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Ian Bicking has been shared in 8 public circles

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Thomas Harlan70A Hot Circle they do ad you back2015-02-15 17:52:07423000
Green0Get more friend, more and more.. #sharedcircles   #circleshare   #circleshare  2015-02-03 06:42:20449224
Daniel Gibbs18,513Active users on Google+. Circle Share. If you received a notification, please reshare to your circlesIf you’d like to be added to the next circle share: • +1 this circle • Share this circle to PUBLIC • Include me in your circles • Comment on this post#circle #circles #publiccircle #circleshare #Fiji #japan #tokyo #malaysia #malaysia #kota_kinabalu #malaysia #kuala_lumpur #malaysia #kuala_terengganu #malaysia #kuantan #malaysia #kuching #malaysia #langkawi #malaysia #penang #myanmar #myanmar #yangon #philippines #philippines #cebu #south_korea #south_korea #seoul #taiwan #taiwan #kaohsiung #taiwan #taipei #thailand #chiang_mai 2015-02-02 10:32:23448777696
Oleg Kochetkov1,798HI All!I am very happy to share  for you  this #circle . You'll love this circle. This is TOP Google + peoples circle!To be added to the Circle you have to do these simple steps:1 - Do +1 t the post.  2 - Comment the post and specify your "category" (job or interest)         (ex: fashion, photography, seo, social media marketing).   3 - Include the circle among your circles.   4 - Share the circle (include yourself).   #circles   #circleshare #circlesharing #sharedcircles #sharingcircles #sharedpubliccircles #sharedcircleoftheday #circlemonday #share #shared #followers #addcircles #publicsharedcircles #share #addpeople #addcircle #addfriends #circle #empireavenue #socialmedia   #influencers #influencer   #influence #influencermarketing #slivermetalcircle 2014-01-20 18:46:52501402620
Tom Brander2,281Figured with Pycon coming up it was time to share this circle again if you want to be added comment below!2012-03-05 15:51:34471400
Tom Brander2,081Superseded by this updated circle post https://plus.google.com/u/0/118303283951449952966/posts/assbAGsf2ej Once again, (updated) my Python circle, let me know if you want to be added and you have a real interest in Python..Therefore I have closed comments here2012-01-08 18:54:034662000
Andy Dustman247Like Python? Here's my Pythonistas circle. Only a portion of these were personally hand-selected. Some are from +Michael Bernstein and others. Oh, and the convention seems to be, +1 this if you think you should be in this circle.Andy Dustman shared a circle with you.2011-10-13 19:33:37389204
Michael Bernstein1,976This is my Python circle. I've included folks from the Django, Zope, Pyramid, and Plone communities, among others. Are you a user of Python? Let me know and I'll add you too!Michael Bernstein shared a circle with you.2011-10-11 17:42:3129541813

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 15

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2015-03-03 03:46:39 (15 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

I do feel a tad bit like a sucker using Google+... http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/03/google-changes-leadership-again-as-engineers-flee-the-stagnant-project/

Should I switch to a Facebook page?  It's basically the same features as Google+.

Most reshares: 8

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2015-03-27 03:27:51 (4 comments, 8 reshares, 33 +1s)Open 

"Margot Wallström, the Swedish foreign minister, denounced the subjugation of women in Saudi Arabia. As the theocratic kingdom prevents women from travelling, conducting official business or marrying without the permission of male guardians, and as girls can be forced into child marriages where they are effectively raped by old men, she was telling no more than the truth. Wallström went on to condemn the Saudi courts for ordering that Raif Badawi receive ten years in prison and 1,000 lashes for setting up a website that championed secularism and free speech. [...]

"Saudi Arabia withdrew its ambassador and stopped issuing visas to Swedish businessmen. The United Arab Emirates joined it. The Organisation of Islamic Co-operation, which represents 56 Muslim-majority states, accused Sweden of failing to respect the world’s ‘rich and varied ethical standards’ — standards so rich andvaried, a... more »

Most plusones: 33

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2015-03-27 03:27:51 (4 comments, 8 reshares, 33 +1s)Open 

"Margot Wallström, the Swedish foreign minister, denounced the subjugation of women in Saudi Arabia. As the theocratic kingdom prevents women from travelling, conducting official business or marrying without the permission of male guardians, and as girls can be forced into child marriages where they are effectively raped by old men, she was telling no more than the truth. Wallström went on to condemn the Saudi courts for ordering that Raif Badawi receive ten years in prison and 1,000 lashes for setting up a website that championed secularism and free speech. [...]

"Saudi Arabia withdrew its ambassador and stopped issuing visas to Swedish businessmen. The United Arab Emirates joined it. The Organisation of Islamic Co-operation, which represents 56 Muslim-majority states, accused Sweden of failing to respect the world’s ‘rich and varied ethical standards’ — standards so rich andvaried, a... more »

Latest 50 posts

2015-04-26 19:45:30 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Thinking more about the Remembrance Agent... what if linking wasn't just an author concern, but also a user agent concern? What would it mean to automatically hyperlink content, maybe based on history?

Thinking more about the Remembrance Agent... what if linking wasn't just an author concern, but also a user agent concern? What would it mean to automatically hyperlink content, maybe based on history?___

2015-04-23 20:21:30 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Another post in my series, As A Building Block, thinking a little about what the larger possibilities of PageShot might be.

Another post in my series, As A Building Block, thinking a little about what the larger possibilities of PageShot might be.___

2015-04-23 15:34:04 (8 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Some wandery thoughts...

Watching a little video about APL I was reminded about the Wolfram Language, and a little about the difference of = in math vs = in programming, the idea of expressing truths vs expressing instructions. I think there's some analog between a live expression vs a traditional programming function, and call by reference vs call by value. That is, you don't get access to the expression contained in the function, like you don't get access to the state underlying an object in call by value.

Maybe this analogy doesn't hold. There's this sense about whether something is of a moment, or more universal. The copied value in a call by value call is the state as that moment, a local playground. The return value of a function feels similar.

Strict functional programming erases the difference between call by value and call by reference.  You... more »

Some wandery thoughts...

Watching a little video about APL I was reminded about the Wolfram Language, and a little about the difference of = in math vs = in programming, the idea of expressing truths vs expressing instructions. I think there's some analog between a live expression vs a traditional programming function, and call by reference vs call by value. That is, you don't get access to the expression contained in the function, like you don't get access to the state underlying an object in call by value.

Maybe this analogy doesn't hold. There's this sense about whether something is of a moment, or more universal. The copied value in a call by value call is the state as that moment, a local playground. The return value of a function feels similar.

Strict functional programming erases the difference between call by value and call by reference.  You can't tell an object from its copy if you can't change it. Erlang can toss objects around as a result, shared state or not shared state doesn't mean much. It works similarly for functions: a purely functional function, given an immutable input, the expression is deterministic, memoized or not the result will be the same, there is no sense of whether an expression is always live or only invoked on demand.

But functional schmunctional.  It can erase the need to think about time in our computation, but the importance of time and coordination and change is still essential. Functional programming feels like avoidance. Which can be fine, partitioning the problem space can be useful, but you can't get a solution through partitioning, you only hope to make the solution easier to find in that smaller space.

So what if we thought less about imperative instructions? Maybe it would be more like using "when... then..." instead of "if... then...". (Maybe I'm just circling around functional reactive programming.) And also making functions less opaque. What can we know about a function? In a sense can a function answer why? To be able to introspect dependent state would be a kind of answer. But we might also be able to answer questions like: if this changes, what else will change? Can we reverse functions? We do that for properties, "obj.foo" vs "obj.foo = bar". Maybe it doesn't even have to be magic – getters and setters aren't magic, you just write two functions.

Alright, enough wandering.___

2015-04-21 15:30:18 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Another blog post in my series: What Are We Making?, where I at least describe a bit of what we're trying to do.

Another blog post in my series: What Are We Making?, where I at least describe a bit of what we're trying to do.___

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2015-04-14 05:09:21 (9 comments, 3 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

I should use a better note-taking system.

I've realized this for a while, I have a lot of ad hoc things to remember now.  Text editors aren't working well, the granularity of notes are too small, the retrieval doesn't match files.

Then I was listening to this podcast, part one where they talk to +Thad Starner (around 14:30): http://www.npr.org/programs/invisibilia/385792677/our-computers-ourselves – and he talks about the Rememberance Agent (http://alumni.media.mit.edu/~rhodes/Papers/remembrance.html), where as you enter notes, the agent shows you past notes that have related terms.

Thad talks about this all in the context of wearable computing, but working remotely, at least as far as work is concerned, I always have my laptop with me as I work.  Including during all conversations.  So it seems sufficiently ubiquitous.  And indeed it's the notesabout p... more »

I should use a better note-taking system.

I've realized this for a while, I have a lot of ad hoc things to remember now.  Text editors aren't working well, the granularity of notes are too small, the retrieval doesn't match files.

Then I was listening to this podcast, part one where they talk to +Thad Starner (around 14:30): http://www.npr.org/programs/invisibilia/385792677/our-computers-ourselves – and he talks about the Rememberance Agent (http://alumni.media.mit.edu/~rhodes/Papers/remembrance.html), where as you enter notes, the agent shows you past notes that have related terms.

Thad talks about this all in the context of wearable computing, but working remotely, at least as far as work is concerned, I always have my laptop with me as I work.  Including during all conversations.  So it seems sufficiently ubiquitous.  And indeed it's the notes about people that feel most valuable to me – what did we talk about last, when else have I referred to this person I am now talking to, etc.

Any simple tools I might start with?  (I keep being reminded of http://tiddlywiki.com but haven't yet tried it.)___

2015-04-08 15:15:25 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

From "Ask HN: How do you deal with professional jealousy and getting older?":

> It's been getting better. For the first time in my life, my procrastination is starting to get tamed. I've been working hard on my first big project, and I expect it's going to be a great one. But I can't help but feel that if I had started in earnest at 25, at 21, at 19 — then maybe the list of accomplishments at the end of my life will be longer. Mentally, I've resigned to the fact that I've procrastinated away a decade of valuable time, and it just endlessly haunts me.

And a reply:

> It's not, it's getting worse.

> You are in a cycle of slave-driving yourself. You remind me of Jiddu Krishnamurthi's assertion that "Influence acts strongest when you don't realize that it is acting". I would venture that mostof... more »

From "Ask HN: How do you deal with professional jealousy and getting older?":

> It's been getting better. For the first time in my life, my procrastination is starting to get tamed. I've been working hard on my first big project, and I expect it's going to be a great one. But I can't help but feel that if I had started in earnest at 25, at 21, at 19 — then maybe the list of accomplishments at the end of my life will be longer. Mentally, I've resigned to the fact that I've procrastinated away a decade of valuable time, and it just endlessly haunts me.

And a reply:

> It's not, it's getting worse.

> You are in a cycle of slave-driving yourself. You remind me of Jiddu Krishnamurthi's assertion that "Influence acts strongest when you don't realize that it is acting". I would venture that most of your accomplishments are a result of being told what you should do, what you should be.

> You will NEVER have the energy that the people whom you compare with have. Because they are being themselves, and are connected to the natural wellspring of motivation that comes from genuine interest, while you are the salmon swimming upstream, aping societal ideals and trying to be someone you are not.
>
> Choose the opposite for a while : stop doing things that don't motivate you. Find out what motivates you. Be spontaneous. If you find a small plant at the roadside that you want to water, do it. Observe that absolutely no effort was required in this action. This is the mark of genuine flow : you will not feel the effort. If you chance upon some project which you execute in this natural state of interest, you will not feel tired.
>
> Almost no one takes my advice because it's so threatening to be natural. What if you are not naturally ambitious? That's a horrific thought to have while being in the company of achievers, isn't it?

One of the unfortunate parts of privilege is that we don't even take very good advantage of it.

I was listening to this podcast recently, in which among other things they profile a woman who lost her sense of fear: http://www.npr.org/programs/invisibilia/377515477/fearless

She lives a mostly normal but somewhat peculiar life.  She knows danger intellectually, just not emotionally.  She's been assaulted several times, probably all in circumstances where a person with a normal sense of fear would have avoided the circumstance.  But she doesn't seem traumatized by it either, these are just facts.  Which raises the question: do we need fear?  Of course we need fear!  But maybe like vaccination it's sufficient to have herd fear.  Society itself is afraid that safety will cultivate laziness.  But it could also cultivate boldness and bravery.  Society's very fear of laziness and hedonism may be what makes of so cautious, our actions so tepid, because we are reluctant to allow people to take advantage of their privilege.  And we are ALL so privileged now, it's not a 1% or 10% phenomena, it's more like the top 80%.  But we fear the laziness of the bottom most, and repress them most, make them them least capable of taking advantage of what is nearly within their grasp.

I might be slipping into some bizarro version of Ayn Rand, a notion of an anarchist ubermensch.  That wasn't really where I was expecting to go, when all I meant to say was I really liked how this person talked about letting go of ambition...___

2015-04-07 16:16:06 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

As we consume information, are we also composing... composing internally, creating new thoughts, reactions, all in our heads.  Not a composition like a newspaper article, but just a personal journal.  Some of this composition sticks in our heads, is remixed later in our dreams and through our forgetfulness, and tied into future consumptive compositions.  Much is lost, maybe that's why browsing can feel like an obsessive forward collecting, like we're information Pacmans – move forward to avoid acknowledging how fleeting our compositions are (compositions that appear frighteningly synonymous with our souls).

I recall an article about Ted Nelson (of Hypertext/Xanadu fame) in which it was noted he obsessively recorded his own activity.  It struck me as an intellectual non sequitur at the time.  And what would he, or anyone else, ever do with all that video?  So maybe that's thelink be... more »

As we consume information, are we also composing... composing internally, creating new thoughts, reactions, all in our heads.  Not a composition like a newspaper article, but just a personal journal.  Some of this composition sticks in our heads, is remixed later in our dreams and through our forgetfulness, and tied into future consumptive compositions.  Much is lost, maybe that's why browsing can feel like an obsessive forward collecting, like we're information Pacmans – move forward to avoid acknowledging how fleeting our compositions are (compositions that appear frighteningly synonymous with our souls).

I recall an article about Ted Nelson (of Hypertext/Xanadu fame) in which it was noted he obsessively recorded his own activity.  It struck me as an intellectual non sequitur at the time.  And what would he, or anyone else, ever do with all that video?  So maybe that's the link between obsessive recording and an obsession with information organization.

But even if we can't capture thoughts, can't permanently journal otherwise transient observations, we can capture your actions on a computer.  Some hint, some bit of evidence of these passing thoughts.  But we don't do a lot with that.  There's something there I think.___

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2015-04-07 00:07:36 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"The standard, textbook answer is that we should look at public goods — goods that are non rival and non excludable, so that the private sector won’t provide them. National defense, weather satellites, disease control, etc.

"Nowadays, however, governments are involved in a lot more — education, retirement, health care."

I would argue that all these things have become non-excludable (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excludability): "In economics, a good or service is called excludable if it is possible to prevent people (consumers) who have not paid for it from having access to it. By comparison, a good or service is non-excludable if non-paying consumers cannot be prevented from accessing it."

We started Social Security because poverty of the elderly became morally unacceptable.  That is, we (society) felt compelled to prevent that poverty,regard... more »

"The standard, textbook answer is that we should look at public goods — goods that are non rival and non excludable, so that the private sector won’t provide them. National defense, weather satellites, disease control, etc.

"Nowadays, however, governments are involved in a lot more — education, retirement, health care."

I would argue that all these things have become non-excludable (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Excludability): "In economics, a good or service is called excludable if it is possible to prevent people (consumers) who have not paid for it from having access to it. By comparison, a good or service is non-excludable if non-paying consumers cannot be prevented from accessing it."

We started Social Security because poverty of the elderly became morally unacceptable.  That is, we (society) felt compelled to prevent that poverty, regardless of the choices the person had made leading up.  Some time ago we decided the same about health care, long before the ACA.  Which is why people could always receive emergency room access, and a large mishmash of other ways to keep people from truly going without – ACA just tried to make some sense out of an obligation we had already established.  And education relates to children, and anything that excludes children makes people feel uncomfortable.___

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2015-03-29 02:13:31 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Entropica has an interesting hypothesis of AI: http://phys.org/news/2013-04-emergence-complex-behaviors-causal-entropic.html

Or a TED talk: https://www.ted.com/talks/alex_wissner_gross_a_new_equation_for_intelligence

The idea, as I see it, is an attempt to make a kind of universal goal: seek future states where the intelligent agent's autonomy is greatest.  In the example of an agent (as in the picture below) that can move left or right, and has an inverted pendulum attached to it, it will try to balance the pendulum in an upright position: this is most unstable, but also the situation where the agent is most capable of exerting change in the future.  In some places I'm seeing this be described as "entropy seeking" which confuses me, I'd describe it more as autonomy seeking.

As a way of achieving ends this seems incomplete.  After keeping optionsopen... more »

Entropica has an interesting hypothesis of AI: http://phys.org/news/2013-04-emergence-complex-behaviors-causal-entropic.html

Or a TED talk: https://www.ted.com/talks/alex_wissner_gross_a_new_equation_for_intelligence

The idea, as I see it, is an attempt to make a kind of universal goal: seek future states where the intelligent agent's autonomy is greatest.  In the example of an agent (as in the picture below) that can move left or right, and has an inverted pendulum attached to it, it will try to balance the pendulum in an upright position: this is most unstable, but also the situation where the agent is most capable of exerting change in the future.  In some places I'm seeing this be described as "entropy seeking" which confuses me, I'd describe it more as autonomy seeking.

As a way of achieving ends this seems incomplete.  After keeping options open, at some point you close them off when your goal is in reach.  You might trap the mouse by putting yourself in a state where you are most able to influence the mouse's actions, but at some point you catch the mouse and eat it.  That said, the approach seems interesting because often an analytic effort to achieve a goal is too hard, there are too many unknowns.  So when it is impossible to work directly towards a goal, you may simply act to keep options open, seeking the moment when you can achieve that goal.  

The actual work seems a little fishy, I must admit (echoed some in this Quora topic: http://www.quora.com/How-legitimate-is-the-entropy-based-AI-Entropica-by-Dr-Alex-Wissner-Gross).  A little too inspirational, and not enough meat.  But still, interesting.___

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2015-03-27 03:27:51 (4 comments, 8 reshares, 33 +1s)Open 

"Margot Wallström, the Swedish foreign minister, denounced the subjugation of women in Saudi Arabia. As the theocratic kingdom prevents women from travelling, conducting official business or marrying without the permission of male guardians, and as girls can be forced into child marriages where they are effectively raped by old men, she was telling no more than the truth. Wallström went on to condemn the Saudi courts for ordering that Raif Badawi receive ten years in prison and 1,000 lashes for setting up a website that championed secularism and free speech. [...]

"Saudi Arabia withdrew its ambassador and stopped issuing visas to Swedish businessmen. The United Arab Emirates joined it. The Organisation of Islamic Co-operation, which represents 56 Muslim-majority states, accused Sweden of failing to respect the world’s ‘rich and varied ethical standards’ — standards so rich andvaried, a... more »

"Margot Wallström, the Swedish foreign minister, denounced the subjugation of women in Saudi Arabia. As the theocratic kingdom prevents women from travelling, conducting official business or marrying without the permission of male guardians, and as girls can be forced into child marriages where they are effectively raped by old men, she was telling no more than the truth. Wallström went on to condemn the Saudi courts for ordering that Raif Badawi receive ten years in prison and 1,000 lashes for setting up a website that championed secularism and free speech. [...]

"Saudi Arabia withdrew its ambassador and stopped issuing visas to Swedish businessmen. The United Arab Emirates joined it. The Organisation of Islamic Co-operation, which represents 56 Muslim-majority states, accused Sweden of failing to respect the world’s ‘rich and varied ethical standards’ — standards so rich and varied, apparently, they include the flogging of bloggers and encouragement of paedophiles"___

2015-03-24 15:27:20 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

"I have been watching programs about the Coastguard.  They are responsible for the protection of the US coastal borders, but also for rescuing people in distress. [...]  One of the problems of a helicopter though, is that the pilots can’t see behind or underneath them.  In the back of the helicopter is a flight mechanic, whose job it is to control the hoist.  He can see the boat, and the end of the winch, but obviously, he can’t control the helicopter.  So he calls out everything he’s doing.  [...] if nothing happens – the helicopter doesn’t move, the boat doesn’t move, there’s no wind, there’s no effect from the downdraft of the helicopter.  If it’s PERFECT, he reports TWELVE times in less than 2 minutes just to get the guy to the boat."

I'm still not very good at reporting, but that's a bug.

"I have been watching programs about the Coastguard.  They are responsible for the protection of the US coastal borders, but also for rescuing people in distress. [...]  One of the problems of a helicopter though, is that the pilots can’t see behind or underneath them.  In the back of the helicopter is a flight mechanic, whose job it is to control the hoist.  He can see the boat, and the end of the winch, but obviously, he can’t control the helicopter.  So he calls out everything he’s doing.  [...] if nothing happens – the helicopter doesn’t move, the boat doesn’t move, there’s no wind, there’s no effect from the downdraft of the helicopter.  If it’s PERFECT, he reports TWELVE times in less than 2 minutes just to get the guy to the boat."

I'm still not very good at reporting, but that's a bug.___

2015-03-24 15:20:04 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Huh, "for (attr in obj)" goes along with "if (attr in obj)", but "for (item of array)" doesn't have an equivalent "if (item of array)"

There is a proposal I guess for a method, but only for ES7: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/includes

Huh, "for (attr in obj)" goes along with "if (attr in obj)", but "for (item of array)" doesn't have an equivalent "if (item of array)"

There is a proposal I guess for a method, but only for ES7: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/includes___

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2015-03-23 15:37:59 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

An interesting take on the purpose of a flat structure, not how I've understood it before

An interesting take on the purpose of a flat structure, not how I've understood it before___

2015-03-20 16:33:05 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

A short blog post, The Evolutionary Prototype: http://www.ianbicking.org/blog/2015/03/product-journal-evolutionary-prototype.html

A short blog post, The Evolutionary Prototype: http://www.ianbicking.org/blog/2015/03/product-journal-evolutionary-prototype.html___

2015-03-17 04:44:51 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

I've read a fair number of accounts of what it feels like to be in technology as a member of an outgroup – from women or minorities or people who don't fit the cultures self-conception of meritocracy.  And that's useful, I've learned from those, but I realize it's not very actionable. So often the accounts are about things I don't perceive. Maybe unconscious bias (which I may perpetrate, but unconsciously). Maybe overt harassment (which I don't perpetrate, don't often notice, but may unwittingly witness).

If I want to do something actionable, the accounts only get me half the way, because they help me know what it's like to be in a difficult situation, but don't do as much to help me know what to look for from my own perspective. Because whatever happens I'm going to experience it as a white male, and often as a bystander. I don't even have to bepa... more »

I've read a fair number of accounts of what it feels like to be in technology as a member of an outgroup – from women or minorities or people who don't fit the cultures self-conception of meritocracy.  And that's useful, I've learned from those, but I realize it's not very actionable. So often the accounts are about things I don't perceive. Maybe unconscious bias (which I may perpetrate, but unconsciously). Maybe overt harassment (which I don't perpetrate, don't often notice, but may unwittingly witness).

If I want to do something actionable, the accounts only get me half the way, because they help me know what it's like to be in a difficult situation, but don't do as much to help me know what to look for from my own perspective. Because whatever happens I'm going to experience it as a white male, and often as a bystander. I don't even have to be particularly innocent to usually end up as a bystander, the numbers just work out that way.   But what should I look out for, that sign I am a bystander, that sign that I could intervene?  (The sign I am perhaps deliberately trying to avoid, for it is always easier and safer to not intervene.)  The victim cannot tell me.  The advocate, with breathless urgency, tells me the exact wrong thing – for I must be reminded of the banality of it, because my observations are mostly banal, and stories that are not about myself are always at risk of being skimmed.  So if I am to see the story of a peer, see a dysfunction not directed at myself, I need details, I need to be shown the signals.  And if anyone is going to show me, it should probably be that other white guy who was mostly minding his own business, interested but unsure, who ultimately did nothing but on retrospect, with an added perspective, would have rather he had done something.

It's not a story I've heard.  It's also not a very interesting story, but it's the one that would help me know when to act.___

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2015-03-13 21:01:03 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Listening to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TY-hBgYLJqc#t=672

I'm only 11 minutes in, but he's talking about Montessori and computing. And, since I've recently become more aware of Montessori philosophy, I am curious to think about what that would mean. What would a computing experience with the principles of Montessori education look like? You can imagine the accoutrements of Montessori being translated, but that's not very interesting. You can pluck out a few parts of Montessori and translate them, but Montessori has many very complementary aspects that work together.  But I'm afraid I don't have a sufficiently structured concept of Montessori principles to start thinking about how to translate them. I suspect there's something there though.

Listening to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TY-hBgYLJqc#t=672

I'm only 11 minutes in, but he's talking about Montessori and computing. And, since I've recently become more aware of Montessori philosophy, I am curious to think about what that would mean. What would a computing experience with the principles of Montessori education look like? You can imagine the accoutrements of Montessori being translated, but that's not very interesting. You can pluck out a few parts of Montessori and translate them, but Montessori has many very complementary aspects that work together.  But I'm afraid I don't have a sufficiently structured concept of Montessori principles to start thinking about how to translate them. I suspect there's something there though.___

2015-03-13 17:15:48 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Advice on pushing more GitHub activity to an IRC channel?  The IRC service only seems to do commits.  I'd like new issues notification at least, and probably issue comments.

Advice on pushing more GitHub activity to an IRC channel?  The IRC service only seems to do commits.  I'd like new issues notification at least, and probably issue comments.___

2015-03-12 13:58:27 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Interesting approach: phones are cheaper and more capable than any of the hobbyist boards, so why not just mod them?

(Though getting access to GPIO ports is not exactly easy: http://ee.telenor.io/gonzo/hardware/2015/02/10/gpio.html)

Interesting approach: phones are cheaper and more capable than any of the hobbyist boards, so why not just mod them?

(Though getting access to GPIO ports is not exactly easy: http://ee.telenor.io/gonzo/hardware/2015/02/10/gpio.html)___

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2015-03-12 13:50:17 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

http://www.thingsmadethinkable.com/item/at_what_age_do_we_do_our_greatest_work.php

http://www.thingsmadethinkable.com/item/at_what_age_do_we_do_our_greatest_work.php___

2015-03-12 05:27:35 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Wherein Brendan Eich gets pissed off at people suggesting multiple languages in the browser would be a good investment...

Wherein Brendan Eich gets pissed off at people suggesting multiple languages in the browser would be a good investment...___

2015-03-11 15:30:33 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Looking at a proposal from the V8 people for "SoundScript", an increasingly strict form of JavaScript:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Qk0qC4s_XNCLemj42FqfsRLp49nDQMZ1y7fwf5YjaI4/view

(More context: https://developers.google.com/v8/experiments)

The basic idea is to get rid of some features that make optimization hard and aren't particularly useful.  Some stuff seems totally okay, like arrays that can't have holes.

But once I read through the actual proposal I got way less excited. They want to switch to much more static objects.  No expando properties.  No using objects as hashes (they suggest Weak Map instead?!?)  No calling methods in constructors!  Like ES6 they seem to feel classes shouldn't contain anything but methods.

IMHO it seems reasonable until you read further.  They mix totally reasonable suggestions with veryheavy ... more »

Looking at a proposal from the V8 people for "SoundScript", an increasingly strict form of JavaScript:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Qk0qC4s_XNCLemj42FqfsRLp49nDQMZ1y7fwf5YjaI4/view

(More context: https://developers.google.com/v8/experiments)

The basic idea is to get rid of some features that make optimization hard and aren't particularly useful.  Some stuff seems totally okay, like arrays that can't have holes.

But once I read through the actual proposal I got way less excited. They want to switch to much more static objects.  No expando properties.  No using objects as hashes (they suggest Weak Map instead?!?)  No calling methods in constructors!  Like ES6 they seem to feel classes shouldn't contain anything but methods.

IMHO it seems reasonable until you read further.  They mix totally reasonable suggestions with very heavy suggestions that are completely incompatible with current JavaScript practice, so that if you read lightly you might think this is a conservative proposal, but it is not.  I suppose it might be an okay discussion starter, I'm not sure.___

2015-03-10 16:57:03 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Another blog post, As A Working Manager, or: how to do two things poorly.

Another blog post, As A Working Manager, or: how to do two things poorly.___

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2015-03-10 05:07:49 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"The Missing Scarf"

"The Missing Scarf"___

2015-03-08 03:13:04 (9 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Somewhere I heard someone talking about genetics, whether we are made of DNA, defined by our genetics.  And he asked: have you seen DNA without a cell?  And no, there is a continuity: the DNA is never naked, it is always found inside a cell, which is to say that those cells have as long a history as the genes they contain.  It made me think about life and heritage more holistically

I was thinking about nature vs. nurture this evening, while listening to some discussion of gender, and was reminded of this.  It has been a long time, and many species, since we have reproduced without a period of nurturing.  We talk sometimes about how much "we" impose on children, imagine who they might be without societies many repressions.  More, we imagine there is an underlying truth to the child, that we are covering up their true self.  What then would be the truest person?  A feral child? That i... more »

Somewhere I heard someone talking about genetics, whether we are made of DNA, defined by our genetics.  And he asked: have you seen DNA without a cell?  And no, there is a continuity: the DNA is never naked, it is always found inside a cell, which is to say that those cells have as long a history as the genes they contain.  It made me think about life and heritage more holistically

I was thinking about nature vs. nurture this evening, while listening to some discussion of gender, and was reminded of this.  It has been a long time, and many species, since we have reproduced without a period of nurturing.  We talk sometimes about how much "we" impose on children, imagine who they might be without societies many repressions.  More, we imagine there is an underlying truth to the child, that we are covering up their true self.  What then would be the truest person?  A feral child?  That is a painful and sad existence, that child was not given the freedom to be their true self.  Our nurturing is a defining part of ourselves, it is our heritage as much as our genes. Is my true self the color of my hair? The values with which I was raised? Is my true self only what I choose? All that is given to me belongs to history, not to me? Something like language seems intrinsic to humanity, like we are built for it – yet you skip the nurturing process for only one generation and it would be lost again for millennia. ___

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2015-03-03 03:46:39 (15 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

I do feel a tad bit like a sucker using Google+... http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/03/google-changes-leadership-again-as-engineers-flee-the-stagnant-project/

Should I switch to a Facebook page?  It's basically the same features as Google+.

I do feel a tad bit like a sucker using Google+... http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/03/google-changes-leadership-again-as-engineers-flee-the-stagnant-project/

Should I switch to a Facebook page?  It's basically the same features as Google+.___

2015-03-02 21:54:37 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Am I reading ES6 classes right, that there's no way to set class properties, you can only define methods and getter/setters in the class? I must be reading this wrong.  This would mean no decorators in class bodies!  And other nonsense.  I hope I'm mistaken, though I can find no evidence of that.

Am I reading ES6 classes right, that there's no way to set class properties, you can only define methods and getter/setters in the class? I must be reading this wrong.  This would mean no decorators in class bodies!  And other nonsense.  I hope I'm mistaken, though I can find no evidence of that.___

2015-02-23 15:57:49 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

+James Long talks at length about the mobile web and performance concerns/etc: http://jlongster.com/Radical-Statements-about-the-Mobile-Web

His conclusions end up being largely that the DOM isn't going to work to create high quality mobile applications.  Now I'm biased, because I really like the DOM, and am personally invested in its success, but I think the alternate evolution from the tension he describes isn't so much the DOM will be fast enough, but that there's another path of competition.

A pattern of success I see: availability beats fidelity.  Native apps have better fidelity.  On mobile apps can have as good or better availability too, so... not an immediately optimistic statement.  The DOM isn't helping the web much here, but I think it could.  I think having a declarative, concrete representation of an interface has the potential to buildavaila... more »

+James Long talks at length about the mobile web and performance concerns/etc: http://jlongster.com/Radical-Statements-about-the-Mobile-Web

His conclusions end up being largely that the DOM isn't going to work to create high quality mobile applications.  Now I'm biased, because I really like the DOM, and am personally invested in its success, but I think the alternate evolution from the tension he describes isn't so much the DOM will be fast enough, but that there's another path of competition.

A pattern of success I see: availability beats fidelity.  Native apps have better fidelity.  On mobile apps can have as good or better availability too, so... not an immediately optimistic statement.  The DOM isn't helping the web much here, but I think it could.  I think having a declarative, concrete representation of an interface has the potential to build availability (using a very broad definition of "available" – available to a multitude of uses, including ones not planned on by the original author/developer).

Do 60fps, retina displays, "beautiful" interfaces, and so on form the feature set that will drive our future platforms?  IMHO only if we're lazy, if we accept content and the DOM as opaque, and if we give up on high-level (i.e., platform-level) mediation and enhancement of experiences.___

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2015-02-23 15:37:19 (6 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

I gave this podcast a relisten the other day: http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2013/09/tyler_cowen_on.html

It's a conversation on the future, based on Tyler Cowen's deliberately boring predictions.  I'd call them "conventional" predictions, but they aren't – conventional predictions tend to be breathless and designed to gain attention, rather than trying to be correct.  Cowen's predictions aren't radical, but then they start to talk through the implications and it feels like it matters.  As a father, I feel an obligation to prepare my children for this future.  I'm not going to stop the future, I can only change it in small ways, but I can have a significant effect on the children in my life.  I haven't really decided what this implies for me in practice.

One thing that struck me this time through is there discussion of politics towardsthe en... more »

I gave this podcast a relisten the other day: http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2013/09/tyler_cowen_on.html

It's a conversation on the future, based on Tyler Cowen's deliberately boring predictions.  I'd call them "conventional" predictions, but they aren't – conventional predictions tend to be breathless and designed to gain attention, rather than trying to be correct.  Cowen's predictions aren't radical, but then they start to talk through the implications and it feels like it matters.  As a father, I feel an obligation to prepare my children for this future.  I'm not going to stop the future, I can only change it in small ways, but I can have a significant effect on the children in my life.  I haven't really decided what this implies for me in practice.

One thing that struck me this time through is there discussion of politics towards the end.  Cowen thinks that the highly privileged will grow in number, he talks about something like 15% of the population living like the millionaires of today.  I haven't read his book so I don't know how he comes to that, but it feels reasonable, I see that expansion happening now.  That class of people is highly invested in The System.  I imagine it could be like the new political middle class – that is, a group of people who have enough resources to hold some political autonomy and initiative, while also being a high enough quantity of people to matter in the polls and as part of the on-the-ground political conversation.  The result of this would be a more conservative politics, specifically more resistant to populism on the right and left.  Combine it with an aging population and things start to look downright boring.

Another thought I had as they were talking about higher education – they talk about how the best presenters will have a larger audience, the best schools will still have a clear tenure track, but it's unclear what everyone else does.  What will we be looking for in the next generation of professors?  MOOCs to me seem more like an exercise in revealing the weaknesses of our current system.  The system tells itself that teaching is important, and the instructional material is important, and assignments and blah blah blah... but the result is a bunch of web pages and videos and online forums, and it's kind of pathetic-looking.  To the degree higher education succeeds at its goals (and I don't think it's particularly successful), it doesn't understand quite why.

The new class of worker they talk about is the coach.  This is something computers don't do particularly well.  I think in part because the computer can never imbue a topic with importance. Computers cycles are cheap.  No one is giving up anything to have a computer email you, or talk to you, or remind you of things. To make oneself accountable, even self-accountable, requires some sacrifice. And there's something about a human coach that embodies that.

What might it mean if we combine a coach with the MOOC, or a whole set of available tools and environments?  This coaching happens at various times in upper education, but it's very ad hoc. Who teaches you study skills? Who has an honest conversation about your motivations and fears? Who do you go to when you don't think things are working? Sometimes there is a trusted person, a teacher, parent, professor – but usually no one.

Imagine after high school, you decide on a set of goals.  Not a five-year plan, just some next steps. Maybe you don't know what you want to do next, so you want to explore a breadth of topics. Maybe you want to accomplish something specific. Maybe you want to progress along an academic track. Then you make a plan. Maybe you need to understand why your work is relevant, so you need some real world experience. Maybe you want to find yourself, and so you want something more like the less worldly environment of a college campus. For the price of a college education (which apparently we consider a reasonable price for that post-high-school experience) you can buy a lot of personal attention and a lot of different experiences.

A coaching model could seem like a lot of wimpy handholding.  Like a formalization of laziness.  And maybe it would be – but in part it just seems like an honest attempt at guidance.  Much more honest than our current educational system, which throws people into a structure and calls it a meritocracy that some people succeed and some do not, when it simultaneously is an educational institution where it's supposed to help people succeed.___

2015-02-20 15:54:52 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

I've generally liked git subtree instead of git submodules, but it has some serious usability problems.  Interesting to see git subrepo, which mostly uses the git subtree model but with improvements that all touch on the actual problems I've had: https://github.com/ingydotnet/git-subrepo/blob/master/Intro.pod#git-subtrees

I've generally liked git subtree instead of git submodules, but it has some serious usability problems.  Interesting to see git subrepo, which mostly uses the git subtree model but with improvements that all touch on the actual problems I've had: https://github.com/ingydotnet/git-subrepo/blob/master/Intro.pod#git-subtrees___

2015-02-18 16:31:21 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Another blog post in my Product Journal series.  This one thinking through what I want to build when I'm targeting internal demos.

Another blog post in my Product Journal series.  This one thinking through what I want to build when I'm targeting internal demos.___

2015-02-17 16:26:57 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

Postgres has pub/sub capabilities built into it: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.1/static/sql-notify.html – something I did not previously know.

Just some slides, but it shows a reasonable model for handling websocket traffic in a Node/SocketIO process with the database as a coordination layer: https://denibertovic.com/talks/real-time-notifications/ (does totally have a SQL injection attack built in to the example though).  Some might find this a useful way to add realtime updates to a traditional app server (e.g., something like Django that isn't very WebSocket friendly).

Postgres has pub/sub capabilities built into it: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.1/static/sql-notify.html – something I did not previously know.

Just some slides, but it shows a reasonable model for handling websocket traffic in a Node/SocketIO process with the database as a coordination layer: https://denibertovic.com/talks/real-time-notifications/ (does totally have a SQL injection attack built in to the example though).  Some might find this a useful way to add realtime updates to a traditional app server (e.g., something like Django that isn't very WebSocket friendly).___

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2015-02-17 05:02:18 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

The Shipping Culture Is Hurting Us: http://bitbashing.io/2015/02/16/shipping-culture.html (a _Get off my lawn!_ style rant)

Starting it I thought it might be similar in sense to my MVP post from a few weeks back (http://www.ianbicking.org/blog/2015/01/product-journal-mvp.html).  But no, it's mostly about technology choices.  And I think that's quite the point.  For instance, to quote:

"The problem is that these technologies, being so beginner-friendly and aggressively marketed, rapidly pick up steam and become the “cool” things to use, regardless of actual merit or lack thereof. Nothing illustrated this more to me than when I went to my first (and only) hackathon last year. I went with the assumption that I would see a wild variety of projects using a wild variety of technologies. Instead, I found the vast majority of contestants there writing some web app, usuallywith No... more »

The Shipping Culture Is Hurting Us: http://bitbashing.io/2015/02/16/shipping-culture.html (a _Get off my lawn!_ style rant)

Starting it I thought it might be similar in sense to my MVP post from a few weeks back (http://www.ianbicking.org/blog/2015/01/product-journal-mvp.html).  But no, it's mostly about technology choices.  And I think that's quite the point.  For instance, to quote:

"The problem is that these technologies, being so beginner-friendly and aggressively marketed, rapidly pick up steam and become the “cool” things to use, regardless of actual merit or lack thereof. Nothing illustrated this more to me than when I went to my first (and only) hackathon last year. I went with the assumption that I would see a wild variety of projects using a wild variety of technologies. Instead, I found the vast majority of contestants there writing some web app, usually with Node.js and MongoDB. It certainly didn’t help that MongoDB people were there, at the hackathon, marketing their wares."

Were the people at the hackathon trying to show off some awesome Noding and Mongoing?  Probably not, they were probably trying to make something they thought was cool.  Nothing the author talks about in this article actually is about making something cool, it's all tools.

I think there's reason to be skeptical of "shipping culture" as a way to make cool things.  Maybe it's because I'm sensitive to the obligation of work in the wild.  The danger of investing in conventional wisdom. But the tech?  It's like letting yourself be bogged down by legacy you haven't even acquired yet – all the obligation of having shipped something without any of the reward.___

2015-02-13 16:49:07 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Using React, and server-side rendering, there are so damn many options and choices of how to lay things out.  It gives me little confidence in our choices, because the simple quantity makes it seem unlikely that they were all good or even reasonable choices.  Probably in a few days I'll feel okay about it, but geez...

Using React, and server-side rendering, there are so damn many options and choices of how to lay things out.  It gives me little confidence in our choices, because the simple quantity makes it seem unlikely that they were all good or even reasonable choices.  Probably in a few days I'll feel okay about it, but geez...___

2015-02-11 22:12:29 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

I'd like to have a space to keep secure, collaborative text notes (maybe just one long log) to coordinate deployment notes, manually log activity, etc.  It would be nice to be able to append via curl (i.e., an API I can use from a shell script).  Thoughts?

I'd like to have a space to keep secure, collaborative text notes (maybe just one long log) to coordinate deployment notes, manually log activity, etc.  It would be nice to be able to append via curl (i.e., an API I can use from a shell script).  Thoughts?___

2015-02-09 19:51:26 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

I receive a notification from an app that led with "FYI" – i.e., nothing actionable expected.  A thoughtfully humane indicator.

Might not work in email notifications because every human-like indicator has been coopted for marketing purposes.  Casual language is almost a negative now, at least if you admit your email comes from a bot you can establish an honest relationship with the recipient.

I receive a notification from an app that led with "FYI" – i.e., nothing actionable expected.  A thoughtfully humane indicator.

Might not work in email notifications because every human-like indicator has been coopted for marketing purposes.  Casual language is almost a negative now, at least if you admit your email comes from a bot you can establish an honest relationship with the recipient.___

2015-02-09 17:49:28 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

A thought I had with React.js server-side rendering: the basic pattern is to make the markup on the server, then fix up the markup (including event handlers, or controls dependent on status).  The result is that while you are doing server-side rendering, it doesn't have to be very accurate.  It can be stale.  It can serve everyone unauthenticated UI. (Though this could cause bad stuttering depending on what the live updates shift around.)  It's more like a first approximation.  And also a robot view of the page, which again can be an approximation.

This also makes full-page caching more appealing.  E.g., using Varnish instead of an object cache like memcached.

I'm still a little fuzzy on how we would want to deal with getting the fully accurate data from the server.  I think it makes sense to send this data with the page itself.  But if we aren't guaranteeinganythin... more »

A thought I had with React.js server-side rendering: the basic pattern is to make the markup on the server, then fix up the markup (including event handlers, or controls dependent on status).  The result is that while you are doing server-side rendering, it doesn't have to be very accurate.  It can be stale.  It can serve everyone unauthenticated UI. (Though this could cause bad stuttering depending on what the live updates shift around.)  It's more like a first approximation.  And also a robot view of the page, which again can be an approximation.

This also makes full-page caching more appealing.  E.g., using Varnish instead of an object cache like memcached.

I'm still a little fuzzy on how we would want to deal with getting the fully accurate data from the server.  I think it makes sense to send this data with the page itself.  But if we aren't guaranteeing anything about that data, then you still need to get the "real" data, which maybe means sending the data twice (though a cheap 304 would be common).

I can imagine actually using <script src="/page-state.js?url={this_url}&if_modified={date_page_was_generated}"></script> at the bottom of pages, thus immediately triggering a fetch.  You wouldn't even want a 304 in this case, because you want to serve back an empty file if there's been no modifications.___

2015-02-09 16:16:59 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Any pointers to the state of the art in open source article text extraction? Having a hard time separating the wheat from the chaff.

Any pointers to the state of the art in open source article text extraction? Having a hard time separating the wheat from the chaff.___

2015-02-06 02:30:33 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

A Hayekian theory of artificial intelligence... I think that could mean something. What?

A Hayekian theory of artificial intelligence... I think that could mean something. What?___

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2015-02-05 20:30:27 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Choose Your Own Adventure bear encounter!

Choose Your Own Adventure bear encounter!___

2015-02-02 17:00:22 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

A discussion of async and sync programming, which coexist frequently in many modern environments.  And coexist painfully.  It's really pretty incredibly awful, I don't know how we put up with it at all.

An aside, doctest.js (http://doctestjs.org/) has something like the "await" feature he talks about, as it converts your doctest stanzas into individual chunks of code with CSP-style chaining, and lets you wait in between those stanzas while the code looks relatively linear.  It's far more naive than a real language feature, but even if it's kind of dumb it sure is nice.  Best feature in doctest.js (the best testing framework that no one uses!)

A discussion of async and sync programming, which coexist frequently in many modern environments.  And coexist painfully.  It's really pretty incredibly awful, I don't know how we put up with it at all.

An aside, doctest.js (http://doctestjs.org/) has something like the "await" feature he talks about, as it converts your doctest stanzas into individual chunks of code with CSP-style chaining, and lets you wait in between those stanzas while the code looks relatively linear.  It's far more naive than a real language feature, but even if it's kind of dumb it sure is nice.  Best feature in doctest.js (the best testing framework that no one uses!)___

2015-01-29 16:45:26 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

A followup post to my Being A Manager Is Lonely post (less complainy ;)

A followup post to my Being A Manager Is Lonely post (less complainy ;)___

2015-01-27 19:03:19 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Next in my blog series: To MVP or not to MVP, thinking about design process, initial execution, planning vs doing, etc.

Next in my blog series: To MVP or not to MVP, thinking about design process, initial execution, planning vs doing, etc.___

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2015-01-27 04:35:51 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Gaze upon the darkness of modern internet journalism! http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/most-depressing-buzzfeed-article-of-all-time.html

It really is terrible, but it was only when I went to the Buzzfeed author's page that I truly felt the depth to which we have fallen, all of us: http://www.buzzfeed.com/joannaborns

Gaze upon this "Best Of 2014 / Classic" list of haikus: http://www.buzzfeed.com/joannaborns/year-2014-haikus   Alex from Target
  he's just a teen at Target
  internet scary

Reading her articles literally makes me feel all weird inside.  I can't watch scary movies where people get cut because there's some part of me that can't help but imagine what it feels like to hold the knife and the texture of the skin as the blade goes through it.  This is how I feel reading her writing, somehow I cannot help but imagine myselfwritin... more »

Gaze upon the darkness of modern internet journalism! http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/most-depressing-buzzfeed-article-of-all-time.html

It really is terrible, but it was only when I went to the Buzzfeed author's page that I truly felt the depth to which we have fallen, all of us: http://www.buzzfeed.com/joannaborns

Gaze upon this "Best Of 2014 / Classic" list of haikus: http://www.buzzfeed.com/joannaborns/year-2014-haikus   Alex from Target
  he's just a teen at Target
  internet scary

Reading her articles literally makes me feel all weird inside.  I can't watch scary movies where people get cut because there's some part of me that can't help but imagine what it feels like to hold the knife and the texture of the skin as the blade goes through it.  This is how I feel reading her writing, somehow I cannot help but imagine myself writing that.  Like some kind of personal hell based on bad high school essay experiences.___

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2015-01-25 17:05:52 (3 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

This is some of the sense I'm hoping to bring into my new project... an expansive approach instead of reductive, imaginative before analytical. It's so much more pleasant.

This is some of the sense I'm hoping to bring into my new project... an expansive approach instead of reductive, imaginative before analytical. It's so much more pleasant.___

2015-01-21 19:24:38 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

I put up a second post in the series, The Technology Demo – and thinking about how to move past a technology demo to a product conception.

I put up a second post in the series, The Technology Demo – and thinking about how to move past a technology demo to a product conception.___

2015-01-16 03:19:10 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

I'm going to try to write out my process and thought process in developing a new product; first post...

I'm going to try to write out my process and thought process in developing a new product; first post...___

2015-01-13 17:13:33 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Put up a blog post: Being A Manager Is Lonely

Hopefully I'm not being too whiney ;)

Put up a blog post: Being A Manager Is Lonely

Hopefully I'm not being too whiney ;)___

2015-01-13 15:29:45 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Most readability-related libraries try to create a better experience through article text extraction.  But it's really common that some of the article is lost in the process – images, sidebars, addendums, anything that isn't part of the main block, and often otherwise obvious trailing content that comes after some transition is lost.

An alternate approach would be to kind of fix-up the page in place.  E.g., add "opacity: 0.1" to all the elements you might otherwise delete.  I'm a little less sure how to take an article designed for desktop display and make it display full width on mobile, but seems like it should be possible.  You can take all the identified article text and force its styling to use appropriate font sizes and colors.

Has anyone heard of code that approaches the problem this way?

Most readability-related libraries try to create a better experience through article text extraction.  But it's really common that some of the article is lost in the process – images, sidebars, addendums, anything that isn't part of the main block, and often otherwise obvious trailing content that comes after some transition is lost.

An alternate approach would be to kind of fix-up the page in place.  E.g., add "opacity: 0.1" to all the elements you might otherwise delete.  I'm a little less sure how to take an article designed for desktop display and make it display full width on mobile, but seems like it should be possible.  You can take all the identified article text and force its styling to use appropriate font sizes and colors.

Has anyone heard of code that approaches the problem this way?___

posted image

2014-12-31 06:04:51 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Reflecting on the passing of time, and the passing of my time

Reflecting on the passing of time, and the passing of my time___

2014-12-17 04:55:09 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

I don't really get this sort of thing.  Maybe because I understand how to do stuff without jQuery well enough.  But jQuery isn't really a framework.  It maps reasonably well.  Doing something like $el.offset() is surprisingly painful without jQuery.  Doing $(".active").removeClass("active") without jQuery is easy, but terribly tedious.  $el.is(":visible") is pretty challenging to do right.  Of course many of these you can do naively without much trouble!  like (el.style.display == "none") – and that will work with a very particular application logic, and you'll test it and it will be okay, and maybe it is okay.  And when you fix it you might implement a real visibility test (thus going down the path of reproducing jQuery bit by bit), or you may work around it another way, probably some terrible way that only makes everything even morefragile.more »

I don't really get this sort of thing.  Maybe because I understand how to do stuff without jQuery well enough.  But jQuery isn't really a framework.  It maps reasonably well.  Doing something like $el.offset() is surprisingly painful without jQuery.  Doing $(".active").removeClass("active") without jQuery is easy, but terribly tedious.  $el.is(":visible") is pretty challenging to do right.  Of course many of these you can do naively without much trouble!  like (el.style.display == "none") – and that will work with a very particular application logic, and you'll test it and it will be okay, and maybe it is okay.  And when you fix it you might implement a real visibility test (thus going down the path of reproducing jQuery bit by bit), or you may work around it another way, probably some terrible way that only makes everything even more fragile.

If you want to reproduce jQuery in a slightly less magical way, sure; lots of people have.  There's other approaches too, but there's far more approaches that are worse than jQuery than better.  ___

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