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Shared Circles including Rick Falkvinge

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 20

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2015-06-18 10:03:48 (20 comments, 17 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

Google Chrome listening in to your room shows the importance of privacy defense-in-depth. New column on Privacy News.

Yesterday, news broke that Google has been stealth downloading audio listeners onto every computer that runs Chrome, and transmits audio data back to Google. Effectively, this means that Google had taken itself the right to listen to every conversation in every room that runs Chrome somewhere, without any kind of consent from the people eavesdropped on. In official statements, Google shrugged off the practice with what amounts to “we can do that”.

It looked like just another bug report. "When I start Chromium, it downloads something." Followed by strange status information that notably included the lines "Microphone: Yes" and "Audio Capture Allowed: Yes".

Without consent, Google’s code had downloaded a black box ofcode ... more »

Most reshares: 20

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2015-05-10 21:13:33 (0 comments, 20 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

You cannot defend public libraries while opposing file-sharing. New column on TorrentFreak.

The purpose of public libraries is exactly the same as the effect of file-sharing. You cannot defend one while opposing the other.

Public libraries started appearing in the mid-1800s. At the time, publishers went absolutely berserk: they had been lobbying for the lending of books to become illegal, as reading a book without paying anything first was “stealing”, they argued. As a consequence, they considered private libraries at the time to be hotbeds of crime and robbery. (Those libraries were so-called “subscription libraries”, so they were argued to be for-profit, too.)

British Parliament at the time, unlike today’s politicians, wisely disagreed with the publishing industry lobby – the copyright industry of the time. Instead, they saw the economic value in aneducated an... more »

Most plusones: 48

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2015-04-26 22:58:52 (1 comments, 15 reshares, 48 +1s)Open 

Farmers who are unable to repair their tractors because copyright monopoly: Never a "side effect", but core intention of the law. New column on TorrentFreak.

This week, there have been stories about farmers who can’t legally repair their John Deere tractors, as copyright monopoly legislation prohibits tampering with computer code in something you own. This has been described as an “unexpected side effect” of the copyright monopoly legislation in general and the DMCA/EUCD in particular.

That’s wrong. It’s not a side effect and it’s not unexpected. That is exactly what those laws intended to accomplish. Being locked out of your own possessions is not a side effect – it was the central point of the legislation and its core purpose.

As usual, the geeks who understood the deeper repercussions of this cried murder over the legislation at the time,and were summ... more »

Latest 50 posts

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2015-06-29 20:27:47 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report, week 26.

Last week's great liberty news was obviously that the U.S. Supreme Court extends human rights to homosexual people. The U.S. Senate is also considering extending human rights to Europeans, while the U.K. is busy revoking them.

Presented by +Private Internet Access :
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lCPXY50mGY

Liberties Report, week 26.

Last week's great liberty news was obviously that the U.S. Supreme Court extends human rights to homosexual people. The U.S. Senate is also considering extending human rights to Europeans, while the U.K. is busy revoking them.

Presented by +Private Internet Access :
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lCPXY50mGY___

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2015-06-29 18:21:10 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Information Hygiene: Most people haven't connected their dots are getting connected. New column on Privacy News.

Your refrigerator tells you when milk expires. Your cameras tell you remotely of anything unusual happening in your home. Your wi-fi connected scale tells you about your BMI and body fat content down to three decimals precision. With this just around the corner, it’s imperative we realize that they’re also telling other people the same thing.

A new skill is rapidly emerging: Information Hygiene. The understanding, at a deep technical level, of who else can see your information depending on what you do with it. When you send a mail, it’s open for the world to see. When you’re storing unencrypted things “in the cloud”, you might as well have put it on YouTube. When you’re connecting your home cameras to “the cloud”, you’re inviting any number ofunknown people – th... more »

Information Hygiene: Most people haven't connected their dots are getting connected. New column on Privacy News.

Your refrigerator tells you when milk expires. Your cameras tell you remotely of anything unusual happening in your home. Your wi-fi connected scale tells you about your BMI and body fat content down to three decimals precision. With this just around the corner, it’s imperative we realize that they’re also telling other people the same thing.

A new skill is rapidly emerging: Information Hygiene. The understanding, at a deep technical level, of who else can see your information depending on what you do with it. When you send a mail, it’s open for the world to see. When you’re storing unencrypted things “in the cloud”, you might as well have put it on YouTube. When you’re connecting your home cameras to “the cloud”, you’re inviting any number of unknown people – the point being that you can’t know how many and who they are – to look straight into your home.

Did you buy an anonymous prepaid SIM card for your mobile phone? Good. Did you pay it with your credit card? Then it’s not anonymous anymore.

As all of these small dots of data are collected, they’re also connected. Understanding how that happens will be key to privacy in the very near future.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/06/information-hygiene-most-people-havent-connected-their-dots-are-getting-connected/___

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2015-06-18 10:03:48 (20 comments, 17 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

Google Chrome listening in to your room shows the importance of privacy defense-in-depth. New column on Privacy News.

Yesterday, news broke that Google has been stealth downloading audio listeners onto every computer that runs Chrome, and transmits audio data back to Google. Effectively, this means that Google had taken itself the right to listen to every conversation in every room that runs Chrome somewhere, without any kind of consent from the people eavesdropped on. In official statements, Google shrugged off the practice with what amounts to “we can do that”.

It looked like just another bug report. "When I start Chromium, it downloads something." Followed by strange status information that notably included the lines "Microphone: Yes" and "Audio Capture Allowed: Yes".

Without consent, Google’s code had downloaded a black box ofcode ... more »

Google Chrome listening in to your room shows the importance of privacy defense-in-depth. New column on Privacy News.

Yesterday, news broke that Google has been stealth downloading audio listeners onto every computer that runs Chrome, and transmits audio data back to Google. Effectively, this means that Google had taken itself the right to listen to every conversation in every room that runs Chrome somewhere, without any kind of consent from the people eavesdropped on. In official statements, Google shrugged off the practice with what amounts to “we can do that”.

It looked like just another bug report. "When I start Chromium, it downloads something." Followed by strange status information that notably included the lines "Microphone: Yes" and "Audio Capture Allowed: Yes".

Without consent, Google’s code had downloaded a black box of code that – according to itself – had turned on the microphone and was actively listening to your room.

This episode highlights the need for hard, not soft, switches to all devices – webcams, microphones – that can be used for surveillance. A software on/off switch for a webcam is no longer enough, a hard shield in front of the lens is required. A software on/off switch for a microphone is no longer enough, a physical switch that breaks its electrical connection is required. That’s how you defend against this in depth.

Early last decade, privacy activists practically yelled and screamed that the NSA’s taps of various points of the Internet and telecom networks had the technical potential for enormous abuse against privacy. Everybody dismissed those points as basically tinfoilhattery – until the Snowden files came out, and it was revealed that precisely everybody involved had abused their technical capability for invasion of privacy as far as was possible.

Perhaps it would be wise to not repeat that exact mistake. Nobody, and I really mean nobody, is to be trusted with a technical capability to listen to every room in the world, with listening profiles customizable at the identified-individual level, on the mere basis of “trust us”.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/06/google-chrome-listening-in-to-your-room-shows-the-importance-of-privacy-defense-in-depth/___

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2015-06-15 09:21:31 (10 comments, 17 reshares, 36 +1s)Open 

So this is my next startup - net-generation reporting.

Today, I’m launching a news service in an entirely new format, designed to outcompete oldmedia. The new service publishes all news as shareable images, thereby bypassing a large number of restrictions and limitations, not needing clickbait, and being immune to adblock – but also paying people well, using bitcoin. Meanwhile, oldmedia continues to call people greedy and selfish for not buying their printouts of yesterday’s internet.

More in the blog post: http://falkvinge.net/2015/06/15/launching-new-reporting-service-682-writers-editors-managers-wanted-for-part-time-yes-youll-get-paid-and-paid-well-launch-now-operational-in-q3/

and on the wiki: https://wiki.falconwing.org/

Falkvinge starts net-generation news service, hiring 682 people___So this is my next startup - net-generation reporting.

Today, I’m launching a news service in an entirely new format, designed to outcompete oldmedia. The new service publishes all news as shareable images, thereby bypassing a large number of restrictions and limitations, not needing clickbait, and being immune to adblock – but also paying people well, using bitcoin. Meanwhile, oldmedia continues to call people greedy and selfish for not buying their printouts of yesterday’s internet.

More in the blog post: http://falkvinge.net/2015/06/15/launching-new-reporting-service-682-writers-editors-managers-wanted-for-part-time-yes-youll-get-paid-and-paid-well-launch-now-operational-in-q3/

and on the wiki: https://wiki.falconwing.org/

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2015-06-01 06:47:25 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

Snooping section of the Patriot Act has expired. Now what? New column on Privacy News.

As the US Senate failed to renew the mass surveillance section of the US Patriot act, as of less than an hour ago, it has formally expired. This means that the US NSA, according to their own measures, are no longer authorized to do mass surveillance. What now?

Tonight, the infamous Section 215 of the Patriot Act, which the NSA has been using to justify its mass blanket surveillance, expired. It came with so-called “sunset provisions” that meant it would automatically expire unless actively renewed. That happened – or rather, did not happen – last night. The law is no longer in effect.

However, as pointed out earlier, the NSA has been blanket wiretapping phonecalls since at least 1976, so it’s unclear how much they really depend on a law from 2001. This needs to be seen forthe polit... more »

Snooping section of the Patriot Act has expired. Now what? New column on Privacy News.

As the US Senate failed to renew the mass surveillance section of the US Patriot act, as of less than an hour ago, it has formally expired. This means that the US NSA, according to their own measures, are no longer authorized to do mass surveillance. What now?

Tonight, the infamous Section 215 of the Patriot Act, which the NSA has been using to justify its mass blanket surveillance, expired. It came with so-called “sunset provisions” that meant it would automatically expire unless actively renewed. That happened – or rather, did not happen – last night. The law is no longer in effect.

However, as pointed out earlier, the NSA has been blanket wiretapping phonecalls since at least 1976, so it’s unclear how much they really depend on a law from 2001. This needs to be seen for the political victory that it is, rather than as an event causing the endgame change.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/05/snooping-section-of-us-patriot-act-has-expired-now-what/___

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2015-05-26 10:07:16 (3 comments, 2 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

NSA and Patriot Act - Keep eyes on the big picture, but every victory is important. New column on Privacy News.

As I wrote in my last column, an expiry of the Patriot Act means nothing to what the NSA does or does not. They have been wiretapping phonecalls since at least 1976, and are in no way, shape, or form dependent on the Patriot Act which was enacted in 2001 – when they had already been doing this for 25 years. However, one thing has crucially changed, and that’s the ability to win against the NSA.

Right now, a game is playing out in US Congress where the NSA is seen as the problem child, rather than the custodian of safety. That attitude change is the enormous political win here – not the exact wording of laws that come out of the game.

The NSA will keep doing exactly what they have been doing, legal or not, for the simple reason that they can, and aregetti... more »

NSA and Patriot Act - Keep eyes on the big picture, but every victory is important. New column on Privacy News.

As I wrote in my last column, an expiry of the Patriot Act means nothing to what the NSA does or does not. They have been wiretapping phonecalls since at least 1976, and are in no way, shape, or form dependent on the Patriot Act which was enacted in 2001 – when they had already been doing this for 25 years. However, one thing has crucially changed, and that’s the ability to win against the NSA.

Right now, a game is playing out in US Congress where the NSA is seen as the problem child, rather than the custodian of safety. That attitude change is the enormous political win here – not the exact wording of laws that come out of the game.

The NSA will keep doing exactly what they have been doing, legal or not, for the simple reason that they can, and are getting away with it. Their work is so secretive, for whatever made-up reason, that they are not held accountable – nobody is able to hold them accountable. The NSA's attitude is to the point where it’s reminiscent of caricature antagonists in games.

(“We do what we must, because we can.” — Aperture Science)

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/05/nsa-keep-eyes-on-the-big-picture-but-every-victory-is-important/___

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2015-05-26 07:16:52 (1 comments, 5 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 21. Two things are interesting right now. While most eyes are on the NSA and the Patriot Act, a small country in Europe has announced it can't pay its national debt installments. If it goes bankrupt, more than one other country can follow - possibly cascading all the way to USA and China. And governments always save themselves first.

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://youtu.be/glMUj_XwlyI

Liberties Report for week 21. Two things are interesting right now. While most eyes are on the NSA and the Patriot Act, a small country in Europe has announced it can't pay its national debt installments. If it goes bankrupt, more than one other country can follow - possibly cascading all the way to USA and China. And governments always save themselves first.

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://youtu.be/glMUj_XwlyI___

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2015-05-19 20:10:15 (0 comments, 6 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 20. David Cameron of the UK announces an end to the 250-year-old principle of anything not being explicitly forbidden by law always being allowed - a principle otherwise known as the Rule of Law. The GCHQ has received legislative permission to break into anything and everything. And in Sweden, law enforcement agencies are complaining that accused people are defending themselves, making their work difficult and preferring that their word cannot be questioned - moving from Orwellian territory into Kafkaesque.

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WtK1Xe0OJA

Liberties Report for week 20. David Cameron of the UK announces an end to the 250-year-old principle of anything not being explicitly forbidden by law always being allowed - a principle otherwise known as the Rule of Law. The GCHQ has received legislative permission to break into anything and everything. And in Sweden, law enforcement agencies are complaining that accused people are defending themselves, making their work difficult and preferring that their word cannot be questioned - moving from Orwellian territory into Kafkaesque.

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WtK1Xe0OJA___

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2015-05-15 08:57:29 (0 comments, 7 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

The NSA have wiretapped in bulk since 1976. They're not going to care what happens to the Patriot Act of 2001. New column on Privacy News.

Right now, there is a debate about a small section of the Patriot Act in the U.S., and which option best removes the authorization from the U.S. NSA to wiretap the world. Both answers in the debate are wrong. No change in law will stop the NSA’s behavior: they have been wiretapping like this since at least 1976, and will not care about changes to a law from 2001. It just happens to be the most convenient justification of the day. If that justification is removed, there will be countless others.

Let me tell you about an event in 2008, when I happened to be on the same expert panel as the local supervisor of NSA activities.

[...]

You will note from this episode that while there is an outward official legalj... more »

The NSA have wiretapped in bulk since 1976. They're not going to care what happens to the Patriot Act of 2001. New column on Privacy News.

Right now, there is a debate about a small section of the Patriot Act in the U.S., and which option best removes the authorization from the U.S. NSA to wiretap the world. Both answers in the debate are wrong. No change in law will stop the NSA’s behavior: they have been wiretapping like this since at least 1976, and will not care about changes to a law from 2001. It just happens to be the most convenient justification of the day. If that justification is removed, there will be countless others.

Let me tell you about an event in 2008, when I happened to be on the same expert panel as the local supervisor of NSA activities.

[...]

You will note from this episode that while there is an outward official legal justification, the top brass know full well that what they’re doing is completely illegal on every level. More importantly, you will also note that they don’t care a bit that it’s illegal, for the simple reason they don’t have to care.

It comes down to this: When the problem is that the NSA and their accomplice agencies don’t care a bit what the law says, the solution cannot be to change what the law says.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/05/the-nsa-have-wiretapped-in-bulk-since-1976-theyre-not-going-to-care-what-happens-to-the-patriot-act-of-2001/___

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2015-05-12 20:02:01 (2 comments, 4 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 19. France goes Orwellian, Canada goes Orwellian, and the UK goes Orwellian. It doesn't take a genius to see the pattern here. New so-called security bills give the government practically unlimited discretion in restricting liberty at will - if it were more honest, it would be called martial law. Meanwhile, the NSA had an apparent setback in a court that won't affect it at all. 

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/sxjTSwsPJCk

Liberties Report for week 19. France goes Orwellian, Canada goes Orwellian, and the UK goes Orwellian. It doesn't take a genius to see the pattern here. New so-called security bills give the government practically unlimited discretion in restricting liberty at will - if it were more honest, it would be called martial law. Meanwhile, the NSA had an apparent setback in a court that won't affect it at all. 

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/sxjTSwsPJCk___

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2015-05-10 21:13:33 (0 comments, 20 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

You cannot defend public libraries while opposing file-sharing. New column on TorrentFreak.

The purpose of public libraries is exactly the same as the effect of file-sharing. You cannot defend one while opposing the other.

Public libraries started appearing in the mid-1800s. At the time, publishers went absolutely berserk: they had been lobbying for the lending of books to become illegal, as reading a book without paying anything first was “stealing”, they argued. As a consequence, they considered private libraries at the time to be hotbeds of crime and robbery. (Those libraries were so-called “subscription libraries”, so they were argued to be for-profit, too.)

British Parliament at the time, unlike today’s politicians, wisely disagreed with the publishing industry lobby – the copyright industry of the time. Instead, they saw the economic value in aneducated an... more »

You cannot defend public libraries while opposing file-sharing. New column on TorrentFreak.

The purpose of public libraries is exactly the same as the effect of file-sharing. You cannot defend one while opposing the other.

Public libraries started appearing in the mid-1800s. At the time, publishers went absolutely berserk: they had been lobbying for the lending of books to become illegal, as reading a book without paying anything first was “stealing”, they argued. As a consequence, they considered private libraries at the time to be hotbeds of crime and robbery. (Those libraries were so-called “subscription libraries”, so they were argued to be for-profit, too.)

British Parliament at the time, unlike today’s politicians, wisely disagreed with the publishing industry lobby – the copyright industry of the time. Instead, they saw the economic value in an educated and cultural populace, and passed a law allowing free public libraries in 1850, so that local libraries were built throughout Britain, where the public could take part of knowledge and culture for free.

So how is this different from file-sharing? From manufacturing your own copies of knowledge and culture from others’ sources? Is it different at all?

We have built the most amazing public library ever created. All of humanity is able to access the collective culture and knowledge of all of humanity, twenty-four by seven, as well as contribute to that collective pool. All the tools are already in place, all the infrastructure already rolled out, all the training already completed. Not a single tax penny needs to be spent to accomplish this. The only thing we need to do is to remove the ban on using it.

Why are we letting a cartoon industry stand in the way of this?

http://torrentfreak.com/you-cant-defend-public-libraries-and-oppose-file-sharing-150510/___

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2015-05-07 07:41:45 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

A private Internet is just as fundamental a right as Freedom of Speech. New column on Privacy News.

This week, new invasive spying bills passed in Canada and in France. Both of them, as usual, go beyond what has been seen before in their audacity. But a private net is just as fundamental a right as freedom of speech.

The concept of politicians listening to every phonecall, every conversation, every search, every thought was unthinkable just two decades ago. When the Soviet Union collapsed and East Europe was freed from enslavement, the idea was that the citizens of Eastern Europe were supposed to enjoy Western liberty from that point on instead of having their every move monitored by a distrusting government. It was never supposed to be the other way around, that the Western world would copy the governments of Eastern Europe.

Today, we exercise our fundamental rights... more »

A private Internet is just as fundamental a right as Freedom of Speech. New column on Privacy News.

This week, new invasive spying bills passed in Canada and in France. Both of them, as usual, go beyond what has been seen before in their audacity. But a private net is just as fundamental a right as freedom of speech.

The concept of politicians listening to every phonecall, every conversation, every search, every thought was unthinkable just two decades ago. When the Soviet Union collapsed and East Europe was freed from enslavement, the idea was that the citizens of Eastern Europe were supposed to enjoy Western liberty from that point on instead of having their every move monitored by a distrusting government. It was never supposed to be the other way around, that the Western world would copy the governments of Eastern Europe.

Today, we exercise our fundamental rights – freedoms of assembly, speech, opinion, the press, and expression – through the net. Therefore, a free net has itself become as fundamental a right, as all the other rights we exercise through it.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/05/a-private-net-is-just-as-fundamental-a-right-as-freedom-of-speech/___

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2015-05-05 15:16:45 (5 comments, 11 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

A year ago, the European Supreme Court appears to have ruled everything on the entire Web to be in the public domain, freely copyable and republishable by anybody. New article.

On February 13, 2014, the European Court of Justice - the Supreme Court of the European Union - appears to have ruled that anything published on the web may be re-published freely by anybody else. The case concerned linking, but the court went beyond linking in its ruling. This case has not really been noticed, nor have its effects been absorbed by the community at large.

It was a little-known ruling about hyperlinking. But beneath the surface lay a bombshell that will have repercussions for how the entire world exercises the copyright monopoly: a Supreme Court ruling that every single item posted on every single webpage without access control is permanently and irrevocably in the public domain, free for... more »

A year ago, the European Supreme Court appears to have ruled everything on the entire Web to be in the public domain, freely copyable and republishable by anybody. New article.

On February 13, 2014, the European Court of Justice - the Supreme Court of the European Union - appears to have ruled that anything published on the web may be re-published freely by anybody else. The case concerned linking, but the court went beyond linking in its ruling. This case has not really been noticed, nor have its effects been absorbed by the community at large.

It was a little-known ruling about hyperlinking. But beneath the surface lay a bombshell that will have repercussions for how the entire world exercises the copyright monopoly: a Supreme Court ruling that every single item posted on every single webpage without access control is permanently and irrevocably in the public domain, free for anybody else to copy and rebroadcast without restrictions - without restrictability.

The ECJ makes it clear that the copyright monopoly holder, once having granted an audience permission to access the work, that copyright holder has no further right to authorize or prohibit other transmissions of the same work to the same public or audience.

It therefore follows, as the ECJ writes in its ruling, that once something is published openly on the web, the entire world has been granted access to it, deliberately, by the copyright monopoly holder. Therefore, the ECJ continues in driving down the hammer on this crucial point, there are no further exclusive rights to authorize or prohibit. This effectively puts the work in the public domain.

https://falkvinge.net/…/a-year-ago-the-european-supreme-co…/___

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2015-04-26 22:58:52 (1 comments, 15 reshares, 48 +1s)Open 

Farmers who are unable to repair their tractors because copyright monopoly: Never a "side effect", but core intention of the law. New column on TorrentFreak.

This week, there have been stories about farmers who can’t legally repair their John Deere tractors, as copyright monopoly legislation prohibits tampering with computer code in something you own. This has been described as an “unexpected side effect” of the copyright monopoly legislation in general and the DMCA/EUCD in particular.

That’s wrong. It’s not a side effect and it’s not unexpected. That is exactly what those laws intended to accomplish. Being locked out of your own possessions is not a side effect – it was the central point of the legislation and its core purpose.

As usual, the geeks who understood the deeper repercussions of this cried murder over the legislation at the time,and were summ... more »

Farmers who are unable to repair their tractors because copyright monopoly: Never a "side effect", but core intention of the law. New column on TorrentFreak.

This week, there have been stories about farmers who can’t legally repair their John Deere tractors, as copyright monopoly legislation prohibits tampering with computer code in something you own. This has been described as an “unexpected side effect” of the copyright monopoly legislation in general and the DMCA/EUCD in particular.

That’s wrong. It’s not a side effect and it’s not unexpected. That is exactly what those laws intended to accomplish. Being locked out of your own possessions is not a side effect – it was the central point of the legislation and its core purpose.

As usual, the geeks who understood the deeper repercussions of this cried murder over the legislation at the time, and were summarily ignored by policymakers. Perhaps only now, when it becomes clear that it’s not just geek toys that are affected but everything in our everyday life, will more people become aware of how the copyright monopoly limits property rights.

The cartoon industry – copyright industry – realized that they needed to attack the core concept of the ability to hold property in order to prop up their crumbling copyright monopoly, and pushed for legislation that turned out as something called the DMCA in the US and the EUCD/InfoSoc in Europe. It “fixes” the conceptual problem with DRM by simply making it illegal to tinker with your own property when the original manufacturer, who sold the object to you, doesn’t want it tinkered with even after it’s been sold to you.

John Deere claiming that farmers aren’t allowed to tinker with their tractors and other farming equipment is not an “unfortunate side effect” of copyright monopoly legislation. It was the core idea, all the time, to prevent owners of property to exercise their normal property rights. That was the only possible way the copyright monopoly was even slightly maintainable into a digital environment.

One has to ask whether it was, and continue to be, worth that price.

http://torrentfreak.com/farmers-unable-to-repair-tractors-because-copyright-never-a-side-effect-but-core-intention-of-law-150426/___

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2015-04-15 10:51:41 (2 comments, 7 reshares, 37 +1s)Open 

#SCIENCE !

#SCIENCE !___

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2015-04-15 10:40:29 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

In NZ, Copyright industry threatening ISPs over un-geoblocking. New column on Privacy News.

News are trickling out from Down Under – from NZ to be precise, not Australia – that the copyright industry is threatening to sue Internet Service Providers who offer geoblock circumvention, a typical feature of VPNs that ISPs had offered directly.

The concept of geoblocking is complete nonsense in the first place, of course. Yes, you can segment a market by natural boundaries in order to run a better business. But those border lines are supposed to be internal to your business, not imposed onto the rest of society. You have no right intruding on the property of others to enforce your arbitrary division. When you do so anyway, and try to get that right legislated, it shows your business is hopelessly broken from the ground up, and that you’re trying to assert a level of control thatwas n... more »

In NZ, Copyright industry threatening ISPs over un-geoblocking. New column on Privacy News.

News are trickling out from Down Under – from NZ to be precise, not Australia – that the copyright industry is threatening to sue Internet Service Providers who offer geoblock circumvention, a typical feature of VPNs that ISPs had offered directly.

The concept of geoblocking is complete nonsense in the first place, of course. Yes, you can segment a market by natural boundaries in order to run a better business. But those border lines are supposed to be internal to your business, not imposed onto the rest of society. You have no right intruding on the property of others to enforce your arbitrary division. When you do so anyway, and try to get that right legislated, it shows your business is hopelessly broken from the ground up, and that you’re trying to assert a level of control that was never yours to assert in the first place.

The point is, of course, that it doesn’t work in the first place. The Internet wasn’t built with national boundaries in mind, so an approximation is all you get. Approximations may be fine for a lot of measurement applications, but never for enforcement of something.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/04/in-nz-copyright-industry-threatening-isps-over-un-geoblocking/___

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2015-04-09 15:26:28 (0 comments, 8 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

Wiretapping today just doesn't mean what the word meant in the 1990s, so don't fall for that lie. New column on Privacy News.

Many legislators and surveillance hawks are framing an extensive real-time bulk wiretapping of the Internet as “just an adaptation to new technology”, and try to pretend it doesn’t mean anything different today than it did in the analog world. That’s not just disingenuous, it’s a complete fabrication and an outright lie. Wiretapping today is a far worse intrusion than it was in the analog world; it’s so much worse it’s not even the same animal.

To go a little Miranda, everything you say, do, and think today can and will be used against you 20 and 40 years from today, when values have shifted in a way you can’t predict today.

Don’t fall for the lie of Internet wiretapping just being a “modernization” of wiretappingthat’s always existed... more »

Wiretapping today just doesn't mean what the word meant in the 1990s, so don't fall for that lie. New column on Privacy News.

Many legislators and surveillance hawks are framing an extensive real-time bulk wiretapping of the Internet as “just an adaptation to new technology”, and try to pretend it doesn’t mean anything different today than it did in the analog world. That’s not just disingenuous, it’s a complete fabrication and an outright lie. Wiretapping today is a far worse intrusion than it was in the analog world; it’s so much worse it’s not even the same animal.

To go a little Miranda, everything you say, do, and think today can and will be used against you 20 and 40 years from today, when values have shifted in a way you can’t predict today.

Don’t fall for the lie of Internet wiretapping just being a “modernization” of wiretapping that’s always existed. It’s something far, far worse. It’s the closest thing we’ve ever come to mind reading – and surveillance hawks are pushing hard, lying, and scheming to introduce a blanket, indiscriminate version of it.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/04/wiretapping-today-just-doesnt-mean-what-the-word-meant-in-the-1990s/___

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2015-03-30 20:25:57 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 13. Last week's major event was the tragic crash of the Germanwings flight in the Alps, caused by the reinforced cockpit doors that were part of the War on Terror. Ironically, one of the few measures that actually increased security now claimed another 150 victims. Overall, it becomes clearer and clearer that the War on Terror is the perfect Orwellian Perpetual War; there can be no peacetime, and it was always about controlling the masses. It is turning into a War on Cash and a War on Truth.

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oC6TMBsV35c

Liberties Report for week 13. Last week's major event was the tragic crash of the Germanwings flight in the Alps, caused by the reinforced cockpit doors that were part of the War on Terror. Ironically, one of the few measures that actually increased security now claimed another 150 victims. Overall, it becomes clearer and clearer that the War on Terror is the perfect Orwellian Perpetual War; there can be no peacetime, and it was always about controlling the masses. It is turning into a War on Cash and a War on Truth.

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oC6TMBsV35c___

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2015-03-30 18:09:48 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Swarmwise just released in Czech!

The first translation of Swarmwise is officially here – and it’s in Czech! As of 20:00 on March 30, the electronic format of the book is downloadable in a multitude of formats. This is the first translation of Swarmwise to hit the release bar; there are several more in the pipeline.

Swarmwise is a leadership handbook about how to accomplish real change in the world on a shoestring budget (or more commonly, no budget at all). It gives the reader guidance and feet-on-ground leadership lessons from the point of launching a movement or community-based startup right up until the point where it goes international.

Today, as of right now, the Czech translation is available as PDF, EPUB, and XHTML. Creative Commons, just like the original.

There’s an enormous work that has gone into this translation. I’m particularlyimpress... more »

Swarmwise just released in Czech!

The first translation of Swarmwise is officially here – and it’s in Czech! As of 20:00 on March 30, the electronic format of the book is downloadable in a multitude of formats. This is the first translation of Swarmwise to hit the release bar; there are several more in the pipeline.

Swarmwise is a leadership handbook about how to accomplish real change in the world on a shoestring budget (or more commonly, no budget at all). It gives the reader guidance and feet-on-ground leadership lessons from the point of launching a movement or community-based startup right up until the point where it goes international.

Today, as of right now, the Czech translation is available as PDF, EPUB, and XHTML. Creative Commons, just like the original.

There’s an enormous work that has gone into this translation. I’m particularly impressed by how the Czech translators — Martin Doucha, Adam Zábranský, and Pavel Císař — have gone to great lengths to replicate the look and feel of the original book in English, while still adapting it to Czech publishing standards.

http://falkvinge.net/2015/03/30/swarmwise-released-in-czech/___

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2015-03-30 17:07:36 (1 comments, 6 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Once again, the Old World doesn't understand that unrestriction is just a VPN away. New column on Privacy News.

Four pieces of news in the past week show just how little the lawmakers and courts continue to understand of the Internet: Australia introduced Data Retention, Spain ordered The Pirate Bay censored, and Denmark ordered another eleven sites blocked. The old guard actually seems to think that the net can be controlled, or that it has chokepoints that can be controlled. They don’t understand that everybody’s an equal on the Net and that providers aren’t anything like phone companies.

What AU lawmakers don’t get is that insisting on your rights and evading the pre-emptive wiretapping of suspects-to-be is just a VPN connection away.

This is not circumventing the law or acting like a criminal. On the contrary, it’s just a tangible non-acknowledgementof a comm... more »

Once again, the Old World doesn't understand that unrestriction is just a VPN away. New column on Privacy News.

Four pieces of news in the past week show just how little the lawmakers and courts continue to understand of the Internet: Australia introduced Data Retention, Spain ordered The Pirate Bay censored, and Denmark ordered another eleven sites blocked. The old guard actually seems to think that the net can be controlled, or that it has chokepoints that can be controlled. They don’t understand that everybody’s an equal on the Net and that providers aren’t anything like phone companies.

What AU lawmakers don’t get is that insisting on your rights and evading the pre-emptive wiretapping of suspects-to-be is just a VPN connection away.

This is not circumventing the law or acting like a criminal. On the contrary, it’s just a tangible non-acknowledgement of a command to submit your liberties at the door. Noncompliance with such nonsense is absolutely key; lawmakers and courts will take all liberties they can get away with taking at the moment. Technical means to retain your privacy, exercising analog-equivalent rights, are absolutely paramount.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/03/once-again-the-old-world-doesnt-understand-that-unrestriction-is-just-a-vpn-away/___

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2015-03-30 09:00:08 (0 comments, 7 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

Once you accept file-sharing is here to stay, you can focus on all its positive effects. New column on TorrentFreak.

When I grew up, file-sharing was already rampant. But we didn't have any Internet. We had a so-called Sneakernet. And it was actually quite comparable in sharing efficiency - not just over large distances.

People started sharing files with each other – text, games, music – as soon as there was a storage medium you could copy. Originally, this meant the compact cassette which was used for music and programs for the first home computers. Cassette decks at the time had a convenient copy mechanism where you’d insert an original in one slot, a blank tape in another slot, and press a prominent “copy” button to get an analog replica – not perfect, if it was music, but if it was a digital computer file, it would be readable and usable. The one-push copywas even a ... more »

Once you accept file-sharing is here to stay, you can focus on all its positive effects. New column on TorrentFreak.

When I grew up, file-sharing was already rampant. But we didn't have any Internet. We had a so-called Sneakernet. And it was actually quite comparable in sharing efficiency - not just over large distances.

People started sharing files with each other – text, games, music – as soon as there was a storage medium you could copy. Originally, this meant the compact cassette which was used for music and programs for the first home computers. Cassette decks at the time had a convenient copy mechanism where you’d insert an original in one slot, a blank tape in another slot, and press a prominent “copy” button to get an analog replica – not perfect, if it was music, but if it was a digital computer file, it would be readable and usable. The one-push copy was even a sales point.

Today, the storage of an ordinary mobile phone can effectively store all music except the most narrow. And with fourth-generation Bluetooth, it can wirelessly – and tracelessly! – share all of it to all mobile phones in a 50-meter range. Subway cars, cafés, even cars at red light stops become torrent swarms without somebody acting – or even noticing. The notion of being able to stop, control, or contain this files under “what’s the weather like on your planet?”. Moore’s Law further suggests that in a decade or so, an ordinary mobile phone will also have capacity to store most TV and movies ever made.

But more importantly, it means that every human being has 24/7 access to humanity’s collective knowledge and culture, and that every human being is able to add to that pool. That’s the equivalent of when the first public libraries opened in 1850, but on an enormously larger scale. Even though the copyright industry is trying again and again to burn this Library of Alexandria, it’s worth more than pause to consider what a huge leap ahead for humanity this really is.

http://torrentfreak.com/once-you-accept-file-sharing-is-here-to-stay-you-can-focus-on-all-the-positive-things-150329/___

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2015-03-24 11:04:28 (3 comments, 5 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Tax authority demands customer data from bitcoin exchange: demands trackability of all customers' past, present, and future. New column on Privacy News.

The Swedish Tax Authority has demanded the full customer transaction history, specifically including customers' wallet addresses, from the small Swedish bitcoin exchange BTC-X. This demand comes without any individual suspicion of crime, or indeed any suspicion of crime at all, even in general. As this would enable trackability of everybody's financial past, present, and future, BTC-X is taking the Tax Authority to court over their demands.

Various authorities have long mistaken a right to demand tracking data in individual cases on concrete suspicion of a serious and committed crime for a right to throw a dragnet over tons of private data to see what sticks. However, the latest move by the Swedish Tax Authority is a... more »

Tax authority demands customer data from bitcoin exchange: demands trackability of all customers' past, present, and future. New column on Privacy News.

The Swedish Tax Authority has demanded the full customer transaction history, specifically including customers' wallet addresses, from the small Swedish bitcoin exchange BTC-X. This demand comes without any individual suspicion of crime, or indeed any suspicion of crime at all, even in general. As this would enable trackability of everybody's financial past, present, and future, BTC-X is taking the Tax Authority to court over their demands.

Various authorities have long mistaken a right to demand tracking data in individual cases on concrete suspicion of a serious and committed crime for a right to throw a dragnet over tons of private data to see what sticks. However, the latest move by the Swedish Tax Authority is a new level of audacity - and a new level of mass violations of privacy.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/03/tax-authority-demands-customer-data-from-bitcoin-exchange-demands-trackability-of-everybodys-past-present-and-future/___

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2015-03-23 21:04:20 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 12. France, political extremism, and the power of narrative.

There are three recent rulings in France regarding freedom of speech - one where a comedian satirizing Charlie Hebdo was found guilty of criminal speech, a second where France ruled that French courts may rule that Facebook must allow more freedom of speech, and a third where France creates wholesale censorship of websites, allegedly on the basis of
extremism. So is France for or against more freedom of speech? Neither. It's fighting to retain the Power of Narrative - the power to tell the story. The events surrounding the printing press 500 years ago are replaying verbatim once again.

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/ROPqu5ymwYE

Liberties Report for week 12. France, political extremism, and the power of narrative.

There are three recent rulings in France regarding freedom of speech - one where a comedian satirizing Charlie Hebdo was found guilty of criminal speech, a second where France ruled that French courts may rule that Facebook must allow more freedom of speech, and a third where France creates wholesale censorship of websites, allegedly on the basis of
extremism. So is France for or against more freedom of speech? Neither. It's fighting to retain the Power of Narrative - the power to tell the story. The events surrounding the printing press 500 years ago are replaying verbatim once again.

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/ROPqu5ymwYE___

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2015-03-16 20:53:02 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 11. Data retention, the judiciary, and the executive.

The battle lines for your liberty are becoming clearer. Data retention (or as it should have been called, "pre-emptive wiretapping of not-yet-suspects") was annulled and vacated by a court in the Netherlands this week, and the Paraguayan parliament refused to legalize it. It's becoming clearer who's gunning for your privacy and who's defending it: countries with a strong and independent judiciary are starting to come out on top.

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://youtu.be/g_-XUtoyZuY

Liberties Report for week 11. Data retention, the judiciary, and the executive.

The battle lines for your liberty are becoming clearer. Data retention (or as it should have been called, "pre-emptive wiretapping of not-yet-suspects") was annulled and vacated by a court in the Netherlands this week, and the Paraguayan parliament refused to legalize it. It's becoming clearer who's gunning for your privacy and who's defending it: countries with a strong and independent judiciary are starting to come out on top.

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://youtu.be/g_-XUtoyZuY___

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2015-03-16 13:20:04 (3 comments, 11 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

FCC's Net Neutrality: The word "Lawful" has really become newspeak for "Evil". New column on Privacy News.

Apparently, the FCC’s version of net neutrality really does contain a gaping hole for anything copyright-monopoly-related. The little qualifier “lawful” in the sentence that “all lawful traffic must be treated equally” turned out to mean that ISPs may now be required to police the net for copyright monopoly infringements, acting as police, prosecutor, judge, and executioner – often in complex cases, denying citizens any and all due process. This is starting to become a pattern.

It’s become more and more apparent, that the word “lawful” in any policy matters has become synonymous with “evil”. Any and every time something is described as “lawful”, it could just as well have been described as “despicable”, “unjust”,“corrupt”, or “violating human ri... more »

FCC's Net Neutrality: The word "Lawful" has really become newspeak for "Evil". New column on Privacy News.

Apparently, the FCC’s version of net neutrality really does contain a gaping hole for anything copyright-monopoly-related. The little qualifier “lawful” in the sentence that “all lawful traffic must be treated equally” turned out to mean that ISPs may now be required to police the net for copyright monopoly infringements, acting as police, prosecutor, judge, and executioner – often in complex cases, denying citizens any and all due process. This is starting to become a pattern.

It’s become more and more apparent, that the word “lawful” in any policy matters has become synonymous with “evil”. Any and every time something is described as “lawful”, it could just as well have been described as “despicable”, “unjust”, “corrupt”, or “violating human rights”.

The reason is simple: if you presented something good and desirable, you would never point out that it were lawful in the first place, regardless of whether it were or not. “Lawful” has become a justification for anything and everything in society that is being shoved down the throat of the net generation against their will.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/03/fcc-net-neutrality-lawful-has-really-become-newspeak-for-evil/___

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2015-03-12 16:12:20 (9 comments, 4 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

French court says Freedom of Speech may trump Facebook's censorship. New column on Privacy News.

A French court has ruled that a challenge to Facebook’s terms of service under French law may go ahead in a French court. A man had had his account suspended for publishing French nude art on Facebook, and sued Facebook for violations of Freedom of Speech. A French court will now rule whether the man’s fundamental rights were unlawfully limited by Facebook.

Frédéric Durand-Baissas, a teacher in France, posted a famous 19th-century painting by Gustave Courbet named “The Origins of the World” on his Facebook account. The painting portrays a female reproductive organ, celebrating birth and origin – in addition to being a piece of great importance to the community of art historians. Facebook, in accordance with its noncompromising stance on any and all nudity, promptlyblocked mon... more »

French court says Freedom of Speech may trump Facebook's censorship. New column on Privacy News.

A French court has ruled that a challenge to Facebook’s terms of service under French law may go ahead in a French court. A man had had his account suspended for publishing French nude art on Facebook, and sued Facebook for violations of Freedom of Speech. A French court will now rule whether the man’s fundamental rights were unlawfully limited by Facebook.

Frédéric Durand-Baissas, a teacher in France, posted a famous 19th-century painting by Gustave Courbet named “The Origins of the World” on his Facebook account. The painting portrays a female reproductive organ, celebrating birth and origin – in addition to being a piece of great importance to the community of art historians. Facebook, in accordance with its noncompromising stance on any and all nudity, promptly blocked monseiur Durand-Baissas’ Facebook account.

The Frenchman decided to challenge this in court and argued that his freedom of speech had been unlawfully limited, and that French law should apply. Arguably, when he does post in France with a company that does business in France, that’s not an unreasonable position.

At the end of the day, this about the fact that the public square, where freedom of speech used to be enforced, has moved in under the terms-and-services umbrella with a private corporation, where they enforce their own arbitrary limits of what may be expressed and not. That means our fundamental rights have effectively moved into the hands of private interests. I welcome a challenge to this doctrine and an enforcement of freedom of speech, once a public discussion forum – like Facebook – has grown large enough to be a de-facto public location, if not the de-facto public location.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/03/french-court-says-french-freedom-of-speech-may-trump-facebooks-censorship/___

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2015-03-10 21:07:36 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 10. Venezuela, toilet paper, and interest rates: The geopolitical financial situation appears increasingly fragile after decades of mismanagement. Borrowing against future growth only works until the growth stops, at which point governments will try to save themselves first. How would the surveillance machine of nightmares be used in that scenario?

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/gj_Tjknd75o

Liberties Report for week 10. Venezuela, toilet paper, and interest rates: The geopolitical financial situation appears increasingly fragile after decades of mismanagement. Borrowing against future growth only works until the growth stops, at which point governments will try to save themselves first. How would the surveillance machine of nightmares be used in that scenario?

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/gj_Tjknd75o___

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2015-03-03 14:55:42 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

"Linkage": Understanding the combination of electronic tracks you leave behind. New column on Privacy News.

In the movie Citizenfour, Jake Appelbaum is seen briefly giving a security primer to activists. He’s talking about linkage: what happens when you supply two pieces of identity at the same time, and how that means they’re forever linked. Identity doesn’t have to be an ID card; it could be a subway card or a cellphone.

The danger to privacy doesn’t primarily lie in whey you identify yourself using one method – MAC address (your network card’s unique address), IP address, credit card, login, IMEI (your phone’s unique identity), et cetera. The danger lies in when two of those are linked together.

It’s not the tracks you leave behind. It’s the combination of different tracks you leave behind, and the intersections of those tracks.
https://www.pri... more »

"Linkage": Understanding the combination of electronic tracks you leave behind. New column on Privacy News.

In the movie Citizenfour, Jake Appelbaum is seen briefly giving a security primer to activists. He’s talking about linkage: what happens when you supply two pieces of identity at the same time, and how that means they’re forever linked. Identity doesn’t have to be an ID card; it could be a subway card or a cellphone.

The danger to privacy doesn’t primarily lie in whey you identify yourself using one method – MAC address (your network card’s unique address), IP address, credit card, login, IMEI (your phone’s unique identity), et cetera. The danger lies in when two of those are linked together.

It’s not the tracks you leave behind. It’s the combination of different tracks you leave behind, and the intersections of those tracks.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/03/linkage-understanding-the-combination-of-electronic-tracks-you-leave-behind/___

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2015-03-03 07:18:57 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

Why I've chosen to go with Private Internet Access. New column for transparency.

Some people have noticed I’m writing for a VPN service, and having my regular commentary on liberties presented by that VPN service: by Private Internet Access​ VPN. Seeing my previous stance on advertising, I think it merits some explanation why I’m choosing to associate with a service brand.

When I was posting once a day, this blog had one million visits a month. If you monetize that on advertising, it becomes quite a decent income – on the order of $3,000 a month, or frankly, enough to pay food and board for anywhere outside of San Francisco, Tokyo, or Hong Kong. Putting it in real terms, keeping my motives straight came with a price tag of several thousand US dollars a month, money that I chose to leave on the table.

You’ll notice that TorrentFreak ran an article onwhich VPN... more »

Why I've chosen to go with Private Internet Access. New column for transparency.

Some people have noticed I’m writing for a VPN service, and having my regular commentary on liberties presented by that VPN service: by Private Internet Access​ VPN. Seeing my previous stance on advertising, I think it merits some explanation why I’m choosing to associate with a service brand.

When I was posting once a day, this blog had one million visits a month. If you monetize that on advertising, it becomes quite a decent income – on the order of $3,000 a month, or frankly, enough to pay food and board for anywhere outside of San Francisco, Tokyo, or Hong Kong. Putting it in real terms, keeping my motives straight came with a price tag of several thousand US dollars a month, money that I chose to leave on the table.

You’ll notice that TorrentFreak ran an article on which VPN services to trust in a “2015 edition” review yesterday. Private Internet Access is the first service listed. While I’d recommend reading all of it, I’m choosing a few highlights:

"We do not log, period. This includes, but is not limited to, any traffic data, DNS data or meta (session) data. Privacy IS our policy. … We do not log and therefore are unable to provide information about any users of our service. We have not, to date, been served with a valid court order that has required us to provide something we do not have. … We do not attempt to filter, monitor, censor or interfere in our users’ activity in any way, shape or form. BitTorrent is, by definition, allowed."

Feel free to compare this stance to your current ISP. Do read it again if you like.

So to answer the initial question, why do I associate with a service brand? Because I think good people deserve recognition, and they deserve to be the measuring stick for the industry as a whole. This is the kind of attitude – both Bahnhof’s and Private Internet Access’s – that the rest of the Internet industry should aspire to, and needs to aspire to.

https://falkvinge.net/2015/03/03/why-ive-chosen-to-go-with-private-internet-access/___

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2015-03-02 21:07:30 (7 comments, 4 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 9. So the FCC approved Net Neutrality. That's fantastic, or could be fantastic.

But we don't know the details yet, and there are at least two valid concerns. First, there are qualifiers for net neutrality to apply - the infamous "lawful" word - which may turn this into net neutrality's very opposite, with ISPs being forced to police the net. Second, this is still the same FCC that tried to ban "indecency" from the net as recently as 2012. We shouldn't count our chickens just quite yet.

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1dOUdwwxOA

Liberties Report for week 9. So the FCC approved Net Neutrality. That's fantastic, or could be fantastic.

But we don't know the details yet, and there are at least two valid concerns. First, there are qualifiers for net neutrality to apply - the infamous "lawful" word - which may turn this into net neutrality's very opposite, with ISPs being forced to police the net. Second, this is still the same FCC that tried to ban "indecency" from the net as recently as 2012. We shouldn't count our chickens just quite yet.

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
https://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1dOUdwwxOA___

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2015-03-01 22:03:06 (5 comments, 5 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

Copyright monopoly fraudsters need to go to jail with heavy damages. New column on TorrentFreak.

It shouldn't even be controversial. If you're lying about holding a copyright monopoly to something, you're infringing on that work's distribution, and should suffer the same penalties as any other infringer does today.

The Swedish Pirate Party had a very clear policy on crimes like this: if you lied about holding an exclusive right to something, the same penalty that would have applied to an infringer of that exclusive right would instead apply to you. This is only fair, after all: you are infringing on the distribution of a creative work by dishonest means.

The irony is that at the same time as the copyright industry opposes such penalties vehemently, arguing that they can make “innocent mistakes” in sending out nastygrams, threats, and lawsuits tosin... more »

Copyright monopoly fraudsters need to go to jail with heavy damages. New column on TorrentFreak.

It shouldn't even be controversial. If you're lying about holding a copyright monopoly to something, you're infringing on that work's distribution, and should suffer the same penalties as any other infringer does today.

The Swedish Pirate Party had a very clear policy on crimes like this: if you lied about holding an exclusive right to something, the same penalty that would have applied to an infringer of that exclusive right would instead apply to you. This is only fair, after all: you are infringing on the distribution of a creative work by dishonest means.

The irony is that at the same time as the copyright industry opposes such penalties vehemently, arguing that they can make “innocent mistakes” in sending out nastygrams, threats, and lawsuits to single mothers, they are also arguing that the situation with distribution monopolies is always crystal clear and unmistakable to everybody else who deserve nothing but the worst. They can’t have it both ways here.

http://torrentfreak.com/copyright-monopoly-fraudsters-need-go-jail-heavy-damages-150301/___

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2015-02-24 13:53:19 (7 comments, 8 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Superfish, Lenovo, Gemalto show the need for Defense-in-Depth and End-to-End-encryption. New column on Privacy News.

Last week, two significant events further demonstrated the necessity for defense in depth and for end-to-end encryption. It was revealed that surveillance agencies had broken into the mobile network and stolen all cryptokeys, and that the computer maker Lenovo was wiretapping all secure communications of its users in order to insert advertising into it. These are two deep betrayals that force us to re-think what level of security is good enough.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/02/superfish-lenovo-gemalto-show-need-for-defense-in-depth-end-to-end-security-and-more/

Superfish, Lenovo, Gemalto show the need for Defense-in-Depth and End-to-End-encryption. New column on Privacy News.

Last week, two significant events further demonstrated the necessity for defense in depth and for end-to-end encryption. It was revealed that surveillance agencies had broken into the mobile network and stolen all cryptokeys, and that the computer maker Lenovo was wiretapping all secure communications of its users in order to insert advertising into it. These are two deep betrayals that force us to re-think what level of security is good enough.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/02/superfish-lenovo-gemalto-show-need-for-defense-in-depth-end-to-end-security-and-more/___

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2015-02-23 22:43:26 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 8. What a week it's been!

NSA and GCHQ are reported to have stolen billions of cryptokeys and pretty much broken into mobile telephony worldwide, and Lenovo is found to have shipped computers where they would eavesdrop on all communications that happened on their brand of computers - even secure communications like that with a bank - and leave those computers wide open to scammers and malware. Both of these events show the increasing and pervasive need for encryption.

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/h5aq-Lz61Sc

Liberties Report for week 8. What a week it's been!

NSA and GCHQ are reported to have stolen billions of cryptokeys and pretty much broken into mobile telephony worldwide, and Lenovo is found to have shipped computers where they would eavesdrop on all communications that happened on their brand of computers - even secure communications like that with a bank - and leave those computers wide open to scammers and malware. Both of these events show the increasing and pervasive need for encryption.

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/h5aq-Lz61Sc___

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2015-02-16 21:27:25 (2 comments, 9 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 7. Net Neutrality is coming to a boss fight in the USA.

The US has fallen to 40th place in household bandwidth, because the cable and telco industries have been allowed to set the agenda. It's in their strategic interest to prevent the net's utility for as long as they can get away with it. Net neutrality is one important aspect of that; unless you want to see a Disneyified net (in the bad sense), now may be a good time to call the US Congress.

If you're in the USA, you can use the caller tool at https://www.battleforthenet.com/?pia=1 to do so.

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/l8S0EQSI9EQ

Liberties Report for week 7. Net Neutrality is coming to a boss fight in the USA.

The US has fallen to 40th place in household bandwidth, because the cable and telco industries have been allowed to set the agenda. It's in their strategic interest to prevent the net's utility for as long as they can get away with it. Net neutrality is one important aspect of that; unless you want to see a Disneyified net (in the bad sense), now may be a good time to call the US Congress.

If you're in the USA, you can use the caller tool at https://www.battleforthenet.com/?pia=1 to do so.

Presented by Private Internet Access VPN:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/l8S0EQSI9EQ___

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2015-02-16 14:10:41 (4 comments, 4 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Understanding Net Neutrality: What if your kitchen appliances only worked with one power company? New column on Privacy News.

In the US, the regulation on Net Neutrality is coming to a showdown on February 26. For such a boring name, it has enormous implications, and well beyond the internet. Imagine that your electric kitchen appliances only worked with one particular power company? That’s what you get without net neutrality – or grid neutrality, as it would be in that case.

To understand why the absence of neutrality is bad, let’s look at the example with electricity. If your power company did vertical bundling, you’d have to buy everything that ran on electricity from them. They’d provide kitchen appliances, lamps, electric engines, everything that ran on electricity, and quite often remind you about how innovative they were, providing you with this great selection.
T... more »

Understanding Net Neutrality: What if your kitchen appliances only worked with one power company? New column on Privacy News.

In the US, the regulation on Net Neutrality is coming to a showdown on February 26. For such a boring name, it has enormous implications, and well beyond the internet. Imagine that your electric kitchen appliances only worked with one particular power company? That’s what you get without net neutrality – or grid neutrality, as it would be in that case.

To understand why the absence of neutrality is bad, let’s look at the example with electricity. If your power company did vertical bundling, you’d have to buy everything that ran on electricity from them. They’d provide kitchen appliances, lamps, electric engines, everything that ran on electricity, and quite often remind you about how innovative they were, providing you with this great selection.

The lock-in effects would be enormous. If you wanted to change your power company, you’d have to replace every piece of powered hardware.

This is the situation that Team Cable & Telco is salivating over. They see the potential for lock-in by giving preferential access to their preferred services, creating an artificial Walled Garden, and locking out or degrading competing services on the Internet. But this doesn’t just go against the entire concept of the Internet – that everybody’s an equal online; it also creates an enormous economic harm to all of society, and it puts Team Cable & Telco in a gatekeeper position to determine who gets access to market at all.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/02/understanding-net-neutrality-what-if-your-kitchen-appliances-only-worked-with-one-power-company/___

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2015-02-15 22:08:26 (5 comments, 17 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

The war over control of the net is a war over the information advantage. New column on TorrentFreak.

Throughout history, you can observe that many groups have fought over the information advantage - to know more about other people than those others know in return. Whoever has held the information advantage has usually risen to power.

It’s easy to observe that governments have had this role. “Our satellite imagery shows X, Y, and Z on the ground in Farawaystan.” You can’t really dispute it, you have to take that government at their word, simply because you don’t have any expensive satellite network of your own. It’s quite outside of your budget range. Or rather, you had to take them at their word: you don’t anymore. All of a sudden, you have distant acquaintances on the ground in Farawaystan who are confirming or disproving the statement, and usually doing so withinminutes.
more »

The war over control of the net is a war over the information advantage. New column on TorrentFreak.

Throughout history, you can observe that many groups have fought over the information advantage - to know more about other people than those others know in return. Whoever has held the information advantage has usually risen to power.

It’s easy to observe that governments have had this role. “Our satellite imagery shows X, Y, and Z on the ground in Farawaystan.” You can’t really dispute it, you have to take that government at their word, simply because you don’t have any expensive satellite network of your own. It’s quite outside of your budget range. Or rather, you had to take them at their word: you don’t anymore. All of a sudden, you have distant acquaintances on the ground in Farawaystan who are confirming or disproving the statement, and usually doing so within minutes.

Putting it another way: the net generation, the global net generation, has taken the information advantage from the world’s governments, using nothing but their everyday presence and practically no resources at all. And those dethroned governments are absolutely furious about it, and are turning to poisoning the newswell and destroying the net’s utility value by introducing mass surveillance and forcing the network operators’ dirty collaboration in a last-ditch attempt to regain that information advantage – knowing what everybody’s saying, thinking, planning, discussing.

http://torrentfreak.com/the-war-over-control-of-the-net-is-a-war-over-information-advantage-150215/___

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2015-02-11 23:05:09 (0 comments, 7 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

Copyright monopolist claims that legal, non-infringing use of your own property, without asking unnecessary permission anyway, is like AGGRAVATED RAPE. New article.

In a fuming blog article, David Newhoff claims that non-infringing, legal uses of copyrighted works – that is, of people’s own property – are like “aggravated rape” when made without unneeded consent of the monopoly holder. Newhoff tries to scold the crucial concept of “fair use” in copyright monopoly doctrine, the concept which explicitly says that some usages are not covered by the monopoly and therefore not up to the monopoly holder, and ends saying that if you don’t grant permission and can’t set limits, it’s “aggravated rape”. Just when you think copyright monopoly zealots can’t sink any lower, they surprise you with one of the few creativities they’ve ever shown.
https://falkvinge.net/201... more »

Copyright monopolist claims that legal, non-infringing use of your own property, without asking unnecessary permission anyway, is like AGGRAVATED RAPE. New article.

In a fuming blog article, David Newhoff claims that non-infringing, legal uses of copyrighted works – that is, of people’s own property – are like “aggravated rape” when made without unneeded consent of the monopoly holder. Newhoff tries to scold the crucial concept of “fair use” in copyright monopoly doctrine, the concept which explicitly says that some usages are not covered by the monopoly and therefore not up to the monopoly holder, and ends saying that if you don’t grant permission and can’t set limits, it’s “aggravated rape”. Just when you think copyright monopoly zealots can’t sink any lower, they surprise you with one of the few creativities they’ve ever shown.

https://falkvinge.net/2015/02/11/copyright-monopolist-claims-legal-non-infringing-uses-of-your-own-property-without-asking-unnecessary-permission-anyway-is-like-aggravated-rape/___

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2015-02-10 21:07:01 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 6. Last week, we heard new calls from officials for 'governmental master encryption keys' that would decrypt anything and everything.

The officials who call for such a device make it clear that "they're not engineers", just in case that wasn't very obvious already. But they don't have to learn engineering to find out why a golden master key can't possibly work, they can look at somebody else who tried to create golden secret keys and failed with spectactular fireworks: the copyright industry.

From CSS to AACS to HDCP, every secret 'golden key' scheme has been broken in a few months at most.

Those officials are not alone, though. They have good company in legislators who have called for infinite-free-energy solutions, and who claimed that such a device can't be technically hard, either.
... more »

Liberties Report for week 6. Last week, we heard new calls from officials for 'governmental master encryption keys' that would decrypt anything and everything.

The officials who call for such a device make it clear that "they're not engineers", just in case that wasn't very obvious already. But they don't have to learn engineering to find out why a golden master key can't possibly work, they can look at somebody else who tried to create golden secret keys and failed with spectactular fireworks: the copyright industry.

From CSS to AACS to HDCP, every secret 'golden key' scheme has been broken in a few months at most.

Those officials are not alone, though. They have good company in legislators who have called for infinite-free-energy solutions, and who claimed that such a device can't be technically hard, either.

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_KrdFQY9x2k___

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2015-02-10 19:10:25 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

"In this way, our surveillance will become legal": Don't count your chickens over the GCHQ verdict last week. New column on Privacy News at +Private Internet Access .

Last week, there was a verdict in a UK court saying that the GCHQ had indeed broken the law with its bulk surveillance. While many privacy advocates rejoiced, so did the GCHQ, saying the verdict confirms that their activity is legal. How can this be? Don’t count your chickens quite yet.

The FRA had been wiretapping satellites since 1976. They justify this with pointing at a law saying that anybody may listen to radio waves, which makes sense when you’re looking at radio waves from a TV signals or CW radio perspective. But the law just said radio waves in general, which obviously includes directional radio links, such as between satellites and ground stations.

This conflicts sharplywith... more »

"In this way, our surveillance will become legal": Don't count your chickens over the GCHQ verdict last week. New column on Privacy News at +Private Internet Access .

Last week, there was a verdict in a UK court saying that the GCHQ had indeed broken the law with its bulk surveillance. While many privacy advocates rejoiced, so did the GCHQ, saying the verdict confirms that their activity is legal. How can this be? Don’t count your chickens quite yet.

The FRA had been wiretapping satellites since 1976. They justify this with pointing at a law saying that anybody may listen to radio waves, which makes sense when you’re looking at radio waves from a TV signals or CW radio perspective. But the law just said radio waves in general, which obviously includes directional radio links, such as between satellites and ground stations.

This conflicts sharply with privacy-against-wiretapping laws, where you have a so-called expectation of privacy when you’re making a phonecall. In short, there’s a multitude of conflicting laws in the area.

So just like with the FRA, GCHQ’s mass surveillance is legal now, even if a court said it didn’t use to be. That doesn’t help much.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/02/in-this-way-our-work-will-become-legal-dont-count-your-chickens-over-the-gchq-verdict-on-surveillance/___

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2015-02-02 16:20:06 (4 comments, 14 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

In memory of the liberties lost in the War on Piracy. New column on TorrentFreak.

In order to prevent us from discussing and sharing interesting things, the copyright industry has successfully eliminated civil liberties online. But it was all down to a wrong and stupid business assumption in the first place.

The copyright industry was absolutely determined to prevent people from discussing and sharing interesting things (which is what file-sharing amounts to), damn the consequences to civil liberties and society at large to hell. If you put it this way – *what kind of measures would it take to physically and legally prevent people from discussing the things they want in private?* – you should arrive at conclusions which make hairs rise on your arms. The measures required would amount to something beyond Orwellian, and that’s exactly what the copyright industrydeman... more »

In memory of the liberties lost in the War on Piracy. New column on TorrentFreak.

In order to prevent us from discussing and sharing interesting things, the copyright industry has successfully eliminated civil liberties online. But it was all down to a wrong and stupid business assumption in the first place.

The copyright industry was absolutely determined to prevent people from discussing and sharing interesting things (which is what file-sharing amounts to), damn the consequences to civil liberties and society at large to hell. If you put it this way – *what kind of measures would it take to physically and legally prevent people from discussing the things they want in private?* – you should arrive at conclusions which make hairs rise on your arms. The measures required would amount to something beyond Orwellian, and that’s exactly what the copyright industry demanded.

So the copyright industry has successfully lobbied for laws that ban people from sharing and discussing interesting things in private, and done so from the sloppiest conceivable of false business assumptions. As a result of this dimwitted business sense combined with diehard foolhardiness, we’re left with nowhere to talk or walk in private.

And these civil liberties – vital, fundamental civil liberties that aren’t passing from our parents to our children – were lost because of a damn dimwitted sloppy business assumption that turned out to be 180 degrees wrong. It’s beyond depressing. It’s enraging.

http://torrentfreak.com/in-memory-of-the-liberties-lost-in-the-war-on-piracy-150202/___

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2015-02-02 16:08:05 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 5. The Pirate Bay returns exactly on schedule, giving us a sober reminder that The Bay is older than both Facebook and Twitter. China gets more aggressive against VPN connections, desperately clinging to protectionism. And in NYC and the UK, everybody's a terrorist with new laws.

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-FD5U5mH-w

Liberties Report for week 5. The Pirate Bay returns exactly on schedule, giving us a sober reminder that The Bay is older than both Facebook and Twitter. China gets more aggressive against VPN connections, desperately clinging to protectionism. And in NYC and the UK, everybody's a terrorist with new laws.

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-FD5U5mH-w___

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2015-01-31 16:08:54 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

The Pirate Bay returns, and China filters VPNs more aggressively. New column on Privacy News.

Two unrelated things coincide: The return of The Pirate Bay on one hand, and China banning VPNs on the other – actually, not banning them per se, but aggressively filtering VPN traffic in their Great Firewall. It’s a complete coincidence that these both happen in the same week but show something important: inertia and vested interests.

It’s important to keep in mind that The Pirate Bay is over a decade old by now. The Pirate Bay is so old, it has itself become part of inertia – which, in part, explains why it keeps coming back.

Let’s phrase that differently: The Pirate Bay is older than both Facebook and Twitter.

In the Chinese case, the inertia doesn’t come in the form of business interests or symbolism, but from a national self-image – that Chineseservices shou... more »

The Pirate Bay returns, and China filters VPNs more aggressively. New column on Privacy News.

Two unrelated things coincide: The return of The Pirate Bay on one hand, and China banning VPNs on the other – actually, not banning them per se, but aggressively filtering VPN traffic in their Great Firewall. It’s a complete coincidence that these both happen in the same week but show something important: inertia and vested interests.

It’s important to keep in mind that The Pirate Bay is over a decade old by now. The Pirate Bay is so old, it has itself become part of inertia – which, in part, explains why it keeps coming back.

Let’s phrase that differently: The Pirate Bay is older than both Facebook and Twitter.

In the Chinese case, the inertia doesn’t come in the form of business interests or symbolism, but from a national self-image – that Chinese services should simply be superior, and given a chance against dominant services, they will.

There’s not much difference between that attitude and the copyright industry’s attitude toward The Pirate Bay, and it goes to explain a lot of the political moves and countermoves with regard to people’s attempts to regulate the Internet right now.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/01/the-pirate-bay-returns-and-china-filters-vpns/___

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2015-01-28 01:32:10 (0 comments, 9 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 4. The UK continues its path to Big Brother. The revived Snooper's Charter was said to have no way of passing in 2013, and yet, it's merely one horrible bill of many. The problem isn't the single bills, the problem is that anything and everything is used as an excuse to reduce and eliminate vital liberties. What's needed is a Greece-style situation where politicians lose their jobs en masse over this. Until then, expect China to keep being a moral example for the West.

Presented by Private Internet Access:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/HKgXoLQE-s8

Liberties Report for week 4. The UK continues its path to Big Brother. The revived Snooper's Charter was said to have no way of passing in 2013, and yet, it's merely one horrible bill of many. The problem isn't the single bills, the problem is that anything and everything is used as an excuse to reduce and eliminate vital liberties. What's needed is a Greece-style situation where politicians lose their jobs en masse over this. Until then, expect China to keep being a moral example for the West.

Presented by Private Internet Access:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/HKgXoLQE-s8___

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2015-01-22 16:47:03 (0 comments, 8 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

New bank account confiscation rules make monetary privacy as important as data privacy. New column on Privacy News.

We’ve learned the hard way over the decades that if you don’t have physical control of your data, it’s not your data. With the new bank account confiscation rules coming in place, this applies to finance, too: if you don’t have physical control of your money, it’s not your money.

So there you have it. The Cyprus confiscations last year, where the Cypriot government simply swooped in and confiscated/stole/appropriated people’s bank savings, have now become a world standard. Pretty much every world leader has praised it as a very convenient way for a government to save itself, it was made a standard at the G20 meeting last November, and it’s now mandated in the EU.

We first learned this, way in the early days of the Internet, when hosting servicessimply disapp... more »

New bank account confiscation rules make monetary privacy as important as data privacy. New column on Privacy News.

We’ve learned the hard way over the decades that if you don’t have physical control of your data, it’s not your data. With the new bank account confiscation rules coming in place, this applies to finance, too: if you don’t have physical control of your money, it’s not your money.

So there you have it. The Cyprus confiscations last year, where the Cypriot government simply swooped in and confiscated/stole/appropriated people’s bank savings, have now become a world standard. Pretty much every world leader has praised it as a very convenient way for a government to save itself, it was made a standard at the G20 meeting last November, and it’s now mandated in the EU.

We first learned this, way in the early days of the Internet, when hosting services simply disappeared in bankruptcies or similar: If you don’t have physical control of your data, it’s not your data. (As the first online mail providers went under, all their users’ mail history went under, too. Same thing with storage services. Same thing with early blogging platforms.)

And so now, this principle has spread to central-bank currencies, too. With the latest revelation of governments planning to seize money from bank accounts pretty much on-demand and at-will, we’re seeing this coming full circle into the privacy sphere – the reason that privacy of finance, data, and correspondence are three equivalent privacies of the seven privacies:

If you don’t have physical control of your money, it’s not your money.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/01/new-bank-rules-make-care-for-financial-privacy-as-important-as-data-privacy/___

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2015-01-21 20:11:30 (1 comments, 5 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 3. David Cameron suggests outlawing encryption in the UK, which was actually done over ten years ago. There's a bank run going on in Greece, and currency wars are heating up. We live in times of change.

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/g2H4B1dqSYw

Liberties Report for week 3. David Cameron suggests outlawing encryption in the UK, which was actually done over ten years ago. There's a bank run going on in Greece, and currency wars are heating up. We live in times of change.

Presented by +Private Internet Access VPN:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

http://youtu.be/g2H4B1dqSYw___

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2015-01-17 12:10:42 (6 comments, 13 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

Putin's unreported genius on Ukraine - it's currency warfare. New article.

Putin did not invade Ukraine to invade Ukraine, but as a genius invasion against the U.S. Dollar. Almost all media have missed the high-level geopolitical chess at play and focused so narrowly on the individual moves, that they’re completely missing the big picture. There’s currently a war about what reserve currency the world should use – and the U.S. is poised to lose.

Putin has spent the past 15 years making the world’s largest economy – Europe – completely dependent on Russian energy: oil, natural gas, and uranium. Europe cannot do without Russian energy at this point in time.

Russia needed sanctions from the United States, so its energy supply to Europe couldn’t be denominated in US dollars anymore.

Putin’s invasion of Ukraine was not an invasion ofUkraine. It was... more »

Putin's unreported genius on Ukraine - it's currency warfare. New article.

Putin did not invade Ukraine to invade Ukraine, but as a genius invasion against the U.S. Dollar. Almost all media have missed the high-level geopolitical chess at play and focused so narrowly on the individual moves, that they’re completely missing the big picture. There’s currently a war about what reserve currency the world should use – and the U.S. is poised to lose.

Putin has spent the past 15 years making the world’s largest economy – Europe – completely dependent on Russian energy: oil, natural gas, and uranium. Europe cannot do without Russian energy at this point in time.

Russia needed sanctions from the United States, so its energy supply to Europe couldn’t be denominated in US dollars anymore.

Putin’s invasion of Ukraine was not an invasion of Ukraine. It was a trap for the US Dollar, a trap that sprung perfectly.

In effect, Putin has successfully defeated the US Empire by defeating the petrodollar, unless Obama has a last-ditch ace up his sleeve at this point.

http://falkvinge.net/2015/01/17/putins-unreported-genius-on-ukraine-currency-warfare/___

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2015-01-14 22:08:02 (3 comments, 13 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

Liberties Report for week 2. After Charlie Hebdo, everybody and their brother have claimed to defend freedom of speech, while actually saying the exact opposite. Freedom of speech isn't rocket science - it means that stating an opinion is always legal, that there's no legal test for it. And not one Western country meets this simple bar today.

Presented by Private Internet Access:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

Full transcript at the Liberties Report facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/libertiesreport/posts/930801843604368


http://youtu.be/QE-nLvdz0LI

Liberties Report for week 2. After Charlie Hebdo, everybody and their brother have claimed to defend freedom of speech, while actually saying the exact opposite. Freedom of speech isn't rocket science - it means that stating an opinion is always legal, that there's no legal test for it. And not one Western country meets this simple bar today.

Presented by Private Internet Access:
http://tinyurl.com/librep-piavpn

Full transcript at the Liberties Report facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/libertiesreport/posts/930801843604368


http://youtu.be/QE-nLvdz0LI___

2015-01-14 13:45:58 (0 comments, 12 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

Hilarious - activists turn tables on surveillance hawks, wiretap them with honeypot open wifi at security conference. New article.

Activists from the Pirate Party’s youth wing have wiretapped high-level political surveillance hawks at Sweden’s top security conference. They set up an open wi-fi access point at the conference and labeled it “Open Guest”, and then just logged the traffic of about a hundred high-ranking surveillance hawks that lobby for more wiretapping who connected through their unencrypted access point. They presented their findings in an op-ed in Swedish this Tuesday.

http://falkvinge.net/2015/01/14/hilarious-activists-turn-tables-on-political-surveillance-hawks-wiretaps-them-with-honeypot-open-wi-fi-at-security-conference/

Hilarious - activists turn tables on surveillance hawks, wiretap them with honeypot open wifi at security conference. New article.

Activists from the Pirate Party’s youth wing have wiretapped high-level political surveillance hawks at Sweden’s top security conference. They set up an open wi-fi access point at the conference and labeled it “Open Guest”, and then just logged the traffic of about a hundred high-ranking surveillance hawks that lobby for more wiretapping who connected through their unencrypted access point. They presented their findings in an op-ed in Swedish this Tuesday.

http://falkvinge.net/2015/01/14/hilarious-activists-turn-tables-on-political-surveillance-hawks-wiretaps-them-with-honeypot-open-wi-fi-at-security-conference/___

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2015-01-11 13:43:09 (0 comments, 8 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

Charlie Hebdo: And out come the surveillance services, demanding more budget and powers. New column on Privacy News.

Following the terrorist attack on the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris, everybody and their brother have come out in support of freedom of speech. The problem is, they don’t even know what it is when asked. Meanwhile, the surveillance services waste no time in trying to use the attack to claim more powers.

Let’s get this straight: the surveillance services knew full well who these guys were, and still didn’t manage to prevent the attack. And yet they’re asking for more budget and powers to do a lot more of what didn’t work?

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/01/charlie-hebdo-and-out-come-the-surveillance-services-demanding-more-budget-powers/

Charlie Hebdo: And out come the surveillance services, demanding more budget and powers. New column on Privacy News.

Following the terrorist attack on the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris, everybody and their brother have come out in support of freedom of speech. The problem is, they don’t even know what it is when asked. Meanwhile, the surveillance services waste no time in trying to use the attack to claim more powers.

Let’s get this straight: the surveillance services knew full well who these guys were, and still didn’t manage to prevent the attack. And yet they’re asking for more budget and powers to do a lot more of what didn’t work?

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/01/charlie-hebdo-and-out-come-the-surveillance-services-demanding-more-budget-powers/___

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2015-01-04 22:54:44 (2 comments, 8 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

Why EFF's "Let's Encrypt" initiative is more important than it seems. new column on Privacy News.

Late 2014, the Electronic Frontier Foundation announced a small software utility called "Let's Encrypt", aimed at website administrators. It reduces the time and skill required to encrypt a website from three hours and much Googling to twenty seconds and one command. That initiative is more important than just being another random utility.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/01/why-effs-lets-encrypt-initiative-is-more-important-than-it-seems/

Why EFF's "Let's Encrypt" initiative is more important than it seems. new column on Privacy News.

Late 2014, the Electronic Frontier Foundation announced a small software utility called "Let's Encrypt", aimed at website administrators. It reduces the time and skill required to encrypt a website from three hours and much Googling to twenty seconds and one command. That initiative is more important than just being another random utility.

https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2015/01/why-effs-lets-encrypt-initiative-is-more-important-than-it-seems/___

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