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Neuroscience News has been at 3 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Science on Google+595,346*Isaac Newton's Birthday is on Christmas* Join us in a Newton-inspired holiday physics hangout with rockstar physicist +Henry Reich of +MinutePhysics and +MinuteEarth  and brilliant ballerina biologist +Carin Bondar of +National Geographic, +Scientific American and host of Wild Sex, a science show about the strange reproductive habits of the animal kingdom. She knows how the world gets physical. +Veritasium  AKA +Derek Muller may pop in.  We hear there may even be more special guests so you should probably go ahead and RSVP yes to join the lively conversation. BYOB. Hosted by +Amy Robinson of +Science on Google+ .Happy Newtonmas Hangout2013-12-19 00:00:00143  
EyeWire377,663+Sebastian Seung, Professor of Computational Neuroscience at +Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and creator of +EyeWire will host a 30 minute hangout on air on Thursday, Dec 12th at 3 PM US EST.  During this hangout, Sebastian will answer questions about scientific discoveries made possible with the help of EyeWirers as well as talk about what's in the works for the future of EyeWire.Hangout with Neuroscientist Sebastian Seung2013-12-12 21:00:0053  
Science on Google+595,346Please join us for a collaborative Hangout On Air with Autism Brainstorm (http://goo.gl/HO5LZL). We will be discussing current research in Autism and Autism Education, as well as the protein biomarkers associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Topics:  1) Lead by Dr. +Stephen Shore:   *Research in Comparative Approaches to Autism Education with special emphasis on the Miller Method®.* Dr. Shore will be joined by Ethan Miller and Amir Naimov for discussion and Q&A. 2) Lead by +John Elder Robison:   *Current research topic(s) being considered by IACC* (The Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee  is a Federal advisory committee charged with coordinating all activities concerning autism spectrum disorder within the U.S. 3) Lead by Dr. +Alisa Woods:  *Protein Biomarkers and Autism Spectrum Disorders* *PDF LINKS:* Dr. Stephen Shore Dissertation: Comparative Approaches to Autism Education: http://goo.gl/lnqpxb Dr. Stephen Shore: ICDL The Miller Method: http://goo.gl/X6XQoq John Elder Robison: Scholar in Residence at William And Mary: http://goo.gl/QPxtLH  John Elder Robison: IACC Government Strategic Plan for Autism Research: http://goo.gl/reBc9a Dr. Alisa G Woods: Treating Clients with AS and ASD: http://goo.gl/175424 Dr. Alisa G Woods: Proteomics and Cholesterol in Autism: http://goo.gl/SklhcL *Dr. Stephen Shore:* Diagnosed with "Atypical Development and strong autistic tendencies" and "too sick" for outpatient treatment Dr. Shore was recommended for institutionalization. Nonverbal until four, and with much support from his parents, teachers, wife, and others, Stephen is now a professor at Adelphi University where his research focuses on matching best practice to the needs of people with autism. In addition to working with children and talking about life on the autism spectrum, Stephen presents and consults internationally on adult issues pertinent to education, relationships, employment, advocacy, and disclosure as discussed in his books Beyond the Wall: Personal Experiences with Autism and Asperger Syndrome, Ask and Tell: Self-advocacy and Disclosure for People on the Autism Spectrum, the critically acclaimed Understanding Autism for Dummies., and the newly released DVD Living along the Autism Spectrum: What it means to have Autism or Asperger Syndrome. President emeritus of the Asperger’s Association of New England and former board member of the Autism Society, Dr. Shore serves in the Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism Association, United States Autism and Asperger Association, and other autism related organizations.  Dr. Shore is on the advisory board of AUTISM BRAINSTORM and is the primary autism education advisor. He frequently participates in Google Hangout events hosted by AUTISM BRAINSTORM. education.adelphi.edu/profile/steven-shore www.autismasperger.net  *John Elder Robison:* Self Advocate, Parent and Author, Mr. John Elder Robison joined the IACC as a public member in 2012. Mr. Robison is an Aspergian who grAutism Brainstorm and Science On Google+ Collaborative Hangout On Air2013-12-10 04:00:0088  

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Most comments: 81

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2015-06-17 01:37:51 (81 comments, 80 reshares, 652 +1s)Open 

Don't be a Grumpy Cat! Cat Videos Boost Positive Emotions

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/cat-videos-positive-emotions-2131/.

Viewing cat videos boosts energy and positive emotions, IU study finds.

The research is in Computers in Human Behavior. (full access paywall)

Research: "Emotion regulation, procrastination, and watching cat videos online: Who watches Internet cats, why, and to what effect?" by Jessica Gall Myrick in Computers in Human Behavior doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.06.001

Image: Bloomington's own Lil Bub is one of the more popular felines on the Internet. Image credit: Mike Bridavsky/www.lilbub.com.

#psychology   #emotions   #cat  

Most reshares: 80

posted image

2015-06-17 01:37:51 (81 comments, 80 reshares, 652 +1s)Open 

Don't be a Grumpy Cat! Cat Videos Boost Positive Emotions

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/cat-videos-positive-emotions-2131/.

Viewing cat videos boosts energy and positive emotions, IU study finds.

The research is in Computers in Human Behavior. (full access paywall)

Research: "Emotion regulation, procrastination, and watching cat videos online: Who watches Internet cats, why, and to what effect?" by Jessica Gall Myrick in Computers in Human Behavior doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.06.001

Image: Bloomington's own Lil Bub is one of the more popular felines on the Internet. Image credit: Mike Bridavsky/www.lilbub.com.

#psychology   #emotions   #cat  

Most plusones: 652

posted image

2015-06-17 01:37:51 (81 comments, 80 reshares, 652 +1s)Open 

Don't be a Grumpy Cat! Cat Videos Boost Positive Emotions

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/cat-videos-positive-emotions-2131/.

Viewing cat videos boosts energy and positive emotions, IU study finds.

The research is in Computers in Human Behavior. (full access paywall)

Research: "Emotion regulation, procrastination, and watching cat videos online: Who watches Internet cats, why, and to what effect?" by Jessica Gall Myrick in Computers in Human Behavior doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.06.001

Image: Bloomington's own Lil Bub is one of the more popular felines on the Internet. Image credit: Mike Bridavsky/www.lilbub.com.

#psychology   #emotions   #cat  

Latest 50 posts

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2015-06-29 23:14:42 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Smaller Hippocampus in Brains of Patients with Recurrent Depression

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/depression-hippocampus-volume-2173/.

The brains of people with recurrent depression have a significantly smaller hippocampus - the part of the brain most associated with forming new memories - than healthy individuals, a new global study of nearly 9,000 people reveals.

The research will appear in Molecular Psychiatry.

Image: People with an early age of onset of major depression (before the age of 21 years) also had a smaller hippocampus than healthy individuals, consistent with the notion that many of these young people go on to have recurrent disorders. Image is for illustrative purposes only.

#psychology   #depression  

Smaller Hippocampus in Brains of Patients with Recurrent Depression

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/depression-hippocampus-volume-2173/.

The brains of people with recurrent depression have a significantly smaller hippocampus - the part of the brain most associated with forming new memories - than healthy individuals, a new global study of nearly 9,000 people reveals.

The research will appear in Molecular Psychiatry.

Image: People with an early age of onset of major depression (before the age of 21 years) also had a smaller hippocampus than healthy individuals, consistent with the notion that many of these young people go on to have recurrent disorders. Image is for illustrative purposes only.

#psychology   #depression  ___

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2015-06-29 22:53:41 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Men and Women Process Pain Differently

New animal research reveals fundamental sex differences in how pain is processed.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

#neurology   #pain  

Men and Women Process Pain Differently

New animal research reveals fundamental sex differences in how pain is processed.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

#neurology   #pain  ___

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2015-06-29 22:10:21 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

It's Summer and Your Brain Knows It

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/chloride-scn-season-tracking-2171/.

Researchers led by Toru Takumi at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered a key mechanism underlying how animals keep track of the seasons.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: "GABA-mediated repulsive coupling between circadian clock neurons in the SCN encodes seasonal time" by Myung J, Hong S, DeWoskin D, Schutter E, Forger, DB, and Takumi T in PNAS doi:10.1073/pnas.1421200112.

Image: (Top) Expression levels of Bmal1 after exposure to long days. Note that the upper rows (dorsal SCN) are out of phase from the lower rows (ventral SCN). (Bottom) Expression levels in the presence of a GABAA inhibitor. Note that the upper and lower rows have become more synchronized.... more »

It's Summer and Your Brain Knows It

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/chloride-scn-season-tracking-2171/.

Researchers led by Toru Takumi at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered a key mechanism underlying how animals keep track of the seasons.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: "GABA-mediated repulsive coupling between circadian clock neurons in the SCN encodes seasonal time" by Myung J, Hong S, DeWoskin D, Schutter E, Forger, DB, and Takumi T in PNAS doi:10.1073/pnas.1421200112.

Image: (Top) Expression levels of Bmal1 after exposure to long days. Note that the upper rows (dorsal SCN) are out of phase from the lower rows (ventral SCN). (Bottom) Expression levels in the presence of a GABAA inhibitor. Note that the upper and lower rows have become more synchronized. Image credit: RIKEN.

#neuroscience   #summer   #genetics  ___

posted image

2015-06-27 23:34:39 (8 comments, 32 reshares, 135 +1s)Open 

Neural Compensation Linked to Better Memory in Old Age

A new study by neuroscientists in Trinity College Dublin on successful ageing has linked better memory performance in older age with patterns of neural compensation. The research sheds light on how memory can remain efficient in spite of common age-related neural decline.

The research is in Brain and Cognition. (full access paywall)

#aging   #memory  

Neural Compensation Linked to Better Memory in Old Age

A new study by neuroscientists in Trinity College Dublin on successful ageing has linked better memory performance in older age with patterns of neural compensation. The research sheds light on how memory can remain efficient in spite of common age-related neural decline.

The research is in Brain and Cognition. (full access paywall)

#aging   #memory  ___

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2015-06-27 22:17:29 (4 comments, 21 reshares, 72 +1s)Open 

Uncovering How Limbs Develop and Grow

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/limb-development-genetics-2169/.

A comprehensive map of limb development in chick embryos by researchers from RIKEN and Nagoya University has uncovered tissue-level deformation patterns of organ development. The findings reveal that the main driver of early limb formation is a global pattern of tissue stretching—and not spatial changes in organ volume, as previously believed.

The research is in Development. (full access paywall)

Research: "Quantitative analysis of tissue deformation dynamics reveals three characteristic growth modes and globally aligned anisotropic tissue deformation during chick limb development" by Yoshihiro Morishita, Atsushi Kuroiwa and Takayuki Suzuki in Development doi:10.1242/dev.109728

Image: Randomly distributedf... more »

Uncovering How Limbs Develop and Grow

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/limb-development-genetics-2169/.

A comprehensive map of limb development in chick embryos by researchers from RIKEN and Nagoya University has uncovered tissue-level deformation patterns of organ development. The findings reveal that the main driver of early limb formation is a global pattern of tissue stretching—and not spatial changes in organ volume, as previously believed.

The research is in Development. (full access paywall)

Research: "Quantitative analysis of tissue deformation dynamics reveals three characteristic growth modes and globally aligned anisotropic tissue deformation during chick limb development" by Yoshihiro Morishita, Atsushi Kuroiwa and Takayuki Suzuki in Development doi:10.1242/dev.109728

Image: Randomly distributed fluorescent markers (green spheres) reveal tissue-level patterns of hindlimb growth dynamics in chick embryos. Image credit: Y. Morishita et al./Development.

#genetics   #biology  ___

posted image

2015-06-26 22:16:51 (5 comments, 23 reshares, 63 +1s)Open 

Brain Cells Protected From Age Damage With Help of Common Protein

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/marcks-age-related-neural-damage-2168/.

A common protein, when produced by specialized barrier cells in the brain, could help protect the brain from damage due to aging.

The research is in Aging Cell. (full open access)

Research: "MARCKS-dependent mucin clearance and lipid metabolism in ependymal cells are required for maintenance of forebrain homeostasis during aging" by Nagendran Muthusamy, Laura J. Sommerville, Adam J. Moeser, Deborah J. Stumpo, Philip Sannes, Kenneth Adler, Perry J. Blackshear, Jill M. Weimer and H. Troy Ghashghaei in Aging Cell doi:10.1111/acel.12354

Image: Artistic rendition of ependymal cells building up lipid droplets (round objects) during aging. Image adapted from the North Carolina State... more »

Brain Cells Protected From Age Damage With Help of Common Protein

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/marcks-age-related-neural-damage-2168/.

A common protein, when produced by specialized barrier cells in the brain, could help protect the brain from damage due to aging.

The research is in Aging Cell. (full open access)

Research: "MARCKS-dependent mucin clearance and lipid metabolism in ependymal cells are required for maintenance of forebrain homeostasis during aging" by Nagendran Muthusamy, Laura J. Sommerville, Adam J. Moeser, Deborah J. Stumpo, Philip Sannes, Kenneth Adler, Perry J. Blackshear, Jill M. Weimer and H. Troy Ghashghaei in Aging Cell doi:10.1111/acel.12354

Image: Artistic rendition of ependymal cells building up lipid droplets (round objects) during aging. Image adapted from the North Carolina State University article.

#genetics   #aging  ___

posted image

2015-06-26 21:42:55 (7 comments, 11 reshares, 51 +1s)Open 

Specific Calcium Channel Plays a Crucial Role in Healthy Sleep

In a recent paper, Choi, Yu, Lee, and Llinás announced that a specific calcium channel plays a crucial role in healthy sleep, a key step toward understanding both normal and abnormal waking brain functions.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #sleep  

Specific Calcium Channel Plays a Crucial Role in Healthy Sleep

In a recent paper, Choi, Yu, Lee, and Llinás announced that a specific calcium channel plays a crucial role in healthy sleep, a key step toward understanding both normal and abnormal waking brain functions.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #sleep  ___

posted image

2015-06-26 20:06:18 (11 comments, 13 reshares, 59 +1s)Open 

Do Rats Dream of a Journey to a Brighter Future?

When rats rest, their brains simulate journeys to a desired future such as a tasty treat, finds new research.

The research is in eLife. (full open access)

#neuroscience   #sleep   #dream  

Do Rats Dream of a Journey to a Brighter Future?

When rats rest, their brains simulate journeys to a desired future such as a tasty treat, finds new research.

The research is in eLife. (full open access)

#neuroscience   #sleep   #dream  ___

posted image

2015-06-25 23:41:24 (9 comments, 40 reshares, 124 +1s)Open 

Fructose Not as Stimulating to Brain's Reward System as Glucose

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/fructose-limbic-system-neuroscience-2165/.

Fructose not only results in a lower level of satiety, it also stimulates the reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose. This may cause excessive consumption accompanied by effects that are a risk to health.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: "Dissociable Behavioral, Physiological and Neural Effects of Acute Glucose and Fructose Ingestion: A Pilot Study" by Bettina Karin Wölnerhanssen, Anne Christin Meyer-Gerspach, André Schmidt, Nina Zimak, Ralph Peterli, Christoph Beglinger, and Stefan Borgwardt in PLOS ONE doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0130280

Image: The MRI image clearly shows how the brain's reward, or limbic, system behavesd... more »

Fructose Not as Stimulating to Brain's Reward System as Glucose

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/fructose-limbic-system-neuroscience-2165/.

Fructose not only results in a lower level of satiety, it also stimulates the reward system in the brain to a lesser degree than glucose. This may cause excessive consumption accompanied by effects that are a risk to health.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: "Dissociable Behavioral, Physiological and Neural Effects of Acute Glucose and Fructose Ingestion: A Pilot Study" by Bettina Karin Wölnerhanssen, Anne Christin Meyer-Gerspach, André Schmidt, Nina Zimak, Ralph Peterli, Christoph Beglinger, and Stefan Borgwardt in PLOS ONE doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0130280

Image: The MRI image clearly shows how the brain's reward, or limbic, system behaves differently when administered a placebo (top) or one of two types of sugar, glucose (center) and fructose (bottom). Image credit: University of Basel, Department of Biomedicine.

#neuroscience   #fructose   #neuroimaging  ___

posted image

2015-06-25 22:24:02 (4 comments, 21 reshares, 88 +1s)Open 

Restoring Low Levels of Serotonin Could Improve Brain Function for Some with Dementia

Restoring the low levels of the chemical serotonin may help improve brain function and reduce impulsivity in some dementia patients, according to Cambridge researchers.

The research is in Brain. (full open access)

#dementia   #neuroscience   #psychology  

Restoring Low Levels of Serotonin Could Improve Brain Function for Some with Dementia

Restoring the low levels of the chemical serotonin may help improve brain function and reduce impulsivity in some dementia patients, according to Cambridge researchers.

The research is in Brain. (full open access)

#dementia   #neuroscience   #psychology  ___

posted image

2015-06-25 21:35:45 (13 comments, 14 reshares, 72 +1s)Open 

Three Rules Could Explain How the Visual System of the Fruit Fly Self Organizes as it Grows

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/vision-neural-circuitry-neuroscience-2163/.

New study unravels neural mystery with imaging and computation.

The research is in Cell. (full access paywall)

Research: "The Developmental Rules of Neural Superposition in Drosophila" by Marion Langen, Egemen Agi, Dylan J. Altschuler, Lani F. Wu, Steven J. Altschuler, and Peter Robin Hiesinger in Cell doi:10.1016/j.cell.2015.05.055

Image: The fruit fly brain has long been used to study how neural circuits self-assemble. Image credit: Hiesinger et al. / Cell 2005. 

#neuroscience   #vision  

Three Rules Could Explain How the Visual System of the Fruit Fly Self Organizes as it Grows

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/vision-neural-circuitry-neuroscience-2163/.

New study unravels neural mystery with imaging and computation.

The research is in Cell. (full access paywall)

Research: "The Developmental Rules of Neural Superposition in Drosophila" by Marion Langen, Egemen Agi, Dylan J. Altschuler, Lani F. Wu, Steven J. Altschuler, and Peter Robin Hiesinger in Cell doi:10.1016/j.cell.2015.05.055

Image: The fruit fly brain has long been used to study how neural circuits self-assemble. Image credit: Hiesinger et al. / Cell 2005. 

#neuroscience   #vision  ___

posted image

2015-06-25 20:47:28 (5 comments, 20 reshares, 64 +1s)Open 

What Happens in the Brain When We Think?

New research from Lund University in Sweden questions the prevailing doctrine on how the brain absorbs and processes information. The idea that the brain has a mechanism to maintain activity at the lowest possible level is incorrect.

The research is in Trends in Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #thought  

What Happens in the Brain When We Think?

New research from Lund University in Sweden questions the prevailing doctrine on how the brain absorbs and processes information. The idea that the brain has a mechanism to maintain activity at the lowest possible level is incorrect.

The research is in Trends in Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #thought  ___

posted image

2015-06-25 19:45:23 (3 comments, 11 reshares, 47 +1s)Open 

Remapping the Brains Language Area

Old beliefs upended as dementia research yields new locations for word and sentence comprehension.

The research is in Brain. (full access paywall)

#neurology   #language  

Remapping the Brains Language Area

Old beliefs upended as dementia research yields new locations for word and sentence comprehension.

The research is in Brain. (full access paywall)

#neurology   #language  ___

posted image

2015-06-24 23:17:48 (3 comments, 12 reshares, 40 +1s)Open 

Ability to Sort Complex Auditory Signals Aided by Norepinephrine

UMass Amherst scientists discover key role for neuromodulator in auditory function.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience  #norepinephrine

Ability to Sort Complex Auditory Signals Aided by Norepinephrine

UMass Amherst scientists discover key role for neuromodulator in auditory function.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience  #norepinephrine___

posted image

2015-06-24 22:30:30 (1 comments, 12 reshares, 52 +1s)Open 

Mental Flexibility Enabled With Help of Rare Neuron

Behavioral flexibility, the ability to change strategy when the rules change, is controlled by specific neurons in the brain, Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have confirmed. Cholinergic interneurons are rare – they make up just one to two percent of the neurons in the striatum, a key part of the brain involved with higher-level decision-making.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #neurons  

Mental Flexibility Enabled With Help of Rare Neuron

Behavioral flexibility, the ability to change strategy when the rules change, is controlled by specific neurons in the brain, Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have confirmed. Cholinergic interneurons are rare – they make up just one to two percent of the neurons in the striatum, a key part of the brain involved with higher-level decision-making.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #neurons  ___

posted image

2015-06-24 22:05:25 (31 comments, 20 reshares, 46 +1s)Open 

The Epigenetic Diversity of Neurons

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) scientists have profiled key features of the genetic material inside three types of brain cells and found vast differences in the patterns of chemical modifications that affect how the genes in each type of neuron are regulated. The analysis was made possible by a new method of collecting and purifying the nuclei of specific kinds of cells. Doing this type of study on cells in brain tissue has been challenging because the cells are densely packed and intimately intertwined.

The research is in Neuron. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #genetics   #epigenetics  

The Epigenetic Diversity of Neurons

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) scientists have profiled key features of the genetic material inside three types of brain cells and found vast differences in the patterns of chemical modifications that affect how the genes in each type of neuron are regulated. The analysis was made possible by a new method of collecting and purifying the nuclei of specific kinds of cells. Doing this type of study on cells in brain tissue has been challenging because the cells are densely packed and intimately intertwined.

The research is in Neuron. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #genetics   #epigenetics  ___

posted image

2015-06-24 21:34:40 (22 comments, 64 reshares, 155 +1s)Open 

Artificial Neurons Can Communicate in the Same Way as Human Neurons

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/bioelectronic-artificial-neuron-2157/.

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet have managed to build a fully functional neuron by using organic bioelectronics. This artificial neuron contain no ‘living’ parts, but is capable of mimicking the function of a human nerve cell and communicate in the same way as our own neurons do.

The research is in Biosensors & Bioelectronics. (full access paywall)

Research: "An organic electronic biomimetic neuron enables auto-regulated neuromodulation" by Daniel T. Simon, Karin C. Larsson, David Nilsson, Gustav Burström, Dagmar Galter, Magnus Berggren, and Agneta Richter-Dahlfors in Biosensors & Bioelectronics doi:10.1016/j.bios.2015.04.058

Image: To date, the primarytech... more »

Artificial Neurons Can Communicate in the Same Way as Human Neurons

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/bioelectronic-artificial-neuron-2157/.

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet have managed to build a fully functional neuron by using organic bioelectronics. This artificial neuron contain no ‘living’ parts, but is capable of mimicking the function of a human nerve cell and communicate in the same way as our own neurons do.

The research is in Biosensors & Bioelectronics. (full access paywall)

Research: "An organic electronic biomimetic neuron enables auto-regulated neuromodulation" by Daniel T. Simon, Karin C. Larsson, David Nilsson, Gustav Burström, Dagmar Galter, Magnus Berggren, and Agneta Richter-Dahlfors in Biosensors & Bioelectronics doi:10.1016/j.bios.2015.04.058

Image: To date, the primary technique for neuronal stimulation in human cells is based on electrical stimulation. Image credit: The researchers/Karolinska Institute.

#neuroscience   #science  ___

posted image

2015-06-24 20:40:46 (0 comments, 7 reshares, 34 +1s)Open 

Digital Atlas of Aging Brain Could Aid Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/brain-atlas-alzheimers-neurology-2156/.

A digital map of the ageing brain could aid the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders in older people, a study suggests.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: "Use of Brain MRI Atlases to Determine Boundaries of Age-Related Pathology: The Importance of Statistical Method" by David Alexander Dickie, Dominic E. Job, David Rodriguez Gonzalez, Susan D. Shenkin, and Joanna M. Wardlaw in PLOS ONE doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0127939

Image: Atlases of the distribution of the proportions of GM in normal older subjects. These were calculated with parametric (mean ±SD; P—upper panel) and nonparametric (order-based;NP... more »

Digital Atlas of Aging Brain Could Aid Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/brain-atlas-alzheimers-neurology-2156/.

A digital map of the ageing brain could aid the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders in older people, a study suggests.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: "Use of Brain MRI Atlases to Determine Boundaries of Age-Related Pathology: The Importance of Statistical Method" by David Alexander Dickie, Dominic E. Job, David Rodriguez Gonzalez, Susan D. Shenkin, and Joanna M. Wardlaw in PLOS ONE doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0127939

Image: Atlases of the distribution of the proportions of GM in normal older subjects. These were calculated with parametric (mean ±SD; P—upper panel) and nonparametric (order-based; NP—lower panel) methods in 98 aged normal subjects (60–90 years) Image credit: Dickie et al./PLOS ONE.

#neurology   #alzheimers  ___

posted image

2015-06-24 20:05:39 (21 comments, 52 reshares, 279 +1s)Open 

Pretty Polly! Why Parrots are Great at Vocal Imitation

Regions of bird's brain likely duplicated at least 29 million years ago.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

#neuroscience   #evolution   #learning  

Pretty Polly! Why Parrots are Great at Vocal Imitation

Regions of bird's brain likely duplicated at least 29 million years ago.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

#neuroscience   #evolution   #learning  ___

posted image

2015-06-24 01:22:09 (8 comments, 24 reshares, 101 +1s)Open 

Recalling a Nightmare Flight: How Trauma Memory is Processed in the Brain

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/trauma-memory-neuroimaging-2154/.

A group of passengers who thought they were going to die when their plane ran out of fuel over the Atlantic Ocean in August, 2001 have had their brains scanned while recalling the terrifying moments to help science better understand trauma memories and how they are processed in the brain.

The research will appear in Clinical Psychological Science.

Image: Areas in the anterior temporal lobe, including the amygdala and hippocampus, associated with enhanced traumatic recall. Image credit: Daniela Palombo. 

#neuroscience   #memory   #psychology  

Recalling a Nightmare Flight: How Trauma Memory is Processed in the Brain

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/trauma-memory-neuroimaging-2154/.

A group of passengers who thought they were going to die when their plane ran out of fuel over the Atlantic Ocean in August, 2001 have had their brains scanned while recalling the terrifying moments to help science better understand trauma memories and how they are processed in the brain.

The research will appear in Clinical Psychological Science.

Image: Areas in the anterior temporal lobe, including the amygdala and hippocampus, associated with enhanced traumatic recall. Image credit: Daniela Palombo. 

#neuroscience   #memory   #psychology  ___

posted image

2015-06-24 00:10:08 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 31 +1s)Open 

Piloting A Robot Remotely With Thought

Multi-year research project aims to give a measure of independence to paralyzed people. This technology has shown that it works well and is easy to use.

The research will is in Proceedings of the IEEE. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #robotics  

Piloting A Robot Remotely With Thought

Multi-year research project aims to give a measure of independence to paralyzed people. This technology has shown that it works well and is easy to use.

The research will is in Proceedings of the IEEE. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #robotics  ___

posted image

2015-06-23 23:31:26 (3 comments, 32 reshares, 116 +1s)Open 

Bionic Eye Implant Improves Visual Function and Quality of Life

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/bionic-eye-visual-function-2152/.

Patients using Argus II experienced significant improvement in visual function and quality of life.

The research will appear in Ophthalmology.

Image: Figure A, The implanted portions of the Argus II System. Figure B, The external components of the Argus II System. Images in real time are captured by camera mounted on the glasses. The video processing unit down-samples and processes the image, converting it to stimulation patterns. Data and power are sent via radiofrequency link form the transmitter antenna on the glasses to the receiver antenna around the eye. A removable, rechargeable battery powers the system. Image credit: Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. 

#vision   #neuroscience  

Bionic Eye Implant Improves Visual Function and Quality of Life

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/bionic-eye-visual-function-2152/.

Patients using Argus II experienced significant improvement in visual function and quality of life.

The research will appear in Ophthalmology.

Image: Figure A, The implanted portions of the Argus II System. Figure B, The external components of the Argus II System. Images in real time are captured by camera mounted on the glasses. The video processing unit down-samples and processes the image, converting it to stimulation patterns. Data and power are sent via radiofrequency link form the transmitter antenna on the glasses to the receiver antenna around the eye. A removable, rechargeable battery powers the system. Image credit: Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. 

#vision   #neuroscience  ___

posted image

2015-06-23 22:37:53 (0 comments, 8 reshares, 39 +1s)Open 

Turning the Ringer Off

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/potassium-channels-epilepsy-tinnitus-2151/.

New drug promises relief from epilepsy and tinnitus with fewer side effects.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: "Potent KCNQ2/3-Specific Channel Activator Suppresses In Vivo Epileptic Activity and Prevents the Development of Tinnitus" by Bopanna I. Kalappa, Heun Soh, Kevin M. Duignan, Takeru Furuya, Scott Edwards, Anastasios V. Tzingounis, and Thanos Tzounopoulos in Journal of Neuroscience doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5176-14.2015

Image: There are five different kinds of KCNQ potassium channels in the body, but only two are important in epilepsy and tinnitus: KCNQ2 and KCNQ3. The problem with retigabine is that it acts on other KCNQ potassium channels as well. The image is for... more »

Turning the Ringer Off

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/potassium-channels-epilepsy-tinnitus-2151/.

New drug promises relief from epilepsy and tinnitus with fewer side effects.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: "Potent KCNQ2/3-Specific Channel Activator Suppresses In Vivo Epileptic Activity and Prevents the Development of Tinnitus" by Bopanna I. Kalappa, Heun Soh, Kevin M. Duignan, Takeru Furuya, Scott Edwards, Anastasios V. Tzingounis, and Thanos Tzounopoulos in Journal of Neuroscience doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5176-14.2015

Image: There are five different kinds of KCNQ potassium channels in the body, but only two are important in epilepsy and tinnitus: KCNQ2 and KCNQ3. The problem with retigabine is that it acts on other KCNQ potassium channels as well. The image is for illustrative purposes only and shows a top view of potassium ions (purple) moving through potassium channel.

#tinnitus   #epilepsy   #neurology  ___

posted image

2015-06-23 22:04:35 (5 comments, 40 reshares, 66 +1s)Open 

Parkinson's May Begin in Gut and Spread to the Brain Via the Vagus Nerve

A major epidemiological registry-based study from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital indicates that Parkinson's disease begins in the gastrointestinal tract; the study is the largest in the field so far.

The research is in Annals of Neurology. (full access paywall)

#neurology   #parkinsons  

Parkinson's May Begin in Gut and Spread to the Brain Via the Vagus Nerve

A major epidemiological registry-based study from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital indicates that Parkinson's disease begins in the gastrointestinal tract; the study is the largest in the field so far.

The research is in Annals of Neurology. (full access paywall)

#neurology   #parkinsons  ___

posted image

2015-06-23 21:32:59 (2 comments, 23 reshares, 56 +1s)Open 

Synapses Last as Long as the Memories They Hold

A team of Bio-X scientists applied microscopy know-how to a long-standing theory in neuroscience: if brain connections called synapses store memories, those synapses should last as long as the memories themselves. It turns out they do, as Mark Schnitzer was able to show.

The research is in Nature. (full access paywall)

#memory   #synapses  

Synapses Last as Long as the Memories They Hold

A team of Bio-X scientists applied microscopy know-how to a long-standing theory in neuroscience: if brain connections called synapses store memories, those synapses should last as long as the memories themselves. It turns out they do, as Mark Schnitzer was able to show.

The research is in Nature. (full access paywall)

#memory   #synapses  ___

posted image

2015-06-23 02:35:50 (3 comments, 14 reshares, 59 +1s)Open 

Hitting That Curveball: Brain and Phone GPS Apply Same Algorithm to Track Moving Objects

Our brains track moving objects by applying one of the algorithms your phone’s GPS uses, according to researchers at the University of Rochester. This same algorithm also explains why we are fooled by several motion-related optical illusions, including the sudden “break” of baseball’s well known “curveball illusion.”

The research is in PNAS. (full open access)

#vision   #neuroscience  

Hitting That Curveball: Brain and Phone GPS Apply Same Algorithm to Track Moving Objects

Our brains track moving objects by applying one of the algorithms your phone’s GPS uses, according to researchers at the University of Rochester. This same algorithm also explains why we are fooled by several motion-related optical illusions, including the sudden “break” of baseball’s well known “curveball illusion.”

The research is in PNAS. (full open access)

#vision   #neuroscience  ___

posted image

2015-06-22 22:31:56 (16 comments, 25 reshares, 102 +1s)Open 

High Fat and Sugar Diets May Lead to Loss of Cognitive Flexibility

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/diet-gut-bacteria-cognition-2147/.

A study at Oregon State University indicates that both a high-fat and a high-sugar diet, compared to a normal diet, cause changes in gut bacteria that appear related to a significant loss of "cognitive flexibility," or the power to adapt and adjust to changing situations.

The research is in Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: "Relationships between diet-related changes in the gut microbiome and cognitive flexibility" by K.R. Magnusson, L. Hauck, B.M. Jeffrey, V. Elias, A. Humphrey, R. Nath, A. Perrone, L.E. Bermudez in Neuroscience doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.05.016

Image: In this research, after just four weeks on a high-fat or a high-sugar diet, the... more »

High Fat and Sugar Diets May Lead to Loss of Cognitive Flexibility

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/diet-gut-bacteria-cognition-2147/.

A study at Oregon State University indicates that both a high-fat and a high-sugar diet, compared to a normal diet, cause changes in gut bacteria that appear related to a significant loss of "cognitive flexibility," or the power to adapt and adjust to changing situations.

The research is in Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: "Relationships between diet-related changes in the gut microbiome and cognitive flexibility" by K.R. Magnusson, L. Hauck, B.M. Jeffrey, V. Elias, A. Humphrey, R. Nath, A. Perrone, L.E. Bermudez in Neuroscience doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.05.016

Image: In this research, after just four weeks on a high-fat or a high-sugar diet, the performance of mice on various tests of mental and physical function began to drop, compared to animals on a normal diet. One of the most pronounced changes was in what researchers call cognitive flexibility. The image is for illustrative purposes only and shows Clostridium difficile from a stool sample obtained using a 0.1 µm filter. Image credit: CDC.___

posted image

2015-06-22 21:48:13 (2 comments, 5 reshares, 40 +1s)Open 

The Challenging Bird Brain

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/grackle-bird-brain-measurement-2146/.

Researchers find the method commonly used to compare the size of an animal’s skull — and its brain — across species can be far from accurate.

The research is in PeerJ. (full open access)

Research: "Can endocranial volume be estimated accurately from external skull measurements in great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus)?" by Corina J. Logan and Christin R. Palmstrom in PeerJ doi:10.7717/peerj.1000

Image: A grackle skull. Image credit: Sonia Fernandez.

#neuroscience   #evolution  

The Challenging Bird Brain

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/grackle-bird-brain-measurement-2146/.

Researchers find the method commonly used to compare the size of an animal’s skull — and its brain — across species can be far from accurate.

The research is in PeerJ. (full open access)

Research: "Can endocranial volume be estimated accurately from external skull measurements in great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus)?" by Corina J. Logan and Christin R. Palmstrom in PeerJ doi:10.7717/peerj.1000

Image: A grackle skull. Image credit: Sonia Fernandez.

#neuroscience   #evolution  ___

posted image

2015-06-20 00:23:11 (3 comments, 19 reshares, 126 +1s)Open 

Cerebral Cortex Thicker in Youths With Down Syndrome

The thickness of the brain's cerebral cortex could be a key to unlocking answers about intellectual development in youth with Down Syndrome. It could also provide new insights to why individuals with this genetic neurodevelopmental disorder are highly susceptible to early onset Alzheimer's Disease later in life.

The research is in Cerebral Cortex. (full access paywall)

#neurology   #downsyndrome  

Cerebral Cortex Thicker in Youths With Down Syndrome

The thickness of the brain's cerebral cortex could be a key to unlocking answers about intellectual development in youth with Down Syndrome. It could also provide new insights to why individuals with this genetic neurodevelopmental disorder are highly susceptible to early onset Alzheimer's Disease later in life.

The research is in Cerebral Cortex. (full access paywall)

#neurology   #downsyndrome  ___

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2015-06-19 20:34:50 (3 comments, 11 reshares, 61 +1s)Open 

Long Term Musical Memory Spared in Alzheimer's Patients

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/musical-memory-alzheimers-2144/.

Max Planck researchers discover the anatomic reasons for the persistence of musical memory in Alzheimer patients.

The research is in Brain. (full access paywall)

Research: "Why musical memory can be preserved in advanced Alzheimer’s disease" by Jörn-Henrik Jacobsen, Johannes Stelzer, Thomas Hans Fritz, Gael Chételat, Renaud La Joie, and Robert Turner in Brain doi:10.1093/brain/awv135

Image: The region for musical memory (top: red, otherwise surrounded by a white border) compared with other regions of the brain of an Alzheimer's patient: areas with maximum neuronal loss (2nd row from above), decrease in metabolism (3rd row from above.) And amyloid protein aggregations (bottom row)are... more »

Long Term Musical Memory Spared in Alzheimer's Patients

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/musical-memory-alzheimers-2144/.

Max Planck researchers discover the anatomic reasons for the persistence of musical memory in Alzheimer patients.

The research is in Brain. (full access paywall)

Research: "Why musical memory can be preserved in advanced Alzheimer’s disease" by Jörn-Henrik Jacobsen, Johannes Stelzer, Thomas Hans Fritz, Gael Chételat, Renaud La Joie, and Robert Turner in Brain doi:10.1093/brain/awv135

Image: The region for musical memory (top: red, otherwise surrounded by a white border) compared with other regions of the brain of an Alzheimer's patient: areas with maximum neuronal loss (2nd row from above), decrease in metabolism (3rd row from above.) And amyloid protein aggregations (bottom row) are red, areas with minimal changes are shown in purple (in the left and right column, the left brain is shown from different perspectives, respectively). Image credit: MPI f. Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences.

#alzheimers   #memories   #music  ___

posted image

2015-06-19 20:11:30 (3 comments, 36 reshares, 109 +1s)Open 

Multiple Cortical Regions Work Together to Process Sensorimotor Information

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/sensorimotor-processing-cortical-regions-2143/.

Neuroscientists show that multiple cortical regions are needed to process information.

The research is in Science. (full access paywall)

Research: "Cortical information flow during flexible sensorimotor decisions" by Markus Siegel, Timothy J. Buschman, and Earl K. Miller in Science doi:10.1126/science.aab0551

Image: During the tests, the researchers recorded neural activity during five functions of the sensorimotor pathway (from sensory input to action): identifying the gray shape (cue), deciding to pay attention to motion or color (task), detecting color, detecting motion, and executing eye movement (choice). Image credit: Christine Daniloff/MIT.
... more »

Multiple Cortical Regions Work Together to Process Sensorimotor Information

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/sensorimotor-processing-cortical-regions-2143/.

Neuroscientists show that multiple cortical regions are needed to process information.

The research is in Science. (full access paywall)

Research: "Cortical information flow during flexible sensorimotor decisions" by Markus Siegel, Timothy J. Buschman, and Earl K. Miller in Science doi:10.1126/science.aab0551

Image: During the tests, the researchers recorded neural activity during five functions of the sensorimotor pathway (from sensory input to action): identifying the gray shape (cue), deciding to pay attention to motion or color (task), detecting color, detecting motion, and executing eye movement (choice). Image credit: Christine Daniloff/MIT.

#neuroscience  ___

posted image

2015-06-19 05:09:03 (9 comments, 34 reshares, 110 +1s)Open 

Neural Pathway Provides New Insight into Cocaine Addiction

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/activin-receptor-cocaine-addiction-2142/.

Discovery of new neural pathway may lead to preventing relapses in addicts.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: "Activin receptor signaling regulates cocaine-primed behavioral and morphological plasticity" by Amy M Gancarz, Zi-Jun Wang, Gabrielle L Schroeder, Diane Damez-Werno, Kevin M Braunscheidel, Lauren E Mueller, Monica S Humby, Aaron Caccamise, Jennifer A Martin, Karen C Dietz, Rachael L Neve and David M Dietz in Nature Neuroscience doi:10.1038/nn.4036

Image: The researchers discovered that the Activin pathway controls the ability of cocaine to induce this change in the neurons and determined that the Activin receptor may control this... more »

Neural Pathway Provides New Insight into Cocaine Addiction

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/activin-receptor-cocaine-addiction-2142/.

Discovery of new neural pathway may lead to preventing relapses in addicts.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: "Activin receptor signaling regulates cocaine-primed behavioral and morphological plasticity" by Amy M Gancarz, Zi-Jun Wang, Gabrielle L Schroeder, Diane Damez-Werno, Kevin M Braunscheidel, Lauren E Mueller, Monica S Humby, Aaron Caccamise, Jennifer A Martin, Karen C Dietz, Rachael L Neve and David M Dietz in Nature Neuroscience doi:10.1038/nn.4036

Image: The researchers discovered that the Activin pathway controls the ability of cocaine to induce this change in the neurons and determined that the Activin receptor may control this response to cocaine by regulating the expression of a number of genes. The image is for illustrative purposes only. Image credit: Mikael Häggström.

#addiction   #psychology   #neuroscience  ___

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2015-06-19 00:21:19 (4 comments, 14 reshares, 73 +1s)Open 

Are the Roles of Adult Neural Stem Cells Determined Before Birth?

UCSF led study in mice suggests that stem cells in the brain may not be able to develop into many different cell types.

The research is in Cell. (full access paywall)

#genetics   #stemcells  

Are the Roles of Adult Neural Stem Cells Determined Before Birth?

UCSF led study in mice suggests that stem cells in the brain may not be able to develop into many different cell types.

The research is in Cell. (full access paywall)

#genetics   #stemcells  ___

posted image

2015-06-18 23:34:59 (3 comments, 24 reshares, 59 +1s)Open 

Physical Differences Found Between Emotional and Rational Brains

Researchers at Monash University have found physical differences in the brains of people who respond emotionally to others' feelings, compared to those who respond more rationally.

The research is in NeuroImage. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #psychology   #biology  

Physical Differences Found Between Emotional and Rational Brains

Researchers at Monash University have found physical differences in the brains of people who respond emotionally to others' feelings, compared to those who respond more rationally.

The research is in NeuroImage. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #psychology   #biology  ___

posted image

2015-06-18 22:06:37 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

Protein Plays Big Role in Maintaining Embryonic Stem Cells

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/nucleoporins-stem-cells-genetics-2139/.

A protein long believed to only guard the nucleus also regulates gene expression and stem cell development.

The research is in Genes & Development. (full access paywall)

Research: "The nucleoporin Nup153 regulates embryonic stem cell pluripotency through gene silencing" by Filipe V. Jacinto, Chris Benner, and Martin W. Hetzer in Genes & Development doi:10.1101/gad.260919.115

Image: Scientists discovered that a protein called Nup153 (green) control how embryonic stem cells (blue) develop. When Salk scientists deleted Nup153 (left), the cells were free to rapidly begin to turn into the precursors of neurons (marked in red), suggesting a previously unknown role for Nup153.... more »

Protein Plays Big Role in Maintaining Embryonic Stem Cells

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/nucleoporins-stem-cells-genetics-2139/.

A protein long believed to only guard the nucleus also regulates gene expression and stem cell development.

The research is in Genes & Development. (full access paywall)

Research: "The nucleoporin Nup153 regulates embryonic stem cell pluripotency through gene silencing" by Filipe V. Jacinto, Chris Benner, and Martin W. Hetzer in Genes & Development doi:10.1101/gad.260919.115

Image: Scientists discovered that a protein called Nup153 (green) control how embryonic stem cells (blue) develop. When Salk scientists deleted Nup153 (left), the cells were free to rapidly begin to turn into the precursors of neurons (marked in red), suggesting a previously unknown role for Nup153. Image credit: Salk Institute.

#genetics   #stemcells  ___

posted image

2015-06-18 21:39:03 (2 comments, 8 reshares, 36 +1s)Open 

Two Genes Hold Key to Good Night's Sleep

Researchers discover that a protein called Taranis could hold the key to a good night's sleep.

The research is in Current Biology. (full access paywall)

#genetics   #sleep  

Two Genes Hold Key to Good Night's Sleep

Researchers discover that a protein called Taranis could hold the key to a good night's sleep.

The research is in Current Biology. (full access paywall)

#genetics   #sleep  ___

posted image

2015-06-18 21:00:02 (5 comments, 21 reshares, 72 +1s)Open 

Seeing The Music: Musicians Not Only Hear in Tune, They Also See in Tune

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/musicians-visual-binocular-rivalry-2137/.

Musicians don’t just hear in tune, they also see in tune. That is the conclusion of the latest scientific experiment designed to puzzle out how the brain creates an apparently seamless view of the external world based on the information it receives from the eyes.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: "Melodic sound enhances visual awareness of congruent musical notes, but only if you can read music" by Minyoung Lee, Randolph Blake, Sujin Kim, and Chai-Youn Kim in PNAS doi:10.1073/pnas.1509529112

Image: Randolph Blake looking through the instrument he uses to test binocular rivalry: It uses a series of mirrors to present different images to eache... more »

Seeing The Music: Musicians Not Only Hear in Tune, They Also See in Tune

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/musicians-visual-binocular-rivalry-2137/.

Musicians don’t just hear in tune, they also see in tune. That is the conclusion of the latest scientific experiment designed to puzzle out how the brain creates an apparently seamless view of the external world based on the information it receives from the eyes.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: "Melodic sound enhances visual awareness of congruent musical notes, but only if you can read music" by Minyoung Lee, Randolph Blake, Sujin Kim, and Chai-Youn Kim in PNAS doi:10.1073/pnas.1509529112

Image: Randolph Blake looking through the instrument he uses to test binocular rivalry: It uses a series of mirrors to present different images to each eye.  Image credit: Neil Brake / Vanderbilt.

#neuroscience   #vision   #music  ___

posted image

2015-06-18 01:04:31 (5 comments, 15 reshares, 67 +1s)Open 

Reverse Depression by Recalling Happier Memories

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/memory-optogenetics-depression-2136/.

Artificially reactivating positive memories could offer an alternative to traditional antidepressants.

The research is in Nature. (full access paywall)

Research: "Activating positive memory engrams suppresses depression-like behaviour" by Steve Ramirez, Xu Liu, Christopher J. MacDonald, Anthony Moffa, Joanne Zhou, Roger L. Redondo and Susumu Tonegawa in Nature doi:10.1038/nature14514

Image: The nucleus accumbens, a key reward-related structure that lights up when a positive memory is reactivated in the hippocampus. Image credit: Steve Ramirez Moreno and Susumu Tonegawa.

#psychology   #depression   #optogenetics   #memory  

Reverse Depression by Recalling Happier Memories

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/memory-optogenetics-depression-2136/.

Artificially reactivating positive memories could offer an alternative to traditional antidepressants.

The research is in Nature. (full access paywall)

Research: "Activating positive memory engrams suppresses depression-like behaviour" by Steve Ramirez, Xu Liu, Christopher J. MacDonald, Anthony Moffa, Joanne Zhou, Roger L. Redondo and Susumu Tonegawa in Nature doi:10.1038/nature14514

Image: The nucleus accumbens, a key reward-related structure that lights up when a positive memory is reactivated in the hippocampus. Image credit: Steve Ramirez Moreno and Susumu Tonegawa.

#psychology   #depression   #optogenetics   #memory  ___

posted image

2015-06-18 00:40:22 (8 comments, 12 reshares, 70 +1s)Open 

Social Insects May Share Brain Power

Social brains may have evolved very differently in insects than in vertebrates.

The research is in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. (full access paywall)

#evolution   #neuroscience  

Social Insects May Share Brain Power

Social brains may have evolved very differently in insects than in vertebrates.

The research is in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. (full access paywall)

#evolution   #neuroscience  ___

posted image

2015-06-17 23:20:18 (2 comments, 20 reshares, 69 +1s)Open 

Twitter Meme Mapping Method Reveals Neural Networks for Higher Cognition When Applied to Brain

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neural-networks-meme-brain-mapping-2134/.

An international team of researchers from Indiana University and Switzerland is using data mapping methods created to track the spread of information on social networks to trace its dissemination across a surprisingly different system: the human brain.

The research is in Neuron. (full access paywall)

Research: "Cooperative and Competitive Spreading Dynamics on the Human Connectome" by Bratislav Mišić, Richard F. Betzel, Azadeh Nematzadeh, Joaquin Goñi, Alessandra Griffa, Patric Hagmann, Alessandro Flammini, Yong-Yeol Ahn, and Olaf Sporns in Neuron doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2015.05.035

Image: This image depicts the times at which differentco... more »

Twitter Meme Mapping Method Reveals Neural Networks for Higher Cognition When Applied to Brain

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neural-networks-meme-brain-mapping-2134/.

An international team of researchers from Indiana University and Switzerland is using data mapping methods created to track the spread of information on social networks to trace its dissemination across a surprisingly different system: the human brain.

The research is in Neuron. (full access paywall)

Research: "Cooperative and Competitive Spreading Dynamics on the Human Connectome" by Bratislav Mišić, Richard F. Betzel, Azadeh Nematzadeh, Joaquin Goñi, Alessandra Griffa, Patric Hagmann, Alessandro Flammini, Yong-Yeol Ahn, and Olaf Sporns in Neuron doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2015.05.035

Image: This image depicts the times at which different connections in the brain are used to spread information. In general, information appears to rapidly spread from a compact core of central pathways. Image credit: Olaf Sporns/Bratislav Misic.

#neuroscience   #brainmapping  ___

posted image

2015-06-17 22:38:21 (1 comments, 14 reshares, 67 +1s)Open 

Refining Penfield's Motor Homunculus

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/penfield-homunculus-remapping-2133/.

Neuroscientists at Emory have refined a map showing which parts of the brain are activated during head rotation, resolving a decades-old puzzle. Their findings may help in the study of movement disorders affecting the head and neck, such as cervical dystonia and head tremor.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: "Neural Substrates for Head Movements in Humans: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study" by Cecilia N. Prudente, Randall Stilla, Cathrin M. Buetefisch, Shivangi Singh, Ellen J. Hess, Xiaoping Hu, Krish Sathian, and H.A. Jinnah in Journal of Neuroscience doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0851-15.2015

Image: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, Emory... more »

Refining Penfield's Motor Homunculus

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/penfield-homunculus-remapping-2133/.

Neuroscientists at Emory have refined a map showing which parts of the brain are activated during head rotation, resolving a decades-old puzzle. Their findings may help in the study of movement disorders affecting the head and neck, such as cervical dystonia and head tremor.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: "Neural Substrates for Head Movements in Humans: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study" by Cecilia N. Prudente, Randall Stilla, Cathrin M. Buetefisch, Shivangi Singh, Ellen J. Hess, Xiaoping Hu, Krish Sathian, and H.A. Jinnah in Journal of Neuroscience doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0851-15.2015

Image: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, Emory researchers have shown that the neck’s motor control region in the brain is between the shoulders and trunk (red arrow), a finding that resolves a puzzle dating from Penfield's landmark investigations in the 1940s and 1950s. The results are expected to help in the study of cervical dystonia. Image courtesy of Journal of Neuroscience.

#neuroscience  ___

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2015-06-17 22:12:22 (7 comments, 19 reshares, 80 +1s)Open 

Imaging Technique Provides Color Coded Map Showing Cancerous Brain Areas

New imaging technique could make brain tumor removal safer and more effective, study suggests.

The research is in Science Translational Medicine. (full open access)

#neurology   #cancer   #brain  

Imaging Technique Provides Color Coded Map Showing Cancerous Brain Areas

New imaging technique could make brain tumor removal safer and more effective, study suggests.

The research is in Science Translational Medicine. (full open access)

#neurology   #cancer   #brain  ___

posted image

2015-06-17 01:37:51 (81 comments, 80 reshares, 652 +1s)Open 

Don't be a Grumpy Cat! Cat Videos Boost Positive Emotions

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/cat-videos-positive-emotions-2131/.

Viewing cat videos boosts energy and positive emotions, IU study finds.

The research is in Computers in Human Behavior. (full access paywall)

Research: "Emotion regulation, procrastination, and watching cat videos online: Who watches Internet cats, why, and to what effect?" by Jessica Gall Myrick in Computers in Human Behavior doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.06.001

Image: Bloomington's own Lil Bub is one of the more popular felines on the Internet. Image credit: Mike Bridavsky/www.lilbub.com.

#psychology   #emotions   #cat  

Don't be a Grumpy Cat! Cat Videos Boost Positive Emotions

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/cat-videos-positive-emotions-2131/.

Viewing cat videos boosts energy and positive emotions, IU study finds.

The research is in Computers in Human Behavior. (full access paywall)

Research: "Emotion regulation, procrastination, and watching cat videos online: Who watches Internet cats, why, and to what effect?" by Jessica Gall Myrick in Computers in Human Behavior doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.06.001

Image: Bloomington's own Lil Bub is one of the more popular felines on the Internet. Image credit: Mike Bridavsky/www.lilbub.com.

#psychology   #emotions   #cat  ___

posted image

2015-06-17 00:25:46 (2 comments, 21 reshares, 62 +1s)Open 

Exposure to Stressed Mom's Vaginal Microbiome at Birth Impacts Child's Brain Development

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/maternal-stress-brain-development-2130/.

Changes in the vaginal microbiome are associated with effects on offspring gut microbiota and on the developing brain.

The research is in Endocrinology. (full access paywall)

Research: "Alterations in the Vaginal Microbiome by Maternal Stress Are Associated With Metabolic Reprogramming of the Offspring Gut and Brain" by Eldin Jašarević, Christopher L. Howerton, Christopher D. Howard, and Tracy L. Bale in Endocrinology doi:10.1210/en.2015-1177

Image: The findings demonstrate the important link between the maternal vaginal microbiome in populating her offspring's gut at birth, and the profound effect of maternal stress experience on thism... more »

Exposure to Stressed Mom's Vaginal Microbiome at Birth Impacts Child's Brain Development

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/maternal-stress-brain-development-2130/.

Changes in the vaginal microbiome are associated with effects on offspring gut microbiota and on the developing brain.

The research is in Endocrinology. (full access paywall)

Research: "Alterations in the Vaginal Microbiome by Maternal Stress Are Associated With Metabolic Reprogramming of the Offspring Gut and Brain" by Eldin Jašarević, Christopher L. Howerton, Christopher D. Howard, and Tracy L. Bale in Endocrinology doi:10.1210/en.2015-1177

Image: The findings demonstrate the important link between the maternal vaginal microbiome in populating her offspring's gut at birth, and the profound effect of maternal stress experience on this microbial population and in early gut and brain development, especially in male offspring. Image is for illustrative purposes only.

#pregnancy   #stress   #neurodevelopment  ___

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2015-06-16 23:00:22 (1 comments, 9 reshares, 60 +1s)Open 

Distinct Injury Patterns Found in Brains of Those With Post Concussion Depression and Anxiety

A new MRI study has found distinct injury patterns in the brains of people with concussion-related depression and anxiety.

The research is in Radiology. (full access paywall)

#concussion   #neurology  

Distinct Injury Patterns Found in Brains of Those With Post Concussion Depression and Anxiety

A new MRI study has found distinct injury patterns in the brains of people with concussion-related depression and anxiety.

The research is in Radiology. (full access paywall)

#concussion   #neurology  ___

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2015-06-16 21:29:46 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 35 +1s)Open 

Genetic Variation Associated With Emotionally Enhanced Vividness Identified

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/emotional-enhanced-vividness-genetics-2128/.

Carriers of a genetic variation (the ADRA2b deletion variant) showed more vivid perceptions of emotional events (called emotionally enhanced vividness or EEV), which was associated with more activity in a region of the brain responsible for regulating emotions and evaluating pleasure and threat (the ventromedial prefrontal cortex), researchers report.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: "Neurogenic Variations in Norepinephrine Availability Enhance Perceptual Vividness" by Rebecca M. Todd, Mana R. Ehlers, Daniel J. Müller, Amanda Robertson, Daniela J. Palombo, Natalie Freeman, Brian Levine, and Adam K. Anderson in Journal of Neuroscience... more »

Genetic Variation Associated With Emotionally Enhanced Vividness Identified

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/emotional-enhanced-vividness-genetics-2128/.

Carriers of a genetic variation (the ADRA2b deletion variant) showed more vivid perceptions of emotional events (called emotionally enhanced vividness or EEV), which was associated with more activity in a region of the brain responsible for regulating emotions and evaluating pleasure and threat (the ventromedial prefrontal cortex), researchers report.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: "Neurogenic Variations in Norepinephrine Availability Enhance Perceptual Vividness" by Rebecca M. Todd, Mana R. Ehlers, Daniel J. Müller, Amanda Robertson, Daniela J. Palombo, Natalie Freeman, Brian Levine, and Adam K. Anderson in Journal of Neuroscience doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4489-14.2015

Image: MRI images shows increased activity in the brains of EEV gene carriers. Image credit: Rebecca Todd.


#emotion   #genetics  ___

posted image

2015-06-16 20:54:14 (17 comments, 27 reshares, 65 +1s)Open 

Depressed and Stressed Women Have Lower Levels of Longevity Hormone

Women under chronic stress have significantly lower levels of klotho, a hormone that regulates aging and enhances cognition, researchers at UC San Francisco have found in a study comparing mothers of children on the autism spectrum to low-stress controls.

The research is in Translational Psychiatry. (full open access)

#psychology   #depression  

Depressed and Stressed Women Have Lower Levels of Longevity Hormone

Women under chronic stress have significantly lower levels of klotho, a hormone that regulates aging and enhances cognition, researchers at UC San Francisco have found in a study comparing mothers of children on the autism spectrum to low-stress controls.

The research is in Translational Psychiatry. (full open access)

#psychology   #depression  ___

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2015-06-15 22:36:52 (11 comments, 43 reshares, 137 +1s)Open 

Reconstructing Spoken Sentences From Brain Activity Patterns

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/brain-text-sentence-reconstruction-2126/.

Spoken sentences can be reconstructed from activity patterns of human brain surface. "Brain to Text" combines knowledge from neuroscience, medicine and informatics.

The research is in Frontiers in Neuroscience. (full open access)

Research: "Brain-to-text: decoding spoken phrases from phone representations in the brain" by Christian Herff, Dominic Heger, Adriana de Pesters, Dominic Telaar, Peter Brunner, Gerwin Schalk and Tanja Schultz in Frontiers in Neuroscience doi:10.3389/fnins.2015.00217

Image: Brain activity recorded by electrocorticography (blue circles). From the activity patterns (blue/yellow), spoken words can be recognized. Image credit: The researchers.... more »

Reconstructing Spoken Sentences From Brain Activity Patterns

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/brain-text-sentence-reconstruction-2126/.

Spoken sentences can be reconstructed from activity patterns of human brain surface. "Brain to Text" combines knowledge from neuroscience, medicine and informatics.

The research is in Frontiers in Neuroscience. (full open access)

Research: "Brain-to-text: decoding spoken phrases from phone representations in the brain" by Christian Herff, Dominic Heger, Adriana de Pesters, Dominic Telaar, Peter Brunner, Gerwin Schalk and Tanja Schultz in Frontiers in Neuroscience doi:10.3389/fnins.2015.00217

Image: Brain activity recorded by electrocorticography (blue circles). From the activity patterns (blue/yellow), spoken words can be recognized. Image credit: The researchers.

#neuroscience   #ai   #speech  ___

posted image

2015-06-15 21:57:28 (4 comments, 11 reshares, 43 +1s)Open 

Amygdala Activity Increased by Testosterone When People Face Socially Threatening Situations

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/testosterone-motivation-amygdala-fear-2125/.

The activity of the emotion centres in the brain, the amygdala, is influenced by motivation rather than by the emotions themselves. This can be concluded from research carried out at Radboud University into the hormone testosterone. Testosterone increases amygdala activity in a person who is approaching a socially threatening situation and decreases the activity when such a situation is avoided.

The research is in Science Advances. (full open access)

Research: "Testosterone biases the amygdala towards social threat approach" by Sina Radke, Inge Volman, Pranjal Mehta, Veerle van Son, Dorien Enter, Alan Sanfey, Ivan Toni, Ellen R. A. de Bruijn, and Karin Roelofs... more »

Amygdala Activity Increased by Testosterone When People Face Socially Threatening Situations

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/testosterone-motivation-amygdala-fear-2125/.

The activity of the emotion centres in the brain, the amygdala, is influenced by motivation rather than by the emotions themselves. This can be concluded from research carried out at Radboud University into the hormone testosterone. Testosterone increases amygdala activity in a person who is approaching a socially threatening situation and decreases the activity when such a situation is avoided.

The research is in Science Advances. (full open access)

Research: "Testosterone biases the amygdala towards social threat approach" by Sina Radke, Inge Volman, Pranjal Mehta, Veerle van Son, Dorien Enter, Alan Sanfey, Ivan Toni, Ellen R. A. de Bruijn, and Karin Roelofs in Science Advances doi:10.1126/sciadv.1400074

Image: Testosterone increases amygdala activity in a person who is approaching a socially threatening situation and decreases the activity when such a situation is avoided. Image credit: The researchers.

#psychology   #emotions  ___

posted image

2015-06-12 00:11:41 (0 comments, 9 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

Researchers Disrupt Brain Tumor Stem Cells

Scientists have realized in recent years that some cancer cells in glioblastomas and other tumors are more resistant to treatment than others. Those same, more defiant cells also are much better at re-establishing cancer after treatment.

The research is in Cell Reports. (full open access)

#cancer   #genetics   #neurology  

Researchers Disrupt Brain Tumor Stem Cells

Scientists have realized in recent years that some cancer cells in glioblastomas and other tumors are more resistant to treatment than others. Those same, more defiant cells also are much better at re-establishing cancer after treatment.

The research is in Cell Reports. (full open access)

#cancer   #genetics   #neurology  ___

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