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Rich Pollett has been at 5 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Science on Google+863,779Please join us on 3/4 for a Developmental Science HOA with Dr.@102662655160025117683, Associate Professor of Psychology at @109618943120182321190 and director of the Developmental Language and Cognition Lab. Dr. Wagner studies how children acquire language, and in particular, how they learn about meaning. Her research has looks at various dimensions of meaning, including children's understanding of temporal and event semantics (especially the linguistic category of aspect), and their understanding of social indexical meanings coded in dialect and register. She conducts her studies at her lab on OSU's campus, and also at the Columbus Center of Science and Industry (@108175964516692755798). We will enable the Q & A app prior to the HOA so feel free to posts your questions on the event post or by using the app. RSVP “yes” to add this event to your calendar. *Relevant Links:* Faculty page: http://goo.gl/la3xYa  Lab page: http://goo.gl/CduTn0  Buckeye Language Network: http://goo.gl/YA6dNW  *Relevant Readings:* Wagner, L., Clopper, C. G., & Pate, J. (2014).  Children’s perception of dialect variation. _Journal of Child Language, 41,_ 1062 – 1084. http://goo.gl/aFFmPc Clopper, C., Rohrbeck, K. L. & Wagner, L. (2013). Perception of talker age by young adults with High-Functioning Autism. _Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43_, 134 - 146. http://goo.gl/oyf8uD  Wagner, L. (2010). Acquisition of Semantics. _Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science, 1_ (4), 519 - 526. http://goo.gl/8H9rct Science HOAs2015-03-04 16:00:0077  
Joanne Manaster118,790Tune in on Tuesday, February 17th at 12 noon EST as Joanne and @104733415626297507218 with science writer and editor,@110337041053859181296  who edited Bill Nye's latest book, Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation. We will talk about his work on the book as well his other numerous projects at Discover, American Scientist, Popular Science, and so much more! If you can't make it, visit the event page later to view the archived chat!Undeniable Science Edition! with Corey S. Powell2015-02-17 18:00:0045  
Scott Lewis377,789Heck yes! 500th recording of the @117904790972122493317 podcast!! To celebrate this, @115510485336217794615 and I will be live-tweeting the show at @113166718268343560861, @117350484427668823936 and @101736365103983335412 bring us the amazing science we all know and live from TWIS.  If you're over on Twitter, live-tweet with us using the hash tag #TWIS500   (https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&q=%23TWIS500) When the show goes live, my promo video from @112979228143535385377 will be replaced with the live feed, but just in case you're having trouble finding it, check it out at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSuIbMcKpOw I'm sure Michael and I will be uploading some #selfies  of us watching and tweeting about TWIS and I hope you will too! Just put them down here in the event or on Twitter, I know that the trifecta of TWIS would LOVE to see you all celebrate with them! Also, please consider becoming a patron of TWIS. They do an amazing job bringing science to the WORLD every week and couldn't do it without the support of their listeners. You can do so easily over at their Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/thisweekinscience (also linked as "tickets") #ScienceEveryday   #TWIS   #ThisWeekInScience   #HangoutsOnAir   #Science   #STEM   #Podcast  TWIS500 Viewing Party!!2015-02-05 05:00:0084  
Fraser Cain987,906Join @110701307803962595019 and a rotating crew of space journalists to talk about the biggest news in space and astronomy.Weekly Space Hangout - January 16, 20152015-01-16 21:00:0066  
Science on Google+863,779Young people are victimized by bullies at an alarming rate and the consequences have tragic effects on teens, parents, schools and communities. We hope you can join us on 12/4 as we chat with @113958503500525282923  about the research on school violence and bullying. Dr. Pescara-Kovach teaches courses in the field of human development as well as graduate level seminars on the causes, consequences, and prevention of school violence. She is co-chair of U.T.’s Anti-Bullying Task Force and author of “School Shootings and Suicides: Why We Must Stop the Bullies.” You can learn more about Dr. Pescara-Kovach's research by clicking on the links below. http://www.utoledo.edu/education/depts/efl/faculty/kovach/index.html  www.preventingbullying.org www.oregoncs.orgwww.oregoncs.org  http://www.utoledo.edu/tlc/bully Developmental Science HOA: Episode 22014-12-04 20:00:0051  

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 61

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2016-02-20 16:42:48 (61 comments; 1 reshares; 73 +1s)Open 


Book: River, you don't ... fix the Bible

Most reshares: 42

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2016-02-01 20:39:13 (5 comments; 42 reshares; 59 +1s)Open 


Your argument may be silly^^ Comic by Hannah Blumenreich

Most plusones: 153

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2016-03-03 22:16:23 (2 comments; 3 reshares; 153 +1s)Open 


Kaywinnet Lee Kaylee Frye

Latest 50 posts

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2016-03-26 18:25:37 (3 comments; 20 reshares; 43 +1s)Open 


Chameleon chemical reaction where the various oxidation states of Manganese - in Potassium Manganate(VII) - culminate in sequence to produce several vivid colors.
Source: https://youtu.be/kKlXe2mrnHQ


Chameleon chemical reaction where the various oxidation states of Manganese - in Potassium Manganate(VII) - culminate in sequence to produce several vivid colors.
Source: https://youtu.be/kKlXe2mrnHQ___

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2016-03-13 11:46:02 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 30 +1s)Open 


; )


; )___

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2016-03-03 22:16:23 (2 comments; 3 reshares; 153 +1s)Open 


Kaywinnet Lee Kaylee Frye


Kaywinnet Lee Kaylee Frye___

posted image

2016-02-20 16:42:48 (61 comments; 1 reshares; 73 +1s)Open 


Book: River, you don't ... fix the Bible


Book: River, you don't ... fix the Bible___

posted image

2016-02-17 22:30:44 (0 comments; 13 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 


Space Glass

Japanese glass artist Satoshi Tomizu manages to create wondrous cosmic scenes by encasing the universe in orbs of glass that are no larger than the human eye. His pendants are known as Space Glass. Each of them is unique and has breathtaking detail. It’s like a mesmerizing microcosm that can be held in the palm of your hand. These miniature spheres are made of opals, specks of real gold, and swirls of colored glass that spin and burst into constellations of the universe

Tomizu captures these spheres as a close up, reminiscent of the Men In Black film scene of the jewelry piece worn on the cat's collar. Each bauble is blown with a durable glass loop allowing one to wear their personal space-scape around their neck if they wish.

His work has earned him an Atelier Nova Design Award and has also been exhibited in Handmade in Japan Festival.more »


Space Glass

Japanese glass artist Satoshi Tomizu manages to create wondrous cosmic scenes by encasing the universe in orbs of glass that are no larger than the human eye. His pendants are known as Space Glass. Each of them is unique and has breathtaking detail. It’s like a mesmerizing microcosm that can be held in the palm of your hand. These miniature spheres are made of opals, specks of real gold, and swirls of colored glass that spin and burst into constellations of the universe

Tomizu captures these spheres as a close up, reminiscent of the Men In Black film scene of the jewelry piece worn on the cat's collar. Each bauble is blown with a durable glass loop allowing one to wear their personal space-scape around their neck if they wish.

His work has earned him an Atelier Nova Design Award and has also been exhibited in Handmade in Japan Festival.

Gallery: http://www.plusalpha-glass.com/gallery.html

#glassart   #SatoshiTomizu   #spacescape  
.___

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2016-02-01 21:16:55 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 


Conservative voter's existential crisis
Thanks Quantum Leap!


Conservative voter's existential crisis
Thanks Quantum Leap!___

posted image

2016-02-01 20:39:13 (5 comments; 42 reshares; 59 +1s)Open 


Your argument may be silly^^ Comic by Hannah Blumenreich


Your argument may be silly^^ Comic by Hannah Blumenreich___

posted image

2016-01-17 16:35:00 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

Another amazing collection this week!

SciTech #ScienceSunday Digest - 03/2016.
Permalink here: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2016/01/deep-learning-hardware-dna-origami.html

Deep learning hardware, DNA origami pores, Insect drone vision, Compressible torsional materials, Choreographic crystals, 3D printing metals, Implantable sensors, 3D NAND chips, Bone thymus rejuvenation, deep learning software.

1. EIE Chip Accelerates Deep Learning
New software and hardware architecture has been developed into a chip called EIE that significantly boosts the performance of deep neural network applications http://www.nextplatform.com/2015/12/08/emergent-chip-vastly-accelerates-deep-neural-networks/. EIE basically maximises the role of SRAM in processing the inference side of neural networks and uses newly developed “deep compression” to pare these networks down to their most essential components while retaining accuracy to allow ultra-fast, ultra-efficient processing. The chip performs inference operations between 13x and 189x faster compared to benchmarks, while delivering energy efficiency between 3,000x and 24,000x better compared to benchmarks. Interesting questions arise relating to the nature of neural networks and the drastic pruning you can inflict. How long until these chips start being integrated into servers and mobile platforms?

2. DNA Origami Membrane Pores
Self assembling DNA origami techniques have been used to create synthetic molecular membrane pores in biological membranes that can be controllably opened and closed http://phys.org/news/2016-01-dna-blocks-pave-drug-delivery.html. The pores were anchored to the membranes of vesicles and the addition of different complementary strands of DNA was shown to open and close the pore to allow the passage of certain molecules through the 2nm channel, or at least alter their rate of passage by 140-fold. In related news DNA origami structures are being used to functionalise gold nanoparticles and form well-ordered arrays and novel materials out of the particles https://www.mcgill.ca/newsroom/channels/news/printing-press-nanoparticles-257609.

3. Insect Drones & Catcher Drones
In a simple yet effective development, drones operating with insect-inspired vision strategies that become unstable in flight at a specific distance from a landing zone, can utilise this very instability to estimate distance, correct their flight, and execute far smoother and more precise landings http://www.tudelft.nl/en/current/latest-news/article/detail/door-nieuwe-theorie-kunnen-drones-afstanden-zien-met-een-oog/. It also allows the drone to shed other sensors and weight. In other drone news a new anti-drone system employs remote or autonomous drones to shoot a net to capture rogue drones in mid-flight http://www.mtu.edu/news/stories/2016/january/drone-catcher-robotic-falcon-can-capture-retrieve-renegade-drones.html and 100 drones can now be coordinated together in flight http://www.gizmag.com/100-drones-guinness-world-record/41328/.

4. Torsional Materials and Extreme Compressibility
New materials designed with coordination geometries, where subunits in the bulk material form a coordinated framework and are free to rotate, move, or deform independently, have been developed that exhibit properties of extreme compressibility http://phys.org/news/2016-01-atomic-gears-torsion-springs-contribute-extreme.html. Such materials have negative thermal expansion coefficients, shrinking in volume when heated for example, and under pressure deform and compress to a larger extent than any other crystalline material. In these materials compression doesn’t induce the normal shortening of bonds, but rather the structural deformation of subunits that move and rotate to bring nearby subunits closer together.

5. Crystal with Time-Dependent Symmetry
A new type of crystal has been described that possesses symmetry not in the way its atoms are structured but rather in the way it’s particles move in time http://gizmodo.com/physicists-discover-a-new-kind-of-crystal-inspired-by-s-1751911893. It is interesting that the discovery was inspired by satellite orbits as gravity wave detectors because the movement does remind me of quadrupole motion. This is a type of dynamic symmetry, and these hypothetical materials are now known as choreographic crystals; the work also involved some clever mathematics to identify all possible such arrangements above the tetrahedron analogue discovered here. As these are currently confined to theory it remains to be seen whether such materials can be discovered or fabricated - and what their properties might be, for example new metamaterials are able to boost MRI sensitivity by 50% http://phys.org/news/2016-01-metamaterials-boost-sensitivity-mri-machines.html.

6. Improved 3D Printed Metals
Related to last week’s innovation for much improved 3D printed ceramics, this week we have much improved 3D printed metals and metal alloys using liquid inks and common furnaces http://www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/news/articles/2016/01/a-new-way-to-print-3-d-metals-and-alloys.html. The liquid inks contain metal powders, solvents, and elastomers, are printed normally and then sintered in furnace to make the powder fuse; prior to sintering the printed object can be bent and further altered to achieve different structures, and the technique allows safer metal oxides to be printed then turned into their base metals with the addition of hydrogen.

7. Implantable & Wearable Sensors
A couple of fascinating items from the CES show. First, Lumee is an implantable grain-of-rice-sized device and sensing platform made of hydrogel that sits below the skin that doesn’t trigger scar tissue or an immune response and so can remain for very long periods; the prototype contains a dye that measures oxygen levels and which can be interrogated by shining light through the skin http://spectrum.ieee.org/view-from-the-valley/biomedical/devices/move-over-wearables-make-way-for-implantables - a fantasitc platform with a huge range of sensing and diagnostic applications and these new liquid crystal hydrogels might offer additional customisation and control http://phys.org/news/2016-01-polymer-medical-solutions.html. Second, a tiny flexible sticky sensor patch works on thermoelectric principles, harvesting energy from the temperature gradient between your skin and the air, the prototype for which monitors your hydration levels and sends this information to your smartphone http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/biomedical/devices/power-harvesting-sensor-patch-uses-your-body-as-a-battery - great platform with a larger number of applications.

8. Commercial 3D NAND Chips
Micron claims their new 3D NAND memory chips get Flash-based memory back on Moore’s Law scaling curve http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1328652. Their first generation 3D NAND chip is a stack 32 layers deep and being offered in versions with 32 and 48 Gigabytes each; the future roadmap includes 2 Terabyte 3D NAND packages enabling solid state drives with a capacity of 32TB. They’ve also designed and released new chips in a partnership with Intel that have a 3D cross-bar architecture (3D XPoint) sandwiching a material to create arrays of resistive RAMs and enabling mass commercial rollout for memristors.

9. Bone & Thymus Rejuvenation Approaches
A new microRNA delivery technology utilises polymer spheres to protect the microRNA cargo and get inside cells and it can slowly release the payload over the course of a month if needed; in the proof of concept the spheres targeted cells at wound sites in bone, delivering microRNAs that instructed the cells to ramp up bone healing and bone building processes http://ns.umich.edu/new/releases/23403-nano-shells-deliver-molecules-that-tell-bone-to-repair-itself. Boosting levels of metabolic hormone FGF21 in the thymus of old mice protects the organ from age-related degeneration, increasing T-cell production, maintaining an active immune system and extending lifespan by 40%; looking forward to human tests http://news.yale.edu/2016/01/11/life-extending-hormone-bolsters-body-s-immune-function.

10. Microsoft’s 152 Layer Neural Network
Microsoft Research won the ImageNet image recognition contest with a powerful new machine learning architecture called a deep residual network that is more complex than previous deep learning architectures and spans 152 layers http://www.wired.com/2016/01/microsoft-neural-net-shows-deep-learning-can-get-way-deeper/. The new architecture can examine many more features of a data set (images in this case) and circumvents the problem of signal dilution that has plagued other attempts by being able to quickly skip layers that it doesn’t need. Closing the feedback-loop of developing these applications the team also created a system that helps build these networks as needed. The potential here is significant.

Archive: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2016/01/deep-learning-hardware-dna-origami.html___Another amazing collection this week!

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2016-01-08 21:27:45 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 48 +1s)Open 


There are two features of interest, as you are always saying ...


There are two features of interest, as you are always saying ...___

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2016-01-08 14:21:33 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 


IK Prize 2016 ideas anyone?

The IK Prize in partnership with Microsoft celebrates digital creativity in all its forms. Awarded annually by Tate for an idea that proposes an innovative application of digital technology, the winning project will enable the public to experience art on display at Tate Britain and on Tate’s website in exciting new ways. The successful individual, team or company receives a £15,000 prize plus a further £90,000 to turn their idea into a reality.

The Prize is open to creative practitioners around the world with expertise in some form of digital technology, whether animation, gaming, digital product and experience design or otherwise, and involving anything from coding and software development to computer science and robotics. The 2016 competition sets the challenge of applying Artificial Intelligence to engaging the public with art. 
ht... more »


IK Prize 2016 ideas anyone?

The IK Prize in partnership with Microsoft celebrates digital creativity in all its forms. Awarded annually by Tate for an idea that proposes an innovative application of digital technology, the winning project will enable the public to experience art on display at Tate Britain and on Tate’s website in exciting new ways. The successful individual, team or company receives a £15,000 prize plus a further £90,000 to turn their idea into a reality.

The Prize is open to creative practitioners around the world with expertise in some form of digital technology, whether animation, gaming, digital product and experience design or otherwise, and involving anything from coding and software development to computer science and robotics. The 2016 competition sets the challenge of applying Artificial Intelligence to engaging the public with art. 

http://www.tate.org.uk/about/projects/ik-prize

#Science   #Art   #Technology   #Tate   #DigitalEducation  ___

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2016-01-07 21:55:39 (3 comments; 4 reshares; 85 +1s)Open 


Mary & Lestrade


Mary & Lestrade___

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2016-01-07 02:53:52 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 49 +1s)Open 


Holmes, just one thing ... tweeds in a morgue?


Holmes, just one thing ... tweeds in a morgue?___

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2016-01-04 03:11:26 (0 comments; 6 reshares; 38 +1s)Open 

___

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2015-12-24 21:02:52 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 29 +1s)Open 


Tis the Season #Festivus  


Tis the Season #Festivus  ___

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2015-12-23 02:21:35 (0 comments; 4 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 


Bill Nye Reaction Gifs

Thanks for making our Europa Mission Petition the best in Planetary Society history. You can have these gifs to play with and in return I ask that you consider joining the Planetary Society at http://www.planetary.org/imgur 

Let's change the world! 

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJTuOofuN6I&feature=youtu.be

#BillNye   #PlanetarySociety   #gifs   #science   #technology  


Bill Nye Reaction Gifs

Thanks for making our Europa Mission Petition the best in Planetary Society history. You can have these gifs to play with and in return I ask that you consider joining the Planetary Society at http://www.planetary.org/imgur 

Let's change the world! 

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJTuOofuN6I&feature=youtu.be

#BillNye   #PlanetarySociety   #gifs   #science   #technology  ___

posted image

2015-12-20 17:22:26 (9 comments; 7 reshares; 48 +1s)Open 


Fun with fungus

Native to Australia and Tasmania, Clathrus archeri is also known as devil’s fingers. It is what’s known as a phalloid fungus.

The members of the Fungi kingdom—which includes mushrooms, yeasts, and molds—come in a startling array of forms. But none hold a candle to the utterly bizarre Clathrus archeri, also known as the devil’s fingers.

But unlike most of its fungi brethren, devil’s fingers doesn’t sprout straight from the earth. Instead, it begins life in a kind of egg sack.

As it matures, the sack is breached by a number of Cthulhu-esque red tentacles. At first glance,they look like some kind of demon reaching up from the underworld, but they’re actually totally benign.

The four arms are coated in a sticky, strong-smelling tissue meant to attract flies. However, the fungus is not carnivorous. Instead, itcontaminates th... more »


Fun with fungus

Native to Australia and Tasmania, Clathrus archeri is also known as devil’s fingers. It is what’s known as a phalloid fungus.

The members of the Fungi kingdom—which includes mushrooms, yeasts, and molds—come in a startling array of forms. But none hold a candle to the utterly bizarre Clathrus archeri, also known as the devil’s fingers.

But unlike most of its fungi brethren, devil’s fingers doesn’t sprout straight from the earth. Instead, it begins life in a kind of egg sack.

As it matures, the sack is breached by a number of Cthulhu-esque red tentacles. At first glance,they look like some kind of demon reaching up from the underworld, but they’re actually totally benign.

The four arms are coated in a sticky, strong-smelling tissue meant to attract flies. However, the fungus is not carnivorous. Instead, it contaminates the flies with its spore, turning them into agents of dispersal.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clathrus_archeri

#science   #fungus   #nature  

.___

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2015-12-15 19:59:10 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 


Fun with refractive indices (animated)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQx5Be9g16U

1. Slow motion ball: You need a thick liquid, preferably honey, a heavy ball, and a sphere shaped container. Place the heavy ball in the lower half of the sphere. Fill the lower half of the container with honey a little more than half.
If you use too little or too much, it will affect the motion of the ball.

2. Water fire starter. Credit goes to The King of Random for this idea. Be sure to check out his channel. He has a huge selection of amazing how to experiments. https://www.youtube.com/user/01032010814

You need a plastic or glass container with a curved area. The Pom bottles work great. Fill the bottle with water. Fold 2 sheets of paper in half, twice. Print or scribble a black mark on one of the sheets. On a sunny day hold the bottle near the paper, focusing... more »


Fun with refractive indices (animated)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQx5Be9g16U

1. Slow motion ball: You need a thick liquid, preferably honey, a heavy ball, and a sphere shaped container. Place the heavy ball in the lower half of the sphere. Fill the lower half of the container with honey a little more than half.
If you use too little or too much, it will affect the motion of the ball.

2. Water fire starter. Credit goes to The King of Random for this idea. Be sure to check out his channel. He has a huge selection of amazing how to experiments. https://www.youtube.com/user/01032010814

You need a plastic or glass container with a curved area. The Pom bottles work great. Fill the bottle with water. Fold 2 sheets of paper in half, twice. Print or scribble a black mark on one of the sheets. On a sunny day hold the bottle near the paper, focusing the light on the black area of the paper. Once it starts to smoke and a hole begins to form, wrap the other sheet of paper around the smoking piece. Wave the papers through the air to feed oxygen to the spark. Continue this until the paper catches on fire.

3. No-leak magic bag: Al you need is a zip baggy, pencils and water. Fill the bag almost to the top. Zip it shut, and start sticking pencils through the bag. Sometimes a few drops will leak out, but overall, this is a simple yet impressive trick

4. Liquid Stacking: You'll need a tall glass or bottle. Dish Soap, vegetable oil, dark corn syrup, rubbing alcohol, water and food coloring.

First add the dark corn syrup, then dish soap, then add food coloring to the water and pour it in with the bottle tilted, then add the vegetable oil (bottle tilted), and finally add food coloring to the alcohol and pour it in with the bottle tilted.

5. Invisible Bottle: You need glycerin, a glass and a bottle that will fit in the glass. Fill both glass and bottle with glycerin and place the bottle in the glass. It looks like the bottle disappears.

6. Dancing Liquid: You need a powered speaker, a tone generator (can be found online), corn starch, water and plastic to protect the speaker. Pour 1/2 cup of corn starch in a bowl and 1/4 cup of water. Mix. Pour the liquid into the speaker and generate a 60hz tone.

7. Magic Water Barrier: You need 2 of the same glasses. Hot water, cold water, food coloring and a thin piece of plastic or cardboard. Pour the hot water in 1 glass, the cold in the other glass, add food coloring, then place the plastic on top of the hot water glass. Turn the glass upside down, place it on top of the cold water glass, then carefully remove the plastic. Hot water is less dense than cold water, so it "floats" on top of the cold water.

8. Leidenfrost effect: You need a pan, water and a stove. Turn the heat on high for about 4 minutes then add the water. This experiment can stain your pans.

9. Reverse Illusion: Add all sorts of images or words behind a glass, then watch as it reverses when you add water in the glass.

10. Reversing Liquid: You need 1 big glass, 1 smaller glass, 3 mixing glasses, corn syrup, pipettes, food coloring, and clips.

First pour the corn syrup into the 2 bigger glasses. Place the smaller glass inside of the bigger glass. Attach the clips to prevent the smaller glass from moving side to side in the bigger glass. Pour a small amount of corn syrup into the 3 mixing glasses. Add food coloring and stir. Fill each pipette with a different color, then add the colored corn syrup to your big glass. Turn the smaller glass carefully and watch the colors mix. Turn it back and watch them unmix.

#science   #refractiveindices   #fluiddynamics  
.___

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2015-12-14 23:21:03 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 


McCoy^^ 


McCoy^^ ___

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2015-12-10 15:50:48 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 77 +1s)Open 


That's the spirit : )


That's the spirit : )___

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2015-12-09 19:34:33 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 


Simpsons: house rules woo hoo!


Simpsons: house rules woo hoo!___

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2015-12-08 20:36:56 (4 comments; 1 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 


Cool or gross? You can see the lettuce going through their head
For myself ... very cool


Cool or gross? You can see the lettuce going through their head
For myself ... very cool___

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2015-12-08 19:31:29 (8 comments; 23 reshares; 109 +1s)Open 


Our brains are hardwired to see humanity where there is none. Check out these adorable examples. 


Our brains are hardwired to see humanity where there is none. Check out these adorable examples. ___

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2015-12-06 23:42:08 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

+Mark Bruce's weekly while traveling. Cheers Mark!

SciTech #ScienceSunday Digest - 49/2015.
Live from Fort Worth
Permalink here: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2015/12/better-crispr-rolling-dna-motor.html

Better CRISPR, Rolling DNA Motor, Polarized 3D Imaging, Metacage Light Isolation, AI plays Go, Brain protein imaging, Single molecule switches, Lasers & optics, Mass cloning, Longevity genes.

1. A Better Re-Engineered CRISPR
The revolutionary CRISPR gene-editing technology has been re-engineered to create an improved system that significantly reduces off-target editing errors http://news.mit.edu/2015/overcome-crispr-cas9-genome-editing-hurdle-1201. The changes amounted to just 3 of the enzymes 1,400 amino acids being changed but this had the result of reducing off-target DNA editing to undetectable levels and the new enzyme eSpCas9 is being made available globally to other research groups. Such low levels of off-target edits combined with other methods to reduce errors even further will make the technique even safer to use in humans. And here is George Church on CRISPR and beginning to reverse human aging in 5 or so years https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2015/12/interesting-comments-by-george-church.php, and a proposal for CRISPR-Gene-Drives to mitigate the effects of ocean acidification on plankton http://nextbigfuture.com/2015/12/gene-drive-one-of-many-ways-to-prevent.html. 

2. Rolling DNA Motor
A new DNA motor system uses specific strands of DNA bound in high number to tiny glass beads that bind to specific strands of RNA; the binding is facilitated by an enzyme that destroys the RNA on the surface after binding, an event that causes the tiny beads to be pulled along and so allow another DNA strand to bind to the next RNA in its path and so on http://phys.org/news/2015-12-nano-walkers-speedy-dna-based-motor.html. The movement of these DNA and enzyme-powered motors can be imaged and filmed by a smartphone camera and the system is sensitive enough to detect single base mutations and other contaminants. The motors move in a straight line and it would be interesting to see if they can steer such things in future and carry different payloads.

3. Polarization Enables 1000-Fold Better 3D Imaging
A new method uses simple polarizing filters to enable basic 3D imaging systems to produce 3D models up to 1000 times as accurately as before http://news.mit.edu/2015/algorithms-boost-3-d-imaging-resolution-1000-times-1201. An Xbox Kinect can typically produce centimeter resolution from a few meters away, but by rotating in three different polarization filters and taking 3 images the resolution is boosted to tens of micrometers, exceeding high-end laser scanning technologies. This offers the possibility for low resolution depth sensing cameras to be used in smartphones and autonomous vehicles to produce quick convenient 3D models of their surroundings. I've used an Xbox Kinect for 3D scanning and the resolution does indeed match the first image in the article.

4. Metacages for Isolating and Shielding Light
Nanowires measuring 5 - 20nm can be arrayed on a surface in arbitrary shapes and architectures to produce customized regions that can either completely isolate light within or completely block light from entering http://phys.org/news/2015-12-optical-metacage-blocks.html. The gaps between the nanowires are typically the same scale as the nanowires themselves, and freely allow the passage of gas and fluids, with applications in microfluidic chips with biological cells and also in optical circuits where it is important to isolate light and interference. Nested structures might even provide more complete isolation and protection from interference, which might possibly be important for quantum computing and entanglement applications. Meanwhile interesting discoveries with light scattering nanoparticles could lead to invisibility cloaks and smaller optical antennas http://spectrum.ieee.org/nanoclast/semiconductors/materials/light-scattering-nanoparticles-could-lead-to-smaller-optical-antennas. 

5. Tackling the Game of “Go” with AI
While computers have trumped humans at Chess for some time now (search space of 10^60), humans still easily beat the best computers at Go (search space of 10^100). New research from Facebook’s artificial intelligence group might soon change this with a system that combines features of a neural network with a search-based machine to create a Go engine that plays at an advanced level and seems have have plenty of room for further optimisation and improvements http://www.technologyreview.com/view/544181/how-facebooks-ai-researchers-built-a-game-changing-go-engine/. It’s been interesting to see such systems get progressively better at playing games over the years, for example with the game-playing engines developed by DeepMind.

6. Protein Imaging for Brain Structure
SWITCH is a new tissue imaging technique that is able to preserve and image the same tissue repeatedly using different fluorescent protein labels that target different cells each time http://news.mit.edu/2015/protein-imaging-detailed-brain-architecture-1203. As part of the proof-of-concept the group labelled 22 different proteins (scope to use much more in future) in a small section of brain tissue and were able to easily see brain connectivity and other structures. Time is the limiting factor in this method, with approximately one day being required for each labelling protein to diffuse through the small tissue sample used in this case. 

7. Stable Single Molecule Switches
Single molecules comprised of simple organometallic structures arranged around a single molybdenum atom and connected to electrodes have been formed into simple, single-molecule switches http://phys.org/news/2015-11-molecule-manner-electron.html. The molecules themselves are only a couple of nanometers long, function similarly to a silicon transistor, require only two electrodes instead of three, and possess two stable states that have conductivities that differ by three orders of magnitude. An early but promising prototype for future memory storage and computational applications. 

8. Wondrous Laser & Optics Developments
Another big week in laser and optics technology. First, lasers to make diamond structures at room temperature and ambient pressure https://news.ncsu.edu/2015/11/narayan-q-carbon-2015/ and also to efficiently fabricate graphene http://spectrum.ieee.org/nanoclast/semiconductors/materials/laserinduced-graphene-looks-to-diplace-batteries-with-supercapacitors. Second, light can be used with engineered viruses to control gene delivery to cells, with one wavelength holding them together and a second wavelength breaking them apart http://news.rice.edu/2015/12/01/red-means-go-to-therapeutic-viruses/. Third, a much improved photonic sintering method fuses nanoparticles much more precisely and effectively than previously possible http://oregonstate.edu/ua/ncs/archives/2015/dec/photonic-%E2%80%9Csintering%E2%80%9D-may-create-new-solar-electronics-manufacturing-technologies. Finally, a new SPRINT device can capture single photons on demand http://wis-wander.weizmann.ac.il/tapping-particles-of-light#.VmOD-lWrSJc. 

9. Setting Up a Chinese-Korean Cloning Factory
A new cloning factory being developed hopes to clone up to one million cows per year by 2020 http://nextbigfuture.com/2015/12/boyalife-ceo-plans-to-clones-woolly.html. The company is also doing pet cloning, developing mammoth cloning and plans to do racehorses, dogs, and primate cloning. With this capability they would be well placed to do human cloning if they wanted to - there wouldn't be any technical challenges at least, but I wonder what the applications are and who the customers would be? 

10. Genes to Prolong Human Life
Combing through 40,000 genes from three different organisms has revealed 30 genes that are conserved and regulated in a similar way that also significantly influence aging processes https://www.ethz.ch/en/news-and-events/eth-news/news/2015/12/genes-for-longer-healthier-life-found.html. Interfering with these genes had varying levels of influence on aging, with a dozen of such interventions resulting in lifespan extensions of at least five percent; for a couple of examples the mechanism of action was identified, suggesting other methods to achieve the same effects. While the genes are conserved there haven’t been any human studies yet. And if aging interventions and therapies don’t arrive soon enough for you then improved methods of preservation via vitrification or ice-free cryopreservation might be worth considering https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2015/11/an-example-of-present-work-on-improving-vitrification.php. 

Archive: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2015/12/better-crispr-rolling-dna-motor.html___+Mark Bruce's weekly while traveling. Cheers Mark!

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2015-11-28 18:48:02 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 80 +1s)Open 


Just tell her Wash


Just tell her Wash___

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2015-11-28 01:34:33 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 30 +1s)Open 


Happy birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy birthday dear BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL ...


Happy birthday to you, happy birthday to you, happy birthday dear BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL ...___

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2015-11-27 20:41:50 (9 comments; 3 reshares; 81 +1s)Open 


; )


; )___

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2015-11-18 22:03:28 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 51 +1s)Open 


Calvin & Hobbes is 30 years old today!
#calvinandhobbs   #30yearanniversary  


Calvin & Hobbes is 30 years old today!
#calvinandhobbs   #30yearanniversary  ___

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2015-11-16 16:04:01 (3 comments; 10 reshares; 22 +1s)Open 


Ever wonder what a star sounds like?

Stars certainly aren’t silent. Actually, they constantly ‘sing’ by oscillating at certain frequencies. Using ESA’s Corot satellite, astronomers have recorded these frequencies and made them into actual sounds. Click the link (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7687286.stm) to go to the BBC website and actually hear starsongs. 

Ever wonder what the Sun sounds like?

Asteroseismology records the frequencies which a star pulsates at and uses those frequencies to study the internal structure of the star. Those frequencies can be turned into actual sound. The mp3 is of the Sun’s pulsations. Turn your bass up and have a listen (http://www.asteroseismology.org/sounds/sun.wav).

Obviously, actual sound doesn’t travel through space. What you’re hearing are the frequencies the star’s vibrating atafter they’ve be... more »


Ever wonder what a star sounds like?

Stars certainly aren’t silent. Actually, they constantly ‘sing’ by oscillating at certain frequencies. Using ESA’s Corot satellite, astronomers have recorded these frequencies and made them into actual sounds. Click the link (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7687286.stm) to go to the BBC website and actually hear starsongs. 

Ever wonder what the Sun sounds like?

Asteroseismology records the frequencies which a star pulsates at and uses those frequencies to study the internal structure of the star. Those frequencies can be turned into actual sound. The mp3 is of the Sun’s pulsations. Turn your bass up and have a listen (http://www.asteroseismology.org/sounds/sun.wav).

Obviously, actual sound doesn’t travel through space. What you’re hearing are the frequencies the star’s vibrating at after they’ve been recorded by astronomers here on Earth. The tone is affected by a star’s age and how many metals it contains. The fluctuations you hear come from the fact that the whole star is oscillating. Vibrating standing waves ripple through the star’s body, and they can tell you a lot about the internal workings of the star itself.

The technique’s called astroseismology (http://www.asteroseismology.org/). It all started around 1962, when a group studying the Sun noticed that the radiation emitted by the solar surface slowly changes with a period of about 5 minutes. Specifically, they were looking at lines in the Sun’s spectrum, and noticing tiny doppler shifts over time. What they’d found were the acoustic harmonics in the Sun’s surface. 

As you’d expect, giant stars (http://whitedwarf.org/seis/sounds/bHyi.wav) have a deep throbbing sound, while tiny, rapidly spinning white dwarfs (http://whitedwarf.org/seis/sounds/gd358.wav) are full of odd harmonics. You can even compare Alpha Centaurii A (http://whitedwarf.org/seis/sounds/aCenA.wav) with Alpha Centauri B (http://whitedwarf.org/seis/sounds/aCenB.wav).

The technique of actually listening to these vibrations, however, is a relatively new one; though it’s fast becoming popular. More and more astronomers (such as Jodrell Bank’s Tim O’Brien) are listening to sounds from space. It’s easy to see why, with the eerie beauty of some of these sounds, though it’s also a very useful scientific method. http://www.jodrellbank.manchester.ac.uk/
.
#stars   #starsounds   #acousticharmonics   #astroseismology  ___

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2015-11-13 22:46:18 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 26 +1s)Open 


Drake the Science Guy
I know when that Na+/K+ pump bling. It can only mean one thing.
Explaining the Na+/K+ pump to people outside of biology


Drake the Science Guy
I know when that Na+/K+ pump bling. It can only mean one thing.
Explaining the Na+/K+ pump to people outside of biology___

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2015-11-05 11:26:58 (0 comments; 8 reshares; 31 +1s)Open 


The end is nye

National Geographic Explorer: Bill Nye's Global Meltdown
The Five Stages of Climate Change Grief
http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/explorer/galleries/the-five-stages-of-climate-change-grief/at/stage-four-depressionisolation-2100671/


The end is nye

National Geographic Explorer: Bill Nye's Global Meltdown
The Five Stages of Climate Change Grief
http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/explorer/galleries/the-five-stages-of-climate-change-grief/at/stage-four-depressionisolation-2100671/___

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2015-11-03 19:34:03 (3 comments; 7 reshares; 42 +1s)Open 


International Space Station celebrates 15 years of continuous human presence in space (low Earth orbit)

On November 2, 2000, a Russian Soyuz rocket docked at the International Space Station (ISS) carrying Expedition 1, carrying NASA astronaut William Shepherd and Roscosmos cosmonauts Yuri Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev.

The ISS shows what an international co-operation combined with scientific endeavour can achieve: since the launch of the first module in 1998, 211 astronauts from 15 countries have visited the ISS and over 69 countries have contributed to the development and running of the space station.

The breakthroughs achieved there would not have been possible on Earth. Aside from the many hundreds of experiments carried out in 15 years, technological innovations designed for the station have been transferred to help people on Earth, particularly when it comes... more »


International Space Station celebrates 15 years of continuous human presence in space (low Earth orbit)

On November 2, 2000, a Russian Soyuz rocket docked at the International Space Station (ISS) carrying Expedition 1, carrying NASA astronaut William Shepherd and Roscosmos cosmonauts Yuri Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev.

The ISS shows what an international co-operation combined with scientific endeavour can achieve: since the launch of the first module in 1998, 211 astronauts from 15 countries have visited the ISS and over 69 countries have contributed to the development and running of the space station.

The breakthroughs achieved there would not have been possible on Earth. Aside from the many hundreds of experiments carried out in 15 years, technological innovations designed for the station have been transferred to help people on Earth, particularly when it comes to health and medicine.

(http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/15_ways_iss_benefits_earth)

Filtration systems designed for space are helping people around the world gain access to clean water.

Compact ultrasound devices developed for the use on the station have led to portable instruments that can travel to patients who otherwise might not have access to diagnostic machines. 

Robotic arms working on the station have been adapted to do things on Earth like perform surgery. And a lot has been learned about the aspects of living in a micro-gravity environment. you can read more about how ISS is benefiting people here

And of course, the astronauts aboard the space station have provided us with the most incredible views of Earth.

.___

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2015-10-30 00:35:05 (0 comments; 8 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 


Victoria Lautman spent four years traveling India to record deteriorating subterranean stepwells

Ancient structures called stepwells that were built in India beginning in 2nd and 4th centuries A.D. have been crumbling for years, which is leading to their extinction. Chicago journalist  Victoria Lautman’s first trip to the country prompted the discovery of the ruins. During her trip, Lautman decided to record the ancient beauties and give it a permanent stance through photography. 

The impressive stepwells are large subterranean structures, which run deep into the ground up to 10 stories.They were built as a means to access the water tables in regions where climate was the most dry with few monsoons during the spring. By the 11th century, these stunning structures were commissioned by wealthy and powerful citizens as monuments. During the last thousand years, mostste... more »


Victoria Lautman spent four years traveling India to record deteriorating subterranean stepwells

Ancient structures called stepwells that were built in India beginning in 2nd and 4th centuries A.D. have been crumbling for years, which is leading to their extinction. Chicago journalist  Victoria Lautman’s first trip to the country prompted the discovery of the ruins. During her trip, Lautman decided to record the ancient beauties and give it a permanent stance through photography. 

The impressive stepwells are large subterranean structures, which run deep into the ground up to 10 stories.They were built as a means to access the water tables in regions where climate was the most dry with few monsoons during the spring. By the 11th century, these stunning structures were commissioned by wealthy and powerful citizens as monuments. During the last thousand years, most stepwells have remained dried and neglected, except for those near tourist areas. 

For this reason, for the last 30 years Lautman has spent her career capturing the beauty of engineering and art of the ancient world before it banishes. 

More photos and short write up here:
http://culturenlifestyle.com/post/128262615912/journalist-spent-four-years-traverling-india-to-record
.
 ___

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2015-10-29 21:05:47 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 


Typhoon Maysak from the International Space Station


Typhoon Maysak from the International Space Station___

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2015-10-27 21:50:18 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 


#shakespeare   #phrases   #language   #books   #reading  


#shakespeare   #phrases   #language   #books   #reading  ___

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2015-10-26 21:06:57 (7 comments; 4 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

Red meat and cancer risk

The news is awash with stories about how red and processed meats have been classified as carcinogens in the same category as tobacco. But what exactly does this mean? Let's unpick this a little bit before throwing out the bacon with the bathwater. 

There have been several excellent bits of writing that explain what this means - the first is by Ed Yong (http://goo.gl/br9OU7) and the second by CRUK* (http://goo.gl/ELDzCI). These are well-worth a read if you want to learn more. 

Basically, the key bit of information to remember is that this is not a risk assessment, it is a hazard identification. A great analogy (stolen from the CRUK article above) is to think of banana skins - they definitely can cause accidents, but in practice it doesn't happen very often, and isn't as severe as being in a car accident. But under the hazardi... more »

Red meat and cancer risk

The news is awash with stories about how red and processed meats have been classified as carcinogens in the same category as tobacco. But what exactly does this mean? Let's unpick this a little bit before throwing out the bacon with the bathwater. 

There have been several excellent bits of writing that explain what this means - the first is by Ed Yong (http://goo.gl/br9OU7) and the second by CRUK* (http://goo.gl/ELDzCI). These are well-worth a read if you want to learn more. 

Basically, the key bit of information to remember is that this is not a risk assessment, it is a hazard identification. A great analogy (stolen from the CRUK article above) is to think of banana skins - they definitely can cause accidents, but in practice it doesn't happen very often, and isn't as severe as being in a car accident. But under the hazard identification approach, banana skins and cars would be in the same category because they both definitely cause accidents. The severity of the accident is not discussed, and that's where we tend to get lost with the breathless press releases on this topic. 

So should you stop eating red and processed meat? The answer is all about the dreaded, boring M word - moderation. If you're always eating red and processed meat, over years and years, then that's probably not good for you. But meat in moderation (i.e. not too much and not too often) is still okay, and is definitely not as bad as smoking is. The thing with diet and disease is that reality often rather boring; there are no miracle diets or magical juice cleansers that will give you eternal youth. There are no superfoods that offset the damage of binge-drinking every weekend. That's just not how our bodies work. 

What you can do to prevent cancer is eat plenty of fruit and veg with lots of fibre while cutting back on things like alcohol, salt, red and processed meats. And definitely avoid sunburns and smoking. 

*In the interest of full disclosure, I work at the charity CRUK as a science communicator. 

#ScienceEveryday  ___

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2015-10-13 01:33:15 (2 comments; 6 reshares; 60 +1s)Open 



Nine Stunning Astronomy Photographs From 2015

From 2,700 entries the Royal Museums Greenwich (http://www.rmg.co.uk/) in London chose a collection of images from their annual Astronomy Photographer of the Year Competition, which showcase stunning images from space. Featuring a variety of celestial bodies, such as the Horsehead Nebula and Barnard’s Loop, the winner will be announced on September 17 and exhibited at the Royal Observatory Greenwich. We highly recommend clicking each image to view the full extent of their beauty.


1 - Overall and Skyscapes winner: Eclipse totality over Sassendalen by Luc Jamet, France

2 - Aurorae winner: Silk Skies by Jamen Percy, Australia

3 - Galaxies winner: M33 Core by Michael van Doorn, Netherlands

4 - Our Moon winner: Full face of our Moon by András Papp, Hungary

5 - Our Sunwi... more »



Nine Stunning Astronomy Photographs From 2015

From 2,700 entries the Royal Museums Greenwich (http://www.rmg.co.uk/) in London chose a collection of images from their annual Astronomy Photographer of the Year Competition, which showcase stunning images from space. Featuring a variety of celestial bodies, such as the Horsehead Nebula and Barnard’s Loop, the winner will be announced on September 17 and exhibited at the Royal Observatory Greenwich. We highly recommend clicking each image to view the full extent of their beauty.


1 - Overall and Skyscapes winner: Eclipse totality over Sassendalen by Luc Jamet, France

2 - Aurorae winner: Silk Skies by Jamen Percy, Australia

3 - Galaxies winner: M33 Core by Michael van Doorn, Netherlands

4 - Our Moon winner: Full face of our Moon by András Papp, Hungary

5 - Our Sun winner: Huge prominence lift-off by Paolo Porcellana, Italy (detail)

6 - Planets, Comets & Asteroids winner: The arrow missed the heart by Lefteris Velissaratos, Greece

7 - People & Space winner: Sunset Peak star trail by Chap Him Wong, Hong Kong

8 - Stars & Nebulae winner: The Magnificent Omega Centauri by Ignacio Diaz Bobillo, Argentina

9 - Young Competition winner: A Celestial Visitor by George Martin (UK) aged 15

More 2015 and previous years winners here: http://www.rmg.co.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/astronomy-photographer-of-the-year/2015-winners
.___

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2015-10-11 17:58:55 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 


Manoj Bhargava is about doing, his focus he says is solving the basic current problems of the world. The billionaire with a net-worth of $4 billion is currently focusing 99% of his wealth to change the world, specifically towards the three key areas: energy, water and health.

Do you have a world changing idea?
Manoj Bhargava's site Stage 2: http://stage2innovations.com/

Billions in Change Official Film (43 minutes)


Manoj Bhargava is about doing, his focus he says is solving the basic current problems of the world. The billionaire with a net-worth of $4 billion is currently focusing 99% of his wealth to change the world, specifically towards the three key areas: energy, water and health.

Do you have a world changing idea?
Manoj Bhargava's site Stage 2: http://stage2innovations.com/

Billions in Change Official Film (43 minutes)___

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2015-10-11 17:29:04 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

SciTech #ScienceSunday Digest - 41/2015.
Permalink here: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2015/10/brain-circuit-functions-gmo-pets-crispr.html 

Brain circuit functions, GMO pets, CRISPR xenotransplants, Two-qubit logic, Chemical search engine, DNA based sensor, Optogenetics applications, Human brain project, Robotic object grasping, Ion selective membranes. 

1. Understanding Brain Circuits
New imaging techniques that convert brain scans into wiring diagrams are now allowing groups to determine the factors of certain neural networks in the brain that allow control over global thoughts and actions http://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/31801. The results show how the signalling cascade (between neighbouring and distant regions) in the brain resembles other related phenomena such as those involving dynamic networks. In future they hope to test whether wiringd... more »

SciTech #ScienceSunday Digest - 41/2015.
Permalink here: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2015/10/brain-circuit-functions-gmo-pets-crispr.html 

Brain circuit functions, GMO pets, CRISPR xenotransplants, Two-qubit logic, Chemical search engine, DNA based sensor, Optogenetics applications, Human brain project, Robotic object grasping, Ion selective membranes. 

1. Understanding Brain Circuits
New imaging techniques that convert brain scans into wiring diagrams are now allowing groups to determine the factors of certain neural networks in the brain that allow control over global thoughts and actions http://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/31801. The results show how the signalling cascade (between neighbouring and distant regions) in the brain resembles other related phenomena such as those involving dynamic networks. In future they hope to test whether wiring differences between people can predict performance on different cognitive tasks. In related news experimental evidence seems to have proven that ultimate object recognition occurs in the neural circuits of the inferior temporal cortex http://news.mit.edu/2015/how-brain-recognizes-objects-1005. Additional work this week also revealed the brain circuits and firing patterns for how our brain keeps time http://news.mit.edu/2015/neuron-firing-patterns-underlie-time-measurement-brain-1008. 

2. Bringing GMO Pets to Market
China’s BGI group announced that it is selling genetically engineered “micro” pigs for $1,600, which were formerly created by BGI as test animals to help with a range of medical research initiatives http://www.theverge.com/2015/9/30/9423375/micropig-genetic-engineering-dna-china. Created with an older genome-editing technology, TALENs, (it’ll be interesting to see what they’re now cooking up with CRISPR), the pigs were made simply by switching off one of the growth hormone receptor genes. I’m supportive of the effort, novel smaller pets for people with revenues helping to fund medical research, and wonder what other custom genetic alterations of these and other pets will be made available commercially - probably better on the open market than encouraging unseen backyard creations. 

3. CRISPR for Xenotransplantation
Speaking of CRISPR and pigs, the technique has been used to perform a large amount of engineering on the pig genome, with pig embryos created that have had 62 endogenous retroviruses inactivated in their DNA, as well as 20 genes modified that encode for cell surface proteins that trigger immune reactions in humans https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2015/10/crispr-gene-editing-and-xenotransplantation.php. This is a pretty powerful proof-of-concept for using CRISPR to enable xenotransplants of pig organs into humans that (i) removes the risk of endogenous retroviruses causing disease in human organ recipients, and (ii) reduces or removes the need for immunosuppressant drugs in human organ recipients. 

4. Quantum Logic Gate and Two Qubits in Silicon
A two qubit quantum logic gate has been created in silicon for the first time and so helping make silicon quantum computers a feasible prospect http://newsroom.unsw.edu.au/news/science-tech/crucial-hurdle-overcome-quantum-computing. Using the same silicon processing technology as is currently used commercially is a significant benefit that helps increase the feasibility of developing silicon based quantum computers. This is the first time a two-qubit system has been realised in silicon, using silicon transistors that have just a single electron associated with them whose spins can store binary information; the team has designs for chips with millions of qubits. 

5. Combinatorial Chemical Search Engine
Lee Cronin is one of the researchers I try to keep track of and this week his group demonstrated an automated robotic chemistry system that (i) creates many different random combinations of chemical conditions, (ii) focuses on those that prove promising for additional investigation, and (iii) repeats the process to arrive at optimal chemicals and conditions http://www.gla.ac.uk/news/headline_426436_en.html. As part of tackling a question relating to the origin of life on Earth the group demonstrated that small protein fragments can be made much longer and more easily than previously thought; the record of the conditions and chemical reactions that lead to these proteins helps to calculate the likelihood for producing the first molecules required for life. Such a system might be used to search out other optimal molecules for a range of applications and so speed up research and discovery in the process. 

6. DNA Sensor Detects Antibodies
A new sensor comprised of a DNA “nanomachine” is able to selectively signal when it binds to antibodies of interest http://www.nouvelles.umontreal.ca/udem-news/news/20151007-detecting-hiv-diagnostic-antibodies-with-dna-nanomachines.html. It works by (i) desired antigens / detectors are attached at two points, (ii) when an antibody binds the antigens it stretches and opens the DNA molecules up, and (iii) this exposes fluorescent molecules to emit light that can be captured by a detector. This is a nice modular system that (i) can be used to detect almost any antibody of interest, (ii) could be adapted to detect almost any cell type of interest (based on surface proteins), (iii) could be incorporated into cheap assays that are readable by a mobile phone camera. 

7. Optogentics for Fertility and Heart Activation
First, small populations of neurons (called kisspeptin neurons) in mice were engineered with conventional optogentics techniques to make them sensitive to light; researchers then used light to activate or deactivate the firing of these neurons and showed that they are key drivers of fertility that release episodic pulses of key reproductive hormones http://www.otago.ac.nz/news/news/otago195201.html. These mice were made fertile or infertile by turning the light on or off. Second, a convenient optical pacemaker has been demonstrated in flies whose heart cells were optogenetically modified to respond to light and their heart rate could be ratcheted up or down as desired by way of light pulses http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/biomedical/devices/scientists-control-a-flys-heart-with-frickin-lasers. 

8. Human Brain Project Update
The Blue Brain Project component of the Human Brain Project achieved a new milestone with a draft digital reconstruction of the neocortical microcircuitry of the rat brain, the model of which, when processed on a supercomputer matches the observed signalling behaviour of the same region of real rat brains http://actu.epfl.ch/news/a-major-proof-of-concept-for-brain-simulation/. The representation was only of a third of a cubic millimeter of brain tissue with 30,000 neurons and 40 million synapses. The group admit this is an important, but minor milestone and there is a huge amount of work to do. In other brain news new electrode implants for the brain show remarkable flexibility and a firm implantation sheath that dissolves after positioning http://www.lunduniversity.lu.se/article/breakthrough-for-electrode-implants-in-the-brain. 

9. Deep Learning for Robotic Grasping
A Baxter robot loaded with deep learning software has learned how to pick-up and grasp objects better than other pre-programmed picking-and-grasping approaches http://www.technologyreview.com/view/542076/deep-learning-robot-takes-10-days-to-teach-itself-to-grasp/. The software was pre-trained with object-recognition capabilities and Baxter was left alone to practice picking up objects for 10 hours a day, and over a 700 hour period clocked up 50,000 grasps on 150 different objects. The next step will be for the group to incorporate learning to apply the correct grasping strength to objects with different softness / hardness, with a classic end point being the ability to correctly apply toothpaste to a tooth brush. 

10. New Membrane for Selective Ion Absorption
New membranes comprised of graphene and silicon nitride show excellent selectivity for separating ions from solution http://news.mit.edu/2015/big-range-behaviors-tiny-graphene-pores-1005. The graphene is generated by chemical vapour deposition and with deliberate defects that produce nanometer sized holes in the sheets, which are then placed over a layer of silicon nitride that has been punctured with an ion beam; when placed in a salty solution the group demonstrated different ions selectively pass through different pores. Predictive modelling might now allow the design and fabrication of different membranes able to selectively remove gold ions or uranium ions from water for mining applications or biologically relevant ions for sensing applications. 

Archive: http://www.scitechdigest.net/2015/10/brain-circuit-functions-gmo-pets-crispr.html___

posted image

2015-10-05 16:04:33 (13 comments; 36 reshares; 73 +1s)Open 


Open siphon effect, dipping

Non-Newtonian fluids are capable of all kinds of counter-intuitive behaviors. The animation demonstrates one of them: the tubeless or open siphon. Once the effect is triggered by removing some of the liquid, the fluid quickly pours itself out of the beaker. This is possible thanks to the polymers in the liquid. The falling liquid pulls on the fluid left behind in the beaker, which stretches the polymers in the fluid. When stretched, the polymers provide internal tension that opposes the extensional force being applied. This keeps the fluid in the beaker from simply detaching from the falling liquid. Instead, it flows up and over the side against the force of gravity, behaving rather more like a chain than a fluid.  (Image credit: Ewoldt Research Group) 

Video
Open siphon effect, dipping:h... more »


Open siphon effect, dipping

Non-Newtonian fluids are capable of all kinds of counter-intuitive behaviors. The animation demonstrates one of them: the tubeless or open siphon. Once the effect is triggered by removing some of the liquid, the fluid quickly pours itself out of the beaker. This is possible thanks to the polymers in the liquid. The falling liquid pulls on the fluid left behind in the beaker, which stretches the polymers in the fluid. When stretched, the polymers provide internal tension that opposes the extensional force being applied. This keeps the fluid in the beaker from simply detaching from the falling liquid. Instead, it flows up and over the side against the force of gravity, behaving rather more like a chain than a fluid.  (Image credit: Ewoldt Research Group) 

Video
Open siphon effect, dipping: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4od-h7VoRk
.___

posted image

2015-10-01 20:53:42 (5 comments; 7 reshares; 24 +1s)Open 


#themartian   #mattdamon   #bringhimhome   #teamamerica  


#themartian   #mattdamon   #bringhimhome   #teamamerica  ___

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