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ℓaura ℓawrie has been shared in 124 public circles

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AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Светлана Заварыкина156#Добавь в круги#circle  #circleshare  #circlesharing  #circles  #sharedcircles  #sharedpubliccircles  #sharedcircleoftheday  #shared  2014-12-11 16:30:21501000
Валентина Винидиктова0#круглим #кругляши #обмен   #круги   #crazycircles  #hyperball  #circlescirclescircles   #circleoftheweek  #CircleSharing#Circle#SharedCircles#CircleOfTheDay#GooglePlusTips#SharedPublicCircles#Google+#Google#EliteInnerCircle#PublicCircle#AddCircle#Marketing#teamelitecircle#SocialMedia#HearingAids#SocialMediaMarketing#dontconfusethecircles#TeamElite#Engagers#Shared#ГуглПлюс #Делюськругом #Круг #КругДня #Круги #Круглим#Круглы #Кругляши #ОткрытыйКруг 2014-12-10 08:55:32501000
Nolan Harvey218More friend today #sharedcircles   #circleshare   #morefollowers  2014-11-05 16:59:40501001
Валентина Винидиктова0#круглим #кругляши #обмен   #круги   #crazycircles  #hyperball  #circlescirclescircles   #circleoftheweek  #CircleSharing#Circle#SharedCircles#CircleOfTheDay#GooglePlusTips#SharedPublicCircles#Google+#Google#EliteInnerCircle#PublicCircle#AddCircle#Marketing#teamelitecircle#SocialMedia#HearingAids#SocialMediaMarketing#dontconfusethecircles#TeamElite#Engagers#Shared#ГуглПлюс #Делюськругом #Круг #КругДня #Круги #Круглим#Круглы #Кругляши #ОткрытыйКруг 2014-11-05 13:48:41501000
!!!..HAC PATЬ..!!!0 #CHIBURATOR #KRUGI #RUSSIAN #CIRCLE  #CIrcle   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circleoftheday   #shared   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharing   #sharingcircles   #sharingiscaring   #sharingmeansthankyou   #add   #addcircle    #ОбменКругами     #ДобавьВкруги   #Добавитькругляшей     #ОбменКругами     #ПоделилсяКругом   #друзья   #ДрузьяВGoogle   #круги #КругиGoogle   #круглим   #кругляши   #обмен     #ВЗАИМНЫЙОБМЕНКРУГАМИ  #chiburator 2014-10-17 10:31:35501000
Аня Фёдорова0#добавитькруги Обмен Кругами!  5  #CHIBURATOR #KRUGI #RUSSIAN #CIRCLE  #CIrcle   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circleoftheday   #shared   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharing   #sharingcircles   #sharingiscaring   #sharingmeansthankyou   #add   #addcircle    #ОбменКругами     #ДобавьВкруги   #Добавитькругляшей     #ОбменКругами     #ПоделилсяКругом   #друзья   #ДрузьяВGoogle   #круги #КругиGoogle   #круглим   #кругляши   #обмен     2014-10-16 09:40:51466000
Алевтина Кузьмина0Добавляйте эти круги и добавляйте себя тоже в эти круги!#awesome #awesomepeople #chadwick #circle #circles #circlesharing #circleshare #circleoftheday #circleplus #community #followback #followers #gplus #influence #leadership #public #publiccircles #publicsharedcircles #reshare #reshared #reshareday #resharetags #ripples #sharedcircles #sharedpubliccircles #sharedcircleoftheday #sharewithyou #sharing #sharingcircle #socialmedia #theplus #tcs #team #круги#circle #circles #public #publiccircle #circleshare 2014-10-10 08:09:30460000
Kerpi Burgan4,490#awesome #awesomepeople #chadwick #circle #circles #circlesharing #circleshare #circleoftheday #circleplus #community #followback #followers #gplus #influence #leadership #public #publiccircles #publicsharedcircles #reshare #reshared #reshareday #resharetags #ripples #sharedcircles #sharedpubliccircles #sharedcircleoftheday #sharewithyou #sharing #sharingcircle #socialmedia #theplus #tcs #team #круги   2014-08-28 10:12:52492745
Лилия Кулешова0Добавьте меня в круги. :)#CircleSharing#Circle#SharedCircles#CircleOfTheDay#GooglePlusTips#SharedPublicCircles#Google+#Google#EliteInnerCircle#PublicCircle#AddCircle#Marketing#teamelitecircle#SocialMedia#Engagers#Shared #Делюськругом #Круг #КругДня #Круги #Круглим #Кругляши #ОткрытыйКруг #Люди #ВзаимныеЛюди #ВзаимныйФолловинг #Группа #Группы #ГуглCircleOfTheDay#SocialMediaMarketing2014-08-13 11:03:27500004
Сергей Новиков1,050Расшариваем круги и добавляем новые подписки.#ГуглПлюс #Делюськругом #Круг #КругДня #Круги #Круглим #Круглы #Кругляши #ОткрытыйКруг #Люди #ВзаимныеЛюди #Взаимный #ВзаимныйФолловинг #Группа #Группы #Гугл #Добавить #Други #Друзья #Знакомства #Интересно #Интернет #КлубВзаимногоЧтения #КогоПочитать #Новости #Обмен #Общество #Объявления 2014-08-11 07:01:58501238
Joe Martinez61,582My Favorite People & Brand Pages on Google+ - June 2014All these people are amazing and fun (hence why I follow them)! :) If you are looking for people to follow then this is definitely the circle for you! There is a little bit of everything here! From people who love photography, tech, music, art... the list is endless! Enjoy!!  Some of the awesomesauce in this circle:  +Hanna Silver, +DJ Spin, +Tanya Muse Diaz, +Tiffany Henry, +Ant J, +anthony feliciano, +jessi roman, +Bronwyn McGuckin, +Renata Sherwin, +Cynthia K Seymour, +Natascha Otero, +Daria Musk, +Kamal Tailor, +Emily Jiménez, +Carms Perez, +Christopher Lira, +Eleanor Hoh, +Chris Pirillo, +2014-06-23 04:01:3650139640
Dina Tika0Here is a group of Active Engagers, Circle Sharers, Awesome Plus Oners, and Cool People on Google Plus!   Circle Sharing is an awesome way to increase your followers and active engagers on your profile. Some of my favorite people that I've met here on Google + through Circle Sharing.    Want to be in the next Circle of Awesomeness? Follow the Steps Below!  ☛ Add the circle ☛ Share in the Public ☛ Plus 1 the Post. ☛ Comment. 2014-06-10 05:53:52479001
Elijah Novikov0Sharing circles....Обмен кругами:#ГуглПлюс #Делюськругом #Круг #КругДня #Круги #Круглим #Круглы #Кругляши #ОткрытыйКруг #Люди #ВзаимныеЛюди #Взаимный #ВзаимныйФолловинг #Группа #Группы #Гугл #Добавить #Други #Друзья #Знакомства #Интересно #Интернет #КлубВзаимногоЧтения #КогоПочитать #Новости #Обмен #Общество #Объявления 2014-05-31 14:18:115002116
Chris Robinson40,732Musicians on G+ Community Circle 4/14Each month we are circling engaging musicians in the +Musicians on G+ community (http://goo.gl/4lRNe), and then sharing this circle on G+. Here are the engaging musicians for the month of April.2014-05-06 15:34:13130241949
Yoga Imawan947Get Bulk Follower from this CircleTips : Reshare this Circle if you want to get followers, and don't forget used Hashtag on following list, it's good Idea, cause I used Multi language.#add#addcircle#addmetoyourcircles#buy_GooglePlus_followers#cácmối#Çember#Cercle#Ciorcal#circle#CircleOfTheDay#circleoftheweek#circles#CircleShare#circlesharing#CircleSunday#circlethis#circleyoushare#Círculo#cirkel#Cylch#Draugų#Engagers#EngagersCircle#engagerspeople#engagersshowcase  #engagersshowcasecircle#Fèyontiwonn#FridayCircle#FridayCircles#gburugburu#Google#Google+#GooglePlusTips#justanaverageteenagerwhoexpresseshisopinionsovertheinternetcircle2014-04-26 21:02:16501000
Shinta putri anggun2291. Plus The Post2. Comment3. Add People To Circles4. Share The Circle! #circlesharing #circleshare #circles #circle #googleplustips #googleplus #indonesia #artists #artist #artistphotographeramateurorprofessional #artisticgoogle  2014-04-26 16:19:094049526
Blog Guns583#CircleSharing #SharedCircles #CircleOfTheDay #SharedPublicCircles #GooglePlusTips #buy_GooglePlus_followers#Google+ #Google #Engagers #SharedCircleOfTheDay #EngagersCircle #PublicSharedCircles #Share #SocialMedia #FriendsShareFriends #Marketing #Circles #PublicCircle #Magic2014-04-26 07:32:27501104
Blog Guns580#CircleSharing #SharedCircles #CircleOfTheDay #SharedPublicCircles #GooglePlusTips #buy_GooglePlus_followers#Google+ #Google #Engagers #SharedCircleOfTheDay #EngagersCircle #PublicSharedCircles #Share #SocialMedia #FriendsShareFriends #Marketing #Circles #PublicCircle #Magic2014-04-25 14:29:58501104
Yoga Imawan889Get Bulk Follower from this CircleTips : Reshare this Circle if you want to get followers, and don't forget used Hashtag on following list, it's good Idea, cause I used Multi language.#circles#add#addcircle#addmetoyourcircles#buy_GooglePlus_followers#cácmối#Çember#Cercle#Ciorcal#circle#CircleOfTheDay#circleoftheweek#circles#CircleShare#circlesharing#CircleSunday#circlethis#circleyoushare#Círculo#cirkel#Cylch#Draugų#Engagers#EngagersCircle#engagerspeople#engagersshowcase  #engagersshowcasecircle#Fèyontiwonn#gburugburu#Google#Google+#GooglePlusTips#justanaverageteenagerwhoexpresseshisopinionsovertheinternetcircle#Koło2014-04-20 21:54:435019922
Yoga Imawan889IMPORTANT CIRCLE#addcircle#buy_GooglePlus_followers#circle#CircleOfTheDay#circleoftheweek#circles#CircleShare#circlesharing#CircleSunday#circlethis#circleyoushare#Engagers#EngagersCircle#engagersshowcasecircle#Google#Google+#GooglePlusTips#Magic#Marketing#motivateme#publiccircle#PublicSharedCircles#sharedcircle#SharedCircleOfTheDay#SharedCircles#SharedPublicCircles#SocialMedia#SocialMediaMarketing#TopEngagers2014-04-20 18:05:56501537
Shinta putri anggun201please1.share2.click +13.comment thank you #artists   #indonesia #circlesharing   #circleshare #adult   #tourism #facebookmarketing   #facebook #googleplustips  2014-04-19 13:16:385010121
Svetlana Yegorova90Обмен кругами, #круги   #обмен   #кругляши #круглим   #круги#Google+  #SharedCircles   #circles   #circleshare   #sharedcircle   #circlesharing   #followers   #social  2014-04-12 12:07:235008415
Jessica Anggoela0This is a group of individuals that has personally shared four of my best circle sharing circles in the last month (or so).  They also include a mix of new circle sharers and some that are just trying to learn it for the first time. :) :) :0)They are individuals, to a large degree, that are very interested in not just circle sharing (which is great), but also engaging with you in a meaningful way (which is awesome)!!!Guidelines for Core Multipliers- Share the circle to stay in the circle- Have some fun!- If you are new and want in the circle, share the circle.This is a great group.  Enjoy this circle and have an awesome Thursday!*if you were somehow missed/ not included in the circle, please let me know and it will be corrected on the next share. My apologies ahead of time! :)**For those coming from multiplying circle, we are not inviting new folks here, you can privately message them or ping them when you share the circle on your public feed. Thanks!#corecircle #multiplyingcircle #coremultipliers #sharedcircles #circleshare #bestsharedcircle   #circleshare   #sharedcircles   #circleoftheday   #CircleQueen   #CircleMaster   #GPlusList   #Circle   #Circleshare   #Circlesharing   #PublicSharedCircles2014-04-06 08:16:36501404
Chris Robinson40,244Musicians on G+ Community Circle 3/14Each month we are circling engaging musicians* in the +Musicians on G+ community (http://goo.gl/4lRNe), and then sharing this circle on G+. Feel free to add this circle if you want to add engaging musicians to your stream.Upcoming Events 4/6 +Song Show with musical guest +Tom Strasser (http://goo.gl/wEW3R2)*Engaging musicians take part in some (or all) of the following activities. They write up introductions when posting to the community (e.g., a few sentences introducing themselves or the music), they reply when people comment on their posts, they use hangouts or HOAs to engage the community, and/or they take the time to comment on other people's posts.2014-04-01 17:09:48117121124
Сергей Новиков472 Расшариваем круги и добавляем новые подписки :)#ГуглПлюс #Делюськругом #Круг #КругДня #Круги #Круглим #Круглы #Кругляши #ОткрытыйКруг #Люди #ВзаимныеЛюди #Взаимный #ВзаимныйФолловинг #Группа #Группы #Гугл #Добавить #Други #Друзья #Знакомства #Интересно #Интернет #КлубВзаимногоЧтения #КогоПочитать #Новости #Обмен #Общество #Объявления2014-03-12 11:55:44501338
Chris Robinson39,924Musicians on G+ Community Circle 2/14Each month we are circling engaging musicians* in the +Musicians on G+ community (http://goo.gl/4lRNe), and then sharing this circle on G+. There's a lot of interaction in this circle! Click Add people to check it out!Upcoming Events 3/2 +Song Show with +Jonathan Blackshire (http://goo.gl/jIF5e9)*Engaging musicians take part in some (or all) of the following activities. They write up introductions when posting to the community (e.g., a few sentences introducing themselves or the music), they reply when people comment on their posts, they use hangouts or HOAs to engage the community, and/or they take the time to comment on other people's posts.2014-02-28 19:04:351302938
Businessmens.ru1,109Good morning / evening to all.This is a Social Circle of interesting people with an active lifestyle in Google+Это социальный круг общения интересных людей с активной жизненной позицией в Google+You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Вам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!#EarthMyMother #ForFriends #photo2014-02-06 10:27:37501459
Businessmens.ru959Циркуляция сообщества!1. Добавь себе этот круг.2. Добавь в него себя.3. Поделись кругом (запись должна быть видна всем) и скопируй в комментарий это сообщение.Каждый следующий человек будет добавлять тебя в круги, тем самым увеличивая кол-во твоих подписчиков! (плюс ответные добавления от ранее добавленных)ЗЫ: иллюстрированная инструкция тут - https://plus.google.com/photos/110423182607385092010/albums/5750111506919621249?authkey=CNLZ5N_77cOEjgE#ActiveUsers #Add #AddCircle #AddFriends #AddMeToYour #AddMeToYourCircles #AddPeople #Affiliate #afo #AllSortsOfPeople #Art #AstroPhotography #AuthorCircle #Authorshelpingauthors #AutoFollow #AutoFollowBack #Awesome #AwesomeArt #AwesomeCircle #awesomecircles #AwesomeDay #AwesomeFace #AwesomeIdeas #AwesomeIndividuals #AwesomeJuice #AwesomeNess #AwesomePeople #AwesomePublick #AwesomePublickCircle #AwesomeSauce #BeautifulPhotographs #BeautifulPictures 2014-02-01 17:23:355015410
Musicians on G+4,597Musicians on G+ Community Circle 1/14This is a new shared circle series coming out of the Musicians on G+ Community (link to community, http://goo.gl/4lRNe). Each month we will circle some of the engaging musicians in the community and share this circle with you. Click on Add people to check them out! Not a big fan of adding shared circles. No problem. You can search this circle for individual musicians sorted by genre (http://goo.gl/llxGEw) or check out the +Musicians on G+ database (http://goo.gl/CQA96V).Upcoming Events 2/2 +Song Show with +Jonathan Blackshire (http://goo.gl/i2RnPt)2/13 Hangin' with Musicians on G+ (http://goo.gl/MBDqQf)2014-01-31 15:10:426861627
Mikhail Petrovsky63,015Good morning / evening to all.You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Это социальный круг / This social circleВам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!#EarthMyMother #ForFriends #photo2014-01-23 02:07:25499361557
Artur M.35,689A Very Social CircleКруг людей с активной жизненной позицией в Гугле+circle of people, with active life position in Google+Если вы поделились этим кругом вчера, вы находитесь в нем сегодня. Если вы разделяете его с друзьями сегодня, вы будете в нем и завтра.2014-01-20 07:58:29390351165
Syra Khan3,329#circles   #sharedcircles  2014-01-17 10:19:275016320
Alexandra Bolzer1,453sharing with you my updated handselected p h o t o g r a p h e r circle A-LAmateurs and Professionals.. great unique works (04.01.2014)take them, add them, share them if you want #circleshare   #circlesharing   #photography   #photographer   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles  2014-01-04 08:49:02435281725
Alexandra Bolzer1,004here you find my updated handselected PHOTOGRAPHER A-L #circle- they are the best of the best.. amateur and professionals  updated 26.12.2013you are welcome to share as much you like!enjoy! #circleshare   #circlesharing   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #photography   #fineartphotography  2013-12-26 21:37:31393211116
Mikhail Petrovsky59,452This is a Social Circle of interesting people with an active lifestyle in Google+Это круг общения интересных людей с активной жизненной позицией в Google+You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!#EarthMyMother #ForFriends #photo2013-12-26 04:10:46500421768
Vladimir Samsonov23,777Good morning/evening to all. You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Вам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!Это социальный круг This is a Social Circle#ForFriends #photo #EarthMyMother2013-12-08 11:43:39493523976
Andrey Mashnich102,869Good morning/evening to all. You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Вам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!Это социальный круг This is a Social Circle  #ForFriends #photo #EarthMyMother 2013-11-23 15:58:42462452984
Refurio Anachro1,770engagers circle: logistic map frenzyThank you all who showed interest in the topic! I'll be preparing more about the logistic map for another #diagram  post or two, so stay tuned!This circle has (i hope) everyone who has reshared my post, directly liked the origin, or has commented intelligently. It was nice reading the thoughts some of you shared, thanks! As a special gift i added my current favorites who mostly post about math!Direct links to the reshares that had something to add:Special thanks to Richard Green, your share started it! This gives me the opportunity to experiment with your engagers-circle concept. Also thanks for the kind words!https://plus.google.com/101584889282878921052/posts/bCWCuCo1irbAndrew Reidhttps://plus.google.com/113591358584964808233/posts/FyRPg3d1n8fPiotr Parafiniukhttps://plus.google.com/107586274027142920972/posts/U3xGdXSft26philippe rouxhttps://plus.google.com/118331054304456615935/posts/FWPbueRRDnQFrank Nestelhttps://plus.google.com/105661541109472601976/posts/VHpqT1KMAgQW Adenhttps://plus.google.com/104501258233057661239/posts/DqpetshuPMHScienceSundayhttps://plus.google.com/109783903175191665261/posts/MHdX5mK98j8Chomvong Deanhttps://plus.google.com/109290454330797281871/posts/5VtiJFw3hNoAli Orhun Akkirmanhttps://plus.google.com/+AliOrhunAkkirman/posts/FjygxsfCJk8Carlos Castillo-Garsowhttps://plus.google.com/117081920039282965770/posts/7hEadyQEisKDax Solomon Umaminghttps://plus.google.com/102027494320630470417/posts/71Jy84b7cED #sharedcircles   #circlesharing   #engagerscircle   #thankyoucircle   #sciencecircle   #logisticmap  2013-11-19 22:42:11138736
Silvio De Rossi4,316#happyhalloween Circle! Thanks +Andrey Mashnich! #sharedcircles #sharedcircle #circleshare #circlesharing  2013-10-31 14:24:2740124928
Andrey Mashnich100,957Circle of people, with active life position in Google+ Круг людей с активной жизненной позицией в Гугле+ 2013-10-31 13:37:11396391665
Pradeep Sanyal120,484The 500 Best of the Best on Google+!Make sure to share and add this circle so others can know about it! This circle includes fun, interesting, and engaging people that you definitely want to follow! #sharedcircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharedpubliccircles   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circleoftheday   #circleoftheday  2013-09-27 04:31:395009512
Jonathan Blackshire558I was just shared in a circle of very talented musicians that I'm proud to be included in.  I highly recommend you add and check out everyone in this circle!2013-07-23 05:16:49251115
Daniel Mihai Popescu4,968A circle based on +Richard Green's last creation! Add it to yours, share it! They all have some wonderful spark in them!If you're notified, you're in! Sorry to disturb you with the notification! If you want out, just say so :)2013-06-19 09:59:4539032733
Steven Krohn1,616The Popular Choice Circle________________________Richard Green originally shared:Here's version 2 of my Popular Choice circle. The members of this circle were nominated for inclusion here (http://goo.gl/vY07d). Anecdotal evidence suggests that this circle is a pretty good one to add: after the last share, somebody that I follow made the comment:I have to admit I have never had so many people add me back so shortly after adding a shared circle.As guest members of the circle this time, I'm including everyone who has created a circle with me in it in the last four weeks, including +Chris Cota, +Steven Krohn, +Marlo Angelo Tito, +Leo Walsh, +Cesare Riccardo, +Michael Bennett, +1212Scenery, +Daniel Mihai Popescu, +Gai Xinh, +Mithu Hassan, +Daniel Stock, +Marino Puletti, +Christy Sandhoff, +Johnathan Yesson, +Roleta Anedotas, +Linda Dee, +Mariusz Zapart, +César Bustíos Benites, +Andrea Orselli, +Katherine Vucicevic, +Networx, +Rome Heels, +Thumb up your Followers ►, +AyJay Schibig, +Zbynek Kysela, +Ewart Corrigan, +Hamilton Carter, +Don Dobbie, +Brian Buckley, +Wajahat Khan, +Crazy Circles, +Laurent Jean Philippe, +Maria Leoni and +Wolfgang Wodeck.  I'd especially like to thank +Scott Buehler, +Ludovic Moreeuw and +Science on Google+: A Public Database for including me in some particularly exciting circles: the Hyperball, the VIIP Circle and the Smokin' Science Circle, respectively.And now the surprise feature: I invite everyone to leave a comment on (the original post of) this circle share containing a link to one of your own posts. Ideally, this should be something that you posted recently and that you are particularly pleased with. (Don't post spam though; I will delete it.)2013-06-18 14:06:1838425937
Daniel Mihai Popescu4,802I have added version 2 of +Richard Green's  Popular Choice, re-freshed with my nucleus of Invincible circle and brushed of inactive accounts :)If you are notified, you're in, of course :)Thank you for sharing!2013-06-17 10:29:4338924937
Richard Green16,268Here's version 2 of my Popular Choice circle. The members of this circle were nominated for inclusion here (http://goo.gl/vY07d). Anecdotal evidence suggests that this circle is a pretty good one to add: after the last share, somebody that I follow made the comment:I have to admit I have never had so many people add me back so shortly after adding a shared circle.As guest members of the circle this time, I'm including everyone who has created a circle with me in it in the last four weeks, including +Chris Cota, +Steven Krohn, +Marlo Angelo Tito, +Leo Walsh, +Cesare Riccardo, +Michael Bennett, +1212Scenery, +Daniel Mihai Popescu, +Gai Xinh, +Mithu Hassan, +Daniel Stock, +Marino Puletti, +Christy Sandhoff, +Johnathan Yesson, +Roleta Anedotas, +Linda Dee, +Mariusz Zapart, +2013-06-17 04:33:32384693082
matthew rappaport165,364Fun, Funny, Techy and Random #awesomesauce  +Shared Circles on G+ In this circle, YOU+ will find Amazing Plussers to circle that will lead you to everyone that is Epic  and not in this #sharedcircle  through comments, +Reshare s and +mention s!Also, circle anyone that comments below that they weren't inthis circle and Add them to a circle named Oopsy Daisies FTW!+G+ Achievement Unlocked :P2013-06-04 08:41:55450512864
Christy Sandhoff10,119Richard Green originally shared:Remember the Much Better than the Average Circle circles I used to share?  Well, this circle is much better even than those.  The people in this circle were recommended for inclusion in response to my call for nominations, and there are some really interesting profiles in here.  If you've never added a circle before, this one would make a good Starter Circle.I'd especially like to thank +Dirk Talamasca, +Ed Ross, +Korinne M Jackman, +Nina MJ and +Tim Utzig, each of whom suggested a large number of profiles for the circle.  I think I added everyone who was tagged in the nomination post; sorry if I missed anyone.And here's the circle.2013-06-04 04:14:1033821830
Richard Green15,407Remember the Much Better than the Average Circle circles I used to share?  Well, this circle is much better even than those.  The people in this circle were recommended for inclusion in response to my call for nominations, and there are some really interesting profiles in here.  If you've never added a circle before, this one would make a good Starter Circle.I'd especially like to thank +Dirk Talamasca, +Ed Ross, +Korinne M Jackman, +Nina MJ and +Tim Utzig, each of whom suggested a large number of profiles for the circle.  I think I added everyone who was tagged in the nomination post; sorry if I missed anyone.And here's the circle.2013-06-02 14:20:43338532176
Joe Martinez49,987The 500 Best of the Best on Google+ - May/June 2013!I know it's been awhile since I've shared this circle but here we go again! Make sure to share and add this circle so others can know about it! This circle includes really fun, interesting, and engaging people that you definitely want to follow! Here is a sneak peek at some of the awesomesauce that's included in this circle share: +Muse TD, +Euro Maestro, +Tiffany Henry, +Renata Sherwin, +Amanda Blain, +Krystyn Chong, +Chris Pirillo, +Mike Elgan, +Daria Musk, +Hanna Silver, +Casey McKinnon, +Gisel Ocañas, +jessi roman, +Derek Ross, +Bronwyn McGuckin, +Chris Hadfield, +Mike Stenger, +Amanda Rosenberg, +2013-05-30 00:33:42500705466

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2014-09-26 16:08:20 (7 comments, 1 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the American composer George Gershwin (26 September 1898–11 July 1937).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Rhapsody+In+Blue+Original+Version+Using+1925+Piano+Roll/1VTMBI?src=5

Gershwin was incredibly successful as a popular music composer, but he really wanted to be taken seriously as a classical composer. So when the American band leader Paul Whiteman asked Gershwin to write a concerto piece for a jazz concert he was planning in February 1924, Gershwin jumped at the chance. The result, Rhapsody in Blue (which had a mixed reception), has become one of the most well-loved works in the mainstream repertoire.

Leonard Bernstein once said of this one-movement work that it wasn't really a proper composition; he felt that it was "a string of separate paragraphs stuck together." (As it happens, people didn't have much nice to saya... more »

Most reshares: 1

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2014-12-02 22:57:46 (6 comments, 1 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

The Daily Classical Music Post will return in 2015! If there's any music that you'd like to hear/learn about, comment on this post!

Most plusones: 13

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2014-12-02 22:57:46 (6 comments, 1 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

The Daily Classical Music Post will return in 2015! If there's any music that you'd like to hear/learn about, comment on this post!

Latest 50 posts

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2014-12-02 22:57:46 (6 comments, 1 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

What would you like to hear?

The Daily Classical Music Post will return in 2015! If there's any music that you'd like to hear/learn about, comment on this post!___What would you like to hear?

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2014-11-30 05:16:28 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Have you made your wishlist?

How does this whole thing work? Start by making your wishlist!

Participating in Secret Santa is really, really easy. While we work on tidying up some wires behind the scenes making the #SecretSanta  experience even easier, today we'll let you know how the whole thing works!

1) Make your wishlist at Amazon. This is how people will choose what gifts to get you. You make your wishlist at http://www.amazon.com/gp/registry/wishlist

2) Soon, we'll announce where you submit your wishlist.

3) Browse and gift! It's incredibly simple. On the #GPlusSanta  site, you'll be able to browse wishlists and see why your friends or followers need some extra love this season. Additionally, you can search Google+ with the hashtag #SantaGift  

Stay tuned for more details in the coming days.___Have you made your wishlist?

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2014-09-27 13:00:18 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Cyril Scott's Piano Sonata No. 1 Op. 66.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the English composer Cyril Scott (27 September 1879–31 December 1970).

http://classical-music-online.net/en/listen/25563

Eugene Goossens called Scott "the father of modern British music" -- and I'll bet you've never heard any of Scott's music. Scott was an extraordinarily gifted musician, and he experimented with many things, most particularly free rhythm and musical harmonies. He was admired by many other composers, including Debussy, Ravel, Grainger (who was one of his closest friends), Strauss, and Stravinsky.

Scott wrote more piano works (he was a talented pianist as well, which I'm sure helped) from 1903 to 1914 than any other composer in the world, save Scriabin. His experiments in harmonies influenced no less a composer than Elgar, who claimed that the daring harmonies that he used in his Second Symphony were not his idea: "You mustn't forget, it was Cyril Scott started all that!"

In 1909, Scott wrote his Piano Sonata No. 1 Op. 66. This is an absolutely incredible piece: every bar is in a different metre, which gives the work a freedom as well as a sometimes improvisatory air. If you listen carefully, you can hear little snippets of folk music, but Scott has interwoven this with his "free association" harmonies so that the musical language is all his own. I think that Scott could have left the bar lines out completely; maybe that was one innovation too far for him?

There is a wonderful letter written by Percy Grainger to the young Scottish composer Ronald Stevenson in which he mentions this Piano Sonata:

"Dear Ronald Stevenson,

"I found your article on Busoni very stimulating. It brought clarity into my thoughts about Busoni. When I first met him, in 1903, when he offered to give me piano lessons without payment, it was the originality of my sketches for Scotch Strathspey & Reel that attracted him.

"By 1907 he had soured on me, but when we played thru the 2-piano version of Hill-Song No. 2 his hostility melted & he said, quite wistfully: ‘Das ist ein hübsches stück – das ist ein hübsches stück!’

"And of course I talked to him of the various innovations I had already tried-out (irregular rhythms, unresolved discords, large chamber-music, etc.) or intended to try-out in the future (close intervals, gliding tones, etc.). And while I am not denying that he may have got his ‘music of the future’ from all sorts of sources I do suggest that he got enough from me to account for his ideas of music to-come.

"It was the same with Stravinsky & Schoenberg. Neither of these superb geniuses developed their iconoclastic innovations until my innovations, as incorporated in the Cyril Scott Piano Sonata Op. 66 (incorporated by C. Scott with full written permission by me) had been freely played & heard in Central Europe around 1908 – my ‘unresolved discords’ of 1898 leading to atonalism, my irregular rhythms of 1899 leading to irregular rhythms of ‘Sacre du P.’ And when the 1st German War cut off compositional contact between Britain & Central Europe, what happens: These 2 geniuses dropped their British-rooted innovations & went back to less progressive stimulations. (Neither Cyril Scott or I have ever dropped our innovations.) Almost everything that European man does had an English-speaking origin: 5 o’clock tea, train, tram, steamer, flirt, bus, strike, lock-out, club, sandwich, lunch, golf, sport, skyscraper, chewing-gum, maxim-gun, revolver, etc. So why should it be otherwise in music? Is it not a fact that most musical innovations are English-speaking (according to the musicologists): Foweles in the Frith, Worcester Medieval harmony, Dunstable, William Lawes, Jazz? So if an English-speaking composer happens to invent, or revise (for of course Claude Le Jeune also had his irregular rhythms), or transform some aspects of music, why should it seem so unthinkable that it cannot be mentioned?"

Grainger definitely was a pioneer in the use of free rhythms, but Scott was able to take this one step further in the Piano Sonata No. 1 Op. 66 and incorporate his own harmonies and musical ideas, making it an incredibly exciting (and, for the time, daring) work. 

After World War I, Scott's music fell out of favour, and it has only recently been "rediscovered" with new recordings and performances.

My classical music post for today is Scott's Piano Sonata No. 1 Op. 66. It is performed by the great Australian pianist Dennis Hennig, who had planned to record all of Scott's piano works. Unfortunately, Hennig died young, and only released two CDs.___My classical music post for today is Cyril Scott's Piano Sonata No. 1 Op. 66.

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2014-09-26 16:08:20 (7 comments, 1 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the American composer George Gershwin (26 September 1898–11 July 1937).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Rhapsody+In+Blue+Original+Version+Using+1925+Piano+Roll/1VTMBI?src=5

Gershwin was incredibly successful as a popular music composer, but he really wanted to be taken seriously as a classical composer. So when the American band leader Paul Whiteman asked Gershwin to write a concerto piece for a jazz concert he was planning in February 1924, Gershwin jumped at the chance. The result, Rhapsody in Blue (which had a mixed reception), has become one of the most well-loved works in the mainstream repertoire.

Leonard Bernstein once said of this one-movement work that it wasn't really a proper composition; he felt that it was "a string of separate paragraphs stuck together." (As it happens, people didn't have much nice to say about Bernstein's jazz/classical works, but that is another story for another time.) William Grossman and Jack Farrell said Rhapsody in Blue was "one of the most ludicrous of the popular attempts during the 1920s to merge jazz and 'serious' music."

Ferde Grofé, who was Whiteman's pianist and chief arranger (and no mean composer himself) orchestrated Rhapsody in Blue for its first performance, as Gershwin knew very little about orchestration at that time. Grofé produced several versions, and the one most people know is the final one, for a larger orchestra, from 1942. I'm sharing a recording of the earliest jazz band version today.

My classical music post for today is George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue.___My classical music post for today is George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue.

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2014-09-25 16:03:31 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the Presto from Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 9.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the Russian composer Dmitri Dmitriyevich Shostakovich (25 September 1906–9 August 1975).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Presto/3vcTdq?src=5 

A few summers ago, I went to the Aspen Music Festival and heard an absolutely incredible performance of Shostakovich's Symphony No. 9 in E Flat Major, Op. 70. It was all the more amazing because it was a concert given by the American Academy of Conducting, and every movement of this (and of the other two works on the program) were conducted by a different young up-and-coming conductor. The next conductor to take the podium would leave his or her place in the orchestra and take over, seamlessly. It was possibly the most exciting concert that I have ever attended.

And Shostakovich's Symphony No. 9 is a fantastic work as well! This symphony, in five movements (the final three are meant to be played without interruption), was meant to be a celebration of the Soviet victory over Nazi Germany. Although it was received very well in the USSR at the time of its premiere, in 1946, it was not so well received in New York; one critic wrote: "The Russian composer should not have expressed his feelings about the defeat of Nazism in such a childish manner."

In the third movement, Presto, you can hear some of the neoclassical elements that Shostakovich employed very clearly throughout the entire work. He considered this symphony to be a "joyful little piece," and that is obvious particularly in the Presto. At the end of the movement, the orchestra slows down in preparation for the fourth movement, the Largo.

By the way, apparently Shostakovich rarely smiled; I guess there wasn't a lot that made him happy. But I found one of those rare photos to accompany today's post.

My classical music post for today is the Presto from Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 9.___My classical music post for today is the Presto from Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 9.

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2014-09-24 14:20:36 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is a live performance of Klengel's Hymnus for 12 Cellos, Op. 57.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the German cellist Julius Klengel (24 September 1859–27 October 1933).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Hymnus+For+12+Cellos/4PMcWH?src=5

Klengel is best known for his etudes and solo works for cello. Two of his most famous students were William Pleeth and Gregor Piatigorsky. His etudes are still used widely. 

One of the most intriguing of Klengel's compositions (for me, anyway) is his Hymnus for 12 Cellos. It is amazing how much each each individual cellist can contribute to the entire piece, and how well each voice can be heard.

My classical music post for today is a live performance of Klengel's Hymnus for 12 Cellos, Op. 57.___My classical music post for today is a live performance of Klengel's Hymnus for 12 Cellos, Op. 57.

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2014-09-23 13:06:54 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Copland's Connotations.

On 23 September 1962, Philharmonic Hall (now Avery Fisher Hall) opened. A two-hour live CBS special, Opening Night at Lincoln Center, preserved the event on videotape.

http://grooveshark.com/s/Connotations+1961+1962+For+Orchestra+Instrumental/4PM9WX?src=5

The program included the world premiere of Connotations by Aaron Copland and works by Beethoven, Mahler, and Williams. Leonard Bernstein conducted the NY Philharmonic.

Copland's Connotations is one of his rare serial works. There are some flashes of Copland-like harmonies, but it really is very different from many of the pieces we all know and love. Connotations was commissioned by the NY Philharmonic for this occasion, and it was pretty well received at the time.

My classical music post for today is Copland's Connotations.___My classical music post for today is Copland's Connotations.

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2014-09-22 15:03:09 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Blades of Grass by Romeo Cascarino.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the American composer Romeo Cascarino (22 September 1922–8 January 2002).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Blades+Of+Grass/4Pyzs3?src=5

Every once in a while, I come across a composer who was virtually unknown in their lifetime but who should have been recognized and celebrated by a wider audience. Cascarino is one of those very special composers.

Cascarino composed a number of works, including a grand opera, William Penn. He won awards for his compositions, including two Guggenheim Fellowships and the Orpheus Award. He spent his life teaching music theory and composition at a small college in Pennsylvania. 

He grew up in a tough neighborhood in South Philadelphia; according to his obituary, he once said, "With a name like Romeo, a guy writing classical music on the piano, I had to learn to defend myself."

Cascarino wrote Blades of Grass in 1945 for English horn and orchestra. This is an absolutely glorious work, almost unbearably beautiful. I'm not really up on the entire cor anglais repertoire, but it seems to me that this should be at the top of any performer's list.

Blades of Grass was written while Cascarino was in the US Army (in the photo, he is on the right). The basic inspiration was Carl Sandburg's poem Grass, a meditation on death in war:

Pile the bodies high at Austerlitz and Waterloo.
Shovel them under and let me work--
          I am the grass; I cover all.

And pile them high at Gettysburg
And pile them high at Ypres and Verdun.
Shovel them under and let me work.
Two years, ten years, and the passengers ask the conductor:
          What place is this?
          Where are we now?

          I am the grass.
          Let me work.

Bassoonists rate Cascarino's Sonata for Bassoon and Piano very highly. It was written for his World War II army pal Sol Schoenbach, a Philadelphia Orchestra bassoonist (he's the guy on the left in the photo).

Cascarino once said, "A composer speaks through music; words, however eloquent, immediately limit true meaning and understanding." He certainly speaks to me through his music. Cascarino loved the soaring melodies of Puccini, Wagner, Ravel, and other composers; he often was heard to say after a performance of atonal or "academic" new music, "If they could write a melody, they would write a melody." Well, he certainly could write a melody.

My classical music post for today is Blades of Grass by Romeo Cascarino.___My classical music post for today is Blades of Grass by Romeo Cascarino.

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2014-09-21 16:58:28 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the Kyrie from Karl Jenkins's Mass for Peace.

Today, 21 September, is the The International Day of Peace ("Peace Day"), which (according to http://www.internationaldayofpeace.org/) "provides an opportunity for individuals, organizations, and nations to create practical acts of peace on a shared date."

http://grooveshark.com/s/Kyrie/4EtAPx?src=5

The Welsh composer Karl Jenkins (born 1944) composed The Armed Man, subtitled "A Mass for Peace," in 2000. Jenkins was commissioned by the Royal Armouries Museum to compose this work, which is dedicated to victims of the Kosovo crisis. It was composed for SATB chorus, soprano and Muezzin soloists, and orchestra.

According to Classic FM: "And this, [Jenkins's] Mass for Peace, is the primary explanation of his enduring popularity. It was, we’re rather proud to say, given its premiere at a Classic FM live concert in the autumn of 2000 at London’s Royal Albert hall. A year later, the work entered the Classic FM Hall of Fame – and, over the next few years, it climbed rapidly into the Top Ten, where it’s remained as the nation’s favourite piece of contemporary music. . . . Never one to define himself by one set of beliefs, Jenkins uses all sorts of inspirations for the text of The Armed Man, including the Muslim call to prayer, the sixteenth-century 'L’Homme armé' Mass tradition, and ancient religious texts."

My classical music post for today is the Kyrie from Karl Jenkins's Mass for Peace.___My classical music post for today is the Kyrie from Karl Jenkins's Mass for Peace.

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2014-09-20 18:45:02 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is "Pleyel's Hymn (First)."

Today is the anniversary of the birth of Benjamin Franklin White (20 September 1800–5 December 1879), a shape note "singing master" and compiler of The Sacred Harp (1844), a shape note tunebook.

http://grooveshark.com/s/Track+24/70agdT?src=5

Shape note notation was developed as a way to help congregations and communities sing together. It was introduced in the United States in 1801 and became very popular in American singing schools. Shape note singing is described as: " . . . a fluent triple mental association, which links a note of the scale, a shape, and a syllable. This association can be used to help in reading the music. When a song is first sung by a shape note group, they normally sing the syllables (reading them from the shapes) to solidify their command over the notes. Next, they sing the same notes to the words of the music."

Shape note notation, particularly the four shape system, was based on the ut–re–mi-fa-so-la method devised by the 11th-century monk Guido of Arezzo.  This system was in common use in 17th-century England. The English composer Thomas Morley described a four syllable system in his Plain and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke (published in 1597), and some people (most likely mistakenly) give Morley the credit for the four note system.

Sacred Harp singers first read the names of the notes from their shapes and then they sing the words of the song. This is a tradition that dates from the 17th century.

Although Sacred Harp singing is not strictly "classical," some of the conventions (for example, singing in a square, all four parts facing each other) are very similar to those of 17th-century part-songs, glees, and catches. In addition, the 1991 edition of The Sacred Harp includes some songs by classical composers, including Ignaz Pleyel.

My classical music post for today is "Pleyel's Hymn (First)." You can hear the shape note name sing-through before the words.

While Thee I seek, protecting Pow’r,
Be my vain wishes stilled,
And may this consecrated hour
With better hopes be filled.
Thy love the pow’r of thought bestowed,
To Thee my thoughts would soar;
Thy mercy o’er my life has flowed,
That mercy I adore.

When gladness wings my favored hour,
Thy love my thoughts shall fill;
Resigned when storms of sorrow lower,
My soul shall meet Thy will.
My lifted eye, without a tear,
The gathering storm shall see:
My steadfast heart shall know no fear;
That heart shall rest on Thee.___My classical music post for today is "Pleyel's Hymn (First)."

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2014-09-19 16:05:26 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is "Pour, O Pour The Pirate Sherry" from Gilbert and Sullivan's The Pirates of Penzance.

It's International Talk Like A Pirate Day! "Aaarrr!"

http://grooveshark.com/#!/s/Pour+O+Pour+The+Pirate+Sherry/24rxNc?src=5

And what better way in music to celebrate than with a rousing chorus of "Pour, O Pour The Pirate Sherry" from Gilbert and Sullivan's The Pirates of Penzance?

"Avast, there!"___My classical music post for today is "Pour, O Pour The Pirate Sherry" from Gilbert and Sullivan's The Pirates of Penzance.

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2014-09-18 17:24:23 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the overture to Hajibeyov's Koroğlu.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the Azerbaijani and Soviet composer and conductor Uzeyir Hajibeyov (18 September 1885–23 November 1948), widely recognized as the father of Azerbaijani classical music.

http://grooveshark.com/s/Koroglu+Overture/3kQVEz?src=5

I have to say that I am bowled over by Hajibeyov's music. The way that he managed to blend Azerbaijani traditional sounds with Western conventions is just extraordinary, and -- to my ears, at least -- incredibly beautiful. I don't know if he was able to join the two because he learned both forms growing up -- Azerbaijan was part of the Russian empire when he was young. He studied Western music forms at Gory Seminary in Tblisi.

Hajibeyov wrote his opera Koroğlu (The Blind Man's Son) in 1937, to a libretto (in Azerbaijani) by Habib Ismayilov, with poetry by Mammed Said Ordubadi. The story is based on the Epic of Koroğlu, a well-known Turkic heroic legend.

My classical music post for today is the overture to Hajibeyov's Koroğlu.___My classical music post for today is the overture to Hajibeyov's Koroğlu.

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2014-09-17 15:36:42 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Francis Hopkinson's "My Days Have Been So Wondrous Free."

Today, 17 September, is Constitution Day in the United States.

http://grooveshark.com/#!/s/My+Days+Have+Been+So+Wondrous+Free/3aBgWd?src=5

Constitution Day commemorates the formation and signing of the U.S. Constitution on 17 September 1787. One of the ratifiers, Francis Hopkinson (1737–1791), is credited as America's first poet-composer. In the dedication to his Seven Songs (1788), Hopkinson declared, "I cannot, I believe, be refused the Credit of being the first Native of the United States who has produced a Musical Composition."

Francis Hopkinson is the only American-born composer for whom there is evidence that he wrote songs before 1800. "My Days Have Been So Wondrous Free" was written in 1759, to a poem by Irish clergyman Thomas Parnell (also known as Doctor Parnell). Scored for voice and harpsichord, the song is America's earliest surviving secular composition.

As was the performance practice at the time, Hopkinson composed "My Days Have Been So Wondrous Free" in just two parts, the treble and bass, leaving the harmonic details to be filled in by the accompanist.

Incidentally, Hopkinson was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. He is also acknowledged to be the designer of the first U.S. flag.

My classical music post for today is Francis Hopkinson's "My Days Have Been So Wondrous Free."

My days have been so wondrous free,
the little birds that fly
with careless ease from tree
to tree were but as blest as I.

Ask gliding waters if a tear
of mine increased their stream. 
And ask the breathing gales if e'er
I lent a sigh to them.___My classical music post for today is Francis Hopkinson's "My Days Have Been So Wondrous Free."

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2014-09-16 15:40:57 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Taffanel's Andante Pastoral et Scherzettino.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the French flutist Claude-Paul Taffanel (16 September 1844–22 November 1908).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Paul+Taffanel+com+Andante+Pastoral+Et+Scherzettino/3tOyC8?src=5

Taffanel was the foremost flutist of his time. He was a highly respected teacher at the Paris Conservatoire. He introduced many innovations in flute technique, including playing with a lighter tone using carefully modulated vibrato. According to one of Taffanel's students, "When he spoke to us of notes with vibrato or expression, he told us which a mysterious air that these notes, forte or piano, seemed to come from within himself. One had the impression that they came directly from the heart or soul."

Taffanel took advantage of the changes and improvements that Theobald Boehm had made to the flute, and many people agree that it was Taffanel who enabled the French to dominate the flute world in the 20th century, beginning with Marcel Moyse and Georges Barrère, both of whom were students of Taffanel.

In addition to teaching and performing, Taffanel wrote some works that remain staples of the flute repertoire. My classical music post for today is his Andante Pastoral et Scherzettino (1907), the competition piece for the 1907 Paris Conservatory Flute Concours.___My classical music post for today is Taffanel's Andante Pastoral et Scherzettino.

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2014-09-15 16:38:58 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Halfdan Kjerulf's Spring Song Op. 28 No. 5.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian composer Halfdan Kjerulf (15 September 1815–11 August 1868).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Spring+Song+Op+28+No+5/4OUBva?src=5

Kjerulf is not particularly well known, although really he should be. Much of his music has a strong Norwegian national feel. Grieg was one of Kjerulf's admirers, and his Lyric Pieces are based on Kjerulf's piano music. Kjerulf was influenced by French composers, particularly Berlioz, with whom he became acquainted when he traveled to Paris in 1840. Kjerulf also was influenced by Schumann and Chopin.

Kjerulf was only 52 when he died. It is possible that he might have made more of an impact on the Norwegian classical music scene if he had not died so young.

My classical music post is Halfdan Kjerulf's Spring Song Op. 28 No. 5.___My classical music post for today is Halfdan Kjerulf's Spring Song Op. 28 No. 5.

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2014-09-14 18:19:36 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the Kyrie from Michael Haydn's Missa Hispanica.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the Austrian composer Michael Haydn (14 September 1737–10 August 1806), younger brother of Joseph Haydn.

http://grooveshark.com/s/Kyrie/4OTm68?src=5

Michael was a boy soprano at St. Stephen's Cathedral, Vienna, with Joseph. Contemporary records seem to indicate that Michael was considered to have the better voice and also was perhaps a more instinctive musician. Even Joseph felt that Michael's religious works were superior to his own. Michael was Kapellmeister in Salzburg for 43 years. While there, he wrote almost 400 works for church services as well as instrumental music. It is widely accepted that Michael Haydn's Requiem pro defuncto Archiepiscopo Sigismundo (Requiem for the death of Archbishop Siegmund) in C minor of 1771 influenced Mozart's Requiem written almost 20 years later. Mozart was an admirer of Michael's compositions. Michael also had some famous students, including Carl Maria von Weber and Anton Diabelli.

Michael Haydn's Missa Hispanica was written in 1792. Although from the title you might think that it was written for some Spanish church or court or event, apparently there is no evidence that it was performed outside Austria. Also known as the Missa a due cori, Kletzler I:17, MH 422, it is scored for two oboes; two bassoons; two horns in low C, F, and G; two trumpets in C; timpani; strings; basso continuo; SATB soloists; and two mixed choirs.

My classical music post for today is the Kyrie from Michael Haydn's Missa Hispanica.___My classical music post for today is the Kyrie from Michael Haydn's Missa Hispanica.

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2014-09-13 16:52:18 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is one of Clara Schumann’s Romances for Violin and Piano.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the German musician and composer Clara Schumann (née Clara Josephine Wieck; 13 September 1819–20 May 1896).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Romance+For+Violin+And+Piano/3lhRlF?src=5

Clara was one of the most influential pianists of the Romantic era. She was also a composer, although for a long time she was not recognized as such. She didn't even rate herself; she said, "I once believed that I possessed creative talent, but I have given up this idea; a woman must not desire to compose—there has never yet been one able to do it. Should I expect to be the one?"

Well, yes, she should have expected to be the one. Her Three Romances for Violin and Piano, Op. 22 (composed in 1853) show her deep understanding not just of the piano but of music in general. The romance was her favourite genre, and it shows in this, one of her later works. 

My classical music post for today is one of Clara Schumann’s Romances for Violin and Piano.___My classical music post for today is one of Clara Schumann’s Romances for Violin and Piano.

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2014-09-12 14:05:08 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Priti Paintal's Pathways III.

On 12 September 1977, the anti-apartheid leader Stephen Biko died while in police custody in South Africa.

http://grooveshark.com/s/Pathways+Iii+/4a5jli?src=5

There have been many popular songs written about Biko, but one of the most interesting classical works is an opera, Biko, commissioned by the Royal Opera in 1992. The composer, Priti Paintal (b. 1960), is an East Indian composer. She was the first Asian and first woman to receive a commission from the Royal Opera.

Paintal mixes Eastern and Western music in her compositions. In 1993, she said: "In general, close familiarity with Western classical music among Indians is still rather unusual. My experience of it came through my mother, who was introduced to it by her father, he being an orphan had been adopted by a German missionary and put in a German Missionary school in the Himalayas. This in itself was quite unusual, and made him feel a bit of an outsider in India. However, he embraced Western culture with such enthusiasm that all his children grew up having to learn piano and Western classical music . . . . When I was first approached to write opera my initial reaction was to refuse since I felt I had no links with Western form of opera as I knew it. However, I decided to explore the medium a bit further, and after having finished my first chamber opera Survival Song I realised that I was approaching 'opera' differently from my western counterparts. My writing for voices was influenced rhythmically and modally by Indian tribal and folk music, and my instrumental rhythmic language was influenced by African music. This I was able to further develop in my full-length opera Biko, where the singers were asked to sing as naturally as possible, and not in a Western operatic style." 

I have been unable to find a good recording from this opera, but I do want to introduce you to the music of Paintal. She composed Pathways III for the Shiva Nova Ensemble in 2008. This work combines Eastern and Western music beautifully. In an overall electronic framework, this self-titled "music explorer" interweaves the sitar/tablas and the flute/cello beautifully.

My classical music post for today is Priti Paintal's Pathways III. ___My classical music post for today is Priti Paintal's Pathways III.

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2014-09-11 15:18:49 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is John Adams's On the Transmigration of Souls.

The American composer John Adams was commissioned to write a piece within weeks of the September 11, 2001, attacks.

http://grooveshark.com/s/On+The+Transmigration+Of+Souls/3nXUWt?src=5

On the Transmigration of Souls, which received its premiere on September 19, 2002, is composed for orchestra, chorus, children's choir, and pre-recorded tape. Adams won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize in Music for this work.

Matt Campbell says, "The piece starts out with taped sounds of what you’d hear walking down a street in New York City, just traffic noise, walking, a few laughs. Then, voices begin reading names of 9/11 victims, and another voice interjects 'missing' at various points, while the chorus sings quietly in the background. The music is static, and you feel like you’ve entered a room, and you’re watching and waiting. Then, to the music, Adams adds another layer, and the voices continue reading names, but now add in longer phrases, 'Jeff was my uncle,' 'my father,' 'eye color, hazel' that I find more touching because uncle is more informative than Jeff; names don’t tell you much about a person. When you hear 'Jeff was my uncle,' you start to think about your uncles, and making that association is powerful because it taps into your own life and relationships. The chorus starts, in a very static manner, singing words now, while an off-stage trumpet quotes from Charles Ives’ 'The Unanswered Question.' The trumpet is posing the question of existence, and in Ives’ work, the trumpet repeats the melody seven times, while different instruments, unsuccessfully, try to answer. At the same time this is going on, the voices are saying 'I’ll miss you,' 'God bless you.'”

My classical music post for today is John Adams's On the Transmigration of Souls.___My classical music post for today is John Adams's On the Transmigration of Souls.

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2014-09-10 13:36:17 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Walter Steffens's Guernica after Pablo Picasso.

On 10 September 1981, Pablo Picasso's masterpiece Guernica was returned by the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York to Spain.

http://grooveshark.com/s/Guernica+Op+32/49d5Ro?src=5

Guernica was created in response to the bombing of the town of Guernica by German and Italian warplanes at the behest of the Spanish Nationalist forces, on 26 April 1937, during the Spanish Civil War. The Spanish Republican government commissioned Picasso to create a large mural for the Spanish display at the Paris International Exposition at the 1937 World's Fair in Paris. Once it was completed, it was displayed around the world. This tour helped bring the Spanish Civil War to the world's attention. After the victory of Francisco Franco in Spain, Guernica was sent to the United States to raise funds for Spanish refugees. At Picasso's request, MoMA was entrusted with its safekeeping following the tour. Picasso had not wanted the painting to be returned until Spain was restored to a republic; he stipulated this in his will, along with other conditions, including the restoration of "public liberties and democratic institutions."

The German composer Walter Steffens (b. 1934) has spent much of his career expressing paintings in his music. He has based his compositions on paintings by Bosch, Rubens, Chagall, Picasso, Klee, Munch, Aubertin, Soto, Penck and Schumacher.

In Guernica after Pablo Picasso, Op. 32, elegy for viola and orchestra, Steffens summons up his memories of the Allied bombing raids on his home cities of Aachen and Dortmund. The piece begins with a siren. The solo viola plots a course through the destruction and finally finds peace at the end.

My classical music post for today is Walter Steffens's Guernica after Pablo Picasso.___My classical music post for today is Walter Steffens's Guernica after Pablo Picasso.

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2014-09-09 14:56:51 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Chopin's Prelude Op. 28, No. 15.

Happy Birthday, Hugh Grant (born 9 September 1960)!

http://grooveshark.com/s/Prelude+For+Piano+No+15+In+D+Flat+Major+Raindrop+Op+28+15+B+107+10/2qBbxz?src=5

Grant is known for so many films, particularly Four Weddings and a Funeral and Notting Hill. But did you know that one of his earliest major roles was that of Frédéric Chopin in Impromptu? (You can see the trailer for this at Impromptu Official Trailer #1 - Julian Sands Movie (1991) HD.) The photo is a still from the film.

Anyway, this is just an excuse to share a little Chopin today. Prelude Op. 28, No. 15, the "Raindrop" prelude, is the longest of the twenty-four preludes that Chopin wrote during his "honeymoon" on Majorca with George Sand in 1838. As Sara Fishko says, "The prelude is noted for its repeating A-flat, which appears throughout the piece. The A-flat sounds like raindrops to many listeners, giving Op. 28 No. 15 a nickname: The 'Raindrop' Prelude."

My classical music post for today is Chopin's Prelude Op. 28, No. 15.___My classical music post for today is Chopin's Prelude Op. 28, No. 15.

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2014-09-08 14:44:06 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the third movement of Dvořák's Cello Concerto in B minor.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the Czech composer Antonín Leopold Dvořák (8 September 1841–1 May 1904).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Dvorak+Cello+Concerto+In+B+Minor+Op+104+Iii+Finale+Allegro+Moderato/4E03nQ?src=5

Dvořák was one of the most important Romantic composers. He incorporated folk music of his native Bohemia and Moravia along with, later, international elements, particularly once he moved to the United States.

Almost every great composer has a sad story, and Dvořák is no exception. He originally fell in love with his pupil Josefína Čermáková, for whom he composed the song cycle Cypress Trees. However, she never returned his love; she married another man. In 1873, Dvořák married Josefina's younger sister, Anna. But he never stopped loving Josefína.

One of his most beautiful works is his Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104. The third movement was a tribute to the memory of Josefina (actually, the whole Concerto was, but the third movement in particular), who died while he was composing it. The slow section just before the triumphant ending quotes Cypress Trees. Dvořák was adamant that no alteration should ever be made to the Concerto, and specifically to the third movement. He wrote to his publishers: "I give you my work only if you will promise me that no one -- not even my friend Wihan -- shall make any alteration in it without my knowledge and permission, also that there be no cadenza such as Wihan has made in the last movement; and that its form shall be as I have felt it and thought it out."

My classical music post for today is the third movement of Dvořák's Cello Concerto in B minor.___My classical music post for today is the third movement of Dvořák's Cello Concerto in B minor.

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2014-09-07 13:48:00 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is "Vous serez ma Dulcinee" from Philidor's Sancho Pança dans son isle.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the French composer and chess player François-André Danican Philidor (7 September 1726–31 August 1795).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Vous+Serez+Ma+Dulcinee+Sancho+Panca/4xivXZ?src=5

Philidor's Analyse du jeu des Échecs is one of the standard chess manuals; it was the top manual for at least a century. In addition, an opening and a checkmate method are named for him.

Not only was Philidor a top chess player and writer on chess, he also was one of the leading opera composers in France. He wrote more than twenty opéras-comiques and two tragédies-lyriques. He also wrote secular cantatas and motets.

One of the best movies ever made -- IMHO -- is the 1946 Powell-Pressburger romantic-fantasy A Matter of Life and Death (known as Stairway to Heaven in the United States). You should see it, so I won't ruin the plot, but the main character is offered several chances to meet Philidor. One amazing thing about Philidor -- he was the first chess player to win multiple matches playing blindfolded -- is perhaps a subtext in some scenes in the movie.

Philidor wrote his opéra-comique Sancho Pança dans son isle  in 1762. It was based on Cervantes' Don Quixote. It is in one act. It was not considered to be one of Philidor's best works, mainly because of the poor libretto. Baron von Grimm, in his Correspondance littéraire, had this to say:

"A poet who could not make something of the governorship of Sancho Pança should be strangled. M. Poinsinet did not know how to provide situations to the composer either. Except for the scene with the coward who fights with Sancho, dying of fear just like him, I hardly see anything in it that merits the name of situation; and worse, most of the airs do not have much effect. M. Philidor spent a lot on harmony and noise, and not much on melody or musical ideas. He repeated himself in several places; in others he borrowed bits from On ne s'avise jamais de tout and even Annette et Lubin. In a word, this new work by M. Philidor will not hold up to the reputation of Le maréchal ferrant."

I don't think the opera is as bad as this; but I haven't heard that many of Philidor's works. As it happens, Mozart repeated himself a lot and passed off some compositions as new when they were actually rehashes of previously performed works, so Philidor was not the only one to take shortcuts.

My classical music post for today is "Vous serez ma Dulcinee" from Philidor's Sancho Pança dans son isle.___My classical music post for today is "Vous serez ma Dulcinee" from Philidor's Sancho Pança dans son isle.

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2014-09-06 16:04:29 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Einojuhani Rautavaara's On the Last Frontier.

On 6 September 1966, Star Trek premiered on NBC-TV.

http://grooveshark.com/s/On+The+Last+Frontier/6ZVNDM?src=5

To commemorate this event, today's music selection is Einojuhani Rautavaara's On the Last Frontier.

Rautavaara (b. 1928) is a Finnish composer, probably the most important since Jean Sibelius. Rautavaara experimented with serial technique at first but later his work became more mystical and less serial. On the Last Frontier, a fantasy for chorus and orchestra (1997), is based on Edgar Allen Poe's novel Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, mainly the section about the sailors drifting towards the South Pole. But it can just as easily be about the crew of the USS Enterprise drifting towards Delta Vega or Rura Penthe.___My classical music post for today is Einojuhani Rautavaara's On the Last Frontier.

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2014-09-04 16:26:53 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Liszt's Réminiscences de Norma.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the pianist Marie-Félicité-Denise Pleyel (née Moke; 4 September 1811—30 March 1875).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Reminiscences+De+Norma+bellini+/3WSBYm?src=5

Pleyel was one of the most celebrated pianists of the early 19th century; she was the only female virtuoso-pianist who was consistently ranked with Franz Liszt. The music critic François-Joseph Fétis, who invited Pleyel to become the first head of the piano department at the Brussels Conservatory, wrote: "I have heard all the celebrated pianists from Hullmandel and Clementi up to the famous ones of today [ca. 1870] but I say that none of them has given me, as has Mme. Pleyel, the feeling of perfection."

She was an interesting woman; in addition to her musical talent, she was an acknowledged beauty, and was engaged to Hector Berlioz for a time before marrying Camille Pleyel, son of the great French piano maker. Frédéric Chopin dedicated his Nocturnes Op. 9 (1833) to her. She was rumoured to have had relationships with many of the great musicians of the day, including Liszt. Liszt dedicated his Réminiscences de Norma (1841) and the Tarantelle di bravura d’après la Tarantelle de ‘La muette de Portici’ d’Auber (1846) to her. She also composed several works for the piano, including a Rondo parisien pour piano, Op. 1, a Fantasia on motifs from Weber’s Preciosa, and an Andante.

My classical music post for today is Liszt's Réminiscences de Norma; I can imagine Pleyel performing this for a hushed audience.___My classical music post for today is Liszt's Réminiscences de Norma.

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2014-09-03 13:14:56 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Knut Nystedt's Immortal Bach.

Happy Birthday to the Norwegian composer Knut Nystedt (born 3 September 1915)!

http://grooveshark.com/s/Immortal+Bach/4NKUgg?src=5

Nystedt studied composition with Bjarne Brustad and Aaron Copland, but he has a voice all his own. As he has said, "I began as a quasi romantic, national Norwegian composer during the war."  He then began to investigate new tonal possibilities: "So I entered a new world of choral sound, one could speak of a kind of kaleidoscope through which to discover entirely new tone colours. Nevertheless my roots are in Gregorian chant. Even when I write in a modern, experimental style I combine it with elements of very ancient music."

Nystedt's stunningly beautiful Immortal Bach, for a cappella choir, has been described by Vladimir Morosan as "theology expressed in sound." And AJ Harbison has written:

" . . . Immortal Bach (1988) is modeled on Bach’s chorale “Komm, süsser Tod” (“Come, Sweet Death”), and is a deconstruction of the piece for a cappella choir. The choir begins by singing the chorale through as it was written (or at least harmonized) by Bach – the original version, consisting of three phrases, each of which have a cadence, or a progression leading to a particular chord, at the end. . . . Then, the choir sings through each of the three phrases again. But this time, each part moves at a different slow pace through the phrase, so that all of the parts move independently of the others. The result is exquisite, as the parts combine in different ways, the dissonances of the piece are extended and new sonorities are created. At the end of each phrase, all the parts come to rest on the final chord (eventually), there is a pause, and the next phrase begins. It’s incredibly simple, but incredibly beautiful as well."

My classical music post for today is Knut Nystedt's Immortal Bach.___My classical music post for today is Knut Nystedt's Immortal Bach.

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2014-09-02 14:34:39 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Nicola LeFanu's "But Stars Remaining."

Today is the anniversary of the birth of Christa McAuliffe (2 September 1948–28 January 1986), the American schoolteacher who was one of the seven crew members killed in the space shuttle Challenger disaster.

http://grooveshark.com/#!/s/But+Stars+Remaining/48pY9d?src=5

The English composer Nicola LeFanu was born in 1947. Her mother was the composer Elizabeth Maconchy. As well as composing, LeFanu has taught composition at King's College, London (where I studied with her!), and the University of York.

"But Stars Remaining" was written in 1970 for the English soprano Jane Manning. It sets lines from two poems by the Irish poet Cecil Day-Lewis. Manning has said that "But Stars Remaining" is to be “sung as from a high rock, the voice flung across a spacious valley.”

Now to be with you
Elate, unshared
My kestrel joy
O hoverer in wind
Over the quarry furiously at rest
Chaired on shoulders of shouting wind.

Rest from loving and be living.
Fallen is fallen past retrieving
The unique flyer dawn's dove
Arrowing down, feathered with fire.

Here's no meaning but of morning.
Naught soon of night but stars remaining,
Sink lower, fade, as dark womb
Recedes, creation will step clear.

My classical music post for today is Nicola LeFanu's "But Stars Remaining."___My classical music post for today is Nicola LeFanu's "But Stars Remaining."

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2014-09-01 15:19:42 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Bohuslav Martinů's Poločas (Half-Time): Rondo for Orchestra.

Today is transfer deadline day in the UK's Premier League.

http://grooveshark.com/#!/s/Half+Time+H+142+Rondo/483V2o?src=5

In honour of this, I would like to present Poločas (Half-Time): Rondo for Orchestra, H. 142, by the prolific 20th-century neoclassical Czech composer Bohuslav Martinů (1890–1959).

Half-Time was the first major work that Martinů wrote after moving to Paris in October 1923. The composer was inspired by a Czech-French match. The work received its premiere in Prague in December 1924. Martinů was a keen football follower, and this piece represents the enthusiasm of the crowd between the two halves of the match.

The musical style is reminiscent of Stravinsky's Russian ballets, and many critics felt that Martinů had plagiarised, in particular, parts of Petrushka. According to Michael Crump, in Martinů and the Symphony, brass and percussion are much more prominent in this piece than in any other work, and the rhythms are very athletic. He also says about the composer's technique of thematic variation that Martinů's "interpretation of rondo and episode is a source of considerable fascination while listening to Half-Time: a touch of genuine originality, and one of the chief strengths of the composition" (p. 54).

My classical music post for today is Bohuslav Martinů's Poločas (Half-Time): Rondo for Orchestra.___My classical music post for today is Bohuslav Martinů's Poločas (Half-Time): Rondo for Orchestra.

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2014-08-30 15:13:10 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Wagner's “Entry of the Gods into Valhalla” from Das Rheingold.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the German opera director Wolfgang Wagner (30 August 1919–21 March 2010).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Entrance+Of+The+Gods+Into+Valhalla/cOkKN?src=5

Wolfgang Wagner was the son of Siegfried Wagner, the grandson of Richard Wagner, and the great-grandson of Franz Liszt. He was director of the Bayreuth Festival from 1951 to 2008. Many of his decisions and productions were controversial, but there is no doubt that he made the Bayreuth Festival one of the top destinations for operagoers.

This gives me an excuse to share some Richard Wagner today: “Entry of the Gods into Valhalla” from Das Rheingold (1869). As Jessica Davis says, "At the end of Das Rheingold (“The Rhine Gold”), the ruler of the gods (Wotan in these operas, analogous to Odin in most translations of Norse mythology) has just sacrificed the ring, giving it to the giants in payment for the building of a new home, called Valhalla, for the gods. While Wagner’s cycle will end with Valhalla in flames, here Wotan and the other gods believe it is a new promise of their bright future. The god of thunder summons a storm to clear the air, the god of spring conjures a bridge of a rainbow, and Wotan leads them all to their new home, accompanied by all the grandeur and majesty Wagner could conjure in his music."

My classical music post for today is Wagner's “Entry of the Gods into Valhalla” from Das Rheingold.___My classical music post for today is Wagner's “Entry of the Gods into Valhalla” from Das Rheingold.

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2014-08-29 21:55:03 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Leonardo De Lorenzo's I seguaci di Pan.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the Italian virtuoso flutist and composer Leonardo De Lorenzo (29 August 1875–29 July 1962).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Pan/4NfScA?src=5

De Lorenzo's works are wonderful to listen to but incredibly difficult to play! The flute ensemble works (I tre virtuosi, for three flutes, op. 31; I seguaci di Pan, for four flutes, op. 32; Sinfonietta (Divertimento Flautistico), for five flutes, op. 75; and Capriccio, for four flutes, op. 82) are a lot of fun to perform; I played the Capriccio once and would love to again.

De Lorenzo played in the orchestras of Minneapolis, Los Angeles, and Rochester, and he also taught at Eastman. He wrote books about the flute, too.

My classical music post for today is De Lorenzo's I seguaci di Pan.___My classical music post for today is Leonardo De Lorenzo's I seguaci di Pan.

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2014-08-27 13:17:33 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the first movement of Rebecca Clarke's Viola Sonata.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the English composer and violist Rebecca Clarke (27 August 1886–13 October 1979).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Sonata+For+Viola+I/4MVV5U?src=5

Clarke was known primarily as a performer. Her output as a composer is, sadly, small; she once said, "I can't do it unless it's the first thing I think of every morning when I wake and the last thing I think of every night before I go to sleep."

According to the Rebecca Clarke Society (http://www.rebeccaclarke.org/), "Rebecca Clarke achieved what she called 'my one brief whiff of fame' in 1919 when her Viola Sonata tied for first place in a competition sponsored by Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. Clarke lived much of her life in the US, although she was born and educated in Great Britain. Striking for its passion and power, her music spans a range of 20th-century styles including Impressionism, post-Romantic, and neo-Classical. Although she wrote nearly 100 works (including songs, choral works, chamber pieces and music for solo piano), only 20 pieces were published in her lifetime, and by the time of her death in 1979, at age 93, all of these were long out of print."

When the piece tied for first in the competition, it is said that many on the jury thought that "Rebecca Clarke" was a male composer's pseudonym, as it was hard for them to imagine that a woman could write something as beautiful as this.

My classical music post for today is the first movement of Clarke's Viola Sonata. You can definitely hear the influence of Debussy and Vaughan Williams, both of whom were very important to Clarke.___My classical music post for today is the first movement of Rebecca Clarke's Viola Sonata.

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2014-08-21 14:14:28 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Constant Lambert's The Rio Grande.

Today is the anniversary of the death of the British composer Constant Lambert (23 August 1905–21 August 1951).

http://grooveshark.com/s/The+Rio+Grande/5eILqB?src=5

Lambert composed what many consider to be his greatest work, The Rio Grande, in 1927. This work, for alto, choir, piano, brass, strings, and a very large percussion section, is set to a poem by Sacheverell Sitwell. It includes elements of jazz, South American dances, and ragtime. What is truly fascinating about The Rio Grande is the way that Lambert mixes a very English choral sound with bits of Duke Ellington and George Gershwin.

Lambert was an immensely talented composer, but some people feel that The Rio Grande was his masterpiece and that his later works did not live up to the high expectations set by this intriguing work.

The poem is meant to refer to a river in Brazil, although there isn't a Rio Grande in Brazil. But no matter.

My classical music post for today is Constant Lambert's The Rio Grande.

By the Rio Grande
They dance no sarabande
On level banks like lawns above the glassy, lolling tide;
Nor sing they forlorn madrigals
Whose sad note stirs the sleeping gales
Till they wake among the trees and shake the boughs,
And fright the nightingales;
But they dance in the city, down the public squares,
On the marble pavers with each colour laid in shares,
At the open church doors loud with light within.
At the bell's huge tolling,
By the river music, gurgling, thin
Through the soft Brazilian air.
Tile Comendador and Alguacil are there
On horseback, hid with feathers, loud and shrill
Blowing orders on their trumpets like a bird's sharp bill
Through boughs, like a bitter wind, calling
They shine like steady starlight while those other sparks are failing
In burnished armour, with their plumes of fire,
Tireless while all others tire.
The noisy streets are empty and hushed is the town
To where, in the square, they dance and the band is playing ;
Such a space of silence through the town to the river
That the water murmurs loud -
Above the band and crowd together;
And the strains of the sarabande,
More lively than a madrigal,
Go hand in hand
Like the river and its waterfall
As the great Rio Grande rolls down to the sea.
Loud is the marimba's note
Above these half -salt waves,
And louder still the tympanum,
The plectrum, and the kettle-drum,
Sullen and menacing
Do these brazen voices ring.
They ride outside,
Above the salt-sea's tide.
Till the ships at anchor there
Hear this enchantment,
Of the soft Brazilian air,
By those Southern winds wafted,
Slow and gentle,
Their fierceness tempered
By the air that flows between.___My classical music post for today is Constant Lambert's The Rio Grande.

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2014-08-19 13:22:19 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

10,000+ have me in their circles!

+G+ Achievement Unlocked 

10,000+ have me in their circles!

+G+ Achievement Unlocked ___

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2014-08-15 14:26:52 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Alexander Agricola's "Gaudeamus omnes in Domino."

In the Western Church calendar, 15 August is the Feast of the Assumption of Mary.

http://grooveshark.com/s/Gaudeamus+Omnes/443SVJ?src=5

For hundreds of years, the first music that you would hear at a church service on this day would be "Gaudeamus omnes in Domino." I would like to introduce you to a very early setting of this text by the Franco-Flemish composer Alexander Agricola (1445–1506). It is believed that Agricola died on 15 August during a cholera outbreak.

Agricola wrote in a highly distinctive style. His music is often very busy and extraordinarily detailed, with repeated sequence, repetition of rhythmic and motivic units, and interesting and unusual tempi and melodic devices. He is sometimes seen as a bridge between the Burgundian School of music and Josquin des Prez.

Gaudeamus omnes in Domino, diem festum celebrantes sub honore beatae Mariae Virginis: de cuius Assumptione gaudent Angeli, et collaudant Filium Dei.

Let us all rejoice in the Lord, celebrating the feast day in honour of Blessed Mary the Virgin: in whose Assumption the Angels rejoice, and highly extol the Son of God.

My classical music post for today is Alexander Agricola's "Gaudeamus omnes in Domino."
___My classical music post for today is Alexander Agricola's "Gaudeamus omnes in Domino."

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2014-08-07 13:48:36 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the third movement of Aaron Jay Kernis's Double Concerto for Violin and Guitar.

Happy Birthday to the American classical guitarist Sharon Isbin (born 7 August 1956)!

http://grooveshark.com/s/The/3V3RO2?src=5

Isbin has been called “the pre-eminent guitarist of our time” and is also the winner of Guitar Player magazine’s “Best Classical Guitarist” award, First Prize winner of the Toronto Guitar ’75 competition, a winner of the Madrid Queen Sofia, and the first guitarist ever to win the Munich Competition.

My classical music post for today is Isbin playing the third movement of Aaron Jay Kernis's Double Concerto for Violin and Guitar. One reviewer of this work said: "Kernis leaps into a jazz-classical fusion unlike anything I've ever heard. There are flashes of jazz violinist Stephane Grappelli, as well as Leonard Bernstein in his symphonic jazz mode, and a uniquely Kernis synthesis that makes this one of the more exciting new pieces to come from an American composer in a few years."___My classical music post for today is the third movement of Aaron Jay Kernis's Double Concerto for Violin and Guitar.

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2014-08-05 12:50:52 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Guillaume Dufay's Ave maris stella.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the Franco-Flemish Renaissance composer Guillaume Dufay (5 August 1397[?]–27 November 1474).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Ave+Maris+Stella/3XWf7C?src=5

Dufay is considered to be one of the most influential composers of the 15th century. Most of his compositions are simple chant settings written for liturgical use. He was a master of the technique known as fauxbourdon, which consists of the cantus firmus and two other parts a sixth and a perfect fourth below. It is possible that Dufay actually invented this type of harmonization.

Dufay's use of fauxbourdon can be heard in my classical music post for today, a setting of the Marian antiphon Ave maris stella.___My classical music post for today is Guillaume Dufay's Ave maris stella.

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2014-08-02 12:11:10 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the third movement of Laurie Johnson's Symphony (Synthesis): Adagio.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the British journalist and broadcaster Alan Whicker (2 August 1925–12 July 2013).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Symphony+Synthesis+Adagio/4KL9iH?src=5

For those of you not in the UK, Whicker may not seem familiar, but to those of us who grew up on Whicker's World, he was a cultural icon. Whicker's World ran from 1959 to 1988 and was filmed all over the world, with Whicker reporting on stories of social interest from every continent.

The theme song to Whicker's World was written by the well-known film and television composer Laurie Johnson. Although Johnson is best known for his themes, he did study at the Royal College of Music and has written a few straightforward classical works. One of his more interesting works is Symphony (Synthesis) for jazz orchestra and symphony orchestra.

My classical music post for today is the third movement of Laurie Johnson's Symphony (Synthesis): Adagio.___My classical music post for today is the third movement of Laurie Johnson's Symphony (Synthesis): Adagio.

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2014-08-01 12:30:58 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the first movement of Hans Rott's Symphony No. 1.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the Austrian composer Hans Rott (1 August 1858–25 June 1884).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Ala+Breve/2BhARV?src=5

Although Rott was admired by both Mahler and Bruckner, he is hardly known at all today. Mahler had this to say about him:

"a musician of genius . . . who died unrecognized and in want on the very threshold of his career. . . . What music has lost in him cannot be estimated. Such is the height to which his genius soars in . . . [his] Symphony [in E major], which he wrote as 20-year-old youth and makes him . . . the Founder of the New Symphony as I see it. To be sure, what he wanted is not quite what he achieved. . . . But I know where he aims. Indeed, he is so near to my inmost self that he and I seem to me like two fruits from the same tree which the same soil has produced and the same air nourished. He could have meant infinitely much to me and perhaps the two of us would have well-nigh exhausted the content of new time which was breaking out for music."

Rott was always a bit unstable mentally, but what killed him at the age of 25 was TB. Who knows what he might have achieved had he lived?

Rott's Symphony No. 1 in E Major is amazing. You can hear foreshadowings of Mahler in this. And, as Peter Rabinowitz says, "Yes, the symphony looks back as well as forward: As we might expect of a young Bruckner pupil writing at the time, there are lots of reminiscences of Bruckner, Wagner, and the early German Romantics. . . . But in any case, the moments of late-Romantic lingua franca are overwhelmed by Rott’s willingness to go against the grain, to shift direction, to throw in the unexpected gesture, to engage extreme dynamic surprise — and his willingness to push his ideas to the limit. There are a few moments in the first movement that briefly look ahead to the Ives Second — leading us to wonder in what directions his talent might have led him. Not a symphony for those who like their music well mannered, perhaps: But for all its immaturity, it’s a heady work of real genius."

My classical music post for today is the first movement of Hans Rott's Symphony No. 1.___My classical music post for today is the first movement of Hans Rott's Symphony No. 1.

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2014-07-30 13:25:06 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Scene 2: "Oh, somewhere" from William Schuman's The Mighty Casey.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the baseball player and manager Casey Stengel (30 July 1890–29 September 1975).

http://grooveshark.com/#!/s/The+Mighty+Casey+Scene+2+Oh+Somewhere+Watchman/48fxyq?src=5

Charles Dillon Stengel acquired the nickname "K.C." because he came from Kansas City. This quickly became "Casey" as Ernest L. Thayer's 1888 poem Casey at the Bat was extremely popular. According to Stengel, fans called him "strikeout Casey" early in his career, as he seemed to find it difficult to hit the ball!

In 1953, the American composer William Schuman composed a one-act opera, The Mighty Casey, based on Thayer's poem. Schuman was president of Juilliard from 1945 to 1961 and the first president of Lincoln Center from 1962 to 1968. Somehow he also managed to devote at least six hundred hours per year to writing music! The result was two operas, ten symphonies, five string quartets, dozens of concertos and choral works, and over one hundred popular songs.

He was a fan of baseball all his life (the Mets, my childhood team), and he really wished that Major League Baseball had endorsed The Mighty Casey. Joseph W. Polisi wrote about the opera that "expectations, anger, love, and disappointment all live on this baseball diamond. Here, successes and failures take on larger-than-life proportions which speak to issues beyond the isolated incident of an inopportune strikeout. The touching image of Casey attempting to re-live his last at bat—this time with a homer as a result—reflects the hopes in all of us that the next time at bat might be the best of all."

As the original poem ends:

"Oh, somewhere in this favored land the sun is shining bright;
The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light,
And somewhere men are laughing, and somewhere children shout;
But there is no joy in Mudville—mighty Casey has struck out."

My classical music post for today is Scene 2: "Oh, somewhere" from William Schuman's The Mighty Casey.___My classical music post for today is Scene 2: "Oh, somewhere" from William Schuman's The Mighty Casey.

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2014-07-28 15:19:31 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Franco Alfano's opera Cyrano de Bergerac.

Today is the anniversary of the death of the French dramatist Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac (6 March 1619–28 July 1655).

http://classic-online.ru/uploads/86300/86230.mp3

Cyrano de Bergerac is more famous for the fictional works about his life, and perhaps for his large nose, which was probably not all that big really, than for his own work. His wooing of the lovely Roxanne has been the inspiration for many stories of unrequited love.

The Italian composer Franco Alfano (1875–1954) is best known for completing Puccini's Turandot (although his ending was completely destroyed by Toscanini). Most of Alfano's own operas have been ignored, lost, not performed, dismissed out of hand. Hardly anyone even knows Alfano's name.

But in 1936 Alfano wrote a four-act opera, Cyrano de Bergerac, to a libretto by Henri Cain that was based on Edmond Rostand's famous drama Cyrano de Bergerac. This opera, considered by many to be Alfano's best, was not performed in the United States until 2005, when the Metropolitan Opera presented it with Plácido Domingo in the title role.

And my classical music post for today is the entire opera. Even if you just listen to the beginning, you will enjoy it, I am sure!___My classical music post for today is Franco Alfano's opera Cyrano de Bergerac.

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2014-07-24 13:46:02 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Ernest Bloch's America, an Epic Rhapsody.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the Swiss-born American composer Ernest Bloch (24 July 1880–15 July 1959).

http://grooveshark.com/s/America+An+Epic+Rhaspsody/5eJhxG?src=5

Bloch was so happy to have emigrated to the United States that he decided to write an orchestral work as a tribute to his new country. He often said that the minute he saw the Statue of Liberty, the idea for this work began to formulate in his mind. The result, America, an Epic Rhapsody, won the top prize in a 1927 contest sponsored by Musical America.

America, an Epic Rhapsody, is in three movements. The first movement, titled "1620," begins with a musical depiction of a "primeval mist," and the musical quotations, including folksongs, Native American melodies, and hymn tunes, bring to mind the first settlers. The sections of this first movement are called The Soil; The Indians; England; The Mayflower; and The Landing of the Pilgrims. The second movement, "1851–1865," was inspired by Walt Whitman's "I hear American singing." It has two sections: Hours of Joy and Hours of Sorrow. Musical quotations include Virginia reels, old Southern ballads, and (my personal favourite) "Pop Goes the Weasel." The third movement, "1926," begins rather grimly but the mood brightens up as the sounds of the 20th century begin to appear, including jazzy rhythms. The two sections of this movement are The Present and The Future.

At the climax of this third movement, which is also the climax of the work, Bloch marked in the score "The Inevitable Collapse." There is a brief return to the opening "primeval mist" before the final, rousing, patriotic concluding anthem, "America." I have read that Bloch meant for the audience to sing along with the chorus.

My classical music post for today is Ernest Bloch's America, an Epic Rhapsody.___My classical music post for today is Ernest Bloch's America, an Epic Rhapsody.

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2014-07-19 18:30:51 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Meyerbeer's Robert le diable. 

Today is the anniversary of the birth of Edgar Degas (19 July 1834–27 September 1917).

ROBERT LE DIABLE - GIACOMO MEYERBEER - 1985 ( PARIS )

Degas is best known for his paintings of dancers. He did produce a series of paintings at the Paris Opéra, including some of a performance of the "Ballet of the Nuns" from Giacomo Meyerbeer's grand opera Robert le diable.

Robert le diable is widely considered to be the first French grand opera, and it is also notable for the Romantic ballet at the end of the third act. The ballet was so famous that Hans Christian Andersen even wrote about it: "By the hundred they rise from the graveyard and drift into the cloister. They seem not to touch the earth. Like vaporous images, they glide past one another ... Suddenly their shrouds fall to the ground. They stand in all their voluptuous nakedness, and there begins a bacchanal." (As it happens, the dancers were not actually naked in the performance, but that's what literary license is all about!)

Chris Shipman said, "One of the most memorable scenes of Robert le diable (and a late addition in the creative process at the behest of managing director Henri Duponchel) proved especially memorable and quickly achieved notoriety. The scene, a ballet, features a group of dead nuns who come back to life in a graveyard and try to entice Robert to his ruin and damnation with a seductive dance. The scene proved hugely influential, regarded by some as the first of the ballet blancs; . . . And, over 150 years after the world premiere of Robert le diable, it is the notorious ballet of the nuns that has cemented itself in the popular perception of the work, assisted no end by its inclusion in a memorable painting (existing in two versions) by Edgar Degas depicting this very scene on stage at the Paris Opéra. In the late 1860s Degas turned his attention from historical paintings and portraits to scenes of contemporary life. One of his particular interests was ballet dancers, and until the end of his life he drew and painted many scenes of dancers in performance, rehearsal or resting. It is as a depicter of dancers that Degas is now best known. He also did a series of portraits of musicians and opera audience members. Degas focused chiefly on dancers rather than singers – his painting The Ballet Scene from Meyerbeer’s Opera Robert le diable is a relatively rare example among his paintings of a depiction of an opera on stage, and even then it is of a ballet within an opera."

My classical music post for today is Meyerbeer's Robert le diable. The Ballet of the Nuns can be seen some time after about 1 hour 40 minutes in the YouTube video.___My classical music post for today is Meyerbeer's Robert le diable. 

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2014-07-16 18:40:39 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Alfred Deller singing Purcell's "Music for a While."

Today is the anniversary of the death of the English countertenor Alfred Deller (31 May 1912 – 16 July 1979).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Music+For+A+While+Music+For+A+While/30YW5A?src=5

Deller is one of the musicians credited with reintroducing the countertenor of Renaissance and Baroque music to 20th-century audiences. His voice sounded particularly high even for a countertenor; there is a story, perhaps apocryphal, about a performance that he gave early on in his career. A French woman said to him after he sang, "Monsieur, vous êtes eunuque, " to which Deller replied, "I think you mean 'unique,' madam."

In 1948, Deller formed the Deller Consort, and with this group he recorded dozens of works by 16th- and 17th-century English composers as well as Bach and Handel. He also recorded solo songs from the same period. Much of this music had not been heard for centuries, or it had been performed in what Deller considered to be an inauthentic way. Although much of what he did in terms of extemporisation was seen as controversial in his lifetime, many performers of this music today recognise the debt that is owed to him (and to other pioneers such as Bob Dart) in getting this wonderful music performed again.

My classical music post for today is Deller singing Purcell's "Music for a While."___My classical music post for today is Alfred Deller singing Purcell's "Music for a While."

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2014-07-15 12:26:07 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is "Song about Alexander Nevsky” from Prokofiev’s Alexander Nevsky.

On 15 July 1240, Prince Alexander Nevsky led the army of the Republic of Novgorod to victory over the Swedes in the Battle on the Neva.

http://grooveshark.com/s/Alexander+Nevsky+Op+78+II+Song+About+Alexander+Nevsky/531gLb?src=5

Prince Alexander Yaroslavich of Novgorod, who was just 19 years old in 1240, was canonized by the Russian Orthodox Church in 1574 for his role in defending Russia against German and Swedish invaders. The prince received the name "Nevsky" (a form of Neva) as a tribute to his leadership in the Battle of the Neva.

In 1938, the great Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein released his film Alexander Nevsky, with a score by Sergei Prokofiev. Eisenstein very much enjoyed working with Prokofiev: "‘At noon you’ll have the music,’ Prokofiev says as we are coming out of a small projection room. And although it’s now midnight, I’m quite calm. At exactly 11:55 AM a small, dark blue car drives through the studio gates. Sergei Prokofiev will get out of that small, dark blue car. In his hands will be the next number for Alexander Nevsky. We look at a new piece of film at night. In the morning, a new piece of music will be ready for it . . ." 

Prokofiev turned the film score into a concert cantata, also called Alexander Nevsky. The concert cantata is in seven sections. The second section is titled "Song about Alexander Nevsky." Roger Dettmer said, "The 'Song about Alexander Nevsky' is an uncomplicated telling of Prince Alexander's defeat of invading Swedes 'on the wide waters of the River Neva' in 1240, abetted by local peasants armed with axes and improvised weapons. A quicker middle section (Più mosso) effectively recreates the sounds of battle."

My classical music post for today is "Song about Alexander Nevsky” from Prokofiev’s Alexander Nevsky.___My classical music post for today is "Song about Alexander Nevsky” from Prokofiev’s Alexander Nevsky.

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2014-07-14 19:05:24 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Gerald Finzi's Lo, the full final sacrifice.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the British composer Gerald Finzi (14 July 1901–27 September 1956).

http://grooveshark.com/#!/s/Lo+The+Full+Final+Sacrifice+Op+26/4xj5fH?src=5

Finzi once said, ". . . as surely as birds must sing, so long as words exist and man is capable of feeling, there will be song." He certainly made sure of that in his part songs and other vocal and choral works.

According to Cameron Rose, "On June 6, [1946] Finzi was contacted by the Reverend Walter Hussey, vicar of St. Matthew’s in Northampton, for a commission to be performed on September 21 at the church’s annual founder’s celebration. Hussey had long supported the musical and visual arts feeling it was his personal mission 'to help re-forge the ancient link between the Church and the Arts'.”

The result was the extraordinary Lo, the full final sacrifice. Finzi based the text on two poems by the metaphysical poet Richard Crashaw’s versions of two St. Thomas Aquinas hymns, Adoro te, and Lauda Sion.

An early review of this work in The Musical Times said: "The repetition of Finzi's cantata 'The Full, Final Sacrifice', first heard at last year's Festival, was ample testimony of its worth. This composer's gentle and gracious lyricism must be as soothing to the singers as it is to the audience in our brusque and angular melodic age."

My classical music post for today is Gerald Finzi's Lo, the full final sacrifice.___My classical music post for today is Gerald Finzi's Lo, the full final sacrifice.

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2014-07-12 14:18:48 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the great Wagnerian soprano Kirsten Flagstad singing Brunnhilde.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the great Wagnerian soprano Kirsten Flagstad (12 July 1895–7 December 1962). Desmond Shawe-Taylor said: "No one within living memory surpassed her in sheer beauty and consistency of line and tone." And here she is singing the role of Brunnhilde.

There's something slightly surreal about an operatic performance being introduced by Bob Hope; however, once the music starts, and then you hear her extraordinary voice, that's all forgotten.___My classical music post for today is the great Wagnerian soprano Kirsten Flagstad singing Brunnhilde.

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2014-07-09 17:47:41 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is Respighi's The Birds.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the Italian composer Ottorino Respighi (9 July 1879–18 April 1936).

http://grooveshark.com/s/The+Birds/3jHHag?src=5

Ottorino Respighi composed his Gli uccelli (The Birds) for small orchestra in 1927. He based the music on 18th-century melodies, meant to represent birdsong.

The five-movement suite begins with a Prelude based on an opera aria by Pasquini. The second movement, "The Dove," is based on music by de Gallot, and begins with a solo oboe followed by string trills representing wings. "The Hen," based on music by Rameau, begins with music that sounds like a hen clucking. "The Nightingale" is based on 18th-century English music. Finally, "The Cuckoo" is based on an 18th-century harpsichord work by Pasquini, and this ends with a repeat of the Prelude theme.

My classical music post for today is Respighi's The Birds.___My classical music post for today is Respighi's The Birds.

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2014-07-08 19:29:22 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the wind band version of Percy Grainger's Shepherd's Hey.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the Australian composer Percy Grainger (8 July 1882–20 February 1961).

http://grooveshark.com/s/Shepherd+s+Hey/2Pulss?src=5

Grainger is best known for collecting British folk tunes and incorporating them into his music. He loved to experiment in his compositions and his use of harmony is often quite inventive. His Shepard's Hey shows some of this and it is a lovely and lively little work. 

Many people have played and commented on this piece:

"Shepherd's Hey is generally heard in either the full orchestra or military band version. Grainger said he 'dished it up' in many different ways. The version for a 'room-music twelve'some' dates from 1908-1909 and is scored for flute, clarinet, horn (at will), baritone English (chromatic) concertina, 3 fiddles, 2 middle fiddles (viola), 2 bass-fiddles ('celli) and 1 double-bass (contrabass)."--John Hopkins (Orchestral 2).

"Shepherd's Hey in the military band setting is the direct result of the months he spent as an enlisted musician in the U.S. Army during WWI, where, like Vaughan Williams in England, he became aware of the need for a quality music for military band."--Frederick Fennell (Cleveland).

"Shepherd's Hey was scored for wind band in 1918 and has emerged as an exemplary model in the art of wind orchestration. This composition probably best represents the influence Karl Klimsch (the German composer) had on the Grainger st yle of writing. Grainger related Klimsch's theory of composition as follows: 'If you have no theme or melody in your head, don't compose at all. If you have a theme or melody, start off with it right away and the moment your melodic inspiration runs out s top your piece. No prelude, no interlude, no postlude; just the pith of the music all the time.'<|>"--James Westbrook.

My classical music post for today is the wind band version of Percy Grainger's Shepherd's Hey.___My classical music post for today is the wind band version of Percy Grainger's Shepherd's Hey.

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2014-07-05 18:17:29 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the Fantasia from George Rochberg's Violin Concerto, written in 1970.

Today is the anniversary of the birth of the American composer George Rochberg (5 July 1918–29 May 2005).

http://grooveshark.com/#!/s/Rochberg+Violin+Concerto+Fantasia/4HajXt?src=5

According to his publisher, "'All human gestures are available to all human beings at any time.' This became George Rochberg’s credo in the years following his famous change of compositional style. Rochberg’s music following this change was, as musicologist Richard Taruskin puts it, 'to challenge the whole idea of stylistic obsolescence. And to challenge that idea was to put in question the ‘necessity’ of the twentieth century’s stylistic revolutions—the most sacred of all modernist dogmas.' In Taruskin’s view, Rochberg’s later music does not depend on the 'sophisticated irony' that was becoming commonplace in the 1970s and 80s, but rather a 'disconcerting sincerity.' In this respect, the music was a parallel of the man who, in the words of Kyle Gann,' exhibited an honesty and courage that transcended all differences of ideology,” and who was seen by many as a highly progressive and revolutionary force who changed forever the face of American music."

Rochberg initially was a serial composer -- he is considered to be one of the finest American serialists -- but after his teenaged son died in 1964 he abandoned atonality for a more tonal structure.

My classical music post for today is the Fantasia from his Violin Concerto, written in 1970.___My classical music post for today is the Fantasia from George Rochberg's Violin Concerto, written in 1970.

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2014-07-04 12:54:06 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

My classical music post for today is the third movement of Ives's Holiday Symphony: The Fourth of July.

Happy Fourth of July!

http://grooveshark.com/s/New+England+Holidays+Holidays+Symphony+For+Orchestra+The+Fourth+Of+July/2onFWq?src=5

Charles Ives (1874–1954) was an American modernist composer, the first American composer of international renown. His music was ignored during his lifetime for the most part. Ives combined American popular and church music traditions of his youth with European art music. His compositions display a variety of musical techniques including polytonality, polyrhythm, tone clusters, aleatoric elements, and quarter tones; he used many of these techniques before they were widely adopted by composers in the 20th century. Music that can be heard in Ives' compositions include hymn tunes and traditional songs, the town band at a parade, the fiddlers at a Saturday night dance, patriotic songs, sentimental parlor ballads, and the melodies of Stephen Foster.

One of my favourite stories about Ives is from his childhood; his father was a bandmaster and challenged his son with unusual exercises such as alternative tunings and bitonal scales. One time, George Ives had two marching bands start at opposite ends of the town and march towards each other playing two different songs in two different keys. Ives incorporated all this, and more, into his innovative works.

Ives's The Holidays Symphony, composed from 1897 to 1913, has four movements:

i. Washington's Birthday (Winter)
ii. Decoration Day (Spring)
iii. The Fourth of July (Summer)
iv. Thanksgiving and Forefathers' Day (Autumn)

In his preface to the third movement, Ives wrote: "It's a boy's '4th-no historical orations-no patriotic grandiloquences by "grown-ups"--no program in this yard! But he knows what he is celebrating--better than most of the county politicians. And he goes at it in his own way, with a patriotism nearer kin to nature than jingoism. His festivities start in quiet of the midnight before, and grow raucous with the sun. Everybody knows what it's like-if everybody doesn't-cornets, strings around big toes, torpedoes, church bells, lost finger, fifes, clam chowder, a prize-fight, drum-corps, burnt shins, parades (in and out of step), saloons all closed (more drunks than usual), baseball game (Danbury All-Stars vs Beaver Brook Boys), the sky-rocket over the Church steeple, just after the annual explosion sets the Town Hall on fire. All this is not music,--not now."

Ives always felt that this movement was the best thing that he ever composed.

My classical music post for today is the third movement of Ives's Holiday Symphony: The Fourth of July.___My classical music post for today is the third movement of Ives's Holiday Symphony: The Fourth of July.

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