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Ian Bosdet has been at 8 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Joanne Manaster118,790Join Joanne and Jeff for Read Science this Thursday, April 30, at 2pm EDT as we talk about the science of cancer with Sue Armstrong, author of p53, The Gene that Cracked the Cancer Code, and George Johnson, author of The Cancer Chronicles (and also of The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments)Science Books2015-04-30 20:00:0017  
Scott Lewis377,789Heck yes! 500th recording of the @117904790972122493317 podcast!! To celebrate this, @115510485336217794615 and I will be live-tweeting the show at @113166718268343560861, @117350484427668823936 and @101736365103983335412 bring us the amazing science we all know and live from TWIS.  If you're over on Twitter, live-tweet with us using the hash tag #TWIS500   (https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&q=%23TWIS500) When the show goes live, my promo video from @112979228143535385377 will be replaced with the live feed, but just in case you're having trouble finding it, check it out at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSuIbMcKpOw I'm sure Michael and I will be uploading some #selfies  of us watching and tweeting about TWIS and I hope you will too! Just put them down here in the event or on Twitter, I know that the trifecta of TWIS would LOVE to see you all celebrate with them! Also, please consider becoming a patron of TWIS. They do an amazing job bringing science to the WORLD every week and couldn't do it without the support of their listeners. You can do so easily over at their Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/thisweekinscience (also linked as "tickets") #ScienceEveryday   #TWIS   #ThisWeekInScience   #HangoutsOnAir   #Science   #STEM   #Podcast  TWIS500 Viewing Party!!2015-02-05 05:00:0084  
Joanne Manaster118,790In this episode of Read Science! Jeff and Joanne will be hanging out with our favorite lover of the periodic table, Theo Gray and photographer Nick Mann, to talk about the new book, Molecules: the Elements and the Architecture of Everything! If you enjoy Theo's columns in Popular Science and the book The Elements, be sure to join us this Thursday, October 16th at noon EDT for this Google Hangout on Air!Read Science! Molecules Edition with Theo Gray and Nick Mann2014-10-16 18:00:0029  
Joanne Manaster118,790Join Jeff and Joanne on Read Science! as they are joined by the Kitchen Pantry Scientist herself, @110768492090057570044 to talk about teaching science concepts to children with things you have at your house! There may even be live demonstrations. Questions will be accepted from the audience. Thursday, September 25, 7pm EDT.Read Science! Kitchen Science Lab Episode2014-09-26 01:00:0033  
Joanne Manaster118,790Join @104733415626297507218  and +Joanne Manaster for this episode of @115923395996980624785 where their guest @109710318485682657052 tells us all about teaching the general public a bit of physics here and there. Oh, and all dogs are welcome!   Thursday, June 19, 2014 at 12:30pm EDT, 11:30 CDT --About one hour longRead Science! "My Dog Knows Physics" Episode2014-06-19 19:30:0035  
Pamela L. Gay88,039Join us to talk with Moon pioneers @100178094478432687792 and @101857647439433066235  and find out how they're engaging students -- and heading to the Moon! Overview A global team of scientists and engineers are all working toward constructing missions to land on, travel across, and send video back from the Moon. With this new Google Hangout on Air series, we will introduce you to the men and women behind each of these planned missions and bring you all the latest developments from the +Google Lunar XPRIZE .Google Lunar XPRIZE Team Hangout 005: Rockets and Students ENGAGE!2014-05-28 03:00:4825  
ScienceSunday87,225Join hosts +Buddhini Samarasinghe and +Scott Lewis  for another “SciSunHOA”, a live Google+ Hangout On Air broadcast, brought to you by +ScienceSunday. This episode, Professor +Vincent Racaniello joins Buddhini and Scott to discuss his work in virology. Vincent is a professor of microbiology and immunology at Columbia University. His research includes the study of poliovirus (Polio), rhinovirus (Common Cold), and other RNA viruses. His work focuses on how our immune systems interact with these viruses, how they cause disease, while also discovering new viruses in wild animals. Outside of the lab, Vincent is involved in many science outreach efforts, including hosting the excellent podcast series This Week in Virology (TWiV). You can read more on his website here (http://www.virology.ws/) We’re all very excited for this episode of “SciSunHOA” as Vincent is not only a brilliant scientist, but also an outstanding science communicator! Questions for Vincent, Buddhini and Scott can be left here in the event page, as well as during the live show through the shares of the HOA, including on Twitter using the hash tag: #SciSunHOA  Going Viral: #SciSun Hangout on Air featuring Vincent Racaniello2013-04-29 00:00:0058  
Fraser Cain987,906Join our team of space/astronomy journalists as we bring you a quick rundown of all the breaking space news this week. Professional journalists from Universe Today, SPACE.com, Discovery, Discover Magazine, NBC, and more. We'll talk about the latest missions, biggest discoveries, and more. Hosted by Fraser Cain *Click "Yes" to "Are you going" if you want to have this event automatically put into your calendar.*Weekly Space Hangout - Oct. 11, 20122012-10-11 19:00:00251  

Shared Circles including Ian Bosdet

Shared Circles are not available on Google+ anymore, but you can find them still here.

The Google+ Collections of Ian Bosdet

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 7

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2015-04-15 16:28:45 (7 comments; 1 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

“I knew I was right! All the research I did online paid off. No need for expensive invasive surgery with time honored treatments.”

Most reshares: 8

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2015-05-09 04:55:45 (6 comments; 8 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

Most plusones: 32

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2015-04-28 22:30:00 (3 comments; 8 reshares; 32 +1s)Open 

The Government of Canada's approach to energy and the environment:

Latest 50 posts

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2016-03-09 17:27:20 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s)Open 

Looking for a dietitian in Canada? +diana chard has you covered.

Looking for a dietitian in Canada? +diana chard has you covered.___

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2016-02-23 03:20:44 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 14 +1s)Open 

Nihilistic password security questions 

Nihilistic password security questions ___

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2015-12-09 18:50:43 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

He totally deserves this.

He totally deserves this.___

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2015-11-23 22:00:11 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s)Open 

These two snoRNAs (snoRNA = small nucleolar RNA) are recurrently deleted in 10-40% of cancers. They are negative regulators of KRAS and their loss seems to make mutated KRAS, which is a bad feature of a tumour, even worse.

While this doesn't have obvious predictive value (i.e. there aren't therapies targeted KRAS, despite decades of work) the loss of these two RNAs provides some prognostic information. And perhaps finding molecules that target KRAS will help with design of future drugs.

These two snoRNAs (snoRNA = small nucleolar RNA) are recurrently deleted in 10-40% of cancers. They are negative regulators of KRAS and their loss seems to make mutated KRAS, which is a bad feature of a tumour, even worse.

While this doesn't have obvious predictive value (i.e. there aren't therapies targeted KRAS, despite decades of work) the loss of these two RNAs provides some prognostic information. And perhaps finding molecules that target KRAS will help with design of future drugs.___

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2015-10-13 19:05:11 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

I should start practicing this now, but some days I think it may already be too late.

I should start practicing this now, but some days I think it may already be too late.___

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2015-09-16 16:32:45 (3 comments; 4 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

Fair and balanced reporting on the world around us

Fair and balanced reporting on the world around us___

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2015-09-16 04:16:43 (4 comments; 2 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

47c/lb is a good price for premium boneless

47c/lb is a good price for premium boneless___

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2015-08-11 16:50:05 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

The sun comes up and I have a chance to be kind to anyone who crosses my path because I can. I make that choice for myself and nobody has to tell me to do it. I am right with myself. I try my best to do my best, and if I fail, I try again tomorrow.

The sun comes up and I have a chance to be kind to anyone who crosses my path because I can. I make that choice for myself and nobody has to tell me to do it. I am right with myself. I try my best to do my best, and if I fail, I try again tomorrow.___

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2015-08-10 20:00:05 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

A wonderfully existential journey of a plastic bag, narrated by Werner Herzog. 

A wonderfully existential journey of a plastic bag, narrated by Werner Herzog. ___

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2015-08-04 19:35:45 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s)Open 

The untenability of faitheism

Faith Versus Fact is unquestionably partisan, but its tone is matter-of-fact, and the offense that its targets will surely take will come from the force of his arguments rather than any ridicule or cheap shots.

Steven Pinker reviews +Jerry Coyne's new book Faith vs. Fact in the August issue of _Current Biology).

The untenability of faitheism

Faith Versus Fact is unquestionably partisan, but its tone is matter-of-fact, and the offense that its targets will surely take will come from the force of his arguments rather than any ridicule or cheap shots.

Steven Pinker reviews +Jerry Coyne's new book Faith vs. Fact in the August issue of _Current Biology).___

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2015-08-04 19:30:35 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

Quietly, without anyone really noticing, the entire Canadian blue-water navy has sunk.  It's now less-capable than those of Indonesia and Bangladesh, both of whom are long-time recipients of aid from Canada.

Quietly, without anyone really noticing, the entire Canadian blue-water navy has sunk.  It's now less-capable than those of Indonesia and Bangladesh, both of whom are long-time recipients of aid from Canada.___

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2015-06-19 03:18:19 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

Probably getting close though...

Probably getting close though...___

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2015-06-18 20:16:03 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

At press time, residents of the only economically advanced nation in the world where roughly two mass shootings have occurred every month for the past five years were referring to themselves and their situation as “helpless .”

At press time, residents of the only economically advanced nation in the world where roughly two mass shootings have occurred every month for the past five years were referring to themselves and their situation as “helpless .”___

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2015-06-01 17:53:09 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s)Open 

The 2015 World Cup has just begun

At press time, the U.S. national team was leading defending champions Germany in the World Cup’s opening match after being awarded 12 penalties in the game’s first three minutes.

The 2015 World Cup has just begun

At press time, the U.S. national team was leading defending champions Germany in the World Cup’s opening match after being awarded 12 penalties in the game’s first three minutes.___

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2015-06-01 03:52:36 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

Nothing On

Nothing On___

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2015-05-29 16:49:29 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

What this reporter failed to note is that this is a copy of policies developed by the Canadian Government (although it sounds less restrictive).

If someone asks you a question, any question, or you have the urge to say something, anything, then you must first fill in the form.  Once the form has been approved and signed off by your line manager, the communications committee and the Principal, you can say the words.

What this reporter failed to note is that this is a copy of policies developed by the Canadian Government (although it sounds less restrictive).

If someone asks you a question, any question, or you have the urge to say something, anything, then you must first fill in the form.  Once the form has been approved and signed off by your line manager, the communications committee and the Principal, you can say the words.___

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2015-05-28 18:03:28 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

Wow - Google Photos will now give you unlimited space for photos up to 16MP in size (and 1080p videos).  Certainly giving Flickr's 1TB of space some competition.

Wow - Google Photos will now give you unlimited space for photos up to 16MP in size (and 1080p videos).  Certainly giving Flickr's 1TB of space some competition.___

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2015-05-27 20:26:27 (3 comments; 3 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

Selecting a Medical Specialty

Based on some acquaintances I think this is actually how it works.

Selecting a Medical Specialty

Based on some acquaintances I think this is actually how it works.___

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2015-05-25 20:52:27 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

Right-To-Try laws: bad for patients

Right to try laws are being passed in many US states.  On the surface, these laws allow terminally-ill patients to access experimental drugs that may help them.  Hard to argue against that and not seem like a horrible person, but in the linked article below Orac outlines why these are more likely to cause harm to patients.  He, quite sensibly as usual, argues for support of the FDA's Compassionate Access program.  If you don't want to read the whole thing (you should) then here's what he's getting at:

The key difference between right-to-try and FDA compassionate use programs is that right-to-try strips pretty much all protections from patients who would use it; requires them to pay for the drug and any care related to the drug; prevents them from suing manufacturers and doctors if something goes wrong; prevents the statefro... more »

Right-To-Try laws: bad for patients

Right to try laws are being passed in many US states.  On the surface, these laws allow terminally-ill patients to access experimental drugs that may help them.  Hard to argue against that and not seem like a horrible person, but in the linked article below Orac outlines why these are more likely to cause harm to patients.  He, quite sensibly as usual, argues for support of the FDA's Compassionate Access program.  If you don't want to read the whole thing (you should) then here's what he's getting at:

The key difference between right-to-try and FDA compassionate use programs is that right-to-try strips pretty much all protections from patients who would use it; requires them to pay for the drug and any care related to the drug; prevents them from suing manufacturers and doctors if something goes wrong; prevents the state from taking action against the licenses of providers who give patients bad advice recommending right-to-try; tells insurance companies that, not only do they not have to pay for the investigational agent or device, but they don’t have to pay for any complications arising from use of the investigational agent or device; and makes doctors and other health care providers working for right-to-try states leery of advising too strongly against right-to-try, lest they be prosecuted for “blocking” access to experimental drugs. FDA compassionate use programs, in marked contrast, require review and oversight by an institutional review board (IRB). The other difference was that, although 99.5% of compassionate use/expanded access requests are approved by the FDA, the process was onerous. As Dr. Peppercorn points out, that is rapidly changing, arguably eliminating the “need” for right-to-try.___

posted image

2015-05-25 20:50:28 (4 comments; 5 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

Right-To-Try laws: bad for patients

Right to try laws are being passed in many US states.  On the surface, these laws allow terminally-ill patients to access experimental drugs that may help them.  Hard to argue against that and not seem like a horrible person, but in the linked article below Orac outlines why these are more likely to cause harm to patients.  He, quite sensibly as usual, argues for support of the FDA's Compassionate Access program.  If you don't want to read the whole thing (you should) then here's what he's getting at:

The key difference between right-to-try and FDA compassionate use programs is that right-to-try strips pretty much all protections from patients who would use it; requires them to pay for the drug and any care related to the drug; prevents them from suing manufacturers and doctors if something goes wrong; prevents the statefro... more »

Right-To-Try laws: bad for patients

Right to try laws are being passed in many US states.  On the surface, these laws allow terminally-ill patients to access experimental drugs that may help them.  Hard to argue against that and not seem like a horrible person, but in the linked article below Orac outlines why these are more likely to cause harm to patients.  He, quite sensibly as usual, argues for support of the FDA's Compassionate Access program.  If you don't want to read the whole thing (you should) then here's what he's getting at:

The key difference between right-to-try and FDA compassionate use programs is that right-to-try strips pretty much all protections from patients who would use it; requires them to pay for the drug and any care related to the drug; prevents them from suing manufacturers and doctors if something goes wrong; prevents the state from taking action against the licenses of providers who give patients bad advice recommending right-to-try; tells insurance companies that, not only do they not have to pay for the investigational agent or device, but they don’t have to pay for any complications arising from use of the investigational agent or device; and makes doctors and other health care providers working for right-to-try states leery of advising too strongly against right-to-try, lest they be prosecuted for “blocking” access to experimental drugs. FDA compassionate use programs, in marked contrast, require review and oversight by an institutional review board (IRB). The other difference was that, although 99.5% of compassionate use/expanded access requests are approved by the FDA, the process was onerous. As Dr. Peppercorn points out, that is rapidly changing, arguably eliminating the “need” for right-to-try.___

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2015-05-15 17:41:22 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s)Open 

Sad news about BB.  I hope Lucille is well taken care of.

Sad news about BB.  I hope Lucille is well taken care of.___

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2015-05-15 00:11:21 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

At 35, you have 20‑30 per cent chance of your frozen eggs creating a baby in the future, using IVF. At 42, it is 3.9 per cent

At 35, you have 20‑30 per cent chance of your frozen eggs creating a baby in the future, using IVF. At 42, it is 3.9 per cent___

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2015-05-13 17:09:58 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

Thing Explainer

So awesome.  Randall Munroe is releasing a new book called Thing Explainer.  I have his previous book What If and it is a fantastic read.  Too bad we have to wait until November to see this one.

"In Thing Explainer: Complicated Stuff in Simple Words, things are explained in the style of Up Goer Five, using only drawings and a vocabulary of the 1,000 (or "ten hundred") most common words. Explore computer buildings (datacenters), the flat rocks we live on (tectonic plates), the things you use to steer a plane (airliner cockpit controls), and the little bags of water you're made of (cells)."

Thing Explainer

So awesome.  Randall Munroe is releasing a new book called Thing Explainer.  I have his previous book What If and it is a fantastic read.  Too bad we have to wait until November to see this one.

"In Thing Explainer: Complicated Stuff in Simple Words, things are explained in the style of Up Goer Five, using only drawings and a vocabulary of the 1,000 (or "ten hundred") most common words. Explore computer buildings (datacenters), the flat rocks we live on (tectonic plates), the things you use to steer a plane (airliner cockpit controls), and the little bags of water you're made of (cells)."___

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2015-05-13 16:47:41 (2 comments; 3 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

As always, Randall has a unique view on the world.

https://xkcd.com/1524/ 

As always, Randall has a unique view on the world.

https://xkcd.com/1524/ ___

2015-05-12 23:24:31 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

That's a LOT of authors

This paper in Genes, Genomes, Genetics has what appears to be over 1,000 authors (1,021 is my estimate but I cheated and used a BASH script to count the commas in the author list - feel free to check my work).  I wonder if that makes the author list more information-dense than the tiny Drosophila chromosome they were studying. 

http://www.g3journal.org/content/5/5/719.full

That's a LOT of authors

This paper in Genes, Genomes, Genetics has what appears to be over 1,000 authors (1,021 is my estimate but I cheated and used a BASH script to count the commas in the author list - feel free to check my work).  I wonder if that makes the author list more information-dense than the tiny Drosophila chromosome they were studying. 

http://www.g3journal.org/content/5/5/719.full___

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2015-05-12 23:22:06 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

From Canada, Baby Charlotte gets a snowsuit (of course) and her name on a $100,000 donation to a pro-vaccination advocacy group.  Nice.

From Canada, Baby Charlotte gets a snowsuit (of course) and her name on a $100,000 donation to a pro-vaccination advocacy group.  Nice.___

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2015-05-12 17:07:45 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 

I've never been interested in drones before but this thing looks pretty cool.

I've never been interested in drones before but this thing looks pretty cool.___

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2015-05-11 02:25:56 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

Vancouver. Saturday. 

Vancouver. Saturday. ___

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2015-05-10 14:35:08 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

Happy Mother's Day.  Use the handy chart below to figure out how you're related to all the distant family members that Mom talks about today.

Happy Mother's Day.  Use the handy chart below to figure out how you're related to all the distant family members that Mom talks about today.___

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2015-05-09 04:55:45 (6 comments; 8 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

___

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2015-05-08 20:36:46 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

CCMG releases position statement on genome-wide sequencing

The Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (of which I am a member) has today released a position statement on the use of whole-genome sequencing for clinical genetic diagnostics.  I think it does a really good job of exploring the practical, ethical and scientific complexities of this technology.  

One of (I am going to guess) the more controversial recommendations is that labs should limit their analyses to genes clearly associated with the patient's disease phenotype.  What this means is that if you're investigating someone for, say, cardiomyopathy, then the bioinformatic analysis should avoid genes such as the hereditary cancer genes like BRCA1 or TP53.  This will have the effect of minimizing incidental findings for unrelated disorders i.e. "we didn't figure our your heart condition but I havebad... more »

CCMG releases position statement on genome-wide sequencing

The Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (of which I am a member) has today released a position statement on the use of whole-genome sequencing for clinical genetic diagnostics.  I think it does a really good job of exploring the practical, ethical and scientific complexities of this technology.  

One of (I am going to guess) the more controversial recommendations is that labs should limit their analyses to genes clearly associated with the patient's disease phenotype.  What this means is that if you're investigating someone for, say, cardiomyopathy, then the bioinformatic analysis should avoid genes such as the hereditary cancer genes like BRCA1 or TP53.  This will have the effect of minimizing incidental findings for unrelated disorders i.e. "we didn't figure our your heart condition but I have bad news for you and your family about colon cancer".  One could also argue that it's instead a missed chance at opportunistic screening, which is the side that US labs and the ACMG seem to have landed on.

It's a complex topic and it will continue to evolve along with the technology and our knowledge of the genetics of disease.  For now, these recommendations feel like a sensible approach and it's nice to have some additional guidance and consensus in the community.

Paper linked below.  It's peer-reviewed and Open Access. ___

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2015-05-08 20:21:14 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

#26. a generic item of clothing

#26. a generic item of clothing___

posted image

2015-05-07 20:29:06 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

CCMG releases position statement on genome-wide sequencing

The Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (of which I am a member) has today released a position statement on the use of whole-genome sequencing for clinical genetic diagnostics.  I think it does a really good job of exploring the practical, ethical and scientific complexities of this technology.  

One of (I am going to guess) the more controversial recommendations is that labs should limit their analyses to genes clearly associated with the patient's disease phenotype.  What this means is that if you're investigating someone for, say, cardiomyopathy, then the bioinformatic analysis should avoid genes such as the hereditary cancer genes like BRCA1 or TP53.  This will have the effect of minimizing incidental findings for unrelated disorders i.e. "we didn't figure our your heart condition but I havebad... more »

CCMG releases position statement on genome-wide sequencing

The Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (of which I am a member) has today released a position statement on the use of whole-genome sequencing for clinical genetic diagnostics.  I think it does a really good job of exploring the practical, ethical and scientific complexities of this technology.  

One of (I am going to guess) the more controversial recommendations is that labs should limit their analyses to genes clearly associated with the patient's disease phenotype.  What this means is that if you're investigating someone for, say, cardiomyopathy, then the bioinformatic analysis should avoid genes such as the hereditary cancer genes like BRCA1 or TP53.  This will have the effect of minimizing incidental findings for unrelated disorders i.e. "we didn't figure our your heart condition but I have bad news for you and your family about colon cancer".  One could also argue that it's instead a missed chance at opportunistic screening, which is the side that US labs and the ACMG seem to have landed on.

It's a complex topic and it will continue to evolve along with the technology and our knowledge of the genetics of disease.  For now, these recommendations feel like a sensible approach and it's nice to have some additional guidance and consensus in the community.

Paper linked below.  It's peer-reviewed and Open Access. ___

posted image

2015-05-05 21:57:17 (0 comments; 6 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

Nature has a Statistics for Biologists portal.  Lots of good primers on the use (and misuse) of statistics in here, including their fantastic Points of Significance series.

Nature has a Statistics for Biologists portal.  Lots of good primers on the use (and misuse) of statistics in here, including their fantastic Points of Significance series.___

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2015-05-05 17:26:12 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

Funders to insist that all scientific groups contain at least two men

"We can’t be allowing groups to contain too many women, that’d be weird"

Funders to insist that all scientific groups contain at least two men

"We can’t be allowing groups to contain too many women, that’d be weird"___

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2015-05-02 16:28:53 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

___

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2015-05-01 23:25:31 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

#Leo more likely to have GI hemorrhage, #Sagittarius a humerus fracture. The dangers of multiple hypothesis testing revealed (yet again).

#Leo more likely to have GI hemorrhage, #Sagittarius a humerus fracture. The dangers of multiple hypothesis testing revealed (yet again).___

posted image

2015-04-28 22:30:00 (3 comments; 8 reshares; 32 +1s)Open 

The Government of Canada's approach to energy and the environment:

The Government of Canada's approach to energy and the environment:___

posted image

2015-04-27 00:46:05 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Daffodils and Dementia

✿ It's spring time in Maryland, and in the words of the poet Wordsworth, my heart dances with the daffodils. Through the long winter, I conjured up memories of these cheerful blooms in my mind:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

✿ But an estimated 44 million people world wide who suffer from Alzheimer's disease are robbed of their memories by a progressive dementia. As the 6th leading cause of death in the U.S., Alzheimer's cannot be cured or prevented. One of the handful of drugs available to improve memory loss in patients is galantamine, which is extracted from the leaves and bulbs of daffodils (Narcissus) and snowdrops(Ga... more »

Daffodils and Dementia

✿ It's spring time in Maryland, and in the words of the poet Wordsworth, my heart dances with the daffodils. Through the long winter, I conjured up memories of these cheerful blooms in my mind:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

✿ But an estimated 44 million people world wide who suffer from Alzheimer's disease are robbed of their memories by a progressive dementia. As the 6th leading cause of death in the U.S., Alzheimer's cannot be cured or prevented. One of the handful of drugs available to improve memory loss in patients is galantamine, which is extracted from the leaves and bulbs of daffodils (Narcissus) and snowdrops (Galanthus). These extracts have been in use since ancient times. In Homer's Greek epic, Odysseus is said to have used snowdrops to clear his mind bewitched by Circe. In the 1950s, a pharmacologist observed inhabitants of a remote Bulgarian village rubbing the extracts on their forehead and shortly after, the drug was approved for medical use. Galantamine increases the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in some parts of the brain, both by making the receptor more sensitive to its action and by slowing down its removal. The drug has other interesting properties: it is said to promote lucid dreaming, improve sleep quality, memory loss in brain damage, and some autistic symptoms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galantamine).  

✿ No drug has yet stopped the inexorable progress of Alzheimer's. Early intervention is key to effective treatment: in my lab, for example, we are studying endosomal pathology which is the earliest sign of problems at the cellular level (http://goo.gl/DtVUFT). Yet lack of funding stifles productive research. As Newt Gingrich points out in his recent Op-Ed for New York Times, we spend only 0.8% of the estimated 154 billion dollars of annual medical costs related to Alzheimer's disease on research to cure or prevent it

News Story: Newt Gingrich: Double the NIH Budget. April 22, 2015 http://goo.gl/Fq4PAS 

Daffodil GIF: http://headlikeanorange.tumblr.com/

#ScienceSunday  ___

2015-04-23 23:10:49 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

"Most reclassified #VUS (#ACMG 3 variants) are downgraded to benign"  
Anyone know of reference/data to support/refute this statement?

"Most reclassified #VUS (#ACMG 3 variants) are downgraded to benign"  
Anyone know of reference/data to support/refute this statement?___

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2015-04-20 22:30:11 (6 comments; 5 reshares; 19 +1s)Open 

"Scientists now agree—overwhelmingly—that the remedies don't work. But each year, billions of dollars worth of homeopathic products are sold in the U.S."

"Scientists now agree—overwhelmingly—that the remedies don't work. But each year, billions of dollars worth of homeopathic products are sold in the U.S."___

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2015-04-18 05:59:23 (3 comments; 5 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

"Seclusion makes gluten healthier." Totally true. Go ahead and eat that muffin if nobody is watching!

Happy Birthday +diana chard :)

"Seclusion makes gluten healthier." Totally true. Go ahead and eat that muffin if nobody is watching!

Happy Birthday +diana chard :)___

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2015-04-17 19:54:10 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

These are so sad.

#iwishmyteacherknew I don't have a friend to play with me

These are so sad.

#iwishmyteacherknew I don't have a friend to play with me___

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2015-04-16 22:42:11 (5 comments; 1 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

Dr. Oz is guilty of either outrageous conflicts of interest or flawed judgements about what constitutes appropriate medical treatments, or both. Whatever the nature of his pathology, members of the public are being misled and endangered, which makes Dr. Oz's presence on the faculty of a prestigious medical institution unacceptable.

Dr. Oz is guilty of either outrageous conflicts of interest or flawed judgements about what constitutes appropriate medical treatments, or both. Whatever the nature of his pathology, members of the public are being misled and endangered, which makes Dr. Oz's presence on the faculty of a prestigious medical institution unacceptable.___

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2015-04-15 16:47:52 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Are you worried that sometimes you're too anxious?  

Are you worried that sometimes you're too anxious?  ___

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2015-04-15 16:28:45 (7 comments; 1 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

“I knew I was right! All the research I did online paid off. No need for expensive invasive surgery with time honored treatments.”

“I knew I was right! All the research I did online paid off. No need for expensive invasive surgery with time honored treatments.”___

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2015-04-13 23:14:16 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

Seven Actionable Strategies for Advancing Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine

From the March issue of Cell Stem Cell, a report on the inaugural meeting of NYSCF’s Initiative on Women in Science and Engineering (IWISE).  

"It is the IWISE Working Group’s hope that eventually we will stop talking about women in science and start talking about equality in science, so that in time, excellence, not gender or any other measure of diversity, is the only standard that must be considered."

Here are their seven proposed strategies:

1. Implement Flexible Family Care Spending
2. Provide “Extra Hands” Award
3. Recruit Gender-Balanced External Review Committees and Speaker Selection Committees
4. Incorporate Implicit Bias Statements
5. Focus on Education as a Tool
6. Create an Institutional Report Card forGender Eq... more »

Seven Actionable Strategies for Advancing Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine

From the March issue of Cell Stem Cell, a report on the inaugural meeting of NYSCF’s Initiative on Women in Science and Engineering (IWISE).  

"It is the IWISE Working Group’s hope that eventually we will stop talking about women in science and start talking about equality in science, so that in time, excellence, not gender or any other measure of diversity, is the only standard that must be considered."

Here are their seven proposed strategies:

1. Implement Flexible Family Care Spending
2. Provide “Extra Hands” Award
3. Recruit Gender-Balanced External Review Committees and Speaker Selection Committees
4. Incorporate Implicit Bias Statements
5. Focus on Education as a Tool
6. Create an Institutional Report Card for Gender Equality (below)
7. Partner to Expand upon Existing Searchable Databases of Women in Science, Medicine, and Engineering___

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2015-04-13 19:27:01 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

Hi again.  2014 was a bit of a year for me.  We all have them every now and then, and I guess my turn came up.  One of the consequences of this is that I was largely absent from G+ for most of the year.  I continued to run across little tidbits that I thought would make great posts, but I never really found the time or energy to put many together.   But I think I’ve finally recovered enough to dive back in.  A quick browse through my stream today reminds me of what I’ve been missing and makes me wish I could rewind it for a year and catch up.

Hi again.  2014 was a bit of a year for me.  We all have them every now and then, and I guess my turn came up.  One of the consequences of this is that I was largely absent from G+ for most of the year.  I continued to run across little tidbits that I thought would make great posts, but I never really found the time or energy to put many together.   But I think I’ve finally recovered enough to dive back in.  A quick browse through my stream today reminds me of what I’ve been missing and makes me wish I could rewind it for a year and catch up.___

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2014-12-10 19:03:48 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

This analysis looks at the validity of whole genome sequencing in a clinical setting. As this technique becomes more affordable and practical, how can we use it in this setting?

#genomesequencing   #genome  

This analysis looks at the validity of whole genome sequencing in a clinical setting. As this technique becomes more affordable and practical, how can we use it in this setting?

#genomesequencing   #genome  ___

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2014-11-22 16:07:51 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

It is a rough road that leads to the heights of greatness.

It is a rough road that leads to the heights of greatness.___

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