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Annika “Skywalker” O'Brien has been at 8 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Scott Lewis373,759Heck yes! 500th recording of the @117904790972122493317 podcast!! To celebrate this, @115510485336217794615 and I will be live-tweeting the show at @113166718268343560861, @117350484427668823936 and @101736365103983335412 bring us the amazing science we all know and live from TWIS.  If you're over on Twitter, live-tweet with us using the hash tag #TWIS500   (https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&q=%23TWIS500) When the show goes live, my promo video from @112979228143535385377 will be replaced with the live feed, but just in case you're having trouble finding it, check it out at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSuIbMcKpOw I'm sure Michael and I will be uploading some #selfies  of us watching and tweeting about TWIS and I hope you will too! Just put them down here in the event or on Twitter, I know that the trifecta of TWIS would LOVE to see you all celebrate with them! Also, please consider becoming a patron of TWIS. They do an amazing job bringing science to the WORLD every week and couldn't do it without the support of their listeners. You can do so easily over at their Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/thisweekinscience (also linked as "tickets") #ScienceEveryday   #TWIS   #ThisWeekInScience   #HangoutsOnAir   #Science   #STEM   #Podcast  TWIS500 Viewing Party!!2015-02-05 05:00:0084  
Paul Terry Walhus41,071Austin, Texas, SXSW, film, music, photography, robotics, 3D Printing, web design and CMS like Drupal and WordpressSpring.net Podcasting Network2014-08-11 19:00:005  
STEM Women on G+179,982Join us for a STEM Women HOA as we speak to @116099150038090270824 about working as an Engineer in the early space shuttle programs and her current efforts to inspire girls in STEM! Candy worked at @102371865054310418159's  @100042160885780461928 on software for the Space Shuttle in the late 1970s and 1980s, and later for the International Space Station. Candy will tell us what it was like being a woman of Puerto Rico background trying to get into engineering. We'll also discuss what we can do to encourage young Latina girls to become involved in engineering and, more broadly, how we can support minority women to contribute to space programs. This HOA will be hosted by Dr @108510686109338749229 and Dr @110756968351492254645 and you can tune in on Sunday 20th July at 2.30 PM Pacific or 10.30PM UK/ Monday 21st 7.30 AM AUS. The hangout will be available for viewing on our YouTube channel (http://www.youtube.com/stemwomen) after the event. #engineering   #softwareengineering   #stemwomen   #computerscience   #nasa   #ISS   #space   #hoa   #stem  In the Spotlight with Candy Torres: Engineer for the Space Program2014-07-20 23:30:0024  
STEM Women on G+179,982Join us for a STEM Women HOA as we speak to @114480095884024488890  on her career as a roboticist. Annika is an engineer who works on robotics and also a passionate STEM educator, teaching kids how to program and build robots through @101828427997295401901. She will talk to us about her exciting career path as a woman in STEM, what inspires her, and why supporting women in STEM is important.  This HOA will be hosted by Dr @108510686109338749229 and Dr @110756968351492254645   and you can tune in on Sunday April 27th at 4.30 PM Central/ 10.30PM UK. The hangout will be available for viewing on our YouTube channel (http://www.youtube.com/stemwomen) after the event.In The Spotlight, With Annika O'Brien2014-04-27 23:30:0058  
STEM Women on G+179,982Join us for a STEM Women HOA as we speak to @114480095884024488890 on her career as a roboticist. Annika is an engineer who works on robotics and also a passionate STEM educator, teaching kids how to program and build robots through @101828427997295401901. She will talk to us about her exciting career path as a woman in STEM, what inspires her, and why supporting women in STEM is important.  This HOA will be hosted by Dr @108510686109338749229 and Dr @110756968351492254645  and you can tune in on Sunday April 13th at 4.30 PM Central/ 10.30PM UK. The hangout will be available for viewing on our YouTube channel (http://www.youtube.com/stemwomen) after the event.In The Spotlight, With Annika O'Brien2014-04-13 23:30:0054  
Amy Robinson28,518On June 13 the U.S. Supreme Court made a landmark decision, unanimously ruling that human genes may not be patented.  What does that mean for you and me? Join geneticist +Ian Bosdet  and the +Science on Google+: A Public Database  Community for a 30 minute conversation to discuss what this ruling may mean for the future of health and genetic research. This event will be hosted by +Amy Robinson and +Nic Hammond . Ask questions for Ian to answer On Air and share your thoughts on the event page. Ian and the Science on Google+ team will invite a few insightful guests to ask their questions live in the hangout. Gene Patenting: A Google+ Science Conversation2013-07-09 21:00:0063  
The Planetary Society6,278,989Join Planetary Society Director of Projects Bruce Betts for live webcast coverage of the encounter with Asteroid 2012 DA14. This 45-meter asteroid will pass within 27,000 kilometers of Earth.  Also on hand will be the host of Planetary Radio, Mat Kaplan. We'll post the URL to the video here a few minutes before we start. You'll see: * Live telescope feeds from around the world (*courtesy of JPL) * A video tour of La Sagra Observatory in Spain, where 2012 DA14 was discovered with a camera provided by the Planetary Society * A live conversation with co-discoverer Jaime Nomen at La Sagra (subject to his availability) * Just possibly a surprise guest! Bruce will also answer your questions about this and other Near Earth Objects (NEO) as he explains how the Planetary Society backs efforts to detect, track and eventually deflect NEOs that threaten our planet.  It may be the biggest show in space this year. Live Webcast of Asteroid 2012DA14 Flyby 11:15 am PST/1915h UTC2013-02-15 20:15:00562  
The Planetary Society6,278,989Join the Planetary Society and special guests for our live webcast of our Carl Sagan Day show here in Pasadena. We will feature friends and people inspired by Carl, including astrophysicist Kip Thorne, Planetary Society Emeritus Executive Director Lou Friedman, Contact Producer Lynda Obst, and others. The show will be streamed live at http://planetary.org/saganday2012Carl Sagan Day Live-cast2012-11-10 04:00:00163  

Shared Circles including Annika “Skywalker” O'Brien

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The Google+ Collections of Annika “Skywalker” O'Brien

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 43

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2015-10-04 17:45:46 (43 comments; 176 reshares; 270 +1s)Open 

Open letter to female engineers:
+Jared Mauldin

Most reshares: 176

posted image

2015-10-04 17:45:46 (43 comments; 176 reshares; 270 +1s)Open 

Open letter to female engineers:
+Jared Mauldin

Most plusones: 270

posted image

2015-10-04 17:45:46 (43 comments; 176 reshares; 270 +1s)Open 

Open letter to female engineers:
+Jared Mauldin

Latest 50 posts

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2015-12-28 14:00:09 (13 comments; 3 reshares; 52 +1s)Open 

Hey, bachelors!

VIDEO: Meet Moley - The spectral robotic arms that can cook and clean for you

http://futuristech.info/posts/video-meet-moley-the-spectral-robotic-arms-that-can-cook-and-clean-for-you___Hey, bachelors!

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2015-12-24 22:54:25 (4 comments; 2 reshares; 69 +1s)Open 

"Earthrise," taken on Christmas Eve 1968 by the crew of Apollo 8. Happy holidays!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthrise

"Earthrise," taken on Christmas Eve 1968 by the crew of Apollo 8. Happy holidays!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthrise___

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2015-12-18 00:16:52 (6 comments; 0 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

I remember when they shut down.
Looks like they're coming back!

I remember when they shut down.
Looks like they're coming back!___

2015-12-17 14:31:48 (3 comments; 8 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

Google "a long time ago in a galaxy far far away".

Google "a long time ago in a galaxy far far away".___

posted image

2015-12-04 13:23:54 (13 comments; 2 reshares; 31 +1s)Open 

A sad day for those who hit puberty in the 90's:

A sad day for those who hit puberty in the 90's:___

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2015-12-02 14:47:54 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

Joseph F Engelberger (the father of robotics) passed away.

Joseph F Engelberger (the father of robotics) passed away.___

posted image

2015-12-02 04:29:40 (8 comments; 50 reshares; 189 +1s)Open 

___

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2015-12-02 04:15:24 (22 comments; 2 reshares; 56 +1s)Open 

"I have a dream that one day there will be no such thing as a female car enthusiast, or rather, the ‘female enthusiast’ label. It’s probably unrealistic of me to dream of a time where males no longer dominate the automotive industry, but I still think the world would be a much cooler place if more girls liked cars. In my dream, the elusive ‘car girl’ is a thing of the past."

"I have a dream that one day there will be no such thing as a female car enthusiast, or rather, the ‘female enthusiast’ label. It’s probably unrealistic of me to dream of a time where males no longer dominate the automotive industry, but I still think the world would be a much cooler place if more girls liked cars. In my dream, the elusive ‘car girl’ is a thing of the past."___

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2015-11-27 03:24:27 (3 comments; 3 reshares; 42 +1s)Open 

AO-85 & Wouxun KG-UV9D
Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK/VA7EWK is one of the most active amateur satellite enthusiasts on the planet. He recently shared his experience using the Wouxun KG-UV9D handheld transceiver while working AO-85 with the AMSAT-BB mailing list:

Starting just after the launch of AO-85 last month, I have been using different radios to work this satellite. Some of my experiments have been with HTs, along with my Icom IC-2820H mobile radio at different power levels. During the first weekend we had AO-85 in orbit, I had used my Wouxun KG-UV9D to work the satellite, and found that it was usable to work AO-85 when it was above 20 degrees elevation...

Read his entire report:

http://amsat.org/pipermail/amsat-bb/2015-November/056189.html

Learn more about the handheld:
... more »

AO-85 & Wouxun KG-UV9D
Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK/VA7EWK is one of the most active amateur satellite enthusiasts on the planet. He recently shared his experience using the Wouxun KG-UV9D handheld transceiver while working AO-85 with the AMSAT-BB mailing list:

Starting just after the launch of AO-85 last month, I have been using different radios to work this satellite. Some of my experiments have been with HTs, along with my Icom IC-2820H mobile radio at different power levels. During the first weekend we had AO-85 in orbit, I had used my Wouxun KG-UV9D to work the satellite, and found that it was usable to work AO-85 when it was above 20 degrees elevation...

Read his entire report:

http://amsat.org/pipermail/amsat-bb/2015-November/056189.html

Learn more about the handheld:

http://www.powerwerx.com/two-way-radios/handheld-wouxun-radios/wouxun-kg-uv9d-handheld-amateur-radio.html

Join AMSAT and keep ham radio in space!

http://www.amsat.org

#hamradio #amsat #satellites #ao85___

posted image

2015-11-24 21:45:50 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

Just voted for the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention.
8 hours left and you can vote once per day!

Just voted for the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention.
8 hours left and you can vote once per day!___

2015-11-24 20:52:39 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

+Leadwerks is on +Y Combinator!

+Leadwerks is on +Y Combinator!___

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2015-11-22 13:38:02 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

Forbes Magazine on Quanergy — This Startup Has The Technology That Can Put Autonomous Cars On The Road In 2019
by Liane Yvkoff
Forbes | November 20, 2015

The road to autonomous cars is paved with sensors, radars, cameras, and most importantly, LiDARs.

“You cannot build autonomous cars without LiDAR, and anyone who thinks differently, please challenge me.”

This statement about laser radar systems was made by Louay Eldada, CEO of Quanergy, to a crowd at the Connected Car Expo in Los Angeles, Calif., but it seemed directed to Tesla CEO Elon Musk or anyone who may have listened to his press conference in October when he announced the availability of AutoPilot.

During the announcement, Musk said he wasn’t a fan of using LiDAR in the automotive space. LiDAR is mashup of Laser Imaging Radar, and it refers to a hardware and software component thattracks,... more »

Forbes Magazine on Quanergy — This Startup Has The Technology That Can Put Autonomous Cars On The Road In 2019
by Liane Yvkoff
Forbes | November 20, 2015

The road to autonomous cars is paved with sensors, radars, cameras, and most importantly, LiDARs.

“You cannot build autonomous cars without LiDAR, and anyone who thinks differently, please challenge me.”

This statement about laser radar systems was made by Louay Eldada, CEO of Quanergy, to a crowd at the Connected Car Expo in Los Angeles, Calif., but it seemed directed to Tesla CEO Elon Musk or anyone who may have listened to his press conference in October when he announced the availability of AutoPilot.

During the announcement, Musk said he wasn’t a fan of using LiDAR in the automotive space. LiDAR is mashup of Laser Imaging Radar, and it refers to a hardware and software component that tracks, measures, identifies, and classifies objects, and makes a decision on what next to do. Although Musk said he uses them at SpaceX, he believes that autonomous cars can be achieved using 360-degree cameras and radars, even in rain and snow.

That’s fine for highways where you won’t encounter humans or animals, says Eldada, but the moment you have autonomous vehicles in a pedestrian environment, you will hit 1 out of 100 people.

“You need 99 followed by 10 9s before that risk is acceptable,” he explains.

Most experts agree that LiDAR is needed, and if there is an argument against using this technology, it’s likely because of its cost. The units currently used by concept autonomous vehicles run in the thousands of dollars, which is a non-starter in the world of vehicle manufacturing. Cameras, on the other hand, cost pennies at volume. That will change with the onset of Quanergy’s solid state LiDAR, which Eldada keeps under wraps in a black cloth bag about the size of a point-and-shoot camera. Its next-generation system will be the key to unlocking true self-driving capabilities for vehicles because it has no moving parts, which means it won’t break. This level of reliability is essential for autonomously driven vehicles because it’s a mission critical component, and it also increases accuracy and reduces accidents. But even it’s the missing link for autonomous drive, it’s not enough to be unbreakable—it has to be cheap.

Quanergy’s solid state LiDAR will retail to manufacturers for $250, and will cost about half that amount to manufacture. Eldada said this price point has been validated by Delphi, which participated in the $44.5 million Series A financing round. The company has partnered with Flextronics in Milpitas, Calif. to manufacture this component, which will begin in Q3 of 2016, and the laser company is in six non-exclusive partner agreements with suppliers who will bring this to market, although he shared that he is closest with Delphi.

The Sunnyvale, Calif.-based start-up is working with several manufacturers, and Eldada says with an air of certainty that consumers will see production autonomous vehicles on the road in 2019.

“Autonomous vehicles that are safe, well-tested, and delivered by reputable companies will launch in 2019 under a 2020 model year,” he said.

Lending credence to his prediction, his manufacturing forecasts expects 100,000 vehicles globally to be equipped with his LiDARs in 2019, each requiring two units. However, “more aggressive” manufacturers will begin using his LiDARs in Q4 2016. For confidentiality reasons, he could not say on which manufacturer or vehicles, but he shared that next year Quanergy’s solid-state LiDAR will be unveiled on three concept vehicles at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show: two Mercedes-Benz GLE450 vehicles shown by Quanergy and Nvidia, and a Volvo XC90 shown by Delphi.

The November 20, 2015 Forbes article by Liane Yvkoff can be found here:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/lianeyvkoff/2015/11/20/quanergy-expect-truly-autonomous-vehicles-in-2019-as-2020-model-year/

Quanergy CEO Louay Eldada speaking at a press conference at the 2015 Connected Car Expo, Los Angeles Auto Show.___

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2015-11-22 13:33:07 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

Please vote for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention to receive $75K from DSW. We're losing to a pit bull rescue in Fresno right now. I like dogs, but I feel human lives are important, too. You can vote once a day for the next couple of days and family members can vote from other devices. Please share if you can, also. Thanks so much and good luck to all the charities involved!

Please vote for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention to receive $75K from DSW. We're losing to a pit bull rescue in Fresno right now. I like dogs, but I feel human lives are important, too. You can vote once a day for the next couple of days and family members can vote from other devices. Please share if you can, also. Thanks so much and good luck to all the charities involved!___

posted image

2015-11-18 03:12:06 (5 comments; 0 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 

Looks like Fandango ratings aren't correlated with IMDB, Metacritic, or Rotten Tomatoes. This is a beautiful table created by a Houston Startup called DiBS. If you're interested in a super easy-to-use/innovative data visualization tool check out www.dibsvis.com/biowheel.

Looks like Fandango ratings aren't correlated with IMDB, Metacritic, or Rotten Tomatoes. This is a beautiful table created by a Houston Startup called DiBS. If you're interested in a super easy-to-use/innovative data visualization tool check out www.dibsvis.com/biowheel.___

posted image

2015-11-15 16:54:23 (8 comments; 17 reshares; 125 +1s)Open 

I'll be Jewish this year thanks to the Menorasaurus Rex!

I'll be Jewish this year thanks to the Menorasaurus Rex!___

posted image

2015-11-14 16:14:22 (10 comments; 3 reshares; 80 +1s)Open 

I'm teaching 5 yr olds to solder at Houston Mini Maker Faire today with +TXRX Labs | Houston's Hackerspace! 

I'm teaching 5 yr olds to solder at Houston Mini Maker Faire today with +TXRX Labs | Houston's Hackerspace! ___

posted image

2015-11-14 03:24:34 (21 comments; 13 reshares; 103 +1s)Open 

#PeaceForParis   (and Beirut)
cc: +Deepak Chopra 

#PeaceForParis   (and Beirut)
cc: +Deepak Chopra ___

posted image

2015-11-13 14:29:58 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

___

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2015-11-05 23:01:19 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

I assume they grabbed an image from Google.

Did CNN just imply that an Adafruit part was part of the Russian Metrojet plane crash?___I assume they grabbed an image from Google.

posted image

2015-11-05 17:43:48 (20 comments; 11 reshares; 60 +1s)Open 

Wow.

Wow.___

posted image

2015-11-03 14:48:48 (1 comments; 14 reshares; 45 +1s)Open 

Hollister and Coonradt took home first place at the World Robot Olympiad National Championship Sept. 22. The only all-girl elementary school team and their robot named "Robbie" beat out 24 other teams in their age group and will go on to compete in the World Robot Olympiad International Championship in Doha, Qatar, on Nov. 6.

Hollister and Coonradt took home first place at the World Robot Olympiad National Championship Sept. 22. The only all-girl elementary school team and their robot named "Robbie" beat out 24 other teams in their age group and will go on to compete in the World Robot Olympiad International Championship in Doha, Qatar, on Nov. 6.___

posted image

2015-10-29 13:55:58 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 83 +1s)Open 

Harvest Time Happy Little Robots
Artist: http://ericjoyner.com/about-eric-joyner/

Harvest Time Happy Little Robots
Artist: http://ericjoyner.com/about-eric-joyner/___

posted image

2015-10-13 00:51:06 (16 comments; 1 reshares; 46 +1s)Open 

___

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2015-10-13 00:28:31 (10 comments; 0 reshares; 63 +1s)Open 

Playing with a flame thrower at the oldest fraternity in the world. Delta Phi was established in 1827. 

Playing with a flame thrower at the oldest fraternity in the world. Delta Phi was established in 1827. ___

posted image

2015-10-09 04:46:55 (11 comments; 49 reshares; 146 +1s)Open 

Disney is teaming up with Open Bionics to provide royalty-free use of various character hands for children who've lost a limb!
Open Bionics is thrilled to announce the next generation of bionic hands for young amputees. From the Marvel Universe, hot out of Tony Stark’s workshop, the Iron Man hand.

Artwork designed in collaboration with Lucasfilm’s ILMxLAB and inspired by Lightsabers, the Star Wars lightsaber hand.

Inspired by Queen Elsa from Disney’s Frozen, the Snowflake hand.

Now kids can get excited about their prosthetics. They won’t have to do boring physical therapy, they’ll train to become heroes. They’re not just getting medical devices, they’re getting bionic hands inspired by their favorite characters. The Walt Disney Company is generously donating the time of its creative teams and providing royalty free licenses. More designs comingsoon!”... more »

Disney is teaming up with Open Bionics to provide royalty-free use of various character hands for children who've lost a limb!
Open Bionics is thrilled to announce the next generation of bionic hands for young amputees. From the Marvel Universe, hot out of Tony Stark’s workshop, the Iron Man hand.

Artwork designed in collaboration with Lucasfilm’s ILMxLAB and inspired by Lightsabers, the Star Wars lightsaber hand.

Inspired by Queen Elsa from Disney’s Frozen, the Snowflake hand.

Now kids can get excited about their prosthetics. They won’t have to do boring physical therapy, they’ll train to become heroes. They’re not just getting medical devices, they’re getting bionic hands inspired by their favorite characters. The Walt Disney Company is generously donating the time of its creative teams and providing royalty free licenses. More designs coming soon!”___

posted image

2015-10-09 02:08:29 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 33 +1s)Open 

During the #3dprinting show and tell today someone brought in these amazing 3D prints of real people's hearts. These are used by surgeons to help them better grasp a patients anatomy before a surgery.
+TXRX Labs | Houston's Hackerspace +Annika O'Brien 

During the #3dprinting show and tell today someone brought in these amazing 3D prints of real people's hearts. These are used by surgeons to help them better grasp a patients anatomy before a surgery.
+TXRX Labs | Houston's Hackerspace +Annika O'Brien ___

posted image

2015-10-08 23:38:05 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 30 +1s)Open 

via: +Robert M. Taylor 

via: +Robert M. Taylor ___

posted image

2015-10-07 20:54:48 (5 comments; 2 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 

In the mood for a long discussion? Pull up a seat.

In the mood for a long discussion? Pull up a seat.___

posted image

2015-10-06 12:49:18 (7 comments; 0 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

The final layout for the laser is done.

The final layout for the laser is done.___

posted image

2015-10-05 14:51:18 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 32 +1s)Open 

Hubble Views the Star that Changed the Universe

On the night of October 5 1923, the US astronomer Edwin Hubble identified the first Cepheid variable star in the Andromeda galaxy. This proved that the galaxy was not part of the Milky Way.

Though the universe is filled with billions upon billions of stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has been trained on a single variable star that in 1923 altered the course of modern astronomy

The star goes by the inauspicious name of Hubble variable number one, or V1, and resides two million light-years away in the outer regions of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy, or M31. V1 is a special class of pulsating star called a Cepheid variable that can be used to make reliable measurements of large cosmic distances.

The star helped Edwin Hubble show that Andromeda lies beyond our galaxy.... more »

Hubble Views the Star that Changed the Universe

On the night of October 5 1923, the US astronomer Edwin Hubble identified the first Cepheid variable star in the Andromeda galaxy. This proved that the galaxy was not part of the Milky Way.

Though the universe is filled with billions upon billions of stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has been trained on a single variable star that in 1923 altered the course of modern astronomy

The star goes by the inauspicious name of Hubble variable number one, or V1, and resides two million light-years away in the outer regions of the neighboring Andromeda galaxy, or M31. V1 is a special class of pulsating star called a Cepheid variable that can be used to make reliable measurements of large cosmic distances.

The star helped Edwin Hubble show that Andromeda lies beyond our galaxy. Prior to the discovery of V1 many astronomers, including Harlow Shapley, thought spiral nebulae, such as Andromeda, were part of our Milky Way galaxy. Others weren't so sure. In fact, Shapley and Heber Curtis held a public debate in 1920 over the nature of these nebulae. But it took Edwin Hubble's discovery just a few years later to settle the debate.

The following text is excerpted from the article "Hubble Views the Star that Changed the Universe":

For example, Andromeda, the largest of the spiral nebulae, presented ambiguous clues to its distance. Astronomers had observed different types of exploding stars in the nebula. But they didn't fully understand the underlying stellar processes, so they had difficulty using those stars to calculate how far they were from Earth. Distance estimates to Andromeda, therefore, varied from nearby to far away. Which distance was correct?
Edwin Hubble was determined to find out.

The astronomer spent several months in 1923 scanning Andromeda with the 100-inch Hooker telescope, the most powerful telescope of that era, at Mount Wilson Observatory in California. Even with the sharp-eyed telescope, Andromeda was a monstrous target, about 5 feet long at the telescope's focal plane. He therefore took many exposures covering dozens of photographic glass plates to capture the whole nebula.

He concentrated on three regions. One of them was deep inside a spiral arm. On the night of Oct. 5, 1923, Hubble began an observing run that lasted until the early hours of Oct. 6. Under poor viewing conditions, the astronomer made a 45-minute exposure that yielded three suspected novae, a class of exploding star. He wrote the letter "N," for nova, next to each of the three objects.

Later, however, Hubble made a startling discovery when he compared the Oct. 5-6 plate with previous exposures of the novae. One of the so-called novae dimmed and brightened over a much shorter time period than seen in a typical nova.

Hubble obtained enough observations of V1 to plot its light curve, determining a period of 31.4 days, indicating the object was a Cepheid variable. The period yielded the star's intrinsic brightness, which Hubble then used to calculate its distance. The star turned out to be 1 million light-years from Earth, more than three times Shapley's calculated diameter of the Milky Way.

Taking out his marking pen, Hubble crossed out the "N" next to the newfound Cepheid variable and wrote "VAR," for variable, followed by an exclamation point.

For several months the astronomer continued gazing at Andromeda, finding another Cepheid variable and several more novae. Then Hubble sent a letter along with a light curve of V1 to Shapley telling him of his discovery. After reading the letter, Shapley was convinced the evidence was genuine. He reportedly told a colleague, "Here is the letter that destroyed my universe."

By the end of 1924 Hubble had found 36 variable stars in Andromeda, 12 of which were Cepheids. Using all the Cepheids, he obtained a distance of 900,000 light-years. Improved measurements now place Andromeda at 2 million light-years away.

Read more>>
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/star-v1.html

About the image
Views of a famous pulsating star taken nearly 90 years apart and a portrait of its galactic home are shown in this image collection.

The pancake-shaped disk of stars, gas, and dust that make up the Andromeda galaxy, or M31, is shown in the image at left. Andromeda is a Milky Way neighbor and resides 2 million light-years away.

The tiny white box just above center outlines the Hubble Space Telescope view. An arrow points to the Hubble image, taken by the Wide Field Camera 3. The snapshot is blanketed with stars, which look like grains of sand.

The white circle at lower left identifies Hubble variable number one, or V1, the Cepheid variable star discovered by astronomer Edwin Hubble in 1923. Cepheid variables are pulsating stars that brighten and fade in a predictable pattern. Astronomers use them to calculate how far away they are from Earth.

The large white box outlines the region imaged by astronomer Edwin Hubble, who used the 100-inch Hooker telescope, the most powerful telescope of that era. An arrow points to a copy of Hubble's image of Andromeda, which was made on a 4-inch-by-5-inch glass plate and dated Oct. 6, 1923.

Illustration Credit: NASA, ESA, and Z. Levay (STScI)
Source>> http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2011/15/image/d/
News release images>> http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2011/15/image/
Further reading
http://hubblesite.org/hubble_discoveries/science_year_in_review/pdf/2011/revisiting_star_v1.pdf

http://www.space.com/11761-historic-star-variable-hubble-telescope-photo-aas218.html

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/how-edwin-hubble-became-the-20th-centurys-greatest-astronomer-66148381/

http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/hsts414/doel/Hubble_Transformation_Cosmology.pdf

http://www.nasonline.org/publications/biographical-memoirs/memoir-pdfs/hubble-edwin.pdf

http://www.as.utexas.edu/astronomy/education/fall06/bromm/secure/lecture22.pdf

#history_of_science   #Edwin_Hubble   #universe   #cepheid_stars   #first_cepheid_variable_star   #astronomy   #space  ___

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2015-10-04 17:45:46 (43 comments; 176 reshares; 270 +1s)Open 

Open letter to female engineers:
+Jared Mauldin

Open letter to female engineers:
+Jared Mauldin___

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2015-10-03 19:56:37 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 32 +1s)Open 

Houston Robotics Club Telepresence 

Houston Robotics Club Telepresence ___

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2015-10-01 15:12:48 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

My son's AP science class is trying to raise funds to travel to Treehaven for SCIENCE. https://www.gofundme.com/r35dfa8c

My son's AP science class is trying to raise funds to travel to Treehaven for SCIENCE. https://www.gofundme.com/r35dfa8c___

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2015-10-01 00:22:26 (5 comments; 1 reshares; 60 +1s)Open 

+Trey German just flew in and boy are his arms tired!!!

+Trey German just flew in and boy are his arms tired!!!___

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2015-09-29 20:17:24 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

+TX/RX Labs is supporting artists with grants. You get 6 months and access to everything they have to offer. :)

+TX/RX Labs is supporting artists with grants. You get 6 months and access to everything they have to offer. :)___

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2015-09-25 22:15:28 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

Last month Microsoft announced that it was releasing its own developer environment for Windows 10 and the internet of things (IOT). In a follow up to this, the company announced a new partnership with Adafruit which will see the pair producing starter kits for inventors looking to use the Windows 10 IoT (Internet of Things) Core platform.

#IoT   #raspberrypi  

Last month Microsoft announced that it was releasing its own developer environment for Windows 10 and the internet of things (IOT). In a follow up to this, the company announced a new partnership with Adafruit which will see the pair producing starter kits for inventors looking to use the Windows 10 IoT (Internet of Things) Core platform.

#IoT   #raspberrypi  ___

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2015-09-25 16:06:13 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 28 +1s)Open 

It's almost that time of year again! The Houston Mini Maker Faire has grown and will now be at the GRB Convention Center!
cc: +TXRX Labs | Houston's Hackerspace  http://www.houstonmakerfaire.com/ 

It's almost that time of year again! The Houston Mini Maker Faire has grown and will now be at the GRB Convention Center!
cc: +TXRX Labs | Houston's Hackerspace  http://www.houstonmakerfaire.com/ ___

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2015-09-24 14:15:30 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 22 +1s)Open 

Super Duper Lunar Eclipse

This weekend there will be a lunar eclipse. Not just any lunar eclipse, but one of the legendary “super Moon.” So what does it all mean?

A super Moon is a full moon that occurs near the time when the Moon is near perigee. The Moon’s orbit around the Earth is nearly circular, but it isn’t exactly circular, so with each orbit the Moon reaches a point where it is closest to the Earth (perigee) and farthest from the Earth (apogee). While there is a difference in apparent size, and a supermoon will appear brighter than a typical full moon, it isn’t a difference that’s easy to perceive with the naked eye. Supermoon isn’t a term much used by astronomers, but it has gained popularity among the general public. This full moon is also a harvest moon, meaning it is the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox.

But it’s the lunar eclipsethat has everyo... more »

Super Duper Lunar Eclipse

This weekend there will be a lunar eclipse. Not just any lunar eclipse, but one of the legendary “super Moon.” So what does it all mean?

A super Moon is a full moon that occurs near the time when the Moon is near perigee. The Moon’s orbit around the Earth is nearly circular, but it isn’t exactly circular, so with each orbit the Moon reaches a point where it is closest to the Earth (perigee) and farthest from the Earth (apogee). While there is a difference in apparent size, and a supermoon will appear brighter than a typical full moon, it isn’t a difference that’s easy to perceive with the naked eye. Supermoon isn’t a term much used by astronomers, but it has gained popularity among the general public. This full moon is also a harvest moon, meaning it is the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox.

But it’s the lunar eclipse that has everyone buzzing. Lunar eclipses are sometimes called blood moons because of the deep red color they can have during the eclipse. The moon gets a reddish coloring because of Earth’s atmosphere. When the Earth passes between the Sun and the Moon, most of the sunlight is blocked. But Earth’s atmosphere refracts sunlight as well as absorbing or scattering light on the blue end of the spectrum. This creates a ring of sunset around the Earth as seen from the Moon. The physics that gives a deep red to a sunset on Earth is the same physics that gives the Moon it’s reddish glow.

Perhaps someday we’ll have folks on the Moon watching a solar eclipse while those of us on Earth watch a lunar one. That would truly be a super duper eclipse.___

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2015-09-24 11:58:58 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

FISHINO: Arduino become wireless #arduino

FISHINO: Arduino become wireless #arduino___

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2015-09-24 11:45:17 (1 comments; 5 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 

Have you ever wanted to visit CERN, or maybe even work there? Well guess what — one of the prizes for the Intel Modern Code Developer Challenge 2015 is a trip to CERN — and another one for a 9 week internship there! The CERN and Intel sponsored…

Have you ever wanted to visit CERN, or maybe even work there? Well guess what — one of the prizes for the Intel Modern Code Developer Challenge 2015 is a trip to CERN — and another one for a 9 week internship there! The CERN and Intel sponsored…___

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2015-09-24 00:08:40 (6 comments; 9 reshares; 120 +1s)Open 

Interesting way to store your fire wood logs, right?
#CountryLife  

Interesting way to store your fire wood logs, right?
#CountryLife  ___

2015-09-22 03:20:21 (41 comments; 16 reshares; 83 +1s)Open 

In the wake of #IStandWithAhmed the name Taylor Wilson has come up numerous times. People are comparing a 14 year old who disassembled a clock, put it in a metal case and took it to school to show his teacher with a 14 year old who created his own Fusion Reactor and built a radiation detector (which normally cost 100's of 1,000's of dollars) for only a few hundred dollars, later going on to create a FISSION REACTOR which can provide 30 years of energy but doesn't require weapons grade uranium. The part that bothers me about this comparison is when people say that Taylor did not get into trouble because he's white. Ever heard of David Hahn? He was also white and at the age of 17, attempted to build a breeder nuclear reactor, earning him the title of Radioactive Boy Scout and leading to his arrest (even though he was white). His work shed was then buried underground somewhere in Utah as... more »

In the wake of #IStandWithAhmed the name Taylor Wilson has come up numerous times. People are comparing a 14 year old who disassembled a clock, put it in a metal case and took it to school to show his teacher with a 14 year old who created his own Fusion Reactor and built a radiation detector (which normally cost 100's of 1,000's of dollars) for only a few hundred dollars, later going on to create a FISSION REACTOR which can provide 30 years of energy but doesn't require weapons grade uranium. The part that bothers me about this comparison is when people say that Taylor did not get into trouble because he's white. Ever heard of David Hahn? He was also white and at the age of 17, attempted to build a breeder nuclear reactor, earning him the title of Radioactive Boy Scout and leading to his arrest (even though he was white). His work shed was then buried underground somewhere in Utah as low-level radioactive waste.

Now, on the bright side, Taylor went on to earn a lot of money in the form of research grants for his work. Ahmed has also earned a sizable amount in the form of donations and free school offers from people who support his future ventures. Both of these boys get to share the spotlight at the White House and will be honored as Google Science Fair entrants (not concurrently).

Taylor's story began much like David Hahn's, with a brilliant, high-flying child hatching a crazy plan to build a nuclear reactor. Why did one journey end with hazmat teams and an eventual arrest, while the other continues to produce an array of prizes, patents, television appearances, and offers from college recruiters? Despite both being white?

The answer is, mostly, support. Hahn, determined to achieve something extraordinary but discouraged by the adults in his life, pressed on without guidance or oversight—and with nearly catastrophic results. Taylor, just as determined but socially gifted, managed to gather into his orbit people who could help him achieve his dreams: the physics professor; the older nuclear prodigy; the eccentric technician; the entrepreneur couple who, instead of retiring, founded a school to nurture genius kids. There were several more, but none so significant as Tiffany and Kenneth, the parents who overcame their reflexive—and undeniably sensible—inclinations to keep their Icarus-like son on the ground. Instead they gave him the wings he sought and encouraged him to fly up to the sun and beyond, high enough to capture a star of his own.

Fortunately Ahmed is getting the support of every person who's read any article that mentions his name and any critics are immediately labeled racists and Islamophobes. With good guidance and discipline, he will go far in life. He already has the funding and contacts, which are two things many child prodigies will never find. I have a long list of students that I know of that won't ever get an invite to the White House because no matter how ground-breaking their research is, they just don't have the publicity. I only wish more students would show up to school with unidentified electronics and they could all get a free ride to MIT and tweets from the POTUS. Do you think this could be the beginning of a new trend?___

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2015-09-21 16:25:43 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Meanwhile, in Sweden...

Northern Fall light makes Stockholm's harbour even more lovely. Here with 100 astronauts for meetings and student visits.___Meanwhile, in Sweden...

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2015-09-21 16:22:56 (4 comments; 9 reshares; 74 +1s)Open 

#motivationmonday #science

Image: http://bit.ly/1L0Fj1j

#motivationmonday #science

Image: http://bit.ly/1L0Fj1j___

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2015-09-21 00:55:49 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

So here's my e-clip project.  Production test boards for integrated circuits have an open socket that a robotic handler system presses chips into, so they can be calibrated and tested.  When you design a new test board (this is what I do for a living) you need to cycle chips in by hand as we have no handler system.  The socket manufacturer provides a very expensive hand test socket top that allows for testing individual chips with high repeatability.  The problem with this particular model is that there are two alignment pins pressed into a plastic body, and when we run characterization and reliability testing we blast the socket with -40C to 125C air, back and forth between the two, hundreds of times, and the plastic softens and the pins fall out.  Incredibly irritating because then the top doesn't place the chip correctly on the socket pins.  I cut a test pin that has two e-clips, one oneithe... more »

So here's my e-clip project.  Production test boards for integrated circuits have an open socket that a robotic handler system presses chips into, so they can be calibrated and tested.  When you design a new test board (this is what I do for a living) you need to cycle chips in by hand as we have no handler system.  The socket manufacturer provides a very expensive hand test socket top that allows for testing individual chips with high repeatability.  The problem with this particular model is that there are two alignment pins pressed into a plastic body, and when we run characterization and reliability testing we blast the socket with -40C to 125C air, back and forth between the two, hundreds of times, and the plastic softens and the pins fall out.  Incredibly irritating because then the top doesn't place the chip correctly on the socket pins.  I cut a test pin that has two e-clips, one on either side of the plastic body.  That required grinding an e-clip groove cutting tool for the lathe.  The pin is 3mm in diameter, and the groove is 0.2mm wide.  Most of the dimensions had to be accurate to within 0.05mm, with the pin diameter requiring 0.005mm accuracy.  I cut the prototype in crappy mild steel.  The final version will be in 316 stainless steel, as this has to survive 5 years on a test floor in the Phillippines or Malaysia.  I expect these to be very popular.___

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2015-09-18 16:35:13 (2 comments; 3 reshares; 30 +1s)Open 

"Working on robots in factories is what I want to do after high school. And here I am practicing."

At this Tennessee high school, industry is helping to open the minds of young students - To the possibilities and a career in robotics - while effectively training their future workforce.

"Working on robots in factories is what I want to do after high school. And here I am practicing."

At this Tennessee high school, industry is helping to open the minds of young students - To the possibilities and a career in robotics - while effectively training their future workforce.___

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2015-09-18 14:02:42 (9 comments; 4 reshares; 41 +1s)Open 

Dying star creates fantasy-like sculpture of gas and dust

In this detailed view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the so-called Cat's Eye Nebula looks like the penetrating eye of the disembodied sorcerer Sauron from the film adaptation of "Lord of the Rings."

The nebula, formally catalogued NGC 6543, is every bit as inscrutable as the J.R.R. Tolkien phantom character. Although the Cat's Eye Nebula was the first planetary nebula ever to be discovered, it is one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen in space. A planetary nebula forms when Sun-like stars gently eject their outer gaseous layers to form bright nebulae with amazing twisted shapes.

Credit:
ESA, NASA, HEIC and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

https://www.spacetelescope.org/images/heic0414a/

#space   #hubble  

Dying star creates fantasy-like sculpture of gas and dust

In this detailed view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the so-called Cat's Eye Nebula looks like the penetrating eye of the disembodied sorcerer Sauron from the film adaptation of "Lord of the Rings."

The nebula, formally catalogued NGC 6543, is every bit as inscrutable as the J.R.R. Tolkien phantom character. Although the Cat's Eye Nebula was the first planetary nebula ever to be discovered, it is one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen in space. A planetary nebula forms when Sun-like stars gently eject their outer gaseous layers to form bright nebulae with amazing twisted shapes.

Credit:
ESA, NASA, HEIC and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

https://www.spacetelescope.org/images/heic0414a/

#space   #hubble  ___

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2015-09-17 16:23:47 (24 comments; 4 reshares; 90 +1s)Open 

Here's my views:

Lessons from #IStandWithAhmed  

As soon as I woke up on Wednesday, I was flooded with notifications from people who'd tagged me in various stories about a young Muslim kid who had been arrested after taking a homemade clock to school. Many people reached out to me asking if there's anything I can do to help the 14 year old electronics hobbyist because he lives only a few hours from me in the state of Texas. I'm also a maker and have mentored numerous kids who wanted to get into robotics so my opinion was called upon. While researching the story, I noticed many people had already given their version of the events. Kid goes to school with clock, shows it to teacher, teacher sees he's a Muslim and assumes it's a bomb, teacher calls the cops and he's hauled off to jail. I knew there had to be more to the story than that, fortunately, there was. I mean, I know there's a stigma against Islam in this country right now but I have an extensive background in STEM education (primarily with minorities) and I can't imagine an entire school district ganging up on a kid to get him thrown in jail just because of his religious beliefs. Especially a kid that has been described as well-behaved, mild-mannered and was previously in a robotics club. Even in Texas.

I was able to reach out to Ahmed's parents and offered to let him join the Houston Robotics Club, assisting us in building a telepresence robot and take some free programming classes. I even gave them a list of local resources in Dallas for him to explore. 

Most people reacted by saying Ahmed shouldn't be "making while brown" and focused solely on his skin color. They suggested he move out of the state of Texas, stop being creative and give up on ever having any life as a Muslim in America because minorities can't succeed. For me, this really stung. In the past I've talked about how many kids I've known who didn't want to go on to work in STEM fields because they were discouraged by their own friends and family from going to college, told they were "acting white", and one student I had was sexually harassed regularly by another student, groped and told she was a lesbian because she wanted to be a mechanic. Even in a situation where creating results in sexual assault or being arrested, I would never ever tell a kid to stop making. I would, however, offer some sage advice from the experiences of so many that have persevered through the years. 

Below is a list of what I observed, what I feel is wrong and what I would suggest:

Telling his family to leave Texas

This is extremely ignorant, as it suggests that every person in Texas is against technology and education and if they could only pack up all their possessions and flee like refugees to any other place in the US, it would be paradise for a budding clock builder. It suggests that only Texas makes poor judgement calls on students.

If they lived in California, he would have been given millions in start-up capital

This is also very flawed. He disassembled a clock and put it into a pencil case. Now, from what I've read, this was one of the simplest devices he's made, and I don't want to criticize his work because he's 14 and I know this is not indicative of the kinds of projects he's done in the past, but no, Silicon Valley does not give out millions in venture capital to teenage tinkerers who make clocks. However, this is a great start and I hope he continues to do more projects like this into his adulthood so that when he's ready to bring a unique product to market, he'll have investors who believe in him. However, there's a lot of other places in the US that are closer to his home town that would be a great start for first-round capital, like Houston or Austin. The reason I moved here from California was because I was given opportunities that I would have never been given anywhere else. 

The worst comments I read were that he should return with a real bomb and blow up his school to teach them a lesson. Someone posted that in one of my comment threads which caused a huge fight to break out between my Texas and California friends. Because I don't condone murder, I deleted the entire thread which caused one of my California friends to repeatedly message me telling me that I make them want to vomit because I am weak. I am not a violent person and I shouldn't be forced to keep hate speech in my own thread when I am friends with kids and families who live in Texas. #NotAllTexans  

After reading the local versions of the story, prior to it making it into Gawker (who used a fake photo they lifted from an DIY site), I started to understand how something so innocuous as a kid bringing a clock to school could get blown out of proportion. The original story states that Ahmed showed his science teacher the device who told him it was cool but to not show it to any of the other teachers, I assume because he realized that a box of exposed electronics could be misconstrued as something harmful. Anyone who's ever worked with kids building rockets, playing with chemistry sets or creating electronics has had to give that warning. It's not telling the kid that there's anything wrong with what they're doing, but not everybody knows the difference between a bundle of wires and a timer for a bomb. In hindsight, the teacher could have probably offered to keep his project until after school, which is a very common practice in schools. In college, we had a lockup area for things that we shouldn't be hauling around campus with us, like ferric chloride. In fact, if you were found with any amount of ferric chloride outside of the fabrication building, you were immediately expelled, no questions asked.

How do we ensure kids aren't being arrested for building clocks? 

The current Zero Tolerance policy in schools is over 20 years old. It's from before kids were soldering circuit boards to make Arduino pencil launchers and twitter-controlled lamps. We didn't have MAKE magazine and most people had never opened a desktop computer tower to upgrade their RAM. Things have changed. People like myself who've been disassembling electronics their entire life are becoming increasingly popular. If anything, the Maker movement is opening the doors to young kids of all ethnicities and backgrounds because the cost of creating is becoming much more affordable. By robotics club springing up in communities and schools, it gives more opportunities to children who don't come from a family of engineers or scientists. I started with a Commodore 64 in the 80's that my parents spent months saving up for and it didn't even have the computing power of my current phone. The fact that we can purchase an entire box of parts online and have it shipped to our homes, then download the software and learn to program it over the Internet is amazing. All kids should get that experience. Zero Tolerance doesn't allow for creativity because it requires teachers to use outdated definitions to have a child arrested for whatever they perceive to be a threat to students. When I was a kid, I remember getting in trouble for my curiosity, but it would have never gotten me arrested. Kids were expected to do dumb things and hurt themselves sometimes. 

Off-topic: I used to teach a soldering class to children between the ages of 8-12 and the very first thing I told all of my students and their parents was "You are going to burn yourself and cut yourself. But if you are careful, you won't hurt yourself too bad." I didn't use lead-free solder either but I taught all of the students that they are working with a toxic substance and if they wear eye protection, don't breathe in the fumes and wash their hands thoroughly afterward, they would be fine. Rarely did anyone burn or cut themselves so every class ended with people feeling better than they would have had I given them the illusion that they weren't playing with hot and sharp tools. 

-+Annika O'Brien ___Here's my views:

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