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Gideon Rosenblatt has been at 7 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Plus Your Business!13,502*This Thursday!* On this week's show I am delighted to be joined by someone I have great respect for when it comes to business,@105103058358743760661. We will discuss the 'intersection of technology and business as a force for good' - 'Social Business'. *What else?* Will it be funny too, you are asking? Well, maybe! We will discuss Amazon's drone delivery system, and whether we need to leave the house by 2035! And there will be PYB Academy tips and some special shout outs to community members too. Hope to see you there. It is going to be a great ride...The 'Plus Your Business' show!2015-02-26 20:00:00119  
Social Media Today144,004*Does Social Business Make Sense?* _Not just for people but for the organizations as well?_ *Social Business is the focus of every business owner and CEO.* As we transition to a world of people, connections and relationships where advertising and traditional marketing do not work like they used to, the trend is to reposition a business to work harder for its employees, better with its customers and for its community. When the traditional model of a business gives us some very strong, clearly defined guidelines, driven by the irrefutable logic of the balance sheet, *does it make much sense to really talk about social business?* Is it a distraction? *And if not, can there be a workable path that can transition a legacy business to a modern, social one?* Discussing some of the key questions will be TEDx speaker and author @105103058358743760661. *A former Microsoft executive and a thought leader in the field of technology, people and organizations,* Gideon will be sharing some of his insights with us. Hosting the discussion will be @115620878851836664537  with @102000982871890720967  and at the controller's helm, making sure that everything runs smoothly will be @100470926227322431614 with @115000108263064481690. *Don't forget to join the conversation!* We want your questions, highlights, and feedback prior to, during, and after the event so make sure to tweet @socialmedia2day using the hashtag #SMTPowerTalk  or leave us comments on the Google+ or YouTube event pages! Let's get this conversation started!Does Social Business Make Sense?2015-01-22 18:00:00207  
Reinvent832,451Talk about a fundamental Reinvention! The arrival of Artificial Intelligence could reinvent what it is to be human, to be employed. As we shift many kinds of work, even knowledge work, to machines, we might ultimately need to rethink economic distribution and the social compact among citizens. Join @116416314233992548280 , the founding executive editor of Wired magazine, as we focus this roundtable on this important initial question: What is the early path of commercialization for Artificial Intelligence? In other words, what will be AI’s first killer apps? This will be where regular people initally encounter AI. Let’s get a handle on this powerful enabling technology now. We have a great group of participants taking part in this discussion: @108234610138016658041 , Non-fiction author and historian of technology @107791637874069639914 , CEO of Cycorp @109232706375076896189 , Tech entrepreneur, engineer, innovator @104810569466427874748 , CEO of Bottlenose @104401121686781166984 , Resident Futurist at Boulder Future Salon @116425013055966487482 , Founder of Serial Metrics See more at: http://reinventors.net/roundtables/reinvent-artificial-intelligence/Reinvent Artificial Intelligence with Kevin Kelly2014-04-30 20:00:00220  
Business Rockstars3,719 We are pleased to host @103911563591974976562  in a discussion about the human brain and it's possibilities. *We are taking your questions* Submit your questions in the comments for a chance to have @111480413428119678209 relate them to Dr. Michio Kaku in the Hangout!  The New York Times best-selling author of PHYSICS OF THE IMPOSSIBLE, PHYSICS OF THE FUTURE and HYPERSPACE tackles the most fascinating and complex object in the known universe: the human brain.           For the first time in history, the secrets of the living brain are being revealed by a battery of high tech brain scans devised by physicists. Now what was once solely the province of science fiction has become a startling reality. Recording memories, telepathy, videotaping our dreams, mind control, avatars, and telekinesis are not only possible; they already exist.    THE FUTURE OF THE MIND gives us an authoritative and compelling look at the astonishing research being done in top laboratories around the world—all based on the latest advancements in neuroscience and physics.  One day we might have a "smart pill" that can enhance our cognition; be able to upload our brain to a computer, neuron for neuron; send thoughts and emotions around the world on a "brain-net"; control computers and robots with our mind; push the very limits of immortality; and perhaps even send our consciousness across the universe.             Dr. Kaku takes us on a grand tour of what the future might hold, giving us not only a solid sense of how the brain functions but also how these technologies will change our daily lives. He even presents a radically new way to think about "consciousness" and applies it to provide fresh insight into mental illness, artificial intelligence and alien consciousness.   With Dr. Kaku's deep understanding of modern science and keen eye for future developments, THE FUTURE OF THE MIND is a scientific tour de force - an extraordinary, mind-boggling exploration of the frontiers of neuroscience. ------------ #physics   #michiokaku   #hangoutsonair   #businessrockstars   #thefutureofthemind   #business  SOON: "Add 120+ IQ Points & Time Travel!"2014-03-22 00:00:0064  
Yifat Cohen85,343*Why does the ex-head of American Express Chairman’s Innovation Fund think our future is in “producerism,” not consumerism?* What does it even mean?!? _This Hangout is public so feel free to share and invite your friends._ Using frameworks +Steve Faktor developed such as the 4C’s of Innovation™ - Creativity, Capabilities, Culture, and Context - and the Creativity Cube™, Mr. Faktor deconstructs the current economic environment to reveal innovation opportunities and growth sectors – health and education in particular. *Although his initial scenario suggests doom and gloom for the U.S. and other markets, the future he envisions is ripe with opportunity.* *SO - How do You Get Innovation Right?* Well, if we're lucky (and we usually are), Steve will dive into his latest book Econovation and share with us a future we've taken for granted. *It empowers readers to think big, dream big, and conquer economic conditions that will paralyze others.*  *WE WILL TOUCH ON HOW TO* Capitalize on a market that will go from making nothing to making everything . . . for China. Use psychological pricing and some crafty tricks from Google to reduce reliance on tapped-out consumers. Sell to consumers whose new identities will be based on what they create, not what they buy, click or super-size. Seduce a desperate government to finance your business, then feed you pancakes in the morning. Motivate tomorrow’s employees with social currency instead of the green, depreciating kind. Upgrade your business and your kids with a little help from Mormons and kindergartners with hacksaws. *WHO IS STEVEN?* Developing B2B startups at @109499489972846579596  and corporate speaking about emerging producerism opportunities that I wrote about in my book @116385844146363178305 and Forbes column.  --------------------- #hangoutsonair   #americanexpress   #econovation   #interview   #entrepreneur   #entrepreneurship   #economy   #goodbusiness   #amazon   #fortune500   #gplusgotogal  How Global Trends Will Shape the Future of Innovation.2013-01-17 18:00:0046  
Yifat Cohen85,343*Google+ changes the Truth about social media marketing.* _This is a public Hangout, feel free to share and invite_ Have you noticed the date? *Today the world is ending.* And it's a wonderful, wonderful thing. *Everything you know*, or think you know, about online marketing, social media, engagement and where's the money is online - *is no longer true*. *IN THIS HANGOUTS WE ARE GOING TO MAKE SOME TRULY CONTROVERSIAL CLAIMS* @116901017556394771817 is going to show you why you should pay attention to Google+ now, if you want to make money online.  He'll show you why the *money is no longer in the list* How the conversation have moved from one-to-many to *many-to-many* How you can *broadcast your Hangouts simultaneously on hundreds of sites* And most of all - *how to position yourself in front of this trend that is going to turn the social media world upside down.* *BUT WHO IS ALEX MANDOSSIAN TO BE CLAIMING THIS?* His colleagues and students acknowledge him as the Warren Buffet of the Internet because of his unique ability to teach his students how to make BIG money with very little risk.  Alex has generated $243 million in sales and profits for his small business students, clients and joint venture partners since 1993.   Many of the business strategies you'll learn today transformed his annual income in 2001 to be a monthly income in 2003; and eventually daily income by 2006. These marketing principles helped him grow his student data base from 200 people to 20,000 during his first 2 years in business ... and to over 200,000 during the following 3 years. He has engaged with best-selling authors such as Jack Canfield, @112439370122733503773  @105578574150809713602 and @113217646903708244617 (4-Hr Work Wk) Business leaders such as Donald Trump, Vic Conant of Nightingale Conant and Ivan Misner, CEO of Business Network International, and celebs such as Larry King and Mohammad Ali to name a few. *As a family-centered entrepreneur who works from home*, his goal is to become the world’s 1st "work-at-home" billionaire, not just in Net Worth, but by creating 1,000 other Internet millionaires …The money is no longer in the list, so where is it?2012-12-20 18:00:0059  
Yifat Cohen85,343*How the social revolution is changing the way we do business.* We all keep hearing about how important it is to engage and build relationships - what does it really mean, and what tools are out there to help us master it? When @105103058358743760661 spoke at DreamForce he saw *a vision for a future of business information systems that is entirely based on relationships.* *ENGAGE OR DIE.* In this Hangout On Air, we'll dive into the topic of engagement with @105103058358743760661   as he explains what he calls "engagement leverage." This framework bridges the kind of internal engagement you need with employees with the external engagement you need with customers, suppliers, partners and other external stakeholders. It's a simple, yet surprisingly powerful way for thinking about the way your organization gets work done.  Gideon writes at Alchemy of Change about helping companies bring purpose and technology together into a more powerful source of competitive advantage. Gideon just came back from leading a panel on engagement at Salesforce's Dreamforce Conference (now the biggest tech conference in the world) and so in addition to talking with us about the engagement leverage model, he'll also share some of what he saw at Dreamforce. (http://www.salesforce.com/dreamforce/DF12/)DreamForce: what I learned about the relationship revolution.2012-10-04 18:00:0064  

Shared Circles including Gideon Rosenblatt

Shared Circles are not available on Google+ anymore, but you can find them still here.

The Google+ Collections of Gideon Rosenblatt

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

11
comments per post
9
reshares per post
45
+1's per post

918
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 61

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2016-01-28 01:28:19 (61 comments; 15 reshares; 70 +1s)Open 

Go: Going, Going...Gone...to the Machine

And boom, like that, another previously human domain passes to machines. Deep Learning algorithms from the DeepMind team at Google can now beat professional Go players. 

Most reshares: 28

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2016-01-10 04:07:57 (12 comments; 28 reshares; 51 +1s)Open 

Quite possibly one of the BEST short Sci-Fi movies you will ever see!

Most plusones: 129

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2016-01-22 17:29:32 (12 comments; 27 reshares; 129 +1s)Open 

Screwing Up Because We Think Others Want Us To

This explains a lot: 
In fact, this part of the brain works with another region – the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) – to form what neuroscientists refer to as the action-observation network (AON). The AON is involved in “mentalisation” processes by which we infer what another person is thinking, based on his/her facial expressions and direction of gaze.

The pSTS conveys this information to the IPC, which then generates appropriate motor actions. If we feel our observer wants us to do well, we will perform well. But if we pick up negative cues, our IPC is deactivated and our performance falls apart.

Back when I was managing people, I came to the conclusion that "people usually rise (or fall) to our expectations of them." Guess that wasn't far from the truth.

Latest 50 posts

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2016-02-06 00:53:56 (1 comments; 7 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

Previous Hesitations Now Fading in Applying Machine Learning in Google Search

As Bloomberg says, it was Singhal who approved the roll-out of RankBrain. And before that, he and his team may have explored other, simpler forms of machine learning. But for a time, some say, he represented a steadfast resistance to the use of machine learning inside Google Search. In the past, Google relied mostly on algorithms that followed a strict set of rules set by humans. The concern—as described by some former Google employees—was that it was more difficult to understand why neural nets behaved the way it did, and more difficult to tweak their behavior.



HT +Aaron Bradley 

"Artificial intelligence is the future of Google Search, and if it’s the future of Google Search, it’s the future of so much more."

Great +Cade Metz piece in Wired, and the perfect second act to +David Amerland's piece yesterday on machine learning (http://bit.ly/1RboMsE).

Bonus: Metz does a great job of putting RankBrain in context.___Previous Hesitations Now Fading in Applying Machine Learning in Google Search

As Bloomberg says, it was Singhal who approved the roll-out of RankBrain. And before that, he and his team may have explored other, simpler forms of machine learning. But for a time, some say, he represented a steadfast resistance to the use of machine learning inside Google Search. In the past, Google relied mostly on algorithms that followed a strict set of rules set by humans. The concern—as described by some former Google employees—was that it was more difficult to understand why neural nets behaved the way it did, and more difficult to tweak their behavior.



HT +Aaron Bradley 

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2016-02-05 16:21:53 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

The Changing Role of Ownership

This is an interesting look at how the startup world is addressing issues that have long plagued investors: ensuring an alignment of interests between investors and the management of the firm. This is the question of "agency." 

These are complex issues. The overall sense from this article is of a system where ownership interests and control have become increasingly abstracted in layers of investment management. And it's been a long time coming: 

A result of this democratisation of ownership was its dilution and the loss of one of its components—control. Shareholders lost their grip on ownership and the collective strength to manage their agents, who ran companies. In 1932 Gardiner Means and Adolf Berle argued in “The Modern Corporation and Private Property” that the outcome was that companies became akin tosoverei... more »

The Changing Role of Ownership

This is an interesting look at how the startup world is addressing issues that have long plagued investors: ensuring an alignment of interests between investors and the management of the firm. This is the question of "agency." 

These are complex issues. The overall sense from this article is of a system where ownership interests and control have become increasingly abstracted in layers of investment management. And it's been a long time coming: 

A result of this democratisation of ownership was its dilution and the loss of one of its components—control. Shareholders lost their grip on ownership and the collective strength to manage their agents, who ran companies. In 1932 Gardiner Means and Adolf Berle argued in “The Modern Corporation and Private Property” that the outcome was that companies became akin to sovereign entities, divorced from the influence of their “owners” by retained earnings that allowed managers to invest as they chose...

Two thoughts come to mind on this issue of control. The first is that retained earnings could also be a powerful means for ensuring the long-term sustainability of a firm and all the full set of stakeholders who contribute to its success (http://goo.gl/K9enXd). In other words, retained earning, when properly managed, may be part of the antidote to the very serious problem of using corporations as wealth extraction machines (http://goo.gl/GujZVU). 

And this leads me to the second thought, which relates the tighter legal structures and assignments of responsibilities of the startup world, which this article notes as being novel. It doesn't strike me as being all that new really, but perhaps someone more ensconced in the world of startups will have more to say on that. The point is that this kind of careful, contract-based definition of rights and responsibilities, when combined with "technology to create a secondary market for shares", reminds me quite a bit of Distributed Autonomous Corporations, or DACs. Are today's startups really just a stepping stone that that future?

All in all, this is a worthwhile read.  ___

2016-02-04 23:09:40 (28 comments; 0 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

Help - who knows Latin? 

For all you Latin pros out there: how would you translate "Homo Sapiens Mechanica"? 

Help - who knows Latin? 

For all you Latin pros out there: how would you translate "Homo Sapiens Mechanica"? ___

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2016-02-04 22:15:10 (6 comments; 7 reshares; 29 +1s)Open 

Understanding Word Embeddings in Natural Language Processing

While not extremely technical, this article isn't for the mildly curious. It's well written though, and does a nice job of explaining word embeddings, a powerful technique for Natural Language Processing (NLP). 

I think, by the way, that it's this kind of toolset that may be behind Microsoft's recent acquisition of mobile typing app-maker, SwiftKey.

We didn’t try to have similar words be close together. We didn’t try to have analogies encoded with difference vectors. All we tried to do was perform a simple task, like predicting whether a sentence was valid. These properties more or less popped out of the optimization process.

This seems to be a great strength of neural networks: they learn better ways to represent data, automatically. Representing data well, in turn, seems tobe e... more »

Understanding Word Embeddings in Natural Language Processing

While not extremely technical, this article isn't for the mildly curious. It's well written though, and does a nice job of explaining word embeddings, a powerful technique for Natural Language Processing (NLP). 

I think, by the way, that it's this kind of toolset that may be behind Microsoft's recent acquisition of mobile typing app-maker, SwiftKey.

We didn’t try to have similar words be close together. We didn’t try to have analogies encoded with difference vectors. All we tried to do was perform a simple task, like predicting whether a sentence was valid. These properties more or less popped out of the optimization process.

This seems to be a great strength of neural networks: they learn better ways to represent data, automatically. Representing data well, in turn, seems to be essential to success at many machine learning problems. Word embeddings are just a particularly striking example of learning a representation.
......
And the technique also helps map concepts to images: 

Recently, deep learning has begun exploring models that embed images and words in a single representation.

The basic idea is that one classifies images by outputting a vector in a word embedding. Images of dogs are mapped near the “dog” word vector. Images of horses are mapped near the “horse” vector. Images of automobiles near the “automobile” vector. And so on.

#NLP   #wordembedding   #machinevision   #machinelearning  ___

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2016-02-04 18:22:37 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 26 +1s)Open 

Technology allows us to see things in new ways, and sometimes the results are quite beautiful. 

These are some pretty wild photos...___Technology allows us to see things in new ways, and sometimes the results are quite beautiful. 

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2016-02-04 04:37:10 (7 comments; 3 reshares; 55 +1s)Open 

Google on Wednesday said AI chief John Giannandrea will take over search responsibilities when current search boss Amit Singhal retires at the end of the month. That move signals profound changes for how we find things online.

Choosing the head of Google's artificial intelligence efforts to run the company's crown jewel telegraphs how important AI is to Google. That's especially true as Google tries to shift away from search just being bound by a query box and a keyboard, but more of an assistant that can predict what you need in different situations.

Google on Wednesday said AI chief John Giannandrea will take over search responsibilities when current search boss Amit Singhal retires at the end of the month. That move signals profound changes for how we find things online.

Choosing the head of Google's artificial intelligence efforts to run the company's crown jewel telegraphs how important AI is to Google. That's especially true as Google tries to shift away from search just being bound by a query box and a keyboard, but more of an assistant that can predict what you need in different situations.___

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2016-02-04 03:57:50 (7 comments; 1 reshares; 38 +1s)Open 

Deep Self Portrait

Let's see Google's machine vision algorithms tag me with this one. ;)

Deep Self Portrait

Let's see Google's machine vision algorithms tag me with this one. ;)___

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2016-02-03 18:58:24 (16 comments; 6 reshares; 56 +1s)Open 

What Are You Lookin' At?

Ravens show evidence of knowing when they are being spied on - and it's not just a matter of looking at visual cues like the position of another animal's head. These ravens made the connection that when a slot between their cage and a neighboring cage was open, it was possible for the raven next door to spot where they were stashing their food. 

Consciousness is a continuum. 


HT +Nick Benik 

Ravens can imagine being spied on, study finds | Science | The Guardian

'Ravens can imagine being spied upon by a hidden competitor, showing a capacity for abstraction once thought to be exclusively human, according to a new study.

Scientists have shown that the birds take extra care to hide food if they suspect their movements are being monitored by another raven, even when the second bird is not actually there.

The findings, published on Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, suggest that ravens – without recourse to direct observation – are able to understand what might be going on in the mind of another individual.'

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/feb/02/ravens-can-imagine-being-spied-on-study-finds

Ravens attribute visual access to unseen competitors : Nature Communications : Nature Publishing Group

'... Abstract

Recent studies purported to demonstrate that chimpanzees, monkeys and corvids possess a basic Theory of Mind, the ability to attribute mental states like seeing to others. However, these studies remain controversial because they share a common confound: the conspecific’s line of gaze, which could serve as an associative cue. Here, we show that ravens Corvus corax take into account the visual access of others, even when they cannot see a conspecific. Specifically, we find that ravens guard their caches against discovery in response to the sounds of conspecifics when a peephole is open but not when it is closed. Our results suggest that ravens can generalize from their own perceptual experience to infer the possibility of being seen. These findings confirm and unite previous work, providing strong evidence that ravens are more than mere behaviour-readers.
...'

http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2016/160202/ncomms10506/full/ncomms10506.html___What Are You Lookin' At?

Ravens show evidence of knowing when they are being spied on - and it's not just a matter of looking at visual cues like the position of another animal's head. These ravens made the connection that when a slot between their cage and a neighboring cage was open, it was possible for the raven next door to spot where they were stashing their food. 

Consciousness is a continuum. 


HT +Nick Benik 

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2016-02-03 05:01:34 (8 comments; 15 reshares; 73 +1s)Open 

Microsoft Goes to the Spigot of Mobile Natural Language Processing

Microsoft just paid $250 million for SwiftKey:

Swiftkey has built a trove of user-input queries and basically “scrapes” all the phrases entered on the public Internet to construct its data models, as Gigaom reported two years ago. It also parses the phrasing and language of individual users to better predict what the current user is about to ask.

This could be a brilliant strategy for Microsoft to gain direct access to user data to help the company improve its AI for understanding human language. It's a direct feed on both iOS and Android, and a way to possibly overcome their lack of presence on mobile platforms. These days, access to training data is absolutely critical to training AI, and that's the big race that these companies are in.

So now, Microsoft has Cortana andSwift... more »

Microsoft Goes to the Spigot of Mobile Natural Language Processing

Microsoft just paid $250 million for SwiftKey:

Swiftkey has built a trove of user-input queries and basically “scrapes” all the phrases entered on the public Internet to construct its data models, as Gigaom reported two years ago. It also parses the phrasing and language of individual users to better predict what the current user is about to ask.

This could be a brilliant strategy for Microsoft to gain direct access to user data to help the company improve its AI for understanding human language. It's a direct feed on both iOS and Android, and a way to possibly overcome their lack of presence on mobile platforms. These days, access to training data is absolutely critical to training AI, and that's the big race that these companies are in.

So now, Microsoft has Cortana and SwiftKey outposts. They will need to be competitive offerings in order to be installed and used, but at least that's more of an opening than what the company faces in winning the mobile operating system markets at this point.

#microsoft #artificialintelligence ___

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2016-02-01 16:39:35 (13 comments; 4 reshares; 26 +1s)Open 

Y Combinator Research to Research Basic Income

Sam Altman, who recently joined Elon Musk and others to give birth to the OpenAI project, is now digging into Basic Income. I'm starting to really like this guy. He's behind a lot of really innovative, good-for-society type thinking. 

The Y Combinator Research team will be hiring a researcher for five years to focus on questions of Basic Income, including such questions as: 

Do people sit around and play video games, or do they create new things?  Are people happy and fulfilled?  Do people, without the fear of not being able to eat, accomplish far more and benefit society far more?  And do recipients, on the whole, create more economic value than they receive?

Details:
http://blog.ycombinator.com/basic-income

#basicincome  

Y Combinator Research to Research Basic Income

Sam Altman, who recently joined Elon Musk and others to give birth to the OpenAI project, is now digging into Basic Income. I'm starting to really like this guy. He's behind a lot of really innovative, good-for-society type thinking. 

The Y Combinator Research team will be hiring a researcher for five years to focus on questions of Basic Income, including such questions as: 

Do people sit around and play video games, or do they create new things?  Are people happy and fulfilled?  Do people, without the fear of not being able to eat, accomplish far more and benefit society far more?  And do recipients, on the whole, create more economic value than they receive?

Details:
http://blog.ycombinator.com/basic-income

#basicincome  ___

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2016-01-31 23:12:50 (10 comments; 4 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

Automated Stories About Car Chases

This was written by a machine, using Wordsmith: 

JULY 13TH, 2015, San Pedro, California – A vehicle pursuit that commenced in Wilmington during the late evening of July 13th later ended with the crash of the suspect in Point Fermin Park. The incident began at about 11:00 PM when the unknown driver of a Toyota Prius fled from officers of the Los Angeles Port Police following a traffic stop on Pacific Coast Highway in Wilmington. The suspect was then pursued by the LAPP along Alameda Street to San Pedro, and then further along Alameda Street to Point Fermin Park. The incident concluded with the crash of the suspect in Point Fermin Park, where the suspect drove over a cliff. The unidentified suspect was treated for injuries at the scene and was expected to be arrested.

Automated Stories About Car Chases

This was written by a machine, using Wordsmith: 

JULY 13TH, 2015, San Pedro, California – A vehicle pursuit that commenced in Wilmington during the late evening of July 13th later ended with the crash of the suspect in Point Fermin Park. The incident began at about 11:00 PM when the unknown driver of a Toyota Prius fled from officers of the Los Angeles Port Police following a traffic stop on Pacific Coast Highway in Wilmington. The suspect was then pursued by the LAPP along Alameda Street to San Pedro, and then further along Alameda Street to Point Fermin Park. The incident concluded with the crash of the suspect in Point Fermin Park, where the suspect drove over a cliff. The unidentified suspect was treated for injuries at the scene and was expected to be arrested.___

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2016-01-31 16:30:47 (6 comments; 6 reshares; 53 +1s)Open 

You Wanna Go?

Interesting little vignette on how Facebook tried to get the jump on Google's recent announcement about its success in cracking the game of Go using AI. Basically, this is a fight to attract top talent, and high profile problems like Go signal these companies' commitment to and success at tackling hard AI challenges: 

...the reality is that Facebook—and Zuckerberg in particular—place enormous importance on this sort AI, and in this, they are very much in competition with Google, which also happens to be their biggest business rival. This AI race, however, is not really just about which company is better at Go. It’s about which company can attract the top AI talent. Both Zuckerberg and LeCun know they must show the relatively small AI community that the company is serious about this stuff.

#facebook   #google   #artificialintelligence  #go  ... more »

You Wanna Go?

Interesting little vignette on how Facebook tried to get the jump on Google's recent announcement about its success in cracking the game of Go using AI. Basically, this is a fight to attract top talent, and high profile problems like Go signal these companies' commitment to and success at tackling hard AI challenges: 

...the reality is that Facebook—and Zuckerberg in particular—place enormous importance on this sort AI, and in this, they are very much in competition with Google, which also happens to be their biggest business rival. This AI race, however, is not really just about which company is better at Go. It’s about which company can attract the top AI talent. Both Zuckerberg and LeCun know they must show the relatively small AI community that the company is serious about this stuff.

#facebook   #google   #artificialintelligence   #go  ___

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2016-01-29 01:15:32 (7 comments; 15 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 

We Don't Automate Jobs, We Automated Tasks

Sooner good thoughts in this piece from an interview with Jerry Kaplan, author of, Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.

I thought this was a useful frame:
“If you have enough data, you can solve tasks that used to require intelligence,” he said. And just because machines can perform tasks that humans use intelligence for, that doesn’t mean machines have to think in order to do so.

We Don't Automate Jobs, We Automated Tasks

Sooner good thoughts in this piece from an interview with Jerry Kaplan, author of, Humans Need Not Apply: A Guide to Wealth and Work in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.

I thought this was a useful frame:
“If you have enough data, you can solve tasks that used to require intelligence,” he said. And just because machines can perform tasks that humans use intelligence for, that doesn’t mean machines have to think in order to do so.___

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2016-01-28 01:28:19 (61 comments; 15 reshares; 70 +1s)Open 

Go: Going, Going...Gone...to the Machine

And boom, like that, another previously human domain passes to machines. Deep Learning algorithms from the DeepMind team at Google can now beat professional Go players. 

Go: Going, Going...Gone...to the Machine

And boom, like that, another previously human domain passes to machines. Deep Learning algorithms from the DeepMind team at Google can now beat professional Go players. ___

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2016-01-26 14:11:10 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 31 +1s)Open 

Microsoft's Virtual Personal Assistant, Cortana, adds intelligence to email to help you track your commitments.

By the way, Microsoft is hiring like crazy for machine learning expertise. Expect a lot more of this kind of intelligence to start showing up in Office.

Microsoft's Virtual Personal Assistant, Cortana, adds intelligence to email to help you track your commitments.

By the way, Microsoft is hiring like crazy for machine learning expertise. Expect a lot more of this kind of intelligence to start showing up in Office.___

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2016-01-26 01:37:43 (16 comments; 1 reshares; 53 +1s)Open 

New York Times Sharing Icons

Either NYT is customizing my sharing icons because I share mostly on Google+, or Google+ has now bumped Twitter's primary placement. 

When you look at a NYT's article, what do you see? 

For instance, you might want to read this piece on the passing of Artificial Intelligence giant, Marvin Minsky last night: 
http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/01/26/business/marvin-minsky-pioneer-in-artificial-intelligence-dies-at-88.html?_r=0

New York Times Sharing Icons

Either NYT is customizing my sharing icons because I share mostly on Google+, or Google+ has now bumped Twitter's primary placement. 

When you look at a NYT's article, what do you see? 

For instance, you might want to read this piece on the passing of Artificial Intelligence giant, Marvin Minsky last night: 
http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/01/26/business/marvin-minsky-pioneer-in-artificial-intelligence-dies-at-88.html?_r=0___

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2016-01-25 23:01:11 (20 comments; 9 reshares; 63 +1s)Open 

"Machine learning" has caught up with "artificial intelligence" in Google Search volume. 

"Machine learning" has caught up with "artificial intelligence" in Google Search volume. ___

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2016-01-25 21:03:23 (2 comments; 5 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

REI Showcases the Power of Regenerative Business

This is a great story about retailer, REI, and its very different approach to business while working for a mission and caring for its stakeholders. One of the most interesting parts:

Another advantage of being a co-op: Since REI is technically owned by millions of members who’d get little cash from a takeover, it’d be very cumbersome for a rival to buy it out.

“It’s next to impossible to acquire REI,” says Brian Unmacht, who had a 27-year career at REI before his current stint as CEO of Bartell Drugs.

A Seattle Times story from the 1980s says General Mills once tried to buy the co-op, only to be turned away by founder Lloyd Anderson.

One of the interesting points raised in this piece is that as REI has succeeded in growing its membership, the newer, expanded base is less engaged (at leastin terms ... more »

REI Showcases the Power of Regenerative Business

This is a great story about retailer, REI, and its very different approach to business while working for a mission and caring for its stakeholders. One of the most interesting parts:

Another advantage of being a co-op: Since REI is technically owned by millions of members who’d get little cash from a takeover, it’d be very cumbersome for a rival to buy it out.

“It’s next to impossible to acquire REI,” says Brian Unmacht, who had a 27-year career at REI before his current stint as CEO of Bartell Drugs.

A Seattle Times story from the 1980s says General Mills once tried to buy the co-op, only to be turned away by founder Lloyd Anderson.

One of the interesting points raised in this piece is that as REI has succeeded in growing its membership, the newer, expanded base is less engaged (at least in terms of voting) than the original base, or the kinds of membership bases of other cooperative businesses. 

#cooperatives   #goodbusiness  ___

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2016-01-25 01:17:36 (4 comments; 5 reshares; 19 +1s)Open 

Social Networks Don't Really Expand the Number of Connections We Can Sustain Over Time*

An important feature of natural social networks in both humans and non-human primates is that they are structured into a distinctive series of hierarchically inclusive layers that have a natural scaling ratio of approximately 3. These layers reflect both interaction frequencies and, at least in humans, emotional closeness. In humans, these layers have values that approximate 5, 15, 50 and 150, and extend beyond this in at least two further layers to 500 and 1500. The first three layers have been identified in several online datasets and, at least in humans, appear to be a consequence of a constraint on available social time combined with a relationship between time invested in a relationship and its quality (as rated in terms of emotional closeness). The two outermost layers (at 500 and 1500) correspond,... more »

Social Networks Don't Really Expand the Number of Connections We Can Sustain Over Time*

An important feature of natural social networks in both humans and non-human primates is that they are structured into a distinctive series of hierarchically inclusive layers that have a natural scaling ratio of approximately 3. These layers reflect both interaction frequencies and, at least in humans, emotional closeness. In humans, these layers have values that approximate 5, 15, 50 and 150, and extend beyond this in at least two further layers to 500 and 1500. The first three layers have been identified in several online datasets and, at least in humans, appear to be a consequence of a constraint on available social time combined with a relationship between time invested in a relationship and its quality (as rated in terms of emotional closeness). The two outermost layers (at 500 and 1500) correspond, respectively, to acquaintances (people we would not consider as personal friends or family, but know well enough to have a conversation with) and to the number of faces we can put names to.

The fact that social networks remain about the same size despite the communication opportunities provided by social media suggests that the constraints that limit face-to-face networks are not fully circumvented by online environments. Instead, it seems that online social networks remain subject to the same cognitive demands of maintaining relationships that limit offline friendships. These constraints come in two principal forms: a cognitive constraint derivative of the SBH (social brain hypothesis) and a temporal constraint associated with the time that needs to be invested in a relationship to maintain it at a requisite level of emotional intensity. We can only interact coherently with a very small number of other people (about three, in fact) at any one time. It seems that even in an online environment, the focus of our attention is still limited in this way.

HT to +John Hagel​ over on Twitter___

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2016-01-23 15:19:24 (18 comments; 18 reshares; 87 +1s)Open 

Evolution as Information Transcendence

Much more could have been done with the central idea here, but it is worth sharing simply for this central idea:

We know that each of earth’s evolutionary transitions essentially resulted in the enslavement of the old information carriers.

You might say this is related to Brian Arthur's ideas about "combinatorial evolution," in his book, The Nature of Technology.

Nice find, +Scott Nelson​.

___Evolution as Information Transcendence

Much more could have been done with the central idea here, but it is worth sharing simply for this central idea:

We know that each of earth’s evolutionary transitions essentially resulted in the enslavement of the old information carriers.

You might say this is related to Brian Arthur's ideas about "combinatorial evolution," in his book, The Nature of Technology.

Nice find, +Scott Nelson​.

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2016-01-23 02:50:52 (18 comments; 17 reshares; 36 +1s)Open 

New Report Warns of Growing Technological Unemployment

“Automation will continue to put downward pressure on the wages of the low skilled and is starting to impinge on the employment prospects of middle-skilled workers. By contrast, the potential returns to highly skilled and more adaptable workers are increasing.”

Wage pressure isn't the only problem, however. Increased automation and capitalization, when done strategically, increases profits, which today largely results in another form of economic disparity: concentration of wealth by maximizing returns for shareholders. If you're interested in that issue, here's more:

Technology and the Distribution of Wealth
http://www.the-vital-edge.com/technology_and_the_distribution_of_wealth/

That Sucking Sound? It’s the Stock Markethtt... more »

New Report Warns of Growing Technological Unemployment

“Automation will continue to put downward pressure on the wages of the low skilled and is starting to impinge on the employment prospects of middle-skilled workers. By contrast, the potential returns to highly skilled and more adaptable workers are increasing.”

Wage pressure isn't the only problem, however. Increased automation and capitalization, when done strategically, increases profits, which today largely results in another form of economic disparity: concentration of wealth by maximizing returns for shareholders. If you're interested in that issue, here's more:

Technology and the Distribution of Wealth
http://www.the-vital-edge.com/technology_and_the_distribution_of_wealth/

That Sucking Sound? It’s the Stock Market
http://www.the-vital-edge.com/stock-market-concentration-of-wealth/

HT to +Jeffrey J Davis. 

#wealth   #technologicalunemployment   #automation   ___

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2016-01-22 21:23:36 (7 comments; 11 reshares; 71 +1s)Open 

Group Mind of the Termite

Harvard professor of robotics Radhika Nagpal makes an analogy between the behavior of termites and the brain. Individual termites react rather than think, but at a group level they exhibit a kind of cognition and awareness of their surroundings. Similarly, in the brain, individual neurons don't think, but thinking arises in the connections between them. (Single neurons, for example, may recognize a baseball bat and the smell of hot dogs, but working in concert they let you know you're at a baseball game.)

Group Mind of the Termite

Harvard professor of robotics Radhika Nagpal makes an analogy between the behavior of termites and the brain. Individual termites react rather than think, but at a group level they exhibit a kind of cognition and awareness of their surroundings. Similarly, in the brain, individual neurons don't think, but thinking arises in the connections between them. (Single neurons, for example, may recognize a baseball bat and the smell of hot dogs, but working in concert they let you know you're at a baseball game.)___

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2016-01-22 17:29:32 (12 comments; 27 reshares; 129 +1s)Open 

Screwing Up Because We Think Others Want Us To

This explains a lot: 
In fact, this part of the brain works with another region – the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) – to form what neuroscientists refer to as the action-observation network (AON). The AON is involved in “mentalisation” processes by which we infer what another person is thinking, based on his/her facial expressions and direction of gaze.

The pSTS conveys this information to the IPC, which then generates appropriate motor actions. If we feel our observer wants us to do well, we will perform well. But if we pick up negative cues, our IPC is deactivated and our performance falls apart.

Back when I was managing people, I came to the conclusion that "people usually rise (or fall) to our expectations of them." Guess that wasn't far from the truth.

Screwing Up Because We Think Others Want Us To

This explains a lot: 
In fact, this part of the brain works with another region – the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) – to form what neuroscientists refer to as the action-observation network (AON). The AON is involved in “mentalisation” processes by which we infer what another person is thinking, based on his/her facial expressions and direction of gaze.

The pSTS conveys this information to the IPC, which then generates appropriate motor actions. If we feel our observer wants us to do well, we will perform well. But if we pick up negative cues, our IPC is deactivated and our performance falls apart.

Back when I was managing people, I came to the conclusion that "people usually rise (or fall) to our expectations of them." Guess that wasn't far from the truth.___

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2016-01-22 01:37:36 (6 comments; 9 reshares; 60 +1s)Open 

The Core Strategy for OpenAI: Decentralize Control and Tie It to Individuals

This is by far the most interesting quote from this piece: 

 And then philosophically there’s an important element here: we want AI to be widespread. There’s two schools of thought — do you want many AIs, or a small number of AIs? We think probably many is good. And to the degree that you can tie it to an extension of individual human will, that is also good.

The Core Strategy for OpenAI: Decentralize Control and Tie It to Individuals

This is by far the most interesting quote from this piece: 

 And then philosophically there’s an important element here: we want AI to be widespread. There’s two schools of thought — do you want many AIs, or a small number of AIs? We think probably many is good. And to the degree that you can tie it to an extension of individual human will, that is also good.___

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2016-01-21 16:24:42 (2 comments; 15 reshares; 41 +1s)Open 

Zooming in on Human Emotions

This came out a few months ago, but it's pretty interesting. Basically, these researchers have figured out a way to algorithmically identify subtle human microexpressions.

Recognizing microexpressions falls into two parts. The first step is to pick out the extremely fast change in expression, which the scientists did by isolating single frames shot by a high-speed camera. The second step is to then identify the emotion that was thereby captured. This they did by algorithmically exaggerating the captured expression to make it easier to interpret. 

This reminds me of the Eulerian Video Magnification work at MIT, which algorithmically magnifies subtle changes in order to make them clearly visible to the human eye, so that, for example, one could easily watch someone's pulse merely by looking at their wrist. More:more »

Zooming in on Human Emotions

This came out a few months ago, but it's pretty interesting. Basically, these researchers have figured out a way to algorithmically identify subtle human microexpressions.

Recognizing microexpressions falls into two parts. The first step is to pick out the extremely fast change in expression, which the scientists did by isolating single frames shot by a high-speed camera. The second step is to then identify the emotion that was thereby captured. This they did by algorithmically exaggerating the captured expression to make it easier to interpret. 

This reminds me of the Eulerian Video Magnification work at MIT, which algorithmically magnifies subtle changes in order to make them clearly visible to the human eye, so that, for example, one could easily watch someone's pulse merely by looking at their wrist. More:
http://people.csail.mit.edu/mrub/vidmag/
And some speculation I did a while back on applying this technology to lie detection:
http://www.the-vital-edge.com/lie-detector/

I found this through a link from +Hans Youngmann, pointing me to a piece, which in turn pointed me to this article. Here's the pointer piece with a more general background on using software to read human emotion: 
http://singularityhub.com/2016/01/17/anticipating-your-needs-emotional-intelligence-is-the-key-to-smarter-gadgets/

#emotionalintelligence  ___

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2016-01-20 20:51:44 (17 comments; 19 reshares; 61 +1s)Open 

Understanding Graph Databases

Sometimes you have to use history to understand the future. In this case, it's The Flintstones helping us to understand "graph databases." In this very easy to understand article by +Teodora Petkova, you'll get a nice explanation of how graph databases are starting to eat away at traditional relational databases for storing more fluid and complex stores of knowledge. A great read.

#semantics #RDF


Thinking outside the table, yabadabadoo

The first article of the series I mentioned (https://goo.gl/26Qym1) is out, didn’t expect that so early :) but that’s cool too. In it Fred, Wilma, Pebbles, Bamm-Bamm and me :)(really) try our best to simplify the difference between a relational database (tables) and a graph database (graphs).

The good news and the tl;dr here is that today the necessity to shoehorn data into predefined structures is being gradually replaced by the ability to build models that accommodate the organic growth and evolving nature of data. A database can serve not only as a storage cupboard for siloed archives but rather as a springboard for knowledge discovery.
___Understanding Graph Databases

Sometimes you have to use history to understand the future. In this case, it's The Flintstones helping us to understand "graph databases." In this very easy to understand article by +Teodora Petkova, you'll get a nice explanation of how graph databases are starting to eat away at traditional relational databases for storing more fluid and complex stores of knowledge. A great read.

#semantics #RDF

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2016-01-20 19:11:31 (3 comments; 6 reshares; 19 +1s)Open 

Transforming the Unfairness of Lotteries into Pilots for Basic Income

Great piece from +Scott Santens that doesn't just show all the ways that lotteries are regressive, inefficient and just plain unfair - but also paints a vision for using the lottery structure as a way to pave the path to Basic Income. 

#basicincome   #lottery  

Transforming the Unfairness of Lotteries into Pilots for Basic Income

Great piece from +Scott Santens that doesn't just show all the ways that lotteries are regressive, inefficient and just plain unfair - but also paints a vision for using the lottery structure as a way to pave the path to Basic Income. 

#basicincome   #lottery  ___

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2016-01-18 23:23:16 (4 comments; 7 reshares; 22 +1s)Open 

An Amazing, Inspiring Business

I just got back from visiting the manufacturing facilities of the most inspiring business I've run into yet. Skills Inc. was started in 1966 as a way to enhance the lives of individuals with disabilities by providing meaningful employment. It supplies very difficult to manufacture parts to the remarkably demanding technical requirements of the aerospace industry. Boeing is the main customer, and Skills makes some of its most technically demanding outsourced parts. It's got an amazing technological focus, with cutting-edge computer numerical control (CNC) automation. Legally, it's structured as a mission-driven non-profit entity, and it is extremely competitive in its market, and growing like crazy. 

And yet, running through the whole organization is an amazing commitment to putting people at the center. From walking around the offices... more »

An Amazing, Inspiring Business

I just got back from visiting the manufacturing facilities of the most inspiring business I've run into yet. Skills Inc. was started in 1966 as a way to enhance the lives of individuals with disabilities by providing meaningful employment. It supplies very difficult to manufacture parts to the remarkably demanding technical requirements of the aerospace industry. Boeing is the main customer, and Skills makes some of its most technically demanding outsourced parts. It's got an amazing technological focus, with cutting-edge computer numerical control (CNC) automation. Legally, it's structured as a mission-driven non-profit entity, and it is extremely competitive in its market, and growing like crazy. 

And yet, running through the whole organization is an amazing commitment to putting people at the center. From walking around the offices and factory floors today, it was obvious that this isn't just a work place. It changes people's lives, and it's operated for the long-term interests of its community here in the Seattle area.

It's not often that you watch a video about parts manufacturing and get choked up, but this company tends to have that effect. I encourage you to watch the whole video (and like it if you feel so inclined). 

Sure wish there were a lot more companies like this one. 

Website:  http://skillsinc.com/___

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2016-01-17 15:57:03 (5 comments; 14 reshares; 79 +1s)Open 

Google, Facebook, and now Baidu are opening up portions of their artificial intelligence platforms.

Baidu and other tech companies are making the code they use for deep learning freely available (see “Facebook Joins Stampede of Tech Giants Giving Away Artificial Intelligence Technology”) because they are eager to benefit from public research. They also want to encourage researchers and startups that might eventually be acquired to develop machine-learning systems that will be compatible with their own technology.

Google, Facebook, and now Baidu are opening up portions of their artificial intelligence platforms.

Baidu and other tech companies are making the code they use for deep learning freely available (see “Facebook Joins Stampede of Tech Giants Giving Away Artificial Intelligence Technology”) because they are eager to benefit from public research. They also want to encourage researchers and startups that might eventually be acquired to develop machine-learning systems that will be compatible with their own technology.___

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2016-01-16 18:01:20 (12 comments; 6 reshares; 70 +1s)Open 

Robot throws a paper airplane and in the same ark of throwing, subtly flips off humanity. Minute 1:40. 

Now that's cheeky. 

Robot throws a paper airplane and in the same ark of throwing, subtly flips off humanity. Minute 1:40. 

Now that's cheeky. ___

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2016-01-15 03:08:58 (1 comments; 6 reshares; 43 +1s)Open 

Good overview of latest Administration efforts to promote self-driving cars in the US, along with some of the hurdles.

To really reap the benefits of a self-driving car system, the vehicles would need to communicate with each other, as well as the roadway, to make the safest driving decisions, said Dan Edmunds, director of vehicle testing at Edmunds.com. Streets would also need to be mapped in higher detail than typical GPS.

"It needs to be a coordinated effort," he said. "That infrastructure takes time to build out, but before they can build it out, they have to decide exactly what it looks like."

Any policy guidelines for self-driving cars would also need to address issues of liability, as well as the role of the driver.



Good overview of latest Administration efforts to promote self-driving cars in the US, along with some of the hurdles.

To really reap the benefits of a self-driving car system, the vehicles would need to communicate with each other, as well as the roadway, to make the safest driving decisions, said Dan Edmunds, director of vehicle testing at Edmunds.com. Streets would also need to be mapped in higher detail than typical GPS.

"It needs to be a coordinated effort," he said. "That infrastructure takes time to build out, but before they can build it out, they have to decide exactly what it looks like."

Any policy guidelines for self-driving cars would also need to address issues of liability, as well as the role of the driver.

___

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2016-01-14 15:44:28 (23 comments; 4 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

Google's Record of Your Purchases

Type "my order from Dec, 2013" and let me know what you get. What I get is a fairly long list of my orders from Amazon, Apple iTunes, Etsy, Sierra Trading and others. It's nicely formatted, rich data. If I click on the arrow to the right, it shows me the price and taxes I paid for the items. 

So, yeah, I use Gmail, and yeah, Google is paying special, structured attention to my orders.

And yours.

Google's Record of Your Purchases

Type "my order from Dec, 2013" and let me know what you get. What I get is a fairly long list of my orders from Amazon, Apple iTunes, Etsy, Sierra Trading and others. It's nicely formatted, rich data. If I click on the arrow to the right, it shows me the price and taxes I paid for the items. 

So, yeah, I use Gmail, and yeah, Google is paying special, structured attention to my orders.

And yours.___

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2016-01-14 04:40:53 (14 comments; 10 reshares; 43 +1s)Open 

Complexity is the Natural Study of How Algorithmic Systems Evolve 

A wonderful talk by Brian Arthur looking at the history of science and how the primary tool for understanding and conveying scientific insights has shifted from geometry to equations and now to algorithms. Algorithms are process and with their prominence in science, science becomes procedural - no longer noun based, but verb based. 

One of the key insights from this talk: 
Complexity studies systems whose elements react to the patterns they create. i.e. to the context they create. 

Algorithmic updating depends on the inner state of the system. i.e. the context. This allows the systems to react to the context it creates. 

Complexity is the natural study of systems that react to their inner context. 

There's an important point in here aboutso-ca... more »

Complexity is the Natural Study of How Algorithmic Systems Evolve 

A wonderful talk by Brian Arthur looking at the history of science and how the primary tool for understanding and conveying scientific insights has shifted from geometry to equations and now to algorithms. Algorithms are process and with their prominence in science, science becomes procedural - no longer noun based, but verb based. 

One of the key insights from this talk: 
Complexity studies systems whose elements react to the patterns they create. i.e. to the context they create. 

Algorithmic updating depends on the inner state of the system. i.e. the context. This allows the systems to react to the context it creates. 

Complexity is the natural study of systems that react to their inner context. 

There's an important point in here about so-called "hard" and "soft" sciences. Physics experts claim their science is hard while something like economics is soft. But Brian Arthur points out that while much of physics can be boiled down into simpler equations capable of prediction, economics involves lots of feedback and is therefore complex, rather than soft. 

This talk is 90 minutes, but I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in complexity or the history of science. 

For those of you who are into technology, I also highly recommend Brian Arthur's book, The Nature of Technology. I've written up an overview of it here, but it's well worth the full read. It ranks up there in my all-time favorite books. 
http://www.the-vital-edge.com/the-nature-of-technology/___

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2016-01-12 20:45:55 (16 comments; 6 reshares; 68 +1s)Open 

Facebook, Chat Bots and "Conversational Commerce"

Text-based chat bots will likely be the bridge to the Star Trek conversational computer - and commerce will be one of the biggest drivers. 

That's why it's really important to understand what Facebook is doing with "M" and this new software development kit aimed at allowing third-party developers to build their own chat bots. One of the main drivers will be helping companies to build conversational front-ends for cost-effectively engaging with customers. 

Walk into a Starbucks and you're immediately greeted with a chat bot that asks you if you want your regular today. Walk into Target and request assistance with finding the right new TV and the chat bot will get you part of the way there and hand you off to an employee at the right time. 

With M and its other investments inMe... more »

Facebook, Chat Bots and "Conversational Commerce"

Text-based chat bots will likely be the bridge to the Star Trek conversational computer - and commerce will be one of the biggest drivers. 

That's why it's really important to understand what Facebook is doing with "M" and this new software development kit aimed at allowing third-party developers to build their own chat bots. One of the main drivers will be helping companies to build conversational front-ends for cost-effectively engaging with customers. 

Walk into a Starbucks and you're immediately greeted with a chat bot that asks you if you want your regular today. Walk into Target and request assistance with finding the right new TV and the chat bot will get you part of the way there and hand you off to an employee at the right time. 

With M and its other investments in Messenger, Facebook is making some bold moves that don't really look like bold moves until you understand where they're going with all this. 

On the web, keyword search was the core of the experience. But on mobile, it’s become clear that chat is where people spend most of their time. That makes winning the messaging war both a requirement and an opportunity for Facebook.

To stay dominant on phones, it must make Messenger irresistibly useful, and the best way to do that is to augment its own product with bots from developers that offer convenience and utility for every niche use case. If Facebook controls messaging, it controls the portal to commerce and content as well as communication.

P.S. I grabbed the term "conversational commerce" from the folks at +Dan Miller and the folks at Opus Research: 
http://opusresearch.net/wordpress/

#virtualpersonalassistant   #artificialintelligence   #chatbots  ___

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2016-01-12 16:02:15 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Boom in Collaborative Robots - "Co-Bots"

As sales of larger ‘caged’ industrial robots show signs of slowing down (according to the latest filed annual reports of industrial robot manufacturers), sales of Collaborative Robots, or Co-Bots, smaller, more agile industrial robots have been proclaimed as ‘booming,’ with headlines such as Agile Robots Will Rule and claims that demand for collaborative robots is growing exponentially.

By +RobotEnomics 

Boom in Collaborative Robots - "Co-Bots"

As sales of larger ‘caged’ industrial robots show signs of slowing down (according to the latest filed annual reports of industrial robot manufacturers), sales of Collaborative Robots, or Co-Bots, smaller, more agile industrial robots have been proclaimed as ‘booming,’ with headlines such as Agile Robots Will Rule and claims that demand for collaborative robots is growing exponentially.

By +RobotEnomics ___

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2016-01-11 21:51:28 (4 comments; 1 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Cave Artist Digs for Deeper Meaning

It's inspiring when we see someone driven by generating a sense of wonder in spite of all logic. Check out the wonderful cave-carving art of Ra Paulette. 

Cave Artist Digs for Deeper Meaning

It's inspiring when we see someone driven by generating a sense of wonder in spite of all logic. Check out the wonderful cave-carving art of Ra Paulette. ___

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2016-01-10 04:07:57 (12 comments; 28 reshares; 51 +1s)Open 

Game Play

Great concept. Well executed. May haunt my visions of online gaming for a while....

HT to +Luke Bunyip 

Quite possibly one of the BEST short Sci-Fi movies you will ever see!___Game Play

Great concept. Well executed. May haunt my visions of online gaming for a while....

HT to +Luke Bunyip 

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2016-01-09 19:24:49 (2 comments; 12 reshares; 42 +1s)Open 

Framing Human Suffering with the Help of a Video Game

Every once in a while, someone comes along who shakes things up and changes how we think about a category of experience. In this case, a video game developer shares with us the hardship of living through the terminal cancer diagnose for his young son. 

What's interesting about this Wired story is that it captures some of the metaphysics of gameplay: 

Amidst all the plasma guns and power-ups, it can be easy to overlook the fact that videogames are inherently metaphysical exercises. Designing one is like beta-testing a universe. Its creators encode it with algorithms, maps, and decision trees, then invite players to decipher its hidden logic. Intentionally or not, games contain implicit messages about purpose, free will, the afterlife. Master the secret rhythms of Super Mario Bros. and you can deliver thee... more »

Framing Human Suffering with the Help of a Video Game

Every once in a while, someone comes along who shakes things up and changes how we think about a category of experience. In this case, a video game developer shares with us the hardship of living through the terminal cancer diagnose for his young son. 

What's interesting about this Wired story is that it captures some of the metaphysics of gameplay: 

Amidst all the plasma guns and power-ups, it can be easy to overlook the fact that videogames are inherently metaphysical exercises. Designing one is like beta-testing a universe. Its creators encode it with algorithms, maps, and decision trees, then invite players to decipher its hidden logic. Intentionally or not, games contain implicit messages about purpose, free will, the afterlife. Master the secret rhythms of Super Mario Bros. and you can deliver the eponymous plumber to a princely paradise. But even the best Space Invaders player is fated to end the game in defeat, another futile circuit in its samsara-like cycle of death and rebirth.

Ultimately though, this piece is about this video game. And if you watch the clip at the bottom of the article, you might want to grab some tissue. ___

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2016-01-08 21:16:04 (15 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

This article sees a slower adoption of autonomous vehicles than I'd assume and so draws some conclusions about the future of driving, as an occupation, and how drivers are likely to still be required...but...

...autonomous car drivers will be more like babysitters than true controllers of vehicles. That curtailing of responsibilities will likely result in a curtailing of wages.

HT +Jeffrey J Davis​

Career Half Life for Uber Drivers Is Finite:  Autonomous Vehicle Will Pinch Their Future___This article sees a slower adoption of autonomous vehicles than I'd assume and so draws some conclusions about the future of driving, as an occupation, and how drivers are likely to still be required...but...

...autonomous car drivers will be more like babysitters than true controllers of vehicles. That curtailing of responsibilities will likely result in a curtailing of wages.

HT +Jeffrey J Davis​

posted image

2016-01-06 18:00:04 (3 comments; 19 reshares; 50 +1s)Open 

Great new resource for public domain images.

HT +Laura Gibbs​

Did you know that more than 187,000 of the items in our Digital Collections are in the public domain? Starting today, the Library now makes it possible to download all of these items at the highest resolution images available directly from the Digital Collections website. We’ve even created a few tools, projects, and explorations designed to inspire your own creations—go forth and reuse! http://on.nypl.org/1n2V7WO___Great new resource for public domain images.

HT +Laura Gibbs​

posted image

2016-01-06 15:14:53 (5 comments; 0 reshares; 19 +1s)Open 

Interesting writeup about the surprising, continued growth of the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.


And yet CES keeps growing for several reasons. One is the Chinese. Manufacturers like Huawei, Hisense, ZTE, Haier and Lenovo keep increasing their presence in a bid to build brands in the U.S., like the Japanese 40 years ago and the Koreans 15 years ago. “They are trying to be more innovative, trying to be more than ‘we are the cheapest manufacturer,’” Shapiro said.

“We’ve gone from an industry that looked like it was consolidating around a couple of companies in Korea, Japan and the U.S. and suddenly you inject new blood, another 19 companies of equivalent size out of China,” Tom Morrod, an analyst at research firm IHS, said.

Second, the tech industry went horizontal. Tech is disrupting industries as diverse as autos, advertising, Hollywood,healthcare, W... more »

Interesting writeup about the surprising, continued growth of the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.


And yet CES keeps growing for several reasons. One is the Chinese. Manufacturers like Huawei, Hisense, ZTE, Haier and Lenovo keep increasing their presence in a bid to build brands in the U.S., like the Japanese 40 years ago and the Koreans 15 years ago. “They are trying to be more innovative, trying to be more than ‘we are the cheapest manufacturer,’” Shapiro said.

“We’ve gone from an industry that looked like it was consolidating around a couple of companies in Korea, Japan and the U.S. and suddenly you inject new blood, another 19 companies of equivalent size out of China,” Tom Morrod, an analyst at research firm IHS, said.

Second, the tech industry went horizontal. Tech is disrupting industries as diverse as autos, advertising, Hollywood, healthcare, Wall Street and insurance, which now see CES as relevant and essential.

___

posted image

2016-01-01 17:59:36 (10 comments; 2 reshares; 44 +1s)Open 

Time to keep an eye on Singapore's Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and their artificial intelligence and robotics work. I'll be headed there for a visit in a few months. Hoping I'll be able to see this work.

Time to keep an eye on Singapore's Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and their artificial intelligence and robotics work. I'll be headed there for a visit in a few months. Hoping I'll be able to see this work.___

posted image

2015-12-31 19:20:09 (8 comments; 5 reshares; 49 +1s)Open 

“Just Tell Him You’re the President”
Seinfeld interviews the President, proving once and for all that Barack Obama is far and away our coolest Commander in Chief yet. This is not just funny and endearing, but it's actually quite interesting - particularly the parts about politics as American football and dealing with the corruption that comes with privilege and power.

Worth the 18 minutes to watch.

“Just Tell Him You’re the President”
Seinfeld interviews the President, proving once and for all that Barack Obama is far and away our coolest Commander in Chief yet. This is not just funny and endearing, but it's actually quite interesting - particularly the parts about politics as American football and dealing with the corruption that comes with privilege and power.

Worth the 18 minutes to watch.___

posted image

2015-12-30 16:13:43 (13 comments; 8 reshares; 30 +1s)Open 

How do we rethink our organizational structures to embrace a more bee-like intelligence?

That’s because individual honeybees lack the mental capacity to make a decision this complex and nuanced.  But, when they pool the knowledge and experience of their most senior scout bees, they evoke a “Collective Intelligence”that is not only able to make the decision, it finds the optimal solution.

And, just as importantly, how do we do this without making us soulless Borgs?


HT +Grizwald Grim​. Nice original find, +John Verdon​.

___How do we rethink our organizational structures to embrace a more bee-like intelligence?

That’s because individual honeybees lack the mental capacity to make a decision this complex and nuanced.  But, when they pool the knowledge and experience of their most senior scout bees, they evoke a “Collective Intelligence”that is not only able to make the decision, it finds the optimal solution.

And, just as importantly, how do we do this without making us soulless Borgs?


HT +Grizwald Grim​. Nice original find, +John Verdon​.

posted image

2015-12-30 04:07:48 (10 comments; 19 reshares; 88 +1s)Open 

Nice roundup of what we might expect in deep learning in 2016.

One of the themes: more and more unsupervised learning. Some other highlights:

I am convinced that this is just the start: deep learning algorithms will become so efficient that they will be able to run on cheap mobile devices, even without extra hardware support or prohibitive memory overhead.

...Convolutional Networks were once among the largest/deepest neural network architectures, but today they are abstracted away as a small box in the diagrams of most newer architectures. In turn, many of these architectures tend to become just another small box in the next year's innovations. We're learning what the lego blocks are, and how to wire and nest them effectively to build large castles.

I expect within five years, we will have neural networks that can summarize what happens in a video clip,... more »

___Nice roundup of what we might expect in deep learning in 2016.

One of the themes: more and more unsupervised learning. Some other highlights:

I am convinced that this is just the start: deep learning algorithms will become so efficient that they will be able to run on cheap mobile devices, even without extra hardware support or prohibitive memory overhead.

...Convolutional Networks were once among the largest/deepest neural network architectures, but today they are abstracted away as a small box in the diagrams of most newer architectures. In turn, many of these architectures tend to become just another small box in the next year's innovations. We're learning what the lego blocks are, and how to wire and nest them effectively to build large castles.

I expect within five years, we will have neural networks that can summarize what happens in a video clip, and will be able to generate short videos.

Good catch, +Paulo Silveira.

posted image

2015-12-29 02:13:04 (10 comments; 16 reshares; 80 +1s)Open 

Here's Max Tegmark talking about our significance within the Universe. I don't happen to share his view that we are likely alone in the Universe for some of the same reasons stated by a questioner mid-way through the Q&A session at the end of the talk.

I share this talk because it's an interesting perspective on life on Earth and because of Tegmark's remarks about the importance of subjective consciousness. What Tegmark essentially says is that should we succeed in sowing the seeds of our progeny across the Universe, it would be a horrendous waste if these entities were somehow just a form of unconscious zombies without the capacity for self-reflective, subjective consciousness. He gets to this part of the talk at minute 31:34 should you just want to jump to this set of insights.

Great stuff. Thanks for sharing this originally, +martin shervington.
... more »

The Future of Life.
This guy, Max Tegmark, is great.
One for you +Gideon Rosenblatt +Peter Feltham +John Kellden
And note at the 5 mins mark how he seems to mumble, 'before we became aware of parallel Universes...'
TimeTip: Watch with subtitles, on 1.5 if you are short of time.___Here's Max Tegmark talking about our significance within the Universe. I don't happen to share his view that we are likely alone in the Universe for some of the same reasons stated by a questioner mid-way through the Q&A session at the end of the talk.

I share this talk because it's an interesting perspective on life on Earth and because of Tegmark's remarks about the importance of subjective consciousness. What Tegmark essentially says is that should we succeed in sowing the seeds of our progeny across the Universe, it would be a horrendous waste if these entities were somehow just a form of unconscious zombies without the capacity for self-reflective, subjective consciousness. He gets to this part of the talk at minute 31:34 should you just want to jump to this set of insights.

Great stuff. Thanks for sharing this originally, +martin shervington.

#consciousness #life

posted image

2015-12-24 16:19:45 (6 comments; 10 reshares; 72 +1s)Open 

Nice compilation of things, Google+, by +Denis Labelle​.

+Google+ / plus.google.com
. New Google+ > support.google.com/plus
. G+ Help Community > goo.gl/ZoV3y9
. G+ updates on all platforms > goo.gl/tlpA99
. YouTube > goo.gl/aBZGpi
. Branding Guidelines > goo.gl/PVUgpN
. Google+ For Work > goo.gl/j7Rpkf
. Google+ Growth: 2.7 BILLION accounts > goo.gl/xm6SNk
. Policies for Google+, Hangouts & Photos > goo.gl/QmckkW

More:
. The Future Of Google+ -> goo.gl/96JjGO
. Video Guide To The New Google+ > goo.gl/SJEVFV
. The New Google+: Tutorial > goo.gl/C2xscC
. Google+ keyboard shortcuts > goo.gl/JZ65uY
. The New Google+ - Part 1 > goo.gl/lpDCwA
. The New Google+ - Part 2 > goo.gl/vmtULW
. What Marketers Need To Know > goo.gl/tB4hsV
. Build Your Business With G+ Communities > goo.gl/YY6FdM

Any Requests? Ask Here -> goo.gl/8DfMbP

#Googlepedia                                     ___Nice compilation of things, Google+, by +Denis Labelle​.

posted image

2015-12-23 17:54:39 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

Well, looks like we're prodding the Hyperloop idea with some feasibility tests. Cool.

SpaceX has selected 124 teams of mostly college student engineers to participate in a Hyperloop Pod competition at the end of January. The teams will present their concepts for pods, which will then compete on a test track next summer in front of judges from SpaceX, Tesla, and universities.

The hyperloop, as outlined by Elon Musk two years ago, would involve a pod or capsule moving at nearly the speed of sound inside a tube elevated above the ground. This kind of track system could provide rapid transportation between cities 1,500 km or less apart, Musk said, after which supersonic aircraft would probably be faster or cheaper. Passengers might travel from Los Angeles to San Francisco in just 30 minutes, according to Musk. The idea was hailed as visionary by some, but others have criticized itfor... more »

Well, looks like we're prodding the Hyperloop idea with some feasibility tests. Cool.

SpaceX has selected 124 teams of mostly college student engineers to participate in a Hyperloop Pod competition at the end of January. The teams will present their concepts for pods, which will then compete on a test track next summer in front of judges from SpaceX, Tesla, and universities.

The hyperloop, as outlined by Elon Musk two years ago, would involve a pod or capsule moving at nearly the speed of sound inside a tube elevated above the ground. This kind of track system could provide rapid transportation between cities 1,500 km or less apart, Musk said, after which supersonic aircraft would probably be faster or cheaper. Passengers might travel from Los Angeles to San Francisco in just 30 minutes, according to Musk. The idea was hailed as visionary by some, but others have criticized it for being far from practical.

#hyperloop ___

posted image

2015-12-22 18:24:05 (5 comments; 13 reshares; 81 +1s)Open 

Teaching AI Together

...yet there are plenty of complex tasks in which AI machines still trail humans. These range from simple housework such as ironing to more advanced tasks such as driving. The reason for the slow progress in these areas is not that intelligent machines can’t do these tasks. Far from it. It’s because nobody has worked out how to train them.

The huge progress in face recognition, for example, has come about in large part because of massive databases of images in which human annotators have clearly marked faces in advance. AI algorithms have used these databases to learn.

But nobody has been able to create similar databases for more complex tasks such as driving. The absence of such databases is one of the main reasons for the lack of progress in this area.

#crowdteaching

Nice find, +Scott Nelson​.

___Teaching AI Together

...yet there are plenty of complex tasks in which AI machines still trail humans. These range from simple housework such as ironing to more advanced tasks such as driving. The reason for the slow progress in these areas is not that intelligent machines can’t do these tasks. Far from it. It’s because nobody has worked out how to train them.

The huge progress in face recognition, for example, has come about in large part because of massive databases of images in which human annotators have clearly marked faces in advance. AI algorithms have used these databases to learn.

But nobody has been able to create similar databases for more complex tasks such as driving. The absence of such databases is one of the main reasons for the lack of progress in this area.

#crowdteaching

Nice find, +Scott Nelson​.

posted image

2015-12-22 18:11:31 (4 comments; 5 reshares; 59 +1s)Open 

Want to Know More About the Winter Solstice?

Earth's tilt is the reason for the season. Our planet orbits the sun while tilted at an average of 23.5 degrees, so the Northern and Southern Hemispheres receive unequal amounts of sunlight. This causes both the solstices and the seasons.

Each hemisphere's cooler half of the year happens when it's tilted away from the sun, and its winter solstice (December in the north, June in the south) marks the point when that half of the globe is tilted away from the sun at its most extreme angle.

Lack of exposure to the sun's rays makes the winter solstice the darkest day of the year but it's not the coldest. That's still a month or more away, depending on your location, because oceans and landmasses are slow to lose the heat energy they absorbed during the warmer months.



Want to Know More About the Winter Solstice?

Earth's tilt is the reason for the season. Our planet orbits the sun while tilted at an average of 23.5 degrees, so the Northern and Southern Hemispheres receive unequal amounts of sunlight. This causes both the solstices and the seasons.

Each hemisphere's cooler half of the year happens when it's tilted away from the sun, and its winter solstice (December in the north, June in the south) marks the point when that half of the globe is tilted away from the sun at its most extreme angle.

Lack of exposure to the sun's rays makes the winter solstice the darkest day of the year but it's not the coldest. That's still a month or more away, depending on your location, because oceans and landmasses are slow to lose the heat energy they absorbed during the warmer months.

___

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