Login now

Not your profile? Login and get free access to your reports and analysis.

Tags

Sign in

No tag added here yet.
You can login on CircleCount to add some tags here.

Are you missing a tag in the list of available tags? You can suggest new tags here.

Login now

Do you want to see a more detailed chart? Check your settings and define your favorite chart type.

Or click here to get the detailed chart only once.

Ian Bicking has been shared in 8 public circles

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Thomas Harlan70A Hot Circle they do ad you back2015-02-15 17:52:07423000
Green0Get more friend, more and more.. #sharedcircles   #circleshare   #circleshare  2015-02-03 06:42:20449001
Daniel Gibbs18,513Active users on Google+. Circle Share. If you received a notification, please reshare to your circlesIf you’d like to be added to the next circle share: • +1 this circle • Share this circle to PUBLIC • Include me in your circles • Comment on this post#circle #circles #publiccircle #circleshare #Fiji #japan #tokyo #malaysia #malaysia #kota_kinabalu #malaysia #kuala_lumpur #malaysia #kuala_terengganu #malaysia #kuantan #malaysia #kuching #malaysia #langkawi #malaysia #penang #myanmar #myanmar #yangon #philippines #philippines #cebu #south_korea #south_korea #seoul #taiwan #taiwan #kaohsiung #taiwan #taipei #thailand #chiang_mai 2015-02-02 10:32:23448777696
Oleg Kochetkov1,798HI All!I am very happy to share  for you  this #circle . You'll love this circle. This is TOP Google + peoples circle!To be added to the Circle you have to do these simple steps:1 - Do +1 t the post.  2 - Comment the post and specify your "category" (job or interest)         (ex: fashion, photography, seo, social media marketing).   3 - Include the circle among your circles.   4 - Share the circle (include yourself).   #circles   #circleshare #circlesharing #sharedcircles #sharingcircles #sharedpubliccircles #sharedcircleoftheday #circlemonday #share #shared #followers #addcircles #publicsharedcircles #share #addpeople #addcircle #addfriends #circle #empireavenue #socialmedia   #influencers #influencer   #influence #influencermarketing #slivermetalcircle 2014-01-20 18:46:52501402620
Tom Brander2,281Figured with Pycon coming up it was time to share this circle again if you want to be added comment below!2012-03-05 15:51:34471400
Tom Brander2,081Superseded by this updated circle post https://plus.google.com/u/0/118303283951449952966/posts/assbAGsf2ej Once again, (updated) my Python circle, let me know if you want to be added and you have a real interest in Python..Therefore I have closed comments here2012-01-08 18:54:034662000
Andy Dustman247Like Python? Here's my Pythonistas circle. Only a portion of these were personally hand-selected. Some are from +Michael Bernstein and others. Oh, and the convention seems to be, +1 this if you think you should be in this circle.Andy Dustman shared a circle with you.2011-10-13 19:33:37389204
Michael Bernstein1,976This is my Python circle. I've included folks from the Django, Zope, Pyramid, and Plone communities, among others. Are you a user of Python? Let me know and I'll add you too!Michael Bernstein shared a circle with you.2011-10-11 17:42:3129541813

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

3
comments per post
1
reshares per post
5
+1's per post

956
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 21

2014-10-04 05:01:14 (21 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Any recommendations for storing/archiving family videos in the cloud? Ideally viewable sharable private and safe.

Most reshares: 11

posted image

2014-12-15 21:38:57 (3 comments, 11 reshares, 30 +1s)Open 

"Back during World War II, the RAF lost a lot of planes to German anti-aircraft fire. So they decided to armor them up. But where to put the armor? The obvious answer was to look at planes that returned from missions, count up all the bullet holes in various places, and then put extra armor in the areas that attracted the most fire.

"Obvious but wrong. As Hungarian-born mathematician Abraham Wald explained at the time, if a plane makes it back safely even though it has, say, a bunch of bullet holes in its wings, it means that bullet holes in the wings aren't very dangerous. What you really want to do is armor up the areas that, on average, don't have any bullet holes. Why? Because planes with bullet holes in those places never made it back. That's why you don't see any bullet holes there on the ones that do return."  (From... more »

Most plusones: 30

posted image

2014-12-15 21:38:57 (3 comments, 11 reshares, 30 +1s)Open 

"Back during World War II, the RAF lost a lot of planes to German anti-aircraft fire. So they decided to armor them up. But where to put the armor? The obvious answer was to look at planes that returned from missions, count up all the bullet holes in various places, and then put extra armor in the areas that attracted the most fire.

"Obvious but wrong. As Hungarian-born mathematician Abraham Wald explained at the time, if a plane makes it back safely even though it has, say, a bunch of bullet holes in its wings, it means that bullet holes in the wings aren't very dangerous. What you really want to do is armor up the areas that, on average, don't have any bullet holes. Why? Because planes with bullet holes in those places never made it back. That's why you don't see any bullet holes there on the ones that do return."  (From... more »

Latest 50 posts

2015-02-23 15:57:49 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

+James Long talks at length about the mobile web and performance concerns/etc: http://jlongster.com/Radical-Statements-about-the-Mobile-Web

His conclusions end up being largely that the DOM isn't going to work to create high quality mobile applications.  Now I'm biased, because I really like the DOM, and am personally invested in its success, but I think the alternate evolution from the tension he describes isn't so much the DOM will be fast enough, but that there's another path of competition.

A pattern of success I see: availability beats fidelity.  Native apps have better fidelity.  On mobile apps can have as good or better availability too, so... not an immediately optimistic statement.  The DOM isn't helping the web much here, but I think it could.  I think having a declarative, concrete representation of an interface has the potential to buildavaila... more »

+James Long talks at length about the mobile web and performance concerns/etc: http://jlongster.com/Radical-Statements-about-the-Mobile-Web

His conclusions end up being largely that the DOM isn't going to work to create high quality mobile applications.  Now I'm biased, because I really like the DOM, and am personally invested in its success, but I think the alternate evolution from the tension he describes isn't so much the DOM will be fast enough, but that there's another path of competition.

A pattern of success I see: availability beats fidelity.  Native apps have better fidelity.  On mobile apps can have as good or better availability too, so... not an immediately optimistic statement.  The DOM isn't helping the web much here, but I think it could.  I think having a declarative, concrete representation of an interface has the potential to build availability (using a very broad definition of "available" – available to a multitude of uses, including ones not planned on by the original author/developer).

Do 60fps, retina displays, "beautiful" interfaces, and so on form the feature set that will drive our future platforms?  IMHO only if we're lazy, if we accept content and the DOM as opaque, and if we give up on high-level (i.e., platform-level) mediation and enhancement of experiences.___

posted image

2015-02-23 15:37:19 (5 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

I gave this podcast a relisten the other day: http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2013/09/tyler_cowen_on.html

It's a conversation on the future, based on Tyler Cowen's deliberately boring predictions.  I'd call them "conventional" predictions, but they aren't – conventional predictions tend to be breathless and designed to gain attention, rather than trying to be correct.  Cowen's predictions aren't radical, but then they start to talk through the implications and it feels like it matters.  As a father, I feel an obligation to prepare my children for this future.  I'm not going to stop the future, I can only change it in small ways, but I can have a significant effect on the children in my life.  I haven't really decided what this implies for me in practice.

One thing that struck me this time through is there discussion of politics towardsthe en... more »

I gave this podcast a relisten the other day: http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2013/09/tyler_cowen_on.html

It's a conversation on the future, based on Tyler Cowen's deliberately boring predictions.  I'd call them "conventional" predictions, but they aren't – conventional predictions tend to be breathless and designed to gain attention, rather than trying to be correct.  Cowen's predictions aren't radical, but then they start to talk through the implications and it feels like it matters.  As a father, I feel an obligation to prepare my children for this future.  I'm not going to stop the future, I can only change it in small ways, but I can have a significant effect on the children in my life.  I haven't really decided what this implies for me in practice.

One thing that struck me this time through is there discussion of politics towards the end.  Cowen thinks that the highly privileged will grow in number, he talks about something like 15% of the population living like the millionaires of today.  I haven't read his book so I don't know how he comes to that, but it feels reasonable, I see that expansion happening now.  That class of people is highly invested in The System.  I imagine it could be like the new political middle class – that is, a group of people who have enough resources to hold some political autonomy and initiative, while also being a high enough quantity of people to matter in the polls and as part of the on-the-ground political conversation.  The result of this would be a more conservative politics, specifically more resistant to populism on the right and left.  Combine it with an aging population and things start to look downright boring.

Another thought I had as they were talking about higher education – they talk about how the best presenters will have a larger audience, the best schools will still have a clear tenure track, but it's unclear what everyone else does.  What will we be looking for in the next generation of professors?  MOOCs to me seem more like an exercise in revealing the weaknesses of our current system.  The system tells itself that teaching is important, and the instructional material is important, and assignments and blah blah blah... but the result is a bunch of web pages and videos and online forums, and it's kind of pathetic-looking.  To the degree higher education succeeds at its goals (and I don't think it's particularly successful), it doesn't understand quite why.

The new class of worker they talk about is the coach.  This is something computers don't do particularly well.  I think in part because the computer can never imbue a topic with importance. Computers cycles are cheap.  No one is giving up anything to have a computer email you, or talk to you, or remind you of things. To make oneself accountable, even self-accountable, requires some sacrifice. And there's something about a human coach that embodies that.

What might it mean if we combine a coach with the MOOC, or a whole set of available tools and environments?  This coaching happens at various times in upper education, but it's very ad hoc. Who teaches you study skills? Who has an honest conversation about your motivations and fears? Who do you go to when you don't think things are working? Sometimes there is a trusted person, a teacher, parent, professor – but usually no one.

Imagine after high school, you decide on a set of goals.  Not a five-year plan, just some next steps. Maybe you don't know what you want to do next, so you want to explore a breadth of topics. Maybe you want to accomplish something specific. Maybe you want to progress along an academic track. Then you make a plan. Maybe you need to understand why your work is relevant, so you need some real world experience. Maybe you want to find yourself, and so you want something more like the less worldly environment of a college campus. For the price of a college education (which apparently we consider a reasonable price for that post-high-school experience) you can buy a lot of personal attention and a lot of different experiences.

A coaching model could seem like a lot of wimpy handholding.  Like a formalization of laziness.  And maybe it would be – but in part it just seems like an honest attempt at guidance.  Much more honest than our current educational system, which throws people into a structure and calls it a meritocracy that some people succeed and some do not, when it simultaneously is an educational institution where it's supposed to help people succeed.___

2015-02-20 15:54:52 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

I've generally liked git subtree instead of git submodules, but it has some serious usability problems.  Interesting to see git subrepo, which mostly uses the git subtree model but with improvements that all touch on the actual problems I've had: https://github.com/ingydotnet/git-subrepo/blob/master/Intro.pod#git-subtrees

I've generally liked git subtree instead of git submodules, but it has some serious usability problems.  Interesting to see git subrepo, which mostly uses the git subtree model but with improvements that all touch on the actual problems I've had: https://github.com/ingydotnet/git-subrepo/blob/master/Intro.pod#git-subtrees___

2015-02-18 16:31:21 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Another blog post in my Product Journal series.  This one thinking through what I want to build when I'm targeting internal demos.

Another blog post in my Product Journal series.  This one thinking through what I want to build when I'm targeting internal demos.___

2015-02-17 16:26:57 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

Postgres has pub/sub capabilities built into it: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.1/static/sql-notify.html – something I did not previously know.

Just some slides, but it shows a reasonable model for handling websocket traffic in a Node/SocketIO process with the database as a coordination layer: https://denibertovic.com/talks/real-time-notifications/ (does totally have a SQL injection attack built in to the example though).  Some might find this a useful way to add realtime updates to a traditional app server (e.g., something like Django that isn't very WebSocket friendly).

Postgres has pub/sub capabilities built into it: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.1/static/sql-notify.html – something I did not previously know.

Just some slides, but it shows a reasonable model for handling websocket traffic in a Node/SocketIO process with the database as a coordination layer: https://denibertovic.com/talks/real-time-notifications/ (does totally have a SQL injection attack built in to the example though).  Some might find this a useful way to add realtime updates to a traditional app server (e.g., something like Django that isn't very WebSocket friendly).___

posted image

2015-02-17 05:02:18 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

The Shipping Culture Is Hurting Us: http://bitbashing.io/2015/02/16/shipping-culture.html (a _Get off my lawn!_ style rant)

Starting it I thought it might be similar in sense to my MVP post from a few weeks back (http://www.ianbicking.org/blog/2015/01/product-journal-mvp.html).  But no, it's mostly about technology choices.  And I think that's quite the point.  For instance, to quote:

"The problem is that these technologies, being so beginner-friendly and aggressively marketed, rapidly pick up steam and become the “cool” things to use, regardless of actual merit or lack thereof. Nothing illustrated this more to me than when I went to my first (and only) hackathon last year. I went with the assumption that I would see a wild variety of projects using a wild variety of technologies. Instead, I found the vast majority of contestants there writing some web app, usuallywith No... more »

The Shipping Culture Is Hurting Us: http://bitbashing.io/2015/02/16/shipping-culture.html (a _Get off my lawn!_ style rant)

Starting it I thought it might be similar in sense to my MVP post from a few weeks back (http://www.ianbicking.org/blog/2015/01/product-journal-mvp.html).  But no, it's mostly about technology choices.  And I think that's quite the point.  For instance, to quote:

"The problem is that these technologies, being so beginner-friendly and aggressively marketed, rapidly pick up steam and become the “cool” things to use, regardless of actual merit or lack thereof. Nothing illustrated this more to me than when I went to my first (and only) hackathon last year. I went with the assumption that I would see a wild variety of projects using a wild variety of technologies. Instead, I found the vast majority of contestants there writing some web app, usually with Node.js and MongoDB. It certainly didn’t help that MongoDB people were there, at the hackathon, marketing their wares."

Were the people at the hackathon trying to show off some awesome Noding and Mongoing?  Probably not, they were probably trying to make something they thought was cool.  Nothing the author talks about in this article actually is about making something cool, it's all tools.

I think there's reason to be skeptical of "shipping culture" as a way to make cool things.  Maybe it's because I'm sensitive to the obligation of work in the wild.  The danger of investing in conventional wisdom. But the tech?  It's like letting yourself be bogged down by legacy you haven't even acquired yet – all the obligation of having shipped something without any of the reward.___

2015-02-13 16:49:07 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Using React, and server-side rendering, there are so damn many options and choices of how to lay things out.  It gives me little confidence in our choices, because the simple quantity makes it seem unlikely that they were all good or even reasonable choices.  Probably in a few days I'll feel okay about it, but geez...

Using React, and server-side rendering, there are so damn many options and choices of how to lay things out.  It gives me little confidence in our choices, because the simple quantity makes it seem unlikely that they were all good or even reasonable choices.  Probably in a few days I'll feel okay about it, but geez...___

2015-02-11 22:12:29 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

I'd like to have a space to keep secure, collaborative text notes (maybe just one long log) to coordinate deployment notes, manually log activity, etc.  It would be nice to be able to append via curl (i.e., an API I can use from a shell script).  Thoughts?

I'd like to have a space to keep secure, collaborative text notes (maybe just one long log) to coordinate deployment notes, manually log activity, etc.  It would be nice to be able to append via curl (i.e., an API I can use from a shell script).  Thoughts?___

2015-02-09 19:51:26 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

I receive a notification from an app that led with "FYI" – i.e., nothing actionable expected.  A thoughtfully humane indicator.

Might not work in email notifications because every human-like indicator has been coopted for marketing purposes.  Casual language is almost a negative now, at least if you admit your email comes from a bot you can establish an honest relationship with the recipient.

I receive a notification from an app that led with "FYI" – i.e., nothing actionable expected.  A thoughtfully humane indicator.

Might not work in email notifications because every human-like indicator has been coopted for marketing purposes.  Casual language is almost a negative now, at least if you admit your email comes from a bot you can establish an honest relationship with the recipient.___

2015-02-09 17:49:28 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

A thought I had with React.js server-side rendering: the basic pattern is to make the markup on the server, then fix up the markup (including event handlers, or controls dependent on status).  The result is that while you are doing server-side rendering, it doesn't have to be very accurate.  It can be stale.  It can serve everyone unauthenticated UI. (Though this could cause bad stuttering depending on what the live updates shift around.)  It's more like a first approximation.  And also a robot view of the page, which again can be an approximation.

This also makes full-page caching more appealing.  E.g., using Varnish instead of an object cache like memcached.

I'm still a little fuzzy on how we would want to deal with getting the fully accurate data from the server.  I think it makes sense to send this data with the page itself.  But if we aren't guaranteeinganythin... more »

A thought I had with React.js server-side rendering: the basic pattern is to make the markup on the server, then fix up the markup (including event handlers, or controls dependent on status).  The result is that while you are doing server-side rendering, it doesn't have to be very accurate.  It can be stale.  It can serve everyone unauthenticated UI. (Though this could cause bad stuttering depending on what the live updates shift around.)  It's more like a first approximation.  And also a robot view of the page, which again can be an approximation.

This also makes full-page caching more appealing.  E.g., using Varnish instead of an object cache like memcached.

I'm still a little fuzzy on how we would want to deal with getting the fully accurate data from the server.  I think it makes sense to send this data with the page itself.  But if we aren't guaranteeing anything about that data, then you still need to get the "real" data, which maybe means sending the data twice (though a cheap 304 would be common).

I can imagine actually using <script src="/page-state.js?url={this_url}&if_modified={date_page_was_generated}"></script> at the bottom of pages, thus immediately triggering a fetch.  You wouldn't even want a 304 in this case, because you want to serve back an empty file if there's been no modifications.___

2015-02-09 16:16:59 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Any pointers to the state of the art in open source article text extraction? Having a hard time separating the wheat from the chaff.

Any pointers to the state of the art in open source article text extraction? Having a hard time separating the wheat from the chaff.___

2015-02-06 02:30:33 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

A Hayekian theory of artificial intelligence... I think that could mean something. What?

A Hayekian theory of artificial intelligence... I think that could mean something. What?___

posted image

2015-02-05 20:30:27 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Choose Your Own Adventure bear encounter!

Choose Your Own Adventure bear encounter!___

2015-02-02 17:00:22 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

A discussion of async and sync programming, which coexist frequently in many modern environments.  And coexist painfully.  It's really pretty incredibly awful, I don't know how we put up with it at all.

An aside, doctest.js (http://doctestjs.org/) has something like the "await" feature he talks about, as it converts your doctest stanzas into individual chunks of code with CSP-style chaining, and lets you wait in between those stanzas while the code looks relatively linear.  It's far more naive than a real language feature, but even if it's kind of dumb it sure is nice.  Best feature in doctest.js (the best testing framework that no one uses!)

A discussion of async and sync programming, which coexist frequently in many modern environments.  And coexist painfully.  It's really pretty incredibly awful, I don't know how we put up with it at all.

An aside, doctest.js (http://doctestjs.org/) has something like the "await" feature he talks about, as it converts your doctest stanzas into individual chunks of code with CSP-style chaining, and lets you wait in between those stanzas while the code looks relatively linear.  It's far more naive than a real language feature, but even if it's kind of dumb it sure is nice.  Best feature in doctest.js (the best testing framework that no one uses!)___

2015-01-29 16:45:26 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

A followup post to my Being A Manager Is Lonely post (less complainy ;)

A followup post to my Being A Manager Is Lonely post (less complainy ;)___

2015-01-27 19:03:19 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Next in my blog series: To MVP or not to MVP, thinking about design process, initial execution, planning vs doing, etc.

Next in my blog series: To MVP or not to MVP, thinking about design process, initial execution, planning vs doing, etc.___

posted image

2015-01-27 04:35:51 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Gaze upon the darkness of modern internet journalism! http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/most-depressing-buzzfeed-article-of-all-time.html

It really is terrible, but it was only when I went to the Buzzfeed author's page that I truly felt the depth to which we have fallen, all of us: http://www.buzzfeed.com/joannaborns

Gaze upon this "Best Of 2014 / Classic" list of haikus: http://www.buzzfeed.com/joannaborns/year-2014-haikus   Alex from Target
  he's just a teen at Target
  internet scary

Reading her articles literally makes me feel all weird inside.  I can't watch scary movies where people get cut because there's some part of me that can't help but imagine what it feels like to hold the knife and the texture of the skin as the blade goes through it.  This is how I feel reading her writing, somehow I cannot help but imagine myselfwritin... more »

Gaze upon the darkness of modern internet journalism! http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/most-depressing-buzzfeed-article-of-all-time.html

It really is terrible, but it was only when I went to the Buzzfeed author's page that I truly felt the depth to which we have fallen, all of us: http://www.buzzfeed.com/joannaborns

Gaze upon this "Best Of 2014 / Classic" list of haikus: http://www.buzzfeed.com/joannaborns/year-2014-haikus   Alex from Target
  he's just a teen at Target
  internet scary

Reading her articles literally makes me feel all weird inside.  I can't watch scary movies where people get cut because there's some part of me that can't help but imagine what it feels like to hold the knife and the texture of the skin as the blade goes through it.  This is how I feel reading her writing, somehow I cannot help but imagine myself writing that.  Like some kind of personal hell based on bad high school essay experiences.___

posted image

2015-01-25 17:05:52 (3 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

This is some of the sense I'm hoping to bring into my new project... an expansive approach instead of reductive, imaginative before analytical. It's so much more pleasant.

This is some of the sense I'm hoping to bring into my new project... an expansive approach instead of reductive, imaginative before analytical. It's so much more pleasant.___

2015-01-21 19:24:38 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

I put up a second post in the series, The Technology Demo – and thinking about how to move past a technology demo to a product conception.

I put up a second post in the series, The Technology Demo – and thinking about how to move past a technology demo to a product conception.___

2015-01-16 03:19:10 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

I'm going to try to write out my process and thought process in developing a new product; first post...

I'm going to try to write out my process and thought process in developing a new product; first post...___

2015-01-13 17:13:33 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Put up a blog post: Being A Manager Is Lonely

Hopefully I'm not being too whiney ;)

Put up a blog post: Being A Manager Is Lonely

Hopefully I'm not being too whiney ;)___

2015-01-13 15:29:45 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Most readability-related libraries try to create a better experience through article text extraction.  But it's really common that some of the article is lost in the process – images, sidebars, addendums, anything that isn't part of the main block, and often otherwise obvious trailing content that comes after some transition is lost.

An alternate approach would be to kind of fix-up the page in place.  E.g., add "opacity: 0.1" to all the elements you might otherwise delete.  I'm a little less sure how to take an article designed for desktop display and make it display full width on mobile, but seems like it should be possible.  You can take all the identified article text and force its styling to use appropriate font sizes and colors.

Has anyone heard of code that approaches the problem this way?

Most readability-related libraries try to create a better experience through article text extraction.  But it's really common that some of the article is lost in the process – images, sidebars, addendums, anything that isn't part of the main block, and often otherwise obvious trailing content that comes after some transition is lost.

An alternate approach would be to kind of fix-up the page in place.  E.g., add "opacity: 0.1" to all the elements you might otherwise delete.  I'm a little less sure how to take an article designed for desktop display and make it display full width on mobile, but seems like it should be possible.  You can take all the identified article text and force its styling to use appropriate font sizes and colors.

Has anyone heard of code that approaches the problem this way?___

posted image

2014-12-31 06:04:51 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Reflecting on the passing of time, and the passing of my time

Reflecting on the passing of time, and the passing of my time___

2014-12-17 04:55:09 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

I don't really get this sort of thing.  Maybe because I understand how to do stuff without jQuery well enough.  But jQuery isn't really a framework.  It maps reasonably well.  Doing something like $el.offset() is surprisingly painful without jQuery.  Doing $(".active").removeClass("active") without jQuery is easy, but terribly tedious.  $el.is(":visible") is pretty challenging to do right.  Of course many of these you can do naively without much trouble!  like (el.style.display == "none") – and that will work with a very particular application logic, and you'll test it and it will be okay, and maybe it is okay.  And when you fix it you might implement a real visibility test (thus going down the path of reproducing jQuery bit by bit), or you may work around it another way, probably some terrible way that only makes everything even morefragile.more »

I don't really get this sort of thing.  Maybe because I understand how to do stuff without jQuery well enough.  But jQuery isn't really a framework.  It maps reasonably well.  Doing something like $el.offset() is surprisingly painful without jQuery.  Doing $(".active").removeClass("active") without jQuery is easy, but terribly tedious.  $el.is(":visible") is pretty challenging to do right.  Of course many of these you can do naively without much trouble!  like (el.style.display == "none") – and that will work with a very particular application logic, and you'll test it and it will be okay, and maybe it is okay.  And when you fix it you might implement a real visibility test (thus going down the path of reproducing jQuery bit by bit), or you may work around it another way, probably some terrible way that only makes everything even more fragile.

If you want to reproduce jQuery in a slightly less magical way, sure; lots of people have.  There's other approaches too, but there's far more approaches that are worse than jQuery than better.  ___

posted image

2014-12-15 21:38:57 (3 comments, 11 reshares, 30 +1s)Open 

"Back during World War II, the RAF lost a lot of planes to German anti-aircraft fire. So they decided to armor them up. But where to put the armor? The obvious answer was to look at planes that returned from missions, count up all the bullet holes in various places, and then put extra armor in the areas that attracted the most fire.

"Obvious but wrong. As Hungarian-born mathematician Abraham Wald explained at the time, if a plane makes it back safely even though it has, say, a bunch of bullet holes in its wings, it means that bullet holes in the wings aren't very dangerous. What you really want to do is armor up the areas that, on average, don't have any bullet holes. Why? Because planes with bullet holes in those places never made it back. That's why you don't see any bullet holes there on the ones that do return."  (From... more »

"Back during World War II, the RAF lost a lot of planes to German anti-aircraft fire. So they decided to armor them up. But where to put the armor? The obvious answer was to look at planes that returned from missions, count up all the bullet holes in various places, and then put extra armor in the areas that attracted the most fire.

"Obvious but wrong. As Hungarian-born mathematician Abraham Wald explained at the time, if a plane makes it back safely even though it has, say, a bunch of bullet holes in its wings, it means that bullet holes in the wings aren't very dangerous. What you really want to do is armor up the areas that, on average, don't have any bullet holes. Why? Because planes with bullet holes in those places never made it back. That's why you don't see any bullet holes there on the ones that do return."  (From http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2010/09/counterintuitive-world)

When considering software practice and process I wonder if we make the same mistake, looking to armor the area with the most bullet holes.  Every time you have to maintain some buggy annoying and difficult piece of software, you are patching up one of the planes that got home, that made it through.  No one maintains the software that never made it through battle.  The projects that flew on until they ran out of fuel, and due to navigator error never turned around to head home to base.  There's lots of failure modes.  Most of them aren't contingent on the quality of the software engineering.___

2014-12-13 18:15:07 (8 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

I think REST is the PHP of protocol design: it'll get you there, and at least you won't have complicated things too much.

I think REST is the PHP of protocol design: it'll get you there, and at least you won't have complicated things too much.___

2014-12-12 16:56:55 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Writing jQuery-only frontend code feels a lot like coding PHP.  In that you figure out what you want to do, you start at the top, and you work your way through, and it's long and wordy and hard to maintain, but you spend your time on what you are trying to do and not on your tools.  It has its ups and downs.

Writing jQuery-only frontend code feels a lot like coding PHP.  In that you figure out what you want to do, you start at the top, and you work your way through, and it's long and wordy and hard to maintain, but you spend your time on what you are trying to do and not on your tools.  It has its ups and downs.___

posted image

2014-12-12 16:31:39 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Another thought related to my last (https://plus.google.com/u/1/104537541227697934010/posts/h8nRQjf53SQ):

For a rich experience, I see two general arguments for rendering server-side: faster and more efficient page loads, and accessibility by robots (search engines, summarizers, etc.)  Given that React.js makes it so easy to essentially "fix up" a page, I wonder if a good compromise would be to render the skeleton of a page on the server, and then let it get fixed up.  I'm thinking you wouldn't render any controls.  A downside is that it would create jitter as those controls are put into place, and if you try to put in placeholders then maybe you have as much complexity as you started with.  But lots of controls are contingent on state that you might not want to calculate on the server.

Another thought related to my last (https://plus.google.com/u/1/104537541227697934010/posts/h8nRQjf53SQ):

For a rich experience, I see two general arguments for rendering server-side: faster and more efficient page loads, and accessibility by robots (search engines, summarizers, etc.)  Given that React.js makes it so easy to essentially "fix up" a page, I wonder if a good compromise would be to render the skeleton of a page on the server, and then let it get fixed up.  I'm thinking you wouldn't render any controls.  A downside is that it would create jitter as those controls are put into place, and if you try to put in placeholders then maybe you have as much complexity as you started with.  But lots of controls are contingent on state that you might not want to calculate on the server.___

2014-12-11 21:32:19 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Thinking about caching and webapps: it occurs to me that one way of thinking about the single-page app, or live pages in general, is that you have a function bringEverythingUpToDate().  (This is how React.js works at the template level – you can imagine the same thing at the domain object level.)  Assuming server-side rendering is valuable to you, you still have the opportunity to cache that rendering longer might otherwise seem appropriate – because a stale page is updatable on the fly, maybe quickly enough that the person viewing the page won't find it confusing.

Taking this a bit further: with lots of caching like this we're holding on to the data twice, once (inefficiently!) in the cached page, and a second time in the canonical database.  But what if instead of calling this thing a "cache" we call it "an accurate and correct snapshot of state at a moment intime&q... more »

Thinking about caching and webapps: it occurs to me that one way of thinking about the single-page app, or live pages in general, is that you have a function bringEverythingUpToDate().  (This is how React.js works at the template level – you can imagine the same thing at the domain object level.)  Assuming server-side rendering is valuable to you, you still have the opportunity to cache that rendering longer might otherwise seem appropriate – because a stale page is updatable on the fly, maybe quickly enough that the person viewing the page won't find it confusing.

Taking this a bit further: with lots of caching like this we're holding on to the data twice, once (inefficiently!) in the cached page, and a second time in the canonical database.  But what if instead of calling this thing a "cache" we call it "an accurate and correct snapshot of state at a moment in time".  Then once we've saved this thing, potentially we can throw away the data that formed the page and only track subsequent updates.  This of course changes a simple template update into a big migration task.  I still need to think this through some more.___

2014-12-11 08:17:42 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Right now I'm experimenting with a concept around content archiving and curation.  And I keep seeing shades of Pinterest in it.  I thought about it, and I realize that Pinterest is really one of the few new ideas in this area.  There's the recycling of blogs and photo sharing, Tumblr, Instagram... and there is something in them too, yes, but not a great deal.  Pinterest feels like a more distinct experiment, a more meaningful result.

It feels like we are iterating on the smaller ideas.  We're still in awe of five-year-old ideas.  This is not unfair, five years isn't so long, but time marches on and five years becomes six, and seven.  The curation and collection and organization of content is much of what it is to know things.  There is more to be done here.

My own little experiment feels modest.  But it's all modest.  Maybe because tools, as much as wethink abo... more »

Right now I'm experimenting with a concept around content archiving and curation.  And I keep seeing shades of Pinterest in it.  I thought about it, and I realize that Pinterest is really one of the few new ideas in this area.  There's the recycling of blogs and photo sharing, Tumblr, Instagram... and there is something in them too, yes, but not a great deal.  Pinterest feels like a more distinct experiment, a more meaningful result.

It feels like we are iterating on the smaller ideas.  We're still in awe of five-year-old ideas.  This is not unfair, five years isn't so long, but time marches on and five years becomes six, and seven.  The curation and collection and organization of content is much of what it is to know things.  There is more to be done here.

My own little experiment feels modest.  But it's all modest.  Maybe because tools, as much as we think about them, are still only a small corner of what it is to know something.  It is arrogant to imagine a tool can change what it is to know something.  And so incrementalism is our only option, the only thing it is fair to ask for.

Ah, my intention of a flippant but complimentary comment about Pinterest has turned wistful.  I blame it on the late hour.  To bed!___

posted image

2014-10-29 05:48:08 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Listening to Alan Watts (http://zencast.org/zencast-455-what-is-by-alan-watts):

Nature: the mechanistic surroundings that contain us (or do not! much debate!)  Libido: the mechanism of self-reproduction.

Remove the titillation from libido and it is still most certainly a thing, but it also seems almost unrecognizable.  It is not hard to acknowledge that we see nature as mechanistic, despite any appreciation we may have for its mechanism.  Acknowledging libido as natural is easy in the abstract, hard in practice.  Acknowledging libido as natural, mechanistic, and also part of our psyche and perhaps part of our soul – it is challenging to make all those ideas intellectually consistent.

Listening to Alan Watts (http://zencast.org/zencast-455-what-is-by-alan-watts):

Nature: the mechanistic surroundings that contain us (or do not! much debate!)  Libido: the mechanism of self-reproduction.

Remove the titillation from libido and it is still most certainly a thing, but it also seems almost unrecognizable.  It is not hard to acknowledge that we see nature as mechanistic, despite any appreciation we may have for its mechanism.  Acknowledging libido as natural is easy in the abstract, hard in practice.  Acknowledging libido as natural, mechanistic, and also part of our psyche and perhaps part of our soul – it is challenging to make all those ideas intellectually consistent.___

2014-10-22 16:24:25 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Dear lazyweb, I don't know the right keywords to search for.  I'd like to use a service that can take incoming emails and forward them via a POST message to a web service.  I don't know what this would be called, but it must exist, right?

Dear lazyweb, I don't know the right keywords to search for.  I'd like to use a service that can take incoming emails and forward them via a POST message to a web service.  I don't know what this would be called, but it must exist, right?___

posted image

2014-10-07 14:16:26 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

I always appreciate a confessional (this one on Sage Math)

I always appreciate a confessional (this one on Sage Math)___

2014-10-04 05:01:14 (21 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Any recommendations for storing/archiving family videos in the cloud? Ideally viewable sharable private and safe.

Any recommendations for storing/archiving family videos in the cloud? Ideally viewable sharable private and safe.___

2014-10-01 21:21:30 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"Set Up To Fail: How bosses create their own poor performers": http://www.insead.edu/facultyresearch/research/doc.cfm?did=46698

One thing that struck me was how much the boss behavior described here looks like micromanagement.  Which is to say: if your boss is micromanaging you, maybe it's not because your boss is a micromanager, but instead they just think you are a poor performer.  The paper also has some good insights into how this becomes a cycle, both affecting performance and the perception of performance.

"Set Up To Fail: How bosses create their own poor performers": http://www.insead.edu/facultyresearch/research/doc.cfm?did=46698

One thing that struck me was how much the boss behavior described here looks like micromanagement.  Which is to say: if your boss is micromanaging you, maybe it's not because your boss is a micromanager, but instead they just think you are a poor performer.  The paper also has some good insights into how this becomes a cycle, both affecting performance and the perception of performance.___

2014-09-29 23:32:08 (15 comments, 4 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

We're hiring on my team!  For an engineer to work on the client side of services for Firefox OS.

Mozilla is really unique: open source, product driven, with enough resources to explore new product areas.  Also very remote friendly and your work all happens in public.  In this job you'll be working on Firefox OS – an OS built entirely on web technologies.  (Firefox OS is often presented as "a phone", but this is a genuinely new OS, this sort of thing doesn't come around often!)

More details in the job listing.  Feel free to reach out to me with any questions.  We are open to both junior and senior candidates.

We're hiring on my team!  For an engineer to work on the client side of services for Firefox OS.

Mozilla is really unique: open source, product driven, with enough resources to explore new product areas.  Also very remote friendly and your work all happens in public.  In this job you'll be working on Firefox OS – an OS built entirely on web technologies.  (Firefox OS is often presented as "a phone", but this is a genuinely new OS, this sort of thing doesn't come around often!)

More details in the job listing.  Feel free to reach out to me with any questions.  We are open to both junior and senior candidates.___

posted image

2014-09-29 17:18:40 (1 comments, 6 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

Park Rules

Park Rules___

2014-09-21 02:15:15 (2 comments, 3 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Now this is a configuration management tool I could get behind.

Now this is a configuration management tool I could get behind.___

posted image

2014-09-18 18:01:39 (4 comments, 2 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

An actual warrant canary?  That actually detected something?  The concept always seem so fantastical and so seldom seen that I wondered if they were really a plausible thing, or just the dream of programmers that think the law can be hacked like code.

An actual warrant canary?  That actually detected something?  The concept always seem so fantastical and so seldom seen that I wondered if they were really a plausible thing, or just the dream of programmers that think the law can be hacked like code.___

2014-09-16 04:49:27 (4 comments, 8 reshares, 24 +1s)Open 

Wherein I admit I am no longer even a programmer: http://www.ianbicking.org/blog/2014/09/professional-transitions.html

Wherein I admit I am no longer even a programmer: http://www.ianbicking.org/blog/2014/09/professional-transitions.html___

2014-09-14 15:39:14 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Mr Google's Guidebook: "I was in a train, reading a newspaper article about Alfred Wainwright's classic hand-written guides to the paths of the Lake District. It explained that, while the routes of footpaths usually evolved over time rendering such guides as Wainwright's obsolete, the very success of Mr. Wainwright's magnificent effort had preserved their relevance. People used the guides to follow the paths, cementing the routes in place for much longer than would have been the case without them."

Mr Google's Guidebook: "I was in a train, reading a newspaper article about Alfred Wainwright's classic hand-written guides to the paths of the Lake District. It explained that, while the routes of footpaths usually evolved over time rendering such guides as Wainwright's obsolete, the very success of Mr. Wainwright's magnificent effort had preserved their relevance. People used the guides to follow the paths, cementing the routes in place for much longer than would have been the case without them."___

posted image

2014-09-05 19:01:50 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

“I personally feel guilty for getting star-struck and overly agreeable when Jennifer Lawrence floated her weak password ideas by me.”

“I personally feel guilty for getting star-struck and overly agreeable when Jennifer Lawrence floated her weak password ideas by me.”___

2014-09-03 04:11:05 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Maybe we anthropomorphosize so many things not because of some bias or social overlay on our thinking, but because we developed abstract thinking as a social tool, just as another part of our brain developed another way of thinking to interpret images. And then our so-called "rational" mind is just a hack to reuse a specifically social tool as a general purpose problem solver. Like mining Bitcoin on your GPU - that's handy the GPU can do that, but no one would call it a stupid GPU if it happened to be bad at mining Bitcoin.

Maybe we anthropomorphosize so many things not because of some bias or social overlay on our thinking, but because we developed abstract thinking as a social tool, just as another part of our brain developed another way of thinking to interpret images. And then our so-called "rational" mind is just a hack to reuse a specifically social tool as a general purpose problem solver. Like mining Bitcoin on your GPU - that's handy the GPU can do that, but no one would call it a stupid GPU if it happened to be bad at mining Bitcoin.___

posted image

2014-08-27 15:42:45 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Current status: http://www.theonion.com/articles/courageous-email-to-boss-in-drafts-folder-since-de,2492/

Current status: http://www.theonion.com/articles/courageous-email-to-boss-in-drafts-folder-since-de,2492/___

2014-08-25 19:37:50 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

It's funny that on phones people take lots of pictures and video, but almost no audio-only recordings.  Since, after all, phones are traditionally about audio.  There's some more general observation embedded in this that I am not seeing.

It's funny that on phones people take lots of pictures and video, but almost no audio-only recordings.  Since, after all, phones are traditionally about audio.  There's some more general observation embedded in this that I am not seeing.___

2014-08-18 21:10:44 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

I wonder what it would look like if a bug tracker had Stack Overflow-style responses.  So instead of an extended linear thread in response to a bug, you had various comments, each of them possibly expanded.

It doesn't quite work... but there's something about a bug (at least harder bugs) that typically involves a period where the understanding grows and the notion of the bug is expanded on.  The dialog of a bug doesn't represent that growing understanding very well.  Maybe another interaction model could.

I wonder what it would look like if a bug tracker had Stack Overflow-style responses.  So instead of an extended linear thread in response to a bug, you had various comments, each of them possibly expanded.

It doesn't quite work... but there's something about a bug (at least harder bugs) that typically involves a period where the understanding grows and the notion of the bug is expanded on.  The dialog of a bug doesn't represent that growing understanding very well.  Maybe another interaction model could.___

posted image

2014-08-12 21:43:24 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

This article summarizes well many (all?) request for open dialogue; quoting much of the article:

Let’s ask: When it comes to sex, what’s permitted? What’s off-limits? What should stay private? I have specific answers in mind for each of these questions, but until we start framing them in an indignant way that makes it impossible to differ with me, progress cannot and will not happen.

The progress I speak of is only possible through the discursive exchange of opinions I already hold.

And let me just say that being “uncomfortable” with this discourse is no excuse. If that’s how people feel, then we must find a way to move from “uncomfortable” to “zealous outrage in favor of all my positions.” We need to do more than just acknowledge these views. We need to congratulate me for forming them.

This article summarizes well many (all?) request for open dialogue; quoting much of the article:

Let’s ask: When it comes to sex, what’s permitted? What’s off-limits? What should stay private? I have specific answers in mind for each of these questions, but until we start framing them in an indignant way that makes it impossible to differ with me, progress cannot and will not happen.

The progress I speak of is only possible through the discursive exchange of opinions I already hold.

And let me just say that being “uncomfortable” with this discourse is no excuse. If that’s how people feel, then we must find a way to move from “uncomfortable” to “zealous outrage in favor of all my positions.” We need to do more than just acknowledge these views. We need to congratulate me for forming them.___

posted image

2014-08-09 21:09:24 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

I sometimes think about how the built and natural world could intersect more fully.  As humans we are generally capable of enhancing growth through our effort.  We use that for certain ends, to grow food or well manicured golf courses.  But I think we could achieve any number of goals.

I can't help but look at many a forest and think: this seems very inefficient.  There are points of intensity, a clearing, a pond, a grand tree.  Some plant life feels like it gives freely of itself, and some does not – many perennials seem well invested in withholding their energy, even withholding from growth from the plant itself.  I wonder about fallen leaves and needles – part of me thinks they are actually evolved as a weed suppressant, leaving the ground covered with a mat of life-suppressing material.  Forests seem relatively quiet, devoid of life, compared to environments filled withvascular p... more »

I sometimes think about how the built and natural world could intersect more fully.  As humans we are generally capable of enhancing growth through our effort.  We use that for certain ends, to grow food or well manicured golf courses.  But I think we could achieve any number of goals.

I can't help but look at many a forest and think: this seems very inefficient.  There are points of intensity, a clearing, a pond, a grand tree.  Some plant life feels like it gives freely of itself, and some does not – many perennials seem well invested in withholding their energy, even withholding from growth from the plant itself.  I wonder about fallen leaves and needles – part of me thinks they are actually evolved as a weed suppressant, leaving the ground covered with a mat of life-suppressing material.  Forests seem relatively quiet, devoid of life, compared to environments filled with vascular plants, plants that live fast rather than long.

And what if we were to design for this?  Big scale – bulldozers and irrigation and amendments.  And a place for humans, but with neither as an afterthought; not just a cabin in the woods, and not just lawns between buildings on a campus.

I came upon this Buckminster Fuller city design.  The fun old futurist designs people don't do anymore (or if they do, I'd be great fun to see).  It is of a scale that would be a sort of environment.  And it seems implied that there would be considerable landscaping, but I assume all on top of concrete.  I'm suspicious of this sense that you can just implant a natural environment so easily.  (For example: http://persquaremile.com/2013/03/07/trees-dont-like-it-up-there/ – but then apparently at least one building is getting along: http://www.dezeen.com/2014/05/15/stefano-boeri-bosco-verticale-vertical-forest-milan-skyscrapers/ and maybe it's not all just artist renderings).

I guess part of the desire is to be embedded in nature.  When you start with a flat ground and move up then you will not be embedded, even if you only go up a couple floors.  So it seems attractive to turn someone else's roof into your outdoor space.  I feel like there's a puzzle in this that might have some other solution, some of the intensity without quite so much concrete.___

2014-08-08 01:34:04 (7 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

When I ask people about what they like and don't like in a manager, people frequently talk about how they don't like micromanaging.  Though I've had a variety of experiences with managers, positive and negative, I have never been micromanaged.  Is micromanagement really that common of a problem?  I wonder if it's just a really well labelled problem, so it comes to mind easily.  But maybe I'm wrong, my personal sampling is very small, I'd be curious about what specific micromanagement people have encountered, especially as a developer.

When I ask people about what they like and don't like in a manager, people frequently talk about how they don't like micromanaging.  Though I've had a variety of experiences with managers, positive and negative, I have never been micromanaged.  Is micromanagement really that common of a problem?  I wonder if it's just a really well labelled problem, so it comes to mind easily.  But maybe I'm wrong, my personal sampling is very small, I'd be curious about what specific micromanagement people have encountered, especially as a developer.___

posted image

2014-07-19 18:06:44 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

I haven't quite figured out what this language is getting at, but it seems reminiscent of the tension in thinking about alternate logic systems that I was thinking about a while ago. Instead of a probabilistic approach this seems to be taking an all-of-the-above approach, where you run calculations and execute over unknown external inputs. At least that's what I'm imagining, I still haven't figured it out ;)

I haven't quite figured out what this language is getting at, but it seems reminiscent of the tension in thinking about alternate logic systems that I was thinking about a while ago. Instead of a probabilistic approach this seems to be taking an all-of-the-above approach, where you run calculations and execute over unknown external inputs. At least that's what I'm imagining, I still haven't figured it out ;)___

Buttons

A special service of CircleCount.com is the following button.

The button shows the number of followers you have directly in a small button. You can add this button to your website, like the +1-Button of Google or the Like-Button of Facebook.






You can add this button directly in your website. For more information about the CircleCount Buttons and the description how to add them to another page click here.

Ian BickingTwitterFacebookLinkedInCircloscope