robots that follows Dennett’s “emergent” model. Rather than hard-coding emotions into a robot using fixed rules, we might be able to create a robot with an emotional architecture similar to a human’s, wherein first-hand experiences with emotions like happiness and love teach the robot how to express these emotions in the future.



HT +Hans Youngmann​

posted image

2016-03-28 15:37:23 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

IBM is using complex computer models and machine learning to calculate how pollution will spread across the city. The researchers can now produce pollution forecasts, with a resolution of a kilometer square, up to 10 days in advance.

IBM is using complex computer models and machine learning to calculate how pollution will spread across the city. The researchers can now produce pollution forecasts, with a resolution of a kilometer square, up to 10 days in advance.___

posted image

2016-03-27 22:48:20 (9 comments; 4 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 

Learning to See the New Wilderness

I used to do a lot of work with environmental organizations across North America, some that worked directly on invasive species. These organizations would likely be horrified at this article and the fact that I'm sharing it. But I think there is a deep truth in here, even though I'm not personally ready to give up on salmon, wolves or pandas.

The strong respect this author shows for the intelligence of crows is something I completely understand. I love crows. I mean, I really do love crows, and when I think of the strong attachment I have for these brilliant creatures, it actually has a lot to do with the perspective raised in this piece.

Weedy species represent a new ecological trend. A return of the truly wild. Wild creatures don’t do as they are told, and live where they are told to live. I refer to an etymology of thew... more »

Learning to See the New Wilderness

I used to do a lot of work with environmental organizations across North America, some that worked directly on invasive species. These organizations would likely be horrified at this article and the fact that I'm sharing it. But I think there is a deep truth in here, even though I'm not personally ready to give up on salmon, wolves or pandas.

The strong respect this author shows for the intelligence of crows is something I completely understand. I love crows. I mean, I really do love crows, and when I think of the strong attachment I have for these brilliant creatures, it actually has a lot to do with the perspective raised in this piece.

Weedy species represent a new ecological trend. A return of the truly wild. Wild creatures don’t do as they are told, and live where they are told to live. I refer to an etymology of the word that predates animal planet: The wild as dangerous, frightening, mysterious, uncontrollable.

What really is an “invasive species”? The world we live in is dynamic, not static. Living things aren’t concerned with clearly defined abstract mental categories, let alone zoning regulations. You might think that an industrial area and a designated wilderness or national park are separate  but the separation exists only in the human mind. Everything is connected and happening all at once. It’s all the same system.

I also have studied a bit about shamanism and find the author's points about the call for new totems to be something worth contemplation. I could understand the draw of the coyote and the crow. I'm not quite ready, perhaps, to adopt the Norway rat or garlic mustard, but the point is that it nasty be time to expand our admiration of living creatures beyond the majestic.

As I say, I'm not of the same mind as this author. I believe there is something sacred about the remarkable genetic biodiversity of this planet. We can not, we should not, give up on this amazing planetary legacy, simply because our current capacity for destruction outstretches out capacity for understanding and appreciation. With that said, there is still some wisdom in this piece when it comes to reexamining our relationship to 'weeds.'

And if you vaguely agree, you may also be interested in this piece about seeing technology within the bigger frame of Nature:
http://www.the-vital-edge.com/artificial-intelligence-nature/

By +Ted Heistman​​.
___

posted image

2016-03-27 01:56:37 (6 comments; 4 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 

Holoportation: Shrinking Space Even More

Microsoft is developing is Hololens technology with an eye to enabling telepresence. Though the way the demonstration video is shot makes it hard to know what exactly is real and what is smoke and mirror post-production effects, this sounds like it could be very powerful technology.

The technology is used in real time and it was created to be used with reality displays such as Microsoft HoloLens. The technology allows users to see, hear and interact with other participants through a 3D holographic representation of themselves.

The system works with a newly created 3D caption technology, that surrounds the individual with 3D cameras in different spots of the room, creating a sort of holoportation cabin. Each of the cameras records the user from a separate viewpoint, fusing all of the images together and creating a temporally... more »

Holoportation: Shrinking Space Even More

Microsoft is developing is Hololens technology with an eye to enabling telepresence. Though the way the demonstration video is shot makes it hard to know what exactly is real and what is smoke and mirror post-production effects, this sounds like it could be very powerful technology.

The technology is used in real time and it was created to be used with reality displays such as Microsoft HoloLens. The technology allows users to see, hear and interact with other participants through a 3D holographic representation of themselves.

The system works with a newly created 3D caption technology, that surrounds the individual with 3D cameras in different spots of the room, creating a sort of holoportation cabin. Each of the cameras records the user from a separate viewpoint, fusing all of the images together and creating a temporally consistent model of the individual.

___

posted image

2016-03-25 12:50:27 (4 comments; 6 reshares; 24 +1s)Open 

Status of Synthetic Biology

The crux of the story is this: an astonishing number of the genes added to Syn 3.0 at the behest of their computer model, while apparently essential for life, have no known function. Their final genome had exactly 473 genes in it, and a whopping 149 of these are currently mysterious.

That is, in essence, the exact opposite of what this was supposed to reveal. By reducing the number of genes, we were supposed to simplify the processes those gene produce, to the extent that we could say that we understand those processes. Instead, all we’ve revealed is how much we don’t know, but at least that idea is no longer abstract; in a purely genetic sense, we’re pretty much 324/473 = 68.5% of the way to fully answering a very simple iteration of the core question of biology.

Getting a fully characterized version of Syn 3.0 could take ayear, or a d... more »

Status of Synthetic Biology

The crux of the story is this: an astonishing number of the genes added to Syn 3.0 at the behest of their computer model, while apparently essential for life, have no known function. Their final genome had exactly 473 genes in it, and a whopping 149 of these are currently mysterious.

That is, in essence, the exact opposite of what this was supposed to reveal. By reducing the number of genes, we were supposed to simplify the processes those gene produce, to the extent that we could say that we understand those processes. Instead, all we’ve revealed is how much we don’t know, but at least that idea is no longer abstract; in a purely genetic sense, we’re pretty much 324/473 = 68.5% of the way to fully answering a very simple iteration of the core question of biology.

Getting a fully characterized version of Syn 3.0 could take a year, or a decade, or five decades — none of these timelines would surprise me. But once we do get there, we will fundamentally have a life-form we understand on a genetic level, a foundation on which to build. That’s what we’re much better at as a species, I’d argue: building up from knowns into empty possibility space, rather than burrowing down from knowns into concrete unknowns.___

posted image

2016-03-24 18:29:54 (3 comments; 8 reshares; 28 +1s)Open 

Biomimicry: How to Be an Earthling

This is a really wonderful and inspiring documentary with Janine Benyus on the topic of biomimicry. It gives me chills watching this. There is so much to learn from nature's designs for living on the planet Earth. This twenty-minute video will give you a good overview on the concept of biomimicry as well as lots of juicy examples of its principles. 

#biomimicry  

Biomimicry: How to Be an Earthling

This is a really wonderful and inspiring documentary with Janine Benyus on the topic of biomimicry. It gives me chills watching this. There is so much to learn from nature's designs for living on the planet Earth. This twenty-minute video will give you a good overview on the concept of biomimicry as well as lots of juicy examples of its principles. 

#biomimicry  ___

posted image

2016-03-24 16:27:51 (2 comments; 3 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

The Achilles Heel of Chat Bots: Humans

It's another sad tale of an innocent chat bot being corrupted through contact with humanity. ;)

Chat bots are a cheat at intelligence. They appear smart by merely matching the questions they hear to answers that they've heard from people on the web. The result can seem uncannily human-like in certain situations.

But the weakness of chat bots is that they are a mirror of those who interact with them. And so, if you have Hitler-loving crazies interacting with it, it's going to start talking like a Hitler-loving crazy - which is what happened to Microsoft's AI, Tay. Two weeks ago, I met a social robot at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore (http://goo.gl/7LsbOs) that used a chat bot to generate conversation. This robot, named Nadine, it told me its favorite movie was Age of Ultron - you know, that Avengers... more »

There's an approach to conversational AI that's not based on understanding at all, but rather on learning what to say next based on what was said previously; essentially, treating words as opaque objects with meaningful patterns. I'm not very sanguine about this approach, and this case illustrates why: when Microsoft put a "teenage girl" chatbot on Twitter and told it to learn from the conversations it had, it learned... well, about what you would expect it to learn on Twitter, especially if you show up with both "teenage girl" and "Microsoft" signs around your neck during an election year.

The "Hitler-loving sex robot" descriptor of the headline is somewhat of an understatement.

Semantic understanding: yes, it's probably important. ___The Achilles Heel of Chat Bots: Humans

It's another sad tale of an innocent chat bot being corrupted through contact with humanity. ;)

Chat bots are a cheat at intelligence. They appear smart by merely matching the questions they hear to answers that they've heard from people on the web. The result can seem uncannily human-like in certain situations.

But the weakness of chat bots is that they are a mirror of those who interact with them. And so, if you have Hitler-loving crazies interacting with it, it's going to start talking like a Hitler-loving crazy - which is what happened to Microsoft's AI, Tay. Two weeks ago, I met a social robot at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore (http://goo.gl/7LsbOs) that used a chat bot to generate conversation. This robot, named Nadine, it told me its favorite movie was Age of Ultron - you know, that Avengers movie about a maniacal AI bent of taking over the world. That felt somewhat uncanny to me, but it's kind of not what you want to hear coming from a social robot. That's just bad PR, and that's exactly what Microsoft is now facing - bad PR.

Chat bots are a shortcut. They get you human-like responses to conversation, but we've still got a ways to go before they're reliable for commercial applications.

HT +Yonatan Zunger

posted image

2016-03-24 15:08:03 (11 comments; 10 reshares; 105 +1s)Open 

Did Less Chewing Make Us Smart?

A group of researchers have tested just how much less chewing and just how much less force our chewing must exert simply by slicing meat and pounding root vegetables.

Why, you might ask, did they bother doing this? Because they are attempting to show how, way before the practice of cooking, the introduction of stone tools into early human dietary practices would have made us much more efficient in consuming calories (i.e. calories consumed per hour of work). In short, the basic structure of hominin molars would have made it difficult to break raw meat before the invention of stone tools approximately 3.3 million years ago.

We find that if meat comprised one-third of the diet, the number of chewing cycles per year would have declined by nearly 2 million (a 13% reduction) and total masticatory force required would have declined by 15%.... more »

Did Less Chewing Make Us Smart?

A group of researchers have tested just how much less chewing and just how much less force our chewing must exert simply by slicing meat and pounding root vegetables.

Why, you might ask, did they bother doing this? Because they are attempting to show how, way before the practice of cooking, the introduction of stone tools into early human dietary practices would have made us much more efficient in consuming calories (i.e. calories consumed per hour of work). In short, the basic structure of hominin molars would have made it difficult to break raw meat before the invention of stone tools approximately 3.3 million years ago.

We find that if meat comprised one-third of the diet, the number of chewing cycles per year would have declined by nearly 2 million (a 13% reduction) and total masticatory force required would have declined by 15%. Furthermore, by simply slicing meat and pounding USOs, hominins would have improved their ability to chew meat into smaller particles by 41%, reduced the number of chews per year by another 5%, and decreased masticatory force requirements by an additional 12%. Although cooking has important benefits, it appears that selection for smaller masticatory features in Homo would have been initially made possible by the combination of using stone tools and eating meat.

The reduced force requirements that these researchers discovered might also explain the reduction in teeth and jaw size that hominin populations underwent by reducing evolutionary selection pressures for these features. The article then notes that these changes, in turn, would have opened up the possibility of changes in the skull that allowed for speech production, changed locomotion, changed thermoregulation, and possibly changes in the size and shape of the brain.

Summary here, along with option to purchase the actual paper:
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v531/n7595/full/nature16990.html

___

posted image

2016-03-22 14:48:52 (14 comments; 13 reshares; 124 +1s)Open 

City Slicker Birds

I guess that old adage about country living being good for you is for the birds, er, I mean not for the birds.

“We found that not only were birds from urbanized areas better at innovative problem-solving tasks than bullfinches from rural environments, but that surprisingly urban birds also had a better immunity than rural birds,” says Jean-Nicolas Audet, a Ph.D student in the Department of Biology and first author of the study published in the journal Behavioral Ecology.

“Since urban birds were better at problem-solving, we expected that there would be a trade-off and that the immunity would be lower, just because we assumed that you can't be good at everything (in fact, both traits are costly). It seems that in this case, the urban birds have it all.”



City Slicker Birds

I guess that old adage about country living being good for you is for the birds, er, I mean not for the birds.

“We found that not only were birds from urbanized areas better at innovative problem-solving tasks than bullfinches from rural environments, but that surprisingly urban birds also had a better immunity than rural birds,” says Jean-Nicolas Audet, a Ph.D student in the Department of Biology and first author of the study published in the journal Behavioral Ecology.

“Since urban birds were better at problem-solving, we expected that there would be a trade-off and that the immunity would be lower, just because we assumed that you can't be good at everything (in fact, both traits are costly). It seems that in this case, the urban birds have it all.”

___

posted image

2016-03-20 17:07:06 (10 comments; 2 reshares; 31 +1s)Open 

Death Thought Accessibility and the Uncanny Valley of Robotics

Humanlike robots can prompt unconscious concerns and thoughts about death in our minds, called "death thought accessibility," or DTA. It's these thoughts that contribute to what is known as the uncanny valley, the idea that humanoid robots that closely mirror the look and behavior of people make us feel uncomfortable.

Death Thought Accessibility and the Uncanny Valley of Robotics

Humanlike robots can prompt unconscious concerns and thoughts about death in our minds, called "death thought accessibility," or DTA. It's these thoughts that contribute to what is known as the uncanny valley, the idea that humanoid robots that closely mirror the look and behavior of people make us feel uncomfortable.___

posted image

2016-03-18 14:43:09 (4 comments; 6 reshares; 41 +1s)Open 

When Humans Partner with AI to Expand Knowledge

Here's +John Robb talking about the way we humans will partner with artificial intelligence systems to greatly expand the base of human knowledge. This is a topic close that I'm becoming increasingly interested in, and it was actually the focus of the talk I gave a couple weeks back in Singapore. 

An excerpt from John's piece, to give you a sense for where he's going here:
However, all of that earlier innovation is child's play compared to what is now possible.  With limited AGI, it will be possible to exponentially accelerate the gathering, improvement, and sharing of human understanding.  Here's how this is done in its most basic form (currently called cloud robotics):

* An AGI learns a task or a concept through experience (this is becoming very easy to do with model free deep learning,Big... more »

When Humans Partner with AI to Expand Knowledge

Here's +John Robb talking about the way we humans will partner with artificial intelligence systems to greatly expand the base of human knowledge. This is a topic close that I'm becoming increasingly interested in, and it was actually the focus of the talk I gave a couple weeks back in Singapore. 

An excerpt from John's piece, to give you a sense for where he's going here:
However, all of that earlier innovation is child's play compared to what is now possible.  With limited AGI, it will be possible to exponentially accelerate the gathering, improvement, and sharing of human understanding.  Here's how this is done in its most basic form (currently called cloud robotics):

* An AGI learns a task or a concept through experience (this is becoming very easy to do with model free deep learning, Big Data and Big Sim as I pointed out yesterday).
* That understanding is packaged, uploaded, and stored in the cloud.
* Any other AGI can download that understanding as needed.

Here's the complication: AI will be great for extracting human understanding and storing it for anyone to access, or use via an automated agent, but there is still a huge hurdle to re-integrated that new information back into a human mind. We are associative learners and, as far as we know, each of our brains stores knowledge in unique schemas. The only way we currently know how to integrate new knowledge into the existing schema is through the rather slow, associative process of learning that requires making new connections between neural pathways. In other words, the "I just learned kung fu" trick from The Matrix seems like it will be extremely difficult, if not impossible, to accomplish because it would require an instantaneous growth/reconfiguration of physical neural pathways in the human brain. Yes, this knowledge could be stored in some hardware in the brain, but at some point, for it to become useful - and this is especially true with tacit knowledge like kung fu, it has to make the jump into the biology. 

So, in other words, it's getting easier and easier to pull knowledge out of the human brain, but I think we're going to run into some fundamental issues with stuffing it back in. And this takes nothing away from the excellent article that John's written here. I'm simply trying to point out one of the limits that occurs to me. ___

posted image

2016-03-17 20:10:55 (14 comments; 11 reshares; 51 +1s)Open 

Bye Bye Boston Dynamics

Looks like Google is looking to sell Boston Dynamics. The market for humanoid robotics is still premature outside of military applications and it may have tarnished the Google brand a bit what with all the robo-fear these days. Amazon and Toyota are said to be two possible buyers.

Bye Bye Boston Dynamics

Looks like Google is looking to sell Boston Dynamics. The market for humanoid robotics is still premature outside of military applications and it may have tarnished the Google brand a bit what with all the robo-fear these days. Amazon and Toyota are said to be two possible buyers.___

posted image

2016-03-17 18:00:44 (5 comments; 6 reshares; 40 +1s)Open 

The Synergy Between Tools, Neurons and Cognition

While speaking at a conference in Singapore last week, I had the good fortune to get to know Atsushi Iriki, a neuroscientist who is doing some cutting-edge research into the origins of human cognitive processing. This paper will require some effort to get through, but for those interested in this topic, I think you will find it well worth it. 

Here are my notes from my reading of it:

Core ideas:

- There is a feedback loop creating mutually supportive niches across three systems: our physical, neural brain structure, our cognitive processing, and our physical environment (specifically, our tools).

- Three layers of tools aimed at respectively extending our: motor organs/effectors, our sensory organs, and our brain.

- It may be that the interactions between the three niches above are what... more »

The Synergy Between Tools, Neurons and Cognition

While speaking at a conference in Singapore last week, I had the good fortune to get to know Atsushi Iriki, a neuroscientist who is doing some cutting-edge research into the origins of human cognitive processing. This paper will require some effort to get through, but for those interested in this topic, I think you will find it well worth it. 

Here are my notes from my reading of it:

Core ideas:

- There is a feedback loop creating mutually supportive niches across three systems: our physical, neural brain structure, our cognitive processing, and our physical environment (specifically, our tools).

- Three layers of tools aimed at respectively extending our: motor organs/effectors, our sensory organs, and our brain.

- It may be that the interactions between the three niches above are what allowed humans to expand the extensions of ourselves up through these three layers of tools. Motor tools allowed us to conceptually separate objects from each other more clearly. Sensory tools may have given us the ability to distinguish our self from other. Brain tools may have given us the ability to embed some sort of intentionality into the feedback processes.

- Japanese macaques can be trained to use a rake to retrieve food; behavior which they do not normally exhibit. The rake is incorporated as an extension of the forearm within the neurological maps of the animal’s brain. Tools are incorporated into the body schema. Hands may be extended into the tool representation (externalization of the innate body) or tools may be assimilated into the body schema (internalization of external objects). These neurons are polysemous, capable of representing hand or tool.

- These macaques also show an ability to transcend a hierarchy of representations from enactive (motor) to iconic (sensory) to symbolic (brain) structures of development.

- Exposure to these learning tasks physically expanded cortical gray matter in the macaques by as much as 23%. In other words, this learning didn’t just result in plasticity but morphological changes. The question is, is this change then passed on to subsequent generations or is simply restricted to the current generation, only to revert back to the original morphology in subsequent generations? [GR note: or might there be some more complex dynamic of continued cultural pressure in subsequent generations that continues the pressure for expanded tissue as a kind of selective pressure over generations? Yep, see conclusion at end of paper]

- The parietal cortex may have been the location of a niche expansion of tissue, as the inferior parietal lobule expanded and pushed up the superior parietal lobule. This expansion may account for the polysemous capacity for tool usage - a neural niche expansion leading to a cognitive niche expansion.

- One way of understanding the cognitive niche expansion is to look at the object of focus. It may have started with physical objects, then temporal mapping, then virtual entities, virtual eyes to represent body parts, others and tools. All of these may have been steps in a gradual expansion and abstraction of cognitive space.

- Syntactic SVO (subject/verb/object) structure enables abstraction, concept formation, which leads to the emergence of symbols. All of this seems to be located in the inferior parietal cortex and its surroundings.

- In terms of interacting with the environment, there is no more important function than feeding, and here in more primitive species, the mouth is place at the tip of the body’s point of projection into locomotive space; the whole body is used to maneuver the mouth into position. From there, increased mobility of the neck in birds and then forearms in primates eventually led to the dual-plane axis of mobility that bipedal humans evolved. With each of these advances, new cognitive expansions were required.

- A human-modified environment puts pressure on succeeding generations to adapt to it, serving as a kind of learning bridge that exerts genomic adaptive pressure. This may be a mechanism for the triadic niche construction that is the overarching theme of this paper.___

posted image

2016-03-15 22:27:54 (21 comments; 21 reshares; 125 +1s)Open 

The Economics of Artificial General Intelligence Takeoff

There is a corner of the web where super smart people debate the future of artificial intelligence, and in that corner, there is an ongoing debate about whether we will experience what is known as a fast takeoff scenario for Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), or what these folks call - "foom" (as in the sound effect for something sudden).

Artificial General Intelligence, for those who aren't familiar with the term, is the kind of AI we tend to see in movies - very human-like. It's not the kind of narrow AI that just beat Lee Sedol in the game of Go, or the kind that will drive a car or sort your pictures on Google Photos. Artificial General Intelligence is something quite remarkable. It doesn't exist (yet), but if and when it does, it will be a total game-changer. 

The question that I... more »

The Economics of Artificial General Intelligence Takeoff

There is a corner of the web where super smart people debate the future of artificial intelligence, and in that corner, there is an ongoing debate about whether we will experience what is known as a fast takeoff scenario for Artificial General Intelligence (AGI), or what these folks call - "foom" (as in the sound effect for something sudden).

Artificial General Intelligence, for those who aren't familiar with the term, is the kind of AI we tend to see in movies - very human-like. It's not the kind of narrow AI that just beat Lee Sedol in the game of Go, or the kind that will drive a car or sort your pictures on Google Photos. Artificial General Intelligence is something quite remarkable. It doesn't exist (yet), but if and when it does, it will be a total game-changer. 

The question that I tend to think a lot about are the economic structures that would lead to something like this. How might an AGI actually get built? Would it be one company? A guy or gal in a basement? Or will it have to be a much larger collaborative effort? There are many reasons why this matters, but the one I'm most interested in centers on the notion of what I call "the code behind the code." All designed systems have underlying assumptions, biases and intentions baked into them, and whatever form of collaboration it is that builds an AGI will have this code behind the code.

So, it's interesting to me to see a debate going on right now about how localized the actual development process might be in the lead up to an AGI:
 
It seems to me that the key claim made by Eliezer Yudkowsky, and others who predict a local foom scenario, is that our experience in both ordinary products in general and software in particular is misleading regarding the type of software that will eventually contribute most to the first human-level AGI. In products and software, we have observed a certain joint distribution over innovation scope, cost, value, team size, and team sharing. And if that were also the distribution behind the first human-level AGI software, then we should predict that it will be made via a great many people in a great many teams, probably across a great many firms, with lots of sharing across this wide scope. No one team or firm would be very far in advance of the others.

However, the key local foom claim is that there is some way for small teams that share little to produce innovations with far more generality and lumpiness than these previous distributions suggests, perhaps due to being based more on math and basic theory. This would increase the chances that a small team could create a program that grabs a big fraction of world income, and keeps that advantage for an important length of time.

See more at: http://www.overcomingbias.com/2016/03/how-different-agi-software.html#sthash.KLjFPGam.dpuf

#agi   #artificialintelligence  ___

posted image

2016-03-15 00:18:55 (14 comments; 10 reshares; 31 +1s)Open 

Bigger Than Trump: the Bigger Picture on American Authoritarianism

Like many, I am deeply puzzled by what is now happening in the United States. I think this article does a good job of explaining the rise of Trump and similar candidates. It paints a kind of fear-based response to change, one that desperately seeks the power to stop that change, by building authoritarian power. 

In the sense meant by this article, authoritarianism isn't a synonym to fascism; it's meant more as a kind of personality profile that seeks order and stability. That is what is important to understand about the rise of Trump today. It is a response to feelings of disruptions and uncertainty about the future. 

One of the breakthroughs in studying authoritarianism as personality type was to look at parenting values. Some of the variables for assessing authoritarianism includep... more »

Bigger Than Trump: the Bigger Picture on American Authoritarianism

Like many, I am deeply puzzled by what is now happening in the United States. I think this article does a good job of explaining the rise of Trump and similar candidates. It paints a kind of fear-based response to change, one that desperately seeks the power to stop that change, by building authoritarian power. 

In the sense meant by this article, authoritarianism isn't a synonym to fascism; it's meant more as a kind of personality profile that seeks order and stability. That is what is important to understand about the rise of Trump today. It is a response to feelings of disruptions and uncertainty about the future. 

One of the breakthroughs in studying authoritarianism as personality type was to look at parenting values. Some of the variables for assessing authoritarianism include preferences between:
* independence or respect for elders?
* obedience or self-reliance?
* to be considerate or to be well-behaved?
* curiosity or good manners?

One of the questions that this research seems to shed light into is the sense that Trump's support has suddenly come out of the woodwork. Here, it's important to understand the notion of "activation":

Stenner argued that many authoritarians might be latent — that they might not necessarily support authoritarian leaders or policies until their authoritarianism had been "activated."

This activation could come from feeling threatened by social changes such as evolving social norms or increasing diversity, or any other change that they believe will profoundly alter the social order they want to protect. In response, previously more moderate individuals would come to support leaders and policies we might now call Trump-esque.

Other researchers, like Hetherington, take a slightly different view. They believe that authoritarians aren't "activated" — they've always held their authoritarian preferences — but that they only come to express those preferences once they feel threatened by social change or some kind of threat from outsiders.

So how big is the population of authoritarians in the United States?
The first thing that jumped out from the data on authoritarians is just how many there are. Our results found that 44 percent of white respondents nationwide scored as "high" or "very high" authoritarians, with 19 percent as "very high." That's actually not unusual, and lines up with previous national surveys that found that the authoritarian disposition is far from rare.

There is a great deal more in this article. It points out, for example, that one of the driving sources of fear behind the authoritarian personality is a fear of outsiders. 

What is most likely, Hetherington suggested, is that authoritarians are much more susceptible to messages that tell them to fear a specific "other" — whether or not they have a preexisting animus against that group. Those fears would therefore change over time as events made different groups seem more or less threatening.

When it comes to the Republican Party, authoritarians may well be splitting it asunder: 

Now a similar divide is playing out at the presidential level, with results that are even more destructive for the Republican Party. Authoritarians may be a slight majority within the GOP, and thus able to force their will within the party, but they are too few and their views too unpopular to win a national election on their own.

And so the rise of authoritarianism as a force within American politics means we may now have a de facto three-party system: the Democrats, the GOP establishment, and the GOP authoritarians.

For decades, the Republican Party has been winning over authoritarians by implicitly promising to stand firm against the tide of social change, and to be the party of force and power rather than the party of negotiation and compromise. But now it may be discovering that its strategy has worked too well — and threatens to tear the party apart.___

posted image

2016-03-14 22:33:16 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

Kate Tempest

The London hip-hop artist, playwright and poet speaks with a clarity and honesty unencumbered by code or lingo, with stories that cut to the very heart of how we try to survive and embrace our time on Earth. 

Listen to the set she does on this piece. Three very moving pieces.

Kate Tempest

The London hip-hop artist, playwright and poet speaks with a clarity and honesty unencumbered by code or lingo, with stories that cut to the very heart of how we try to survive and embrace our time on Earth. 

Listen to the set she does on this piece. Three very moving pieces.___

Buttons

A special service of CircleCount.com is the following button.

The button shows the number of followers you have directly on a small button. You can add this button to your website, like the +1-Button of Google or the Like-Button of Facebook.






You can add this button directly in your website. For more information about the CircleCount Buttons and the description how to add them to another page click here.

Gideon RosenblattTwitterFacebookCircloscope