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Neuroscience News has been at 3 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Science on Google+387,734Isaac Newton's Birthday is on ChristmasJoin us in a Newton-inspired holiday physics hangout with rockstar physicist +Henry Reich of +MinutePhysics and +MinuteEarth  and brilliant ballerina biologist +Carin Bondar of +National Geographic, +Scientific American and host of Wild Sex, a science show about the strange reproductive habits of the animal kingdom. She knows how the world gets physical. +Veritasium  AKA +Derek Muller may pop in.  We hear there may even be more special guests so you should probably go ahead and RSVP yes to join the lively conversation. BYOB. Hosted by +Amy Robinson of +Science on Google+ .Happy Newtonmas Hangout2013-12-19 00:00:00145G+
EyeWire254,024+Sebastian Seung, Professor of Computational Neuroscience at +Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and creator of +EyeWire will host a 30 minute hangout on air on Thursday, Dec 12th at 3 PM US EST. During this hangout, Sebastian will answer questions about scientific discoveries made possible with the help of EyeWirers as well as talk about what's in the works for the future of EyeWire.Hangout with Neuroscientist Sebastian Seung2013-12-12 21:00:0055G+
Science on Google+387,734Please join us for a collaborative Hangout On Air with Autism Brainstorm (http://goo.gl/HO5LZL). We will be discussing current research in Autism and Autism Education, as well as the protein biomarkers associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders.Topics: 1) Lead by Dr. +Stephen Shore:  Research in Comparative Approaches to Autism Education with special emphasis on the Miller Method®. Dr. Shore will be joined by Ethan Miller and Amir Naimov for discussion and Q&A.2) Lead by +John Elder Robison:  Current research topic(s) being considered by IACC (The Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee  is a Federal advisory committee charged with coordinating all activities concerning autism spectrum disorder within the U.S.3) Lead by Dr. +Alisa Woods: Protein Biomarkers and Autism Spectrum DisordersPDF LINKS:Dr. Stephen Shore Dissertation: Comparative Approaches to Autism Education: http://goo.gl/lnqpxbDr. Stephen Shore: ICDL The Miller Method: http://goo.gl/X6XQoqJohn Elder Robison: Scholar in Residence at William And Mary: http://goo.gl/QPxtLH John Elder Robison: IACC Government Strategic Plan for Autism Research: http://goo.gl/reBc9aDr. Alisa G Woods: Treating Clients with AS and ASD: http://goo.gl/175424Dr. Alisa G Woods: Proteomics and Cholesterol in Autism: http://goo.gl/SklhcLDr. Stephen Shore:Diagnosed with "Atypical Development and strong autistic tendencies" and "too sick" for outpatient treatment Dr. Shore was recommended for institutionalization. Nonverbal until four, and with much support from his parents, teachers, wife, and others, Stephen is now a professor at Adelphi University where his research focuses on matching best practice to the needs of people with autism.In addition to working with children and talking about life on the autism spectrum, Stephen presents and consults internationally on adult issues pertinent to education, relationships, employment, advocacy, and disclosure as discussed in his books Beyond the Wall: Personal Experiences with Autism and Asperger Syndrome, Ask and Tell: Self-advocacy and Disclosure for People on the Autism Spectrum, the critically acclaimed Understanding Autism for Dummies., and the newly released DVD Living along the Autism Spectrum: What it means to have Autism or Asperger Syndrome.President emeritus of the Asperger’s Association of New England and former board member of the Autism Society, Dr. ShorAutism Brainstorm and Science On Google+ Collaborative Hangout On Air2013-12-10 04:00:0088G+

Neuroscience News has been shared in 51 public circles

You can see here the 50 latest shared circles.
If this is your profile, you can check your dashboard to see all shared circles you have been included.

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Helpful Mum1,344This is a circle of people who are frequent G+ users. Really interesting to add if you are just getting started out. Feel free to share the circle.2014-05-18 18:35:454929511CC G+
Graeme McRae25,726Graeme's Circle of Active GooglePlussers! . . . This is a curated circle of active people on Google+ If you add this circle, you will see hundreds of new posts per day in your stream from this circle alone. If you’re in the circle (you’ll know ‘cause I notified you) then please reshare it! It's a circle of people I started following a few months ago, and who have consistently posted something at least once a week during all of weeks since then. If you want an interesting stream, you should add this circle. If you're interested in how I curated this circle, and why I think it makes for a really great stream, read on. . .How did these people get in the circle?. . . They must have posted something interesting, at least once, because I don't follow people unless they post something interesting. By now, you're probably not surprised by the number of people on G+ whose pages are full of repeated posts, videos without comments, "what's up" and other uninteresting things. I don't follow those people.How did they stay in the circle since they were added?. . . After I add someone, I keep them in the circle of people I added around the same time. Then, several times a week, I go through all my circles and delete people who haven't posted (something visible to me) in the last 7 days. So the people who are left in the circle are consistent posters. That says something important about them, because consistency is a proxy for quality.Wait. What? Why is consistency is a proxy for quality?. . . I'll admit it: I don't have the science to back up that wild statement, but I'll tell you why I believe it to be true. People who post crap don't get a lot of followers, and the few followers they have don't bother to engage. After a while, the crappy-posting people start to think G+ is a ghost town, and they lose interest. On the other hand, the people who share (or re-share) interesting things get followers and engagement, slowly at first, but ever increasing, and this outpouring of love is what keeps them going. That's what I think anyway, and I'm sticking to it.People who share interesting things get lots of followers. . . This is another half-baked theory of mine, but hear me out. You might think this makes sense: Google+ offers suggestions of people to follow, especially to new users. Google+'s only source of names to suggest are other G+ers like yourself. The G+ers who have the most engagement are the ones Google+ knows will be good to follow, so these people get put out as suggestions more often, and some percentage of those suggestions are taken up. So the more engagement you have, the more Google+ will suggest you as a person to follow, and so the more followers you'll get. Completing the theory: the more interesting the stuff you share (or reshare), the more engagement you'll get, and hence the more followers you'll get.How can I get in your circle?. . . Don't bother trying to "get into" this circle. This circle isn't for you to get into. Think of it the other way around. This circle is for you to add, so you can follow a bunch of interesting and consistent people. The stream from this one circle will be chock-full of fascinating content for you to reshare. People will start to notice your reshares, and they will engage with you, and then Google+ will "notice" (it's a computer, but let's anthropomorphise, shall we?) you and suggest you to others, who will then follow you.No, really. How can I get in your circle?. . . First, unfollow me, then wait, oh, about a week. Spend that week posting a shitload of interesting things. Then follow me. Since you're so interesting, Google+ will notify me that you followed me (G+ doesn'2014-05-17 08:06:51492575291CC G+
Will Hawkins33,835Google Friends! - You're in this Circle - Share the circle *'"*:•:•* •-::-•:*:•-:¦: Share and Be Shared :¦:-•:*:•.::• •-:•:''''*                                              118This is a super Circle and in it I put together a group of really interesting and active people on Google Plus to add in your circles.I'm talking about the top Google+ users that share unique and original contents.Follow this advice and grow your G+ community with people that share amazing content that will surprise you:Boost your visibility on Google+ - Share the circle!If you want to be added to the next Circle you have to do these simple steps:1 - Include me in your circles 3 - Share the circle (Publicly) 4 - Add +1 to the post 5 - Follow your dreams and smile to life.More you share more you get! :)Thanks!Circle Networkhttps://plus.google.com/b/112542593288160483901/112542593288160483901/postsNetwork Circleshttps://plus.google.com/b/112542593288160483901/communities/113362757071870225795#circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #sharedcircles #sharingcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #share   #shared   #followers   #addcircles #publicsharedcircles   #share   #addpeople   #addcircle #addfriends   #circle  Circlenetwork CircleNetworking IPNetwork NetworkingCircles2014-05-13 22:47:45500534295CC G+
Fabian Weiland763I've set up a nice little circle focusing on health and medicine. It features hospitals, institutes, organziations, universities, media (people). #sharedcircle #sharedcircles #health #medicine #hospitals #publichealth  2013-12-05 08:42:5842000CC G+
Social Media Revolution637All Science! #sharedcircles #sharedpubliccircles #circleshare #circlesharing #circle 2013-08-20 16:03:51189035CC G+
Social Media Revolution592Science #circleshare   #sharedcircles  2013-08-10 21:42:081890113CC G+
Science é Ciencia0We've been shared by +Science on Google+: A Public Database among other 246 interesting pages related to Science that you can follow here on Google+ adding this circle.Thank you! :D #science   #circles   #circlesharing   #sharedcircles  2013-07-24 10:00:53247001CC G+
Smartphones23,919Super Tech Circle Share! #technology   #smartphones   #tablets   #google   #sharedcircles   #publiccircle   #techcircle   #android   #apple   #googleplus   #mobile   #glass   #googleplustips   #socialmedia  2013-05-07 05:26:38104002CC G+
Bobo Fett4Those of you flocking here from the horror that is Facebook, or any that have been here for a while, or maybe even never a part of FB, some pointers to get you started.First thing to know if you type a question mark pretty much anywhere (as long as you don't have a text field in focus, in other words a blinking cursor where you would type text) in G+ you get a little pop up that gives you some handy basic keyboard shortcuts.If you are new here and and you are looking to make your feed more active, click the two little circles labeled Find people in the icons down the left side of the G+ page.  There you can search for people you know and add them to your circles.  Circles are what G+ uses to allow you to organize your friends list.  G+ starts you off with a few default Circles to use, you just need to add people and/or pages to things you enjoy to one of those circles.  Once you have you will see grey buttons at the top of your main feed (The page you get to if you click the big Google+ icon in the top left hand corner).  The first button is the default All circles button, here you will see all of the posts of every person/page you have added to any of your circles.  Next to the All button you will see buttons with the names of your circles.  If you click one of them you will of course see just posts from people/pages in that circle, but also on the rightish side, not quite at the top of the page, you will find a button that says Settings.  That is a drop down that gives you two check boxes.  One is "Show posts in home stream" the other is "Get Notified of new posts".  They pretty much do what they say, and "get notified" means any posts from this circle will make the number between your name and the + Share button in the top right hand corner increment and go red.  You can click that number at any time (even if it's red and 0) to get a drop down window which will show a condensed version of all posts from circles you get notified about. It will also notify you any time someone circles you back, and any +1s you have received in posts or comments you have made. As well as, comments in posts you have also commented on. On this Settings button you will also see a grey area that says Amount.  If you hover over that you get to choose More, Standard, or Fewer.  Which controls how frequently the posts from that circle appear in your feed.If you combine the above tools with the fact that you can change the name of any circle, add as many as you like, and also have people in more than one circle, you have very granular control over what posts you see and when, and exactly who can see your posts.  You can also share your circles with other people, as I have done below.  If you click the View shared circle button below, you will be able to see all the pages in a circle I call, go figure, Pages.  You can look through it and if you like everything you can just add the whole circle as a new circle.  Or, you can pick and choose which things you find interesting and add just them to your own circle that you already have or create a new circle.  Moving stuff from circle to circle is as easy and dragging the rectangle for that particular page/person and dropping onto the circle you want it to be in.  You could also just add this circle in full and then just delete the stuff you don't want (little x in top right hand corner of each rectangle when you hover over it).  Or just view this circle to get ideas for what sort of stuff can be searched for, and use the search box at the top of the Find people/Circle page to find stuff you like.Now once you have some friends added to circles, and pages/people you would like to follow added as well, your feed will get much more interesting. Now on to posting your own stuff.  In the Share what's new... field at the top of pages, you can of course type anything you like2013-05-03 19:55:12143001CC G+
Science on Google+60,330Science Pages- All DisciplinesView pages categorized by discipline: http://goo.gl/WCohTLinks to shared science circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rBIf you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database by filling out this form (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Active profiles and pages will be included in the next shared circle.Science on Google+ community: http://goo.gl/mTTxX#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles 2013-03-17 13:29:4424071916CC G+
Justin Fournier534Tech Engage CircleHello Everyone just following the footsteps of +martin shervington  and attempting to circle share fully engaged circles with you.  Below I'm sharing a circle of definite Technology posters. If your new to this platform and needed a circle for sure fire tech news and help.  *Be sure to add and re-share this circle.*  Later Guys!2013-03-10 16:15:55296516CC G+
Science on Google+32,183Science Pages- All DisciplinesView pages categorized by discipline: http://goo.gl/WCohTLinks to shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rBAdd your science page to next circle: http://goo.gl/yEg7MScience on Google+ community: http://goo.gl/mTTxX #scienceeveryday  #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles 2013-02-08 02:05:592341310CC G+
Science on Google+13,921Ultimate Science Page CircleSpice up your stream with this nice set of Science Pages!Join the Science on Google+ Community: http://goo.gl/uhJCNApplied and Mathematical Sciences: http://goo.gl/l0prdNatural Sciences: http://goo.gl/t8ljmSocial Sciences and Communication: http://goo.gl/vqyNSAdd your Profile/Page to Science on Google+: A Public Database If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database by filling out this form (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that Profiles also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles .#scienceeveryday   #science   #publiccircles   #sharedcircles2012-12-16 17:10:4039321917CC G+
Daniel Harrington26,455SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY CIRCLE! #science   #tech   #sharedcircles   #circleshare   #sciencecircle   #googleplus  2012-12-13 02:01:55106014CC G+
Chris Row1,476Time to share again. Here is a good Circle of active people I have shared this one in the past, but in case you missed it here you go.2012-12-06 22:32:02491617CC G+
Chris Row1,468Here is a random circle I would like to share with you. just a bunch of random people. give it a shot you never know who you might find it here. add it, share it, enjoy it.2012-12-04 20:14:284919412CC G+
Science on Google+12,997Ultimate Science Page Circle 11.20Spice up your stream with this set of Science Pages! Did we miss your science page? Read below.Add your Profile/Page to Science on Google+: A Public Database If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database by filling out this form (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that Profiles also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.#scienceeveryday   #science   #publiccircles   #sharedcircles2012-11-20 19:05:1839031113CC G+
Science on Google+12,836Ultimate Science Page Circle 11.10Spice up your stream with this set of Science Pages! Nine pages were added this week (see below if you would like to add your science page to the circle).Add your Profile/Page to Science on Google+: A Public Database If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database by filling out this form (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that Profiles also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.#scienceeveryday  #science  #publiccircles  #sharedcircles  2012-11-10 13:37:5338201223CC G+
Science on Google+12,642Ultimate Science Page CircleSpice up your stream by adding this really nice set of Science Pages! Add your Profile/Page to +Science on Google+: A Public Database If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database by filling out this form (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that Profiles also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles  2012-11-04 00:18:5037321930CC G+
Science on Google+11,818Science Page Circle - 10.9.12This is a really nice set of Science Pages!  Approximately 200 pages are in +Science on Google+: A Public Database (see http://goo.gl/WCohT for a categorized list), and we circled 157 Science Pages in the last two days!!! Check out the new pages by adding this circle and don't forget to share it with your friends!If you received a direct notification about this circle and would like to be added to future circles, please fill out this form: http://goo.gl/yEg7M. Thanks in advance! #scienceeveryday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles  2012-10-10 01:01:2036524650CC G+
Science on Google+11,317Science Pages- All DisciplinesView pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/WCohTView all shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rBIf you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles 2012-09-30 12:55:041990917CC G+
Scott Sneddon0In the spirit of circle-sharing on #sciencesunday here's my science media circle (a work in progress, but please feel free to add yours and re-share. Let me know what I've missed, or if you have a source you think I should add.Thanks,2012-09-23 15:37:3623103CC G+
Science on Google+9,957Psychology and Neuroscience PagesView pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/MwpSt. View all shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rBIf you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles 2012-09-21 11:07:33366118CC G+
Science on Google+9,821Science Pages- All DisciplinesView pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/WCohTView all shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rBIf you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles 2012-09-16 15:43:301944511CC G+
Science on Google+9,289Science Pages- All DisciplinesThis is a really nice set of Science Pages (see http://goo.gl/WCohT for a categorized list). Help spread the love of Science by sharing this circle with your friends.If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles  2012-09-08 14:08:4719364760CC G+
Science on Google+9,127Biology and Neuroscience PagesView pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/ctxgwView all shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rBIf you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles 2012-09-01 12:45:324201015CC G+
Science on Google+8,449Psychology and Neuroscience PagesView pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/MwpSt. View all shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rBIf you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles 2012-08-16 00:12:19360414CC G+
Science on Google+8,407Biology and Neuroscience PagesView pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/ctxgw.View all shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rBIf you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles 2012-08-15 23:55:20422110CC G+
Science on Google+7,163Searching for Active Science Pages+Science on Google+: A Public Database currently has 150 science pages in the database (see http://goo.gl/WCohT for a categorized list); however, there are many science pages on G+ that are not in the database. We would like to double this Science Page circle and share it this Sunday for   #sciencesunday ; however, we need your help. If you are curating a science page or know of an active science page that is not in the database (http://goo.gl/WCohT), please add it to the database by filling out this short form: http://goo.gl/yEg7M. We will take all of the active science pages, put them in this circle, and share it this Sunday. When you are done adding your favorite science pages, please share this post so we can reach our 300 page goal by Sunday.  Thanks!2012-07-11 15:21:1915032010CC G+
Science on Google+5,678Science Pages- All DisciplinesClick on the following link to view the pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/WCohT. If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.View underlying database: http://goo.gl/Yz8KRView most recent shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rB#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles 2012-06-17 16:02:371404119CC G+
Science on Google+5,678Biology and Neuroscience PagesClick on the following link to view the pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/ctxgw.If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.View underlying database: http://goo.gl/Yz8KRView most recent shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rB#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles 2012-06-17 15:05:40321310CC G+
The Web Resources0Brand Page Circle..Open to suggestionsTags #sharedcircles   #brandpagecircles   #circlesharing   #Brandpages  +Best Shared Circle +Shared Circles Shared a Circle with You +Reshare +Reshare +SharedCircles +Shared Pages Circles +Shared Circles on G+ +Shared a circle with you ..2012-06-11 23:41:37258053CC G+
Science on Google+5,521Updated Science Page Circle 6/10- All DisciplinesClick on the following link to view the pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/WCohT. If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.View underlying database: http://goo.gl/Yz8KRView most recent shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rB#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles  #sharedcircles 2012-06-10 17:14:351392169CC G+
Science on Google+5,446Science Pages- All DisciplinesClick on the following link to view the pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/WCohT. If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.View underlying database: http://goo.gl/Yz8KRView most recent shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rB#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles #sharedcircles 2012-06-03 18:55:35136189CC G+
Science on Google+5,446Biology and Neuroscience PagesClick on the following link to view the pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/ctxgw.If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.View underlying database: http://goo.gl/Yz8KRView most recent shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rB#sciencesunday #science #publiccircles  #sharedcircles 2012-06-03 18:12:5430115CC G+
TheFanar.com Holiday Homes919#CircleSunday #sharedcircles special unique circle continuesravel and Holidays Business PagesThis circle includes the pages of some of the most successful companies in the worldBusiness Pages , Directory for Pages shared , Shared Pages , Shared Business Pages , Directory for Pages , G+ Shared Circle Directory for Pages#hoildays #travel #directory #sharedcircles #busniess #smes #news2012-05-22 13:30:5751002CC G+
Mike Clancy4,510Science & Technology ... if you want it, this is where you'll find it. These people are interesting and active. If you're in it, share it ... if you want into it, +1 it. It's that simple!2012-04-20 03:25:1149912626CC G+
Science on Google+2,105Psychology and Neuroscience PagesClick on the following link to view the pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/MwpSt. If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/vOJoN). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.View underlying database: http://goo.gl/Yz8KRView most recent shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rB2012-04-14 14:19:0130428CC G+
Science on Google+1,707Science Pages- All disciplinesClick on the following link to view the pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/WCohT. If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/vOJoN). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.View underlying database: http://goo.gl/Yz8KRView most recent shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rB2012-04-11 13:04:06810911CC G+
Mike Clancy3,675By far my largest (and favorite) circle, this is a great list of engaged science & technology lovers. As with my sci-fi circle, +1 this if you would like to be added to the circle, share it if you're already in it and want your own circles to grow.2012-04-05 16:33:35460101733CC G+
Science on Google+1,505Psychology/Neuroscience PagesClick on the following link to view the pages in this circle: http://goo.gl/MwpSt. If you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database (http://goo.gl/vOJoN). Please note that you also have to circle +Science on Google+: A Public Database if you would like to be considered for shared circles.View underlying database: http://goo.gl/Yz8KRView most recent shared circles: http://goo.gl/nO7rB2012-04-04 01:14:30290417CC G+
Chris Robinson19,669Science Pages- Updated 3.15.12The pages in this circle cover many important areas/disciplines including: #Anthropology , #Astronomy , #Biology , #Biotechnology , #Botany , #Chemistry , #Climatology , #Ecology , #Geography , #Geology , #Mathematics , #Nanotechnology , #Neurology , #Neuroscience , #Psychology , #Physics , and #robotics . Help spread the love of Science by sharing this circle with your friends/circles.Do you want to add a Science page to the next shared circle? Mention the page on the original post.Pages that will be included in the next circle: +NIH +LA Robotics Club +MicrobiologyBytes +Eye-Com Research +Springer Plants _______________________________Musician and Band Public Database: http://goo.gl/EhCJaShared Circles and Helpful Google+ Links: http://goo.gl/i604C2012-03-15 12:05:16118111713CC G+
Chris Robinson19,669Psychology Pages- Updated 3.15.12This circle covers many areas of Psychology including: #ClinicalPsychology , #CognitiveBehavioralTherapy , #CognitivePsychology , #DevelopmentalPsychology , #EducationalPsychology , #Neurology , #NeuroMarketing , #Neuroscience , #Psychotherapy , #SocialPsychology , and there is even a page devoted to +Psychology Humour! Help spread the love of Psychology by sharing this circle with your friends!Do you want to add a Psychology page to the next shared circle? Mention the page on the original post.Pages to add to next shared circle: +NIH __________________________________Musician and Band Public Database: http://goo.gl/EhCJaShared Circles and Helpful Google+ Links: http://goo.gl/i604C2012-03-15 12:03:12495106CC G+
G+ Shared Circles Directory for Pages194The Science & Technology ~Pages-Only~ Circle! Add these groups and businesses to your circles with a click of a button. Each profile in this circle is a page which means that other pages can add them to circles too!If you'd like to be added to this circle, just leave a comment below.2012-03-13 19:21:241124110CC G+
Wilco Wings1,54203.03.02 Psychology, Psychiatry & MedsIf you're interested to be in this circle's next update, leave a comment. You can also suggest people for this circle.Well, let's try something new here...When you start at Google+, you get a couple of default circles, and when I think back, I had no clue what to do with it. I read a lot of tuts about circle management etc. Started over a few times (bad habit), but it didn’t really worked out for me.I tried to get a number of people interested in Google+ by demonstrating it on the screen. I noticed how confused they were.So I started over with my circle management again, now with a different approach. I took all my interests in my daily live, converted them into interest circles. When I demonstrate Google+ to people now, I don’t see those confused looks anymore, must done something right here.Most Google+ users keep there circle management for themselves (I noticed). I’m going to do the opposite here, I’m gonna share more than 40 interest circles, handpicked (except the Galaxy Nexus circle and the Chromebook circle, these are started by others shared circles).2012-02-28 22:11:3383221CC G+
Igbo Anyanwu1,792My Massive Science Circle.2012-02-27 09:14:56501014CC G+
Chris Robinson15,978Science Pages- Updated 2.13.12The pages in this circle cover many important areas/disciplines including: #Anthropology , #Astronomy , #Biology , #Biotechnology , #Botany , #Chemistry , #Climatology , #Ecology , #Geography , #Geology , #Mathematics , #Nanotechnology , #Neurology , #Neuroscience , #Psychology , and #Physics . Spread the love of Science by sharing this circle with your friends/circles.Pages that will be included in the next circle: +Ask A Biologist +HuffPost Science +Sleep Research +Oxford SciBar +Emily Lakdawalla, Planetary Society Blogger +CosmoQuest Do you want to add a Science page to the next shared circle? Mention the page on the original post: http://goo.gl/6BRLF._________________________________________________Science Circles and Helpful Google+ Links: http://goo.gl/i604C2012-02-13 16:01:3910691614CC G+
Chris Robinson14,511Science in a CircleA circle is a simple shape of Euclidean geometry consisting of those points in a plane that are a given distance from a given point, the centre. The distance between any of the points and the centre is called the radius. The word "circle" derives from the Greek, kirkos "a circle," from the base ker- which means to turn or bend. The origins of the words "circus" and "circuit" are closely related. The circle has been known since before the beginning of recorded history. Natural circles would have been observed, such as the Moon, Sun, and a short plant stalk blowing in the wind on sand, which forms a circle shape in the sand. The circle is the basis for the wheel, which, with related inventions such as gears, makes much of modern civilisation possible. In mathematics, the study of the circle has helped inspire the development of geometry, astronomy, and calculus. Excerpt taken from: http://goo.gl/P21YC.Here on Google+ circle has a different meaning. It's a powerful tool for categorizing profiles and pages. Circles can be beautiful and informative, especially when they're filled with science! I am sharing 50 pages that actively disseminate scientific material; however, it would be nice to build up this circle, as well as the scientific community more generally. Please comment on the original post (http://goo.gl/V1VyI) if you know of other high quality science pages on Google+. Feel free to share this circle with your friends, and don't forget to periodically check the comments in the original post (http://goo.gl/V1VyI) to see the recommended science pages.Science pages not included in circle: +Cancer Research UK, +Environmental Health News, +Research cc: +Allison Sekuler +Robby Bowles +ScienceSunday #sciencesunday2012-01-22 20:01:1450211124CC G+
G+ Business Pages Directory5,276Selection of +Google+ Your Business Pages from M-Z SHARED CIRCLEThis is a small selection of the many pages in the directory to check out. Pages included were done more in a general way and not specific ...in any way except for being in the 2nd half of the alphabet!A fun way to find pages you may not know about! #coolpages2012-01-08 20:17:30343261218CC G+
G+ Business Pages Directory3,402Psychology Pages Shared CircleI received a great interaction with +Chris Robinson today who has a major interest in the sciences and making circles related to All things ScienceMany thanks to him for helping +G+ Business Pages Directory make this circle!Feel free to suggest any other #psych and #science related Pages!#coolpages2011-12-07 22:40:4114349CC G+

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Most comments: 6

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2014-08-13 22:46:44 (6 comments, 18 reshares, 70 +1s)

Poor Sleep Quality Increases Suicide Risk for Older Adults

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/sleep-disturbances-aging-suicide-risk-1211.

In a study, participants who reported poor sleep had a 1.4 times greater chance of death by suicide within a 10-year period than those who reported sleeping well.

The research is in JAMA Psychiatry. (full open access)

Research: “Association of Poor Subjective Sleep Quality With Risk for Death by Suicide During a 10-Year Period: A Longitudinal, Population-Based Study of Late Life” by Rebecca A. Bernert, PhD; Carolyn L. Turvey, PhD; Yeates Conwell, MD; and Thomas E. Joiner Jr, PhD in JAMA Psychiatry. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1126

Image: Researchers discovered participants reporting poor sleep had a 1.4 times greater chance of death by suicide within a 10-year period thanpar... more »

Most reshares: 26

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2014-08-16 21:11:27 (3 comments, 26 reshares, 49 +1s)

Do Gut Bacteria Rule Our Minds?

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neuroscience-evolution-gut-bacteria-1222.

In an article published this week in the journal BioEssays, researchers from UC San Francisco, Arizona State University and University of New Mexico concluded from a review of the recent scientific literature that microbes influence human eating behavior and dietary choices to favor consumption of the particular nutrients they grow best on, rather than simply passively living off whatever nutrients we choose to send their way.

The research is in BioEssays. (full access paywall)

Research: “Is eating behavior manipulated by the gastrointestinal microbiota? Evolutionary pressures and potential mechanisms” by Joe Alcock, Carlo C. Maley and C. Athena Aktipis in BioEssays. doi:10.1002/bies.201400071

Image: Researchsug... more »

Most plusones: 70

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2014-08-13 22:46:44 (6 comments, 18 reshares, 70 +1s)

Poor Sleep Quality Increases Suicide Risk for Older Adults

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/sleep-disturbances-aging-suicide-risk-1211.

In a study, participants who reported poor sleep had a 1.4 times greater chance of death by suicide within a 10-year period than those who reported sleeping well.

The research is in JAMA Psychiatry. (full open access)

Research: “Association of Poor Subjective Sleep Quality With Risk for Death by Suicide During a 10-Year Period: A Longitudinal, Population-Based Study of Late Life” by Rebecca A. Bernert, PhD; Carolyn L. Turvey, PhD; Yeates Conwell, MD; and Thomas E. Joiner Jr, PhD in JAMA Psychiatry. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1126

Image: Researchers discovered participants reporting poor sleep had a 1.4 times greater chance of death by suicide within a 10-year period thanpar... more »

Latest 50 posts

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2014-08-20 21:02:56 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)

Breastfeeding Linked to Lower Risk of Postnatal Depression

A new study of over 10,000 mothers has shown that women who breastfed their babies were at significantly lower risk of postnatal depression than those who did not.

“Breastfeeding has well-established benefits to babies, in terms of their physical health and cognitive development; our study shows that it also benefits the mental health of mothers,” says Dr Maria Iacovou, from the University of Cambridge’s Department of Sociology and a Bye Fellow at Fitzwilliam College.

Research: Full open access  for "New Evidence on Breastfeeding and Postpartum Depression: The Importance of Understanding Women’s Intentions" by Christina Borra, Maria Iacovou and Almudena Sevilla in Maternal and Child Health Journal - August 2014 doi: 10.1007/s10995-014-1591-z( http:/... more »

Breastfeeding Linked to Lower Risk of Postnatal Depression

A new study of over 10,000 mothers has shown that women who breastfed their babies were at significantly lower risk of postnatal depression than those who did not.

“Breastfeeding has well-established benefits to babies, in terms of their physical health and cognitive development; our study shows that it also benefits the mental health of mothers,” says Dr Maria Iacovou, from the University of Cambridge’s Department of Sociology and a Bye Fellow at Fitzwilliam College.

Research: Full open access  for "New Evidence on Breastfeeding and Postpartum Depression: The Importance of Understanding Women’s Intentions" by Christina Borra, Maria Iacovou and Almudena Sevilla in Maternal and Child Health Journal - August 2014 doi: 10.1007/s10995-014-1591-z ( http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10995-014-1591-z/fulltext.html )

Image: The image has been adapted from a Flickr image (twinfeedingshot by Mothering Touch at https://www.flickr.com/photos/motheringtouch/5205275958/in/set-72157625349892719/) and shared with the attribution 2.0 generic Creative Commons license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/deed.en_GB).

You can read more at: http://neurosciencenews.com/breastfeeding-linked-to-lower-postnatal-depression-risk-1238/

#psychology   #parenting   #motherhood  ___

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2014-08-20 17:51:12 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 15 +1s)

This New Genetic Test May Change How Brain Cancer Is Treated

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/genomic-sequencing-brain-cancer-1237.

Scientists at Virginia Tech’s Virginia Bioinformatics Institute working with the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s National Medical Center have found a new way to diagnose brain cancer based on genetic markers found in “junk DNA.”

The research is in Oncotarget. (full access paywall)

Research: “Somatic intronic microsatellite loci differentiate glioblastoma from lower-grade gliomasy” by Enusha Karunasena, Lauren J. McIver, Brian R. Rood, Xiaowei Wu, Hongxiao Zhu, Jasmin H. Bavarva and Harold R. Garner in Oncotarget.doi:not available

Image: Next-generation genome sequencing is allowing researchers to find increasingly more markers for a variety of diseases,including c... more »

This New Genetic Test May Change How Brain Cancer Is Treated

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/genomic-sequencing-brain-cancer-1237.

Scientists at Virginia Tech’s Virginia Bioinformatics Institute working with the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s National Medical Center have found a new way to diagnose brain cancer based on genetic markers found in “junk DNA.”

The research is in Oncotarget. (full access paywall)

Research: “Somatic intronic microsatellite loci differentiate glioblastoma from lower-grade gliomasy” by Enusha Karunasena, Lauren J. McIver, Brian R. Rood, Xiaowei Wu, Hongxiao Zhu, Jasmin H. Bavarva and Harold R. Garner in Oncotarget.doi:not available

Image: Next-generation genome sequencing is allowing researchers to find increasingly more markers for a variety of diseases, including cancer and autism. This image is for illustrative purposes only and shows a biopsy specimen of a Glioblastoma showing angiocentric growth reminiscent of ependymal neoplasms (HE stain). Credit Jensflorian.

#cancer   #neurology   #genetics  ___

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2014-08-20 17:16:32 (0 comments, 14 reshares, 17 +1s)

Tickling Your Ear Could Be Good for Your Heart

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neurology-tens-stimulation-health-1236.

Stimulating nerves in your ear could improve the health of your heart, researchers have discovered.

The research is in Brain Stimulation. (full access paywall)

Research: “Non-invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulation in Healthy Humans Reduces Sympathetic Nerve Activity” by Jennifer A. Clancy, David A. Mary, Klaus K. Witte, John P. Greenwood, Susan A. Deuchars, and Jim Deuchars in Brain Stimulation. doi:10.1016/j.brs.2014.07.031

Image: The technique works by stimulating a major nerve called the vagus, which has an important role in regulating vital organs such as the heart. There is a sensory branch of the vagus in the outer ear and, by sending electrical current down the nerves and into the brain, researcherswer... more »

Tickling Your Ear Could Be Good for Your Heart

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neurology-tens-stimulation-health-1236.

Stimulating nerves in your ear could improve the health of your heart, researchers have discovered.

The research is in Brain Stimulation. (full access paywall)

Research: “Non-invasive Vagus Nerve Stimulation in Healthy Humans Reduces Sympathetic Nerve Activity” by Jennifer A. Clancy, David A. Mary, Klaus K. Witte, John P. Greenwood, Susan A. Deuchars, and Jim Deuchars in Brain Stimulation. doi:10.1016/j.brs.2014.07.031

Image: The technique works by stimulating a major nerve called the vagus, which has an important role in regulating vital organs such as the heart. There is a sensory branch of the vagus in the outer ear and, by sending electrical current down the nerves and into the brain, researchers were able to influence outflows from the brain that regulate the heart. Vagal nerve stimulation has previously been used to treat conditions including epilepsy. Credit University of Leeds.

#neurology  ___

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2014-08-19 20:02:43 (3 comments, 16 reshares, 32 +1s)

Physically Fit Kids Have Beefier White Matter than Less Fit Peers

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/aerobic-fitness-white-matter-neurodevelopment-1235.

A new study of 9 and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit. “White matter” describes the bundles of axons that carry nerve signals from one brain region to another. More compact white matter is associated with faster and more efficient nerve activity.

The research is in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. (full open access)

Research: “Aerobic fitness is associated with greater white matter integrity in children” by Laura Chaddock-Heyman, Kirk I Erickson, Joseph Holtrop, Michelle W Voss, Matthew B. Pontifex, Lauren Raine, Charles H Hillman and Arthur F Kramer in Frontiersin Huma... more »

Physically Fit Kids Have Beefier White Matter than Less Fit Peers

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/aerobic-fitness-white-matter-neurodevelopment-1235.

A new study of 9 and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit. “White matter” describes the bundles of axons that carry nerve signals from one brain region to another. More compact white matter is associated with faster and more efficient nerve activity.

The research is in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. (full open access)

Research: “Aerobic fitness is associated with greater white matter integrity in children” by Laura Chaddock-Heyman, Kirk I Erickson, Joseph Holtrop, Michelle W Voss, Matthew B. Pontifex, Lauren Raine, Charles H Hillman and Arthur F Kramer in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2014.00584

Image: The team used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, also called diffusion MRI) to look at five white-matter tracts in the brains of the 24 participants. This method analyzes water diffusion into tissues. For white matter, less water diffusion means the tissue is more fibrous and compact, both desirable traits. This image shows is an MRI of white matter in the human brain. The image is for illustrative purposes only, and is not connected to the research. Credit Kubicki et al.

#neuroscience  ___

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2014-08-19 19:23:51 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 7 +1s)

Our Connection to Content

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neuromarketing-neuroscience-tools-innerscope-1234.

Using neuroscience tools, Innerscope Research explores the connections between consumers and media.

The research is available at the MIT website. (full open access)

Research: The full research paper (pdf) “Wearable Feedback Systems for Rehabilitation” by M.Sung, C. Marci and A. Pentland is available for download from the MIT website.

Image: Innerscope Research uses 10 neurological tools to measure consumers’ connection with media. Electroencephalography and fMRI technologies measure brain waves and structures. Biometric tools track heart rate, skin conductance, motion, and respiration, which reflect emotional processing. There’s also eye-tracking, voice-analysis, and facial-coding software. CreditInnersc... more »

Our Connection to Content

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neuromarketing-neuroscience-tools-innerscope-1234.

Using neuroscience tools, Innerscope Research explores the connections between consumers and media.

The research is available at the MIT website. (full open access)

Research: The full research paper (pdf) “Wearable Feedback Systems for Rehabilitation” by M.Sung, C. Marci and A. Pentland is available for download from the MIT website.

Image: Innerscope Research uses 10 neurological tools to measure consumers’ connection with media. Electroencephalography and fMRI technologies measure brain waves and structures. Biometric tools track heart rate, skin conductance, motion, and respiration, which reflect emotional processing. There’s also eye-tracking, voice-analysis, and facial-coding software. Credit Innerscope Research/MIT.

#neuroscience   #media  ___

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2014-08-19 18:37:30 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 19 +1s)

Zebrafish Help to Unravel Alzheimer’s Disease

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/stem-cell-zebrafish-alzheimers-1232.

New fundamental knowledge about the regulation of stem cells in the nerve tissue of zebrafish embryos results in surprising insights into neurodegenerative disease processes in the human brain. A new study by scientists at VIB and KU Leuven identifies the molecules responsible for this process.

The research is in Developmental Cell. (full access paywall)

Research: “A Self-Organizing miR-132/Ctbp2 Circuit Regulates Bimodal Notch Signals and Glial Progenitor Fate Choice during Spinal Cord Maturation” by Evgenia Salta, Pierre Lau, Carlo Sala Frigerio, Marion Coolen, Laure Bally-Cuif, and Bart De Strooper in Developmental Cell. doi:10.1016/j.devcel.2014.07.006

Image: The genetic code of humans andzebra... more »

Zebrafish Help to Unravel Alzheimer’s Disease

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/stem-cell-zebrafish-alzheimers-1232.

New fundamental knowledge about the regulation of stem cells in the nerve tissue of zebrafish embryos results in surprising insights into neurodegenerative disease processes in the human brain. A new study by scientists at VIB and KU Leuven identifies the molecules responsible for this process.

The research is in Developmental Cell. (full access paywall)

Research: “A Self-Organizing miR-132/Ctbp2 Circuit Regulates Bimodal Notch Signals and Glial Progenitor Fate Choice during Spinal Cord Maturation” by Evgenia Salta, Pierre Lau, Carlo Sala Frigerio, Marion Coolen, Laure Bally-Cuif, and Bart De Strooper in Developmental Cell. doi:10.1016/j.devcel.2014.07.006

Image: The genetic code of humans and zebrafish is more than 90 % identical. In addition, the genetic material of these fish is easy to manipulate, meaning that they are often used as a model in the study of all sorts of diseases. This image is for illustrative purposes only. Credit Azul.

#alzheimersdisease   #genetics   #neurology  ___

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2014-08-18 23:03:51 (0 comments, 11 reshares, 36 +1s)

Blood Cells Generate Neurons in Crayfish

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/genetics-blood-stem-cells-neurons-1231.

A new study by Barbara Beltz, the Allene Lummis Russell Professor of Neuroscience at Wellesley College, and Irene Söderhäll of Uppsala University, Sweden, published in the August 11 issue of the journal Developmental Cell, demonstrates that the immune system can produce cells with stem cell properties, using crayfish as a model system. These cells can, in turn, create neurons in the adult animal. The flexibility of immune cells in producing neurons in adult animals raises the possibility of the presence of similar types of plasticity in other animals.

The research is in Developmental Cell. (full access paywall)

Research: “Cells from the Immune System Generate Adult-Born Neurons in Crayfish” by Jeanne L. Benton, RachelKery,... more »

Blood Cells Generate Neurons in Crayfish

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/genetics-blood-stem-cells-neurons-1231.

A new study by Barbara Beltz, the Allene Lummis Russell Professor of Neuroscience at Wellesley College, and Irene Söderhäll of Uppsala University, Sweden, published in the August 11 issue of the journal Developmental Cell, demonstrates that the immune system can produce cells with stem cell properties, using crayfish as a model system. These cells can, in turn, create neurons in the adult animal. The flexibility of immune cells in producing neurons in adult animals raises the possibility of the presence of similar types of plasticity in other animals.

The research is in Developmental Cell. (full access paywall)

Research: “Cells from the Immune System Generate Adult-Born Neurons in Crayfish” by Jeanne L. Benton, Rachel Kery, Jingjing Li, Chadanat Noonin, Irene Söderhäll, and Barbara S. Beltz in Developmental Cell. doi:10.1016/j.devcel.2014.06.016

Image: Blood Cells. A new study by Barbara Beltz, of Wellesley College, and Irene Söderhäll of Uppsala University, Sweden, demonstrates that the immune system can produce cells with stem cell properties, using crayfish as a model system. Credit Wellesley College.

#neuroscience   #genetics  ___

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2014-08-18 22:32:24 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 19 +1s)

Targeted Brain Stimulation Aids Stroke Recovery in Mice

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/optogenetics-stroke-treatment-1230.

Optogenetically stimulating mice’s brains five days after stroke improved the animals’ motor control and brain biochemistry.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: “Optogenetic neuronal stimulation promotes functional recovery after stroke” by Michelle Y. Cheng, Eric H. Wang, Wyatt J. Woodson, Stephanie Wang, Guohua Sun, Alex G. Lee, Ahmet Arac, Lief E. Fenno, Karl Deisseroth, and Gary K. Steinberg in PNAS. doi:10.1073/pnas.1404109111

Image: Optogenetics involves expressing a light-sensitive protein in specifically targeted brain cells. Upon exposure to light of the right wavelength, this light-sensitive protein is activated and causes the cell to fire. This image is forillustr... more »

Targeted Brain Stimulation Aids Stroke Recovery in Mice

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/optogenetics-stroke-treatment-1230.

Optogenetically stimulating mice’s brains five days after stroke improved the animals’ motor control and brain biochemistry.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: “Optogenetic neuronal stimulation promotes functional recovery after stroke” by Michelle Y. Cheng, Eric H. Wang, Wyatt J. Woodson, Stephanie Wang, Guohua Sun, Alex G. Lee, Ahmet Arac, Lief E. Fenno, Karl Deisseroth, and Gary K. Steinberg in PNAS. doi:10.1073/pnas.1404109111

Image: Optogenetics involves expressing a light-sensitive protein in specifically targeted brain cells. Upon exposure to light of the right wavelength, this light-sensitive protein is activated and causes the cell to fire. This image is for illustrative purposes only. Credit Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT.

#neuroscience   #optogenetics   #neurology  ___

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2014-08-18 21:58:01 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 18 +1s)

Researchers Obtain Key Insights into How the Internal Body Clock is Tuned

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/genetics-circadian-rhythm-rna-1229.

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found a new way that internal body clocks are regulated by a type of molecule known as long non-coding RNA.

The research is in Nature. (full access paywall)

Research: “Transcriptional interference by antisense RNA is required for circadian clock function” by Zhihong Xue, Qiaohong Ye, Simon R. Anson, Jichen Yang, Guanghua Xiao, David Kowbel, N. Louise Glass, Susan K. Crosthwaite and Yi Liu in Nature. doi:10.1038/nature13671

Image: Determining how circadian clocks work is crucial to understanding several human diseases, including sleep disorders and depression in which the clock malfunctions. The influence of a functional clockis ... more »

Researchers Obtain Key Insights into How the Internal Body Clock is Tuned

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/genetics-circadian-rhythm-rna-1229.

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found a new way that internal body clocks are regulated by a type of molecule known as long non-coding RNA.

The research is in Nature. (full access paywall)

Research: “Transcriptional interference by antisense RNA is required for circadian clock function” by Zhihong Xue, Qiaohong Ye, Simon R. Anson, Jichen Yang, Guanghua Xiao, David Kowbel, N. Louise Glass, Susan K. Crosthwaite and Yi Liu in Nature. doi:10.1038/nature13671

Image: Determining how circadian clocks work is crucial to understanding several human diseases, including sleep disorders and depression in which the clock malfunctions. The influence of a functional clock is evident in the reduced performance of shift workers and jet lag . This image is for illustrative purposes only. Credit Voigt et al/NIH/NIAAA.

#neuroscience   #genetics  ___

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2014-08-18 21:25:32 (0 comments, 6 reshares, 20 +1s)

Taking the Pulse of Aging

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/aging-brain-mapping-arteries-1228.

In an effort to identify how the elasticity of the arteries in the brain correlates with aging well, researchers at the Beckman Institute used optical methods developed in their lab to map out the pulse pressure of the entire brain’s cortex.

The research is in Psychophysiology. (full access paywall)

Research: “Taking the pulse of aging: Mapping pulse pressure and elasticity in cerebral arteries with optical methods” by Monica Fabiani, Kathy A. Low1, Chin-Hong Tan, Benjamin Zimmerman, Mark A. Fletcher1,4, Nils Schneider-Garces, Edward L. Maclin, Antonio M. Chiarelli, Bradley P. Sutton and Gabriele Gratton in Psychophysiology. doi:10.1111/psyp.12288

Image: Arterial stiffening is a cause of reduced brain blood flow. Stiffarter... more »

Taking the Pulse of Aging

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/aging-brain-mapping-arteries-1228.

In an effort to identify how the elasticity of the arteries in the brain correlates with aging well, researchers at the Beckman Institute used optical methods developed in their lab to map out the pulse pressure of the entire brain’s cortex.

The research is in Psychophysiology. (full access paywall)

Research: “Taking the pulse of aging: Mapping pulse pressure and elasticity in cerebral arteries with optical methods” by Monica Fabiani, Kathy A. Low1, Chin-Hong Tan, Benjamin Zimmerman, Mark A. Fletcher1,4, Nils Schneider-Garces, Edward L. Maclin, Antonio M. Chiarelli, Bradley P. Sutton and Gabriele Gratton in Psychophysiology. doi:10.1111/psyp.12288

Image: Arterial stiffening is a cause of reduced brain blood flow. Stiff arteries can lead to a faster rate of cognitive decline and an increased chance of stroke, especially in older adults. This image shows the arteries in the brain and is for illustrative purposes only. Credit adrigu.

#neuroscience   #neurology  ___

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2014-08-18 20:36:23 (3 comments, 3 reshares, 22 +1s)

Happiness in Schizophrenia

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/psychology-schizophrenia-happiness-1227.

Schizophrenia is among the most severe forms of mental illness, yet some people with the disease are as happy as those in good physical and mental health according to a study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

The research is in Schizophrenia Research. (full access paywall)

Research: "Wellness within illness: Happiness in schizophrenia” by Barton W. Palmer, Averria Sirkin Martin, Colin A. Depp, Danielle K. Glorioso, and Dilip V. Jeste in Schizophrenia Research. doi:10.1016/j.schres.2014.07.027

Image: The study shows that happiness among those with chronic forms of schizophrenia is associated with positive psychological and social attributes such as resilience, optimisma... more »

Happiness in Schizophrenia

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/psychology-schizophrenia-happiness-1227.

Schizophrenia is among the most severe forms of mental illness, yet some people with the disease are as happy as those in good physical and mental health according to a study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

The research is in Schizophrenia Research. (full access paywall)

Research: "Wellness within illness: Happiness in schizophrenia” by Barton W. Palmer, Averria Sirkin Martin, Colin A. Depp, Danielle K. Glorioso, and Dilip V. Jeste in Schizophrenia Research. doi:10.1016/j.schres.2014.07.027

Image: The study shows that happiness among those with chronic forms of schizophrenia is associated with positive psychological and social attributes such as resilience, optimism and lower perceived stress. This image is for illustrative purposes only. Credit PublicDomainPictures.

#happiness   #schizophrenia   #psychology  ___

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2014-08-18 19:47:55 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 17 +1s)

New Method Reveals Hidden Genetic Landscape

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/indels-psychology-genetics-autism-1226.

Scientists develop algorithm to uncover genomic insertions and deletions involved in autism and OCD.

The research is in Nature Methods. (full access paywall)

Research: "Accurate de novo and transmitted indel detection in exome-capture data using microassembly" by Giuseppe Narzisi, Jason A O'Rawe, Ivan Iossifov, Han Fang, Yoon-ha Lee, Zihua Wang, Yiyang Wu, Gholson J Lyon, Michael Wigler and Michael C Schatz in Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3069

Image: A simple sentence illustrates the dangers of indels. The letters in the human genome carry instructions to make proteins, via a three-letter code. Each trio spells out a word, and the words are strung together in a sentence to build a... more »

New Method Reveals Hidden Genetic Landscape

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/indels-psychology-genetics-autism-1226.

Scientists develop algorithm to uncover genomic insertions and deletions involved in autism and OCD.

The research is in Nature Methods. (full access paywall)

Research: "Accurate de novo and transmitted indel detection in exome-capture data using microassembly" by Giuseppe Narzisi, Jason A O'Rawe, Ivan Iossifov, Han Fang, Yoon-ha Lee, Zihua Wang, Yiyang Wu, Gholson J Lyon, Michael Wigler and Michael C Schatz in Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3069

Image: A simple sentence illustrates the dangers of indels. The letters in the human genome carry instructions to make proteins, via a three-letter code. Each trio spells out a word, and the words are strung together in a sentence to build a specific protein. Inserting or deleting a letter (‘e’ in this example) shifts the three-letter code. Known as frameshifts, these mutations cause the remaining words to be misspelled and the protein sentence to become unintelligible. Credit Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

#genetics   #psychology  ___

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2014-08-17 22:52:50 (1 comments, 17 reshares, 43 +1s)

New Research Sheds Light on How Children's Brains Memorize Facts

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/learning-math-neurodevelopment-hippocampus-1225.

As children shift from counting on their fingers to remembering math facts, the hippocampus and its functional circuits support the brain’s construction of adult-like ways of using memory.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: “Hippocampal-neocortical functional reorganization underlies children’s cognitive development” by Shaozheng Qin, Soohyun Cho, Tianwen Chen, Miriam Rosenberg-Lee, David C Geary and Vinod Menon in Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3788

Image: Children use certain brain regions, including the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, very differently from adults when the two groups are solving the same types ofmath pr... more »

New Research Sheds Light on How Children's Brains Memorize Facts

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/learning-math-neurodevelopment-hippocampus-1225.

As children shift from counting on their fingers to remembering math facts, the hippocampus and its functional circuits support the brain’s construction of adult-like ways of using memory.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: “Hippocampal-neocortical functional reorganization underlies children’s cognitive development” by Shaozheng Qin, Soohyun Cho, Tianwen Chen, Miriam Rosenberg-Lee, David C Geary and Vinod Menon in Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3788

Image: Children use certain brain regions, including the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex, very differently from adults when the two groups are solving the same types of math problems, the study showed. This image is for illustrative purposes only. Credit PublicDomainPictures.

#neuroscience   #learning   #math  ___

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2014-08-17 21:39:12 (1 comments, 10 reshares, 25 +1s)

Stem Cells Reveal How Illness-Linked Genetic Variation Affects Neurons

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/synaptic-growth-disc1-neurodevelopment-1224.

A genetic variation linked to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression wreaks havoc on connections among neurons in the developing brain, a team of researchers reports. The study, led by Guo-li Ming, M.D., Ph.D., and Hongjun Song, Ph.D., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and described online Aug. 17 in the journal Nature, used stem cells generated from people with and without mental illness to observe the effects of a rare and pernicious genetic variation on young brain cells. The results add to evidence that several major mental illnesses have common roots in faulty “wiring” during early brain development.

The research is in Nature. (full access paywall)
<... more »

Stem Cells Reveal How Illness-Linked Genetic Variation Affects Neurons

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/synaptic-growth-disc1-neurodevelopment-1224.

A genetic variation linked to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression wreaks havoc on connections among neurons in the developing brain, a team of researchers reports. The study, led by Guo-li Ming, M.D., Ph.D., and Hongjun Song, Ph.D., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and described online Aug. 17 in the journal Nature, used stem cells generated from people with and without mental illness to observe the effects of a rare and pernicious genetic variation on young brain cells. The results add to evidence that several major mental illnesses have common roots in faulty “wiring” during early brain development.

The research is in Nature. (full access paywall)

Research: “Synaptic dysregulation in a human iPS cell model of mental disorders” by Zhexing Wen, Ha Nam Nguyen, Ziyuan Guo, Matthew A. Lalli, Xinyuan Wang, Yijing Su, Nam-Shik Kim, Ki-Jun Yoon, Jaehoon Shin, Ce Zhang, Georgia Makri, David Nauen, Huimei Yu, Elmer Guzman, Cheng-Hsuan Chiang, Nadine Yoritomo, Kozo Kaibuchi, Jizhong Zou, Kimberly M. Christian, Linzhao Cheng, Christopher A. Ross, Russell L. Margolis, Gong Chen, Kenneth S. Kosik, Hongjun Song and Guo-li Ming in Nature. doi:10.1038/nature13716

Image: Human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells, with cell nuclei shown in blue and synapses in red and green. Credit Zhexing Wen/Johns Hopkins Medicine.

#genetics   #neuroscience   #psychiatry  ___

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2014-08-17 19:33:53 (2 comments, 7 reshares, 42 +1s)

Epigenetic Breakthrough Bolsters Understanding of Alzheimers Disease

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/alzheimers-epigenetics-ank1-genetics-1223.

A team led by researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School and King’s College London has uncovered some of the strongest evidence yet that epigenetic changes in the brain play a role in Alzheimer’s disease.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: “Methylomic profiling implicates cortical deregulation of ANK1 in Alzheimer’s disease” by Katie Lunnon, Rebecca Smith, Eilis Hannon, Philip L De Jager, Gyan Srivastava, Manuela Volta, Claire Troakes, Safa Al-Sarraj, Joe Burrage, Ruby Macdonald, Daniel Condliffe, Lorna W Harries, Pavel Katsel, Vahram Haroutunian, Zachary Kaminsky, Catharine Joachim, John Powell, Simon Lovestone, David A Bennett, Leonard CSchalkwyk... more »

Epigenetic Breakthrough Bolsters Understanding of Alzheimers Disease

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/alzheimers-epigenetics-ank1-genetics-1223.

A team led by researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School and King’s College London has uncovered some of the strongest evidence yet that epigenetic changes in the brain play a role in Alzheimer’s disease.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: “Methylomic profiling implicates cortical deregulation of ANK1 in Alzheimer’s disease” by Katie Lunnon, Rebecca Smith, Eilis Hannon, Philip L De Jager, Gyan Srivastava, Manuela Volta, Claire Troakes, Safa Al-Sarraj, Joe Burrage, Ruby Macdonald, Daniel Condliffe, Lorna W Harries, Pavel Katsel, Vahram Haroutunian, Zachary Kaminsky, Catharine Joachim, John Powell, Simon Lovestone, David A Bennett, Leonard C Schalkwyk and Jonathan Mill in Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3782

Image: Epigenetic changes affect gene expression, but do not alter DNA. Credit PublicDomainPictures.

#alzheimersdisease   #neurology   #genetics  ___

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2014-08-16 21:11:27 (3 comments, 26 reshares, 49 +1s)

Do Gut Bacteria Rule Our Minds?

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neuroscience-evolution-gut-bacteria-1222.

In an article published this week in the journal BioEssays, researchers from UC San Francisco, Arizona State University and University of New Mexico concluded from a review of the recent scientific literature that microbes influence human eating behavior and dietary choices to favor consumption of the particular nutrients they grow best on, rather than simply passively living off whatever nutrients we choose to send their way.

The research is in BioEssays. (full access paywall)

Research: “Is eating behavior manipulated by the gastrointestinal microbiota? Evolutionary pressures and potential mechanisms” by Joe Alcock, Carlo C. Maley and C. Athena Aktipis in BioEssays. doi:10.1002/bies.201400071

Image: Researchsug... more »

Do Gut Bacteria Rule Our Minds?

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neuroscience-evolution-gut-bacteria-1222.

In an article published this week in the journal BioEssays, researchers from UC San Francisco, Arizona State University and University of New Mexico concluded from a review of the recent scientific literature that microbes influence human eating behavior and dietary choices to favor consumption of the particular nutrients they grow best on, rather than simply passively living off whatever nutrients we choose to send their way.

The research is in BioEssays. (full access paywall)

Research: “Is eating behavior manipulated by the gastrointestinal microbiota? Evolutionary pressures and potential mechanisms” by Joe Alcock, Carlo C. Maley and C. Athena Aktipis in BioEssays. doi:10.1002/bies.201400071

Image: Research suggests that gut bacteria may be affecting our eating decisions in part by acting through the vagus nerve, which connects 100 million nerve cells from the digestive tract to the base of the brain. Credit UCSF.

#neuroscience   #science  ___

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2014-08-16 20:35:43 (4 comments, 9 reshares, 34 +1s)

Workaholism: The Addiction of this Century

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/psychology-health-workaholism-1221.

A recent study from the University of Bergen shows that 8.3 per cent of the Norwegian work force is addicted to work to the point where it becomes a health issue.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: “The Prevalence of Workaholism: A Survey Study in a Nationally Representative Sample of Norwegian Employees” by Cecilie Schou Andreassen, Mark D. Griffiths, Jørn Hetland, Luca Kravina, Fredrik Jensen, and Ståle Pallesen in PLOS ONE. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102446

Image: Using the Bergen Work Addiction Scale, researchers from the University of Bergen (UiB) in Norway have measured work addiction among workers in Norway. The image is for illustrative purposes only and is not connected tothe r... more »

Workaholism: The Addiction of this Century

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/psychology-health-workaholism-1221.

A recent study from the University of Bergen shows that 8.3 per cent of the Norwegian work force is addicted to work to the point where it becomes a health issue.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: “The Prevalence of Workaholism: A Survey Study in a Nationally Representative Sample of Norwegian Employees” by Cecilie Schou Andreassen, Mark D. Griffiths, Jørn Hetland, Luca Kravina, Fredrik Jensen, and Ståle Pallesen in PLOS ONE. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102446

Image: Using the Bergen Work Addiction Scale, researchers from the University of Bergen (UiB) in Norway have measured work addiction among workers in Norway. The image is for illustrative purposes only and is not connected to the research. Credit Unsplash.

#psychology  ___

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2014-08-15 23:06:19 (2 comments, 10 reshares, 36 +1s)

Brain Imaging Shows Brain Differences in Risk Taking Teens

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/teen-risk-taking-neuroimaging-1220.

According to the CDC, unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death for adolescents. Compared to the two leading causes of death for all Americans, heart disease and cancer, a pattern of questionable decision-making in dire situations comes to light in teen mortality. New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas investigating brain differences associated with risk-taking teens found that connections between certain brain regions are amplified in teens more prone to risk.

The research is in Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging. (full access paywall)

Research: “Adolescent risk-taking and resting state functional connectivity” by Samuel J. DeWitt, Sina Aslan, andFra... more »

Brain Imaging Shows Brain Differences in Risk Taking Teens

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/teen-risk-taking-neuroimaging-1220.

According to the CDC, unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death for adolescents. Compared to the two leading causes of death for all Americans, heart disease and cancer, a pattern of questionable decision-making in dire situations comes to light in teen mortality. New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas investigating brain differences associated with risk-taking teens found that connections between certain brain regions are amplified in teens more prone to risk.

The research is in Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging. (full access paywall)

Research: “Adolescent risk-taking and resting state functional connectivity” by Samuel J. DeWitt, Sina Aslan, and Francesca M. Filbey in Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging. doi:10.1016/j.pscychresns.2014.03.009

Image: The research showed that risk-taking teens exhibit hyperconnectivity between the amygdala, a center responsible for emotional reactivity, and specific areas of the prefrontal cortex associated with emotion regulation and critical thinking skills. Credit Center for Brain Health/UT Dallas.

#neuroscience   #psychology  ___

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2014-08-15 22:01:15 (2 comments, 7 reshares, 23 +1s)

Depression Linked to Parkinson’s Disease

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/depressions-parkinsons-treatments-psychiatry-1219.

Depression is known to be a common symptom of Parkinson’s disease, but remains untreated for many patients, according to a new study by Northwestern Medicine investigators in collaboration with the National Parkinson’s Foundation (NPF).

The research is in Journal of Parkinson's Disease. (full access paywall)

Research: “Recognition and Treatment of Depressive Symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease: The NPF Dataset” by Danny Bega, Sam S. Wu, Qinglin Pei, Peter N. Schmidt, and Tanya Simuni in Journal of Parkinson’s Disease. doi:10.3233/JPD-140382

Image: Depression is the most prevalent non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s, a chronic neurodegenerative disorder typically associated with movementdysfunction. Th... more »

Depression Linked to Parkinson’s Disease

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/depressions-parkinsons-treatments-psychiatry-1219.

Depression is known to be a common symptom of Parkinson’s disease, but remains untreated for many patients, according to a new study by Northwestern Medicine investigators in collaboration with the National Parkinson’s Foundation (NPF).

The research is in Journal of Parkinson's Disease. (full access paywall)

Research: “Recognition and Treatment of Depressive Symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease: The NPF Dataset” by Danny Bega, Sam S. Wu, Qinglin Pei, Peter N. Schmidt, and Tanya Simuni in Journal of Parkinson’s Disease. doi:10.3233/JPD-140382

Image: Depression is the most prevalent non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s, a chronic neurodegenerative disorder typically associated with movement dysfunction. This image is for illustrative purposes only and is not connected to the research. Credit PublicDomainPictures.

#parkinsons   #depression   #psychology  ___

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2014-08-15 20:25:15 (4 comments, 8 reshares, 23 +1s)

Dopamine Replacement Therapy Associated with Increase in Impulse Control Disorders Among Early Parkinson’s Disease Patients

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/impulse-control-early-parkinsons-psychiatry-1218.

New Penn Medicine research shows that neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety and fatigue are more common in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients compared to the general population. The study also found that initiation of dopamine replacement therapy, the most common treatment for PD, was associated with increasing frequency of impulse control disorders and excessive daytime sleepiness. The new findings, the first longitudinal study to come out of the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI), are published in the August 15, 2014, issue of Neurology.

The research is in Neurology. (full access paywall)
... more »

Dopamine Replacement Therapy Associated with Increase in Impulse Control Disorders Among Early Parkinson’s Disease Patients

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/impulse-control-early-parkinsons-psychiatry-1218.

New Penn Medicine research shows that neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety and fatigue are more common in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients compared to the general population. The study also found that initiation of dopamine replacement therapy, the most common treatment for PD, was associated with increasing frequency of impulse control disorders and excessive daytime sleepiness. The new findings, the first longitudinal study to come out of the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI), are published in the August 15, 2014, issue of Neurology.

The research is in Neurology. (full access paywall)

Research: “Naltrexone for impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: A placebo-controlled study” by Kimberly Papay, Sharon X. Xie, Matthew Stern, Howard Hurtig, Andrew Siderowf, John E. Duda, James Minger, and Daniel Weintraub in Neurology. doi:10.1212/WNL.0000000000000729

Image: Researchers found evidence that depression may be undertreated in early PD patients. Two-thirds of patients who screened positive for depression at any time point were not taking an antidepressant. The image is for illustrative purposes and is not connected to the research. The image shows two brain scans. Localization of the area of significant brain volume reduction in initial PD compared with a group of participants without the disease in a neuroimaging study, which concluded that brain stem damage may be the first identifiable stage of PD neuropathology. Credit Jubault et al./PLOS ONE.

#parkinsonsdisease   #psychiatry   #neurology  ___

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2014-08-15 19:37:24 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 14 +1s)

Promising New Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neuropharmacology-anti-psychotics-ms-1217.

New treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS) using common anti-psychotic agents have been discovered by Victoria University of Wellington researchers.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: “Treatment with the Antipsychotic Agent, Risperidone, Reduces Disease Severity in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis” by David O’Sullivan, Laura Green, Sarrabeth Stone, Pirooz Zareie, Marie Kharkrang, Dahna Fong, Bronwen Connor, and Anne Camille La Flamme in PLOS ONE. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0104430

Image: Iba-1 expression (deep pink) in the cerebellum was assessed by immunohistochemistry and counterstained with hematoxylin (light purple). Shown are representative sections fromunimm... more »

Promising New Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/neuropharmacology-anti-psychotics-ms-1217.

New treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS) using common anti-psychotic agents have been discovered by Victoria University of Wellington researchers.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: “Treatment with the Antipsychotic Agent, Risperidone, Reduces Disease Severity in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis” by David O’Sullivan, Laura Green, Sarrabeth Stone, Pirooz Zareie, Marie Kharkrang, Dahna Fong, Bronwen Connor, and Anne Camille La Flamme in PLOS ONE. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0104430

Image: Iba-1 expression (deep pink) in the cerebellum was assessed by immunohistochemistry and counterstained with hematoxylin (light purple). Shown are representative sections from unimmunized and immunized, vehicle and risperidone-treated mice as well as the “Iba-1 score” and “disease score” at time of euthanasia. Credit La Flamme et al./PLOS ONE.

#neurology   #multiplesclerosis  ___

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2014-08-15 18:38:12 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 15 +1s)

Bats Bolster Brain Hypothesis

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/bat-echolocation-temporal-binding-hypothesis-1216.

Decades of research on how bats use echolocation to keep a focus on their targets not only lends support to a long debated neuroscience hypothesis about vision but also could lead to smarter sonar and radar technologies.

The research is in Journal of Experimental Biology. (full access paywall)

Research: “Temporal binding of neural responses for focused attention in biosonar” by James A. Simmons in Journal of Experimental Biology. doi:10.1242/jeb.104380

Image: Bats send out harmonic pairs of frequencies to sense where things are. The strength differences in the high and low frequencies in the pair (minimal in red, greater in blue) help the bat focus on the target front and center. Credit James Simmons/BrownUni... more »

Bats Bolster Brain Hypothesis

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/bat-echolocation-temporal-binding-hypothesis-1216.

Decades of research on how bats use echolocation to keep a focus on their targets not only lends support to a long debated neuroscience hypothesis about vision but also could lead to smarter sonar and radar technologies.

The research is in Journal of Experimental Biology. (full access paywall)

Research: “Temporal binding of neural responses for focused attention in biosonar” by James A. Simmons in Journal of Experimental Biology. doi:10.1242/jeb.104380

Image: Bats send out harmonic pairs of frequencies to sense where things are. The strength differences in the high and low frequencies in the pair (minimal in red, greater in blue) help the bat focus on the target front and center. Credit James Simmons/Brown University.

#neuroscience  ___

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2014-08-14 22:13:40 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 19 +1s)

Non-Invasive Technique Controls Size of Molecules Penetrating the Blood-Brain Barrier

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/parkinsons-acoustic-pressure-bbb-neurology-1215.

Innovative ultrasound approach uses acoustic pressure to let molecules through—may help treatment for central nervous system diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

The research is in Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism. (full access paywall)

Research: “The size of blood–brain barrier opening induced by focused ultrasound is dictated by the acoustic pressure” by Hong Chen and Elisa E Konofagou in Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism. doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.71

Image: Damage analysis of BBB-opened brain regions: Histological examination of (A, C) left (BBB-opened) and (B, D) corresponding right (no ultrasound) hippocampi.No microsco... more »

Non-Invasive Technique Controls Size of Molecules Penetrating the Blood-Brain Barrier

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/parkinsons-acoustic-pressure-bbb-neurology-1215.

Innovative ultrasound approach uses acoustic pressure to let molecules through—may help treatment for central nervous system diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

The research is in Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism. (full access paywall)

Research: “The size of blood–brain barrier opening induced by focused ultrasound is dictated by the acoustic pressure” by Hong Chen and Elisa E Konofagou in Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism. doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.71

Image: Damage analysis of BBB-opened brain regions: Histological examination of (A, C) left (BBB-opened) and (B, D) corresponding right (no ultrasound) hippocampi. No microscopic tissue damage was observed in the BBB-opened hippocampus at 0.51 MPa (A), same as in the intact right hippocampus on the same section (B). Minor microhemorrhage is noticeable in one location (box) in the hippocampus sonicated at 0.84 MPa (C), compared to no damage in nonsonicated hippocampus (D). The insert shows magnified image of the region in the box. Scale bar represents 1 mm. Credit Elisa Konofagou/Columbia Engineering.

#parkinsons   #neurology  ___

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2014-08-14 20:28:59 (1 comments, 6 reshares, 17 +1s)

Memories of Errors Foster Faster Learning

Using a deceptively simple set of experiments, researchers at Johns Hopkins have learned why people learn an identical or similar task faster the second, third and subsequent time around. The reason: They are aided not only by memories of how to perform the task, but also by memories of the errors made the first time.

The research is in Science Express. (full access paywall)

Research: “A memory of errors in sensorimotor learning” by David J. Herzfeld, Pavan A. Vaswani, Mollie Marko, and Reza Shadmehr in Science Express. doi:10.1126/science.1253138

Image: The experimental setup: Volunteers cannot see their hands, but they can see a dot of light that reflects their movements more or less accurately. Credit Johns Hopkins Medicine.

#neuroscience #memory #learning 

Memories of Errors Foster Faster Learning

Using a deceptively simple set of experiments, researchers at Johns Hopkins have learned why people learn an identical or similar task faster the second, third and subsequent time around. The reason: They are aided not only by memories of how to perform the task, but also by memories of the errors made the first time.

The research is in Science Express. (full access paywall)

Research: “A memory of errors in sensorimotor learning” by David J. Herzfeld, Pavan A. Vaswani, Mollie Marko, and Reza Shadmehr in Science Express. doi:10.1126/science.1253138

Image: The experimental setup: Volunteers cannot see their hands, but they can see a dot of light that reflects their movements more or less accurately. Credit Johns Hopkins Medicine.

#neuroscience #memory #learning ___

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2014-08-14 19:27:17 (1 comments, 8 reshares, 27 +1s)

Scientists Use Lasers to Control Mouse Brain Switchboard

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/optogenetics-consciousness-trn-1213.

Using mice and flashes of light, scientists show that just a few nerve cells in the brain may control the switch between internal thoughts and external distractions. The study, partly funded by the National Institutes of Health, may be a breakthrough in understanding how a critical part of the brain, called the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), influences consciousness.

The research is in Cell. (full access paywall)

Research: “State-Dependent Architecture of Thalamic Reticular Subnetworks” by Michael M. Halassa, Zhe Chen, Ralf D. Wimmer, Philip M. Brunetti, Shengli Zhao, Basilis Zikopoulos, Fan Wang, Emery N. Brown, and Matthew A. Wilson in Cell. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2014.06.025

Image:Sci... more »

Scientists Use Lasers to Control Mouse Brain Switchboard

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/optogenetics-consciousness-trn-1213.

Using mice and flashes of light, scientists show that just a few nerve cells in the brain may control the switch between internal thoughts and external distractions. The study, partly funded by the National Institutes of Health, may be a breakthrough in understanding how a critical part of the brain, called the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), influences consciousness.

The research is in Cell. (full access paywall)

Research: “State-Dependent Architecture of Thalamic Reticular Subnetworks” by Michael M. Halassa, Zhe Chen, Ralf D. Wimmer, Philip M. Brunetti, Shengli Zhao, Basilis Zikopoulos, Fan Wang, Emery N. Brown, and Matthew A. Wilson in Cell. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2014.06.025

Image: Scientists used mice to study how nerve cells in thalamic reticular nucleus work during sleep and how they help the brain concentrate. Credit Michael Halassa, M.D., Ph.D., NYU Langone Medical Center.

#neuroscience   #consciousness   #optogenetics  ___

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2014-08-14 18:21:12 (0 comments, 9 reshares, 25 +1s)

Bypass Commands From the Brain to Legs Through a Computer

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/paralysis-spinal-locomotion-bci-1212.

Gait disturbance in individuals with spinal cord injury is attributed to the interruption of neural pathways from brain to the spinal locomotor center, whereas neural circuits locate below and above the lesion maintain most of their functions. An artificial connection that bridges the lost pathway and connects brain to spinal circuits has potential to ameliorate the functional loss. A Japanese research group, led by Shusaku Sasada and Yukio Nishimura, has successfully made an artificial connection from the brain to the locomotion center in the spinal cord by bypassing with a computer interface. This allowed subjects to stimulate the spinal locomotion center using volitionally-controlled muscle activity and to control walking in legs.... more »

Bypass Commands From the Brain to Legs Through a Computer

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/paralysis-spinal-locomotion-bci-1212.

Gait disturbance in individuals with spinal cord injury is attributed to the interruption of neural pathways from brain to the spinal locomotor center, whereas neural circuits locate below and above the lesion maintain most of their functions. An artificial connection that bridges the lost pathway and connects brain to spinal circuits has potential to ameliorate the functional loss. A Japanese research group, led by Shusaku Sasada and Yukio Nishimura, has successfully made an artificial connection from the brain to the locomotion center in the spinal cord by bypassing with a computer interface. This allowed subjects to stimulate the spinal locomotion center using volitionally-controlled muscle activity and to control walking in legs.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: “Volitional Walking via Upper Limb Muscle-Controlled Stimulation of the Lumbar Locomotor Center in Man” by Syusaku Sasada, Kenji Kato, Suguru Kadowaki, Stefan J. Groiss, Yoshikazu Ugawa, Tomoyoshi Komiyama, and Yukio Nishimura in Journal of Neuroscience. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4674-13.2014

Image: When turning off the computer-aided spinal cord bypass, the lower extremities which were in a relaxed state did not move even if the subject was swinging his/her arms. With the bypass turned on, when the subject swung his/her arms by his/her own will and a walking motion of the lower extremities began in rhythm to the motion of the arms. Credit Yukio Nishimura.

#neurology   #neuroscience  ___

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2014-08-13 22:46:44 (6 comments, 18 reshares, 70 +1s)

Poor Sleep Quality Increases Suicide Risk for Older Adults

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/sleep-disturbances-aging-suicide-risk-1211.

In a study, participants who reported poor sleep had a 1.4 times greater chance of death by suicide within a 10-year period than those who reported sleeping well.

The research is in JAMA Psychiatry. (full open access)

Research: “Association of Poor Subjective Sleep Quality With Risk for Death by Suicide During a 10-Year Period: A Longitudinal, Population-Based Study of Late Life” by Rebecca A. Bernert, PhD; Carolyn L. Turvey, PhD; Yeates Conwell, MD; and Thomas E. Joiner Jr, PhD in JAMA Psychiatry. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1126

Image: Researchers discovered participants reporting poor sleep had a 1.4 times greater chance of death by suicide within a 10-year period thanpar... more »

Poor Sleep Quality Increases Suicide Risk for Older Adults

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/sleep-disturbances-aging-suicide-risk-1211.

In a study, participants who reported poor sleep had a 1.4 times greater chance of death by suicide within a 10-year period than those who reported sleeping well.

The research is in JAMA Psychiatry. (full open access)

Research: “Association of Poor Subjective Sleep Quality With Risk for Death by Suicide During a 10-Year Period: A Longitudinal, Population-Based Study of Late Life” by Rebecca A. Bernert, PhD; Carolyn L. Turvey, PhD; Yeates Conwell, MD; and Thomas E. Joiner Jr, PhD in JAMA Psychiatry. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1126

Image: Researchers discovered participants reporting poor sleep had a 1.4 times greater chance of death by suicide within a 10-year period than participants who reported sleeping well. This image is for illustrative purposes only and is not connected to the research. Credit NIA/NIH.

#psychiatry   #suicide   #psychology  ___

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2014-08-13 21:54:16 (1 comments, 5 reshares, 23 +1s)

3D Microscope Method to Look Inside Brains

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/3d-imaging-mouse-brain-1210.

A University of Utah team discovered a method for turning a small, $40 needle into a 3-D microscope capable of taking images up to 70 times smaller than the width of a human hair. This new method not only produces high-quality images comparable to expensive microscopes, but may be implanted into the brains of living mice for imaging at the cellular level.

The research is in Applied Physics Letters. (full open access)

Research: “An ultra-small three dimensional computational microscope” by Ganghun Kim and Rajesh Menon in Applied Physics Letters. doi:10.1063/1.4892881

Image: University of Utah engineers have developed a new microscopy method that uses a fine needle or cannula and an LED light to make 3-D images. Theyhop... more »

3D Microscope Method to Look Inside Brains

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/3d-imaging-mouse-brain-1210.

A University of Utah team discovered a method for turning a small, $40 needle into a 3-D microscope capable of taking images up to 70 times smaller than the width of a human hair. This new method not only produces high-quality images comparable to expensive microscopes, but may be implanted into the brains of living mice for imaging at the cellular level.

The research is in Applied Physics Letters. (full open access)

Research: “An ultra-small three dimensional computational microscope” by Ganghun Kim and Rajesh Menon in Applied Physics Letters. doi:10.1063/1.4892881

Image: University of Utah engineers have developed a new microscopy method that uses a fine needle or cannula and an LED light to make 3-D images. They hope this new microscope technology, shown here, can be implanted into the brains of mice to show images of cells. Credit Ganghun Kim, University of Utah.

#neuroscience   #technology  ___

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2014-08-13 20:54:04 (0 comments, 6 reshares, 17 +1s)

Single Gene Controls Jet Lag

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/lhx1-sleep-cycle-genetics-1209.

Salk researchers discover a master gene responsible for sleep and wake cycles, offering hope for a drug that could help reset sleep.

The research is in eLife. (full open access)

Research: “Lhx1 maintains synchrony among circadian oscillator neurons of the SCN” by Megumi Hatori, Shubhroz Gill, Ludovic S Mure, Martyn Goulding, Dennis DM O’Leary, Satchidananda Panda in eLife. doi:10.7554/eLife.03357

Image: A peptide responsible for cell communication in the brain, Vip (green) is reduced in the brains of mice that have little or no Lhx1 (right). Credit Salk Institute.

#genetics   #neuroscience   #sleep  

Single Gene Controls Jet Lag

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/lhx1-sleep-cycle-genetics-1209.

Salk researchers discover a master gene responsible for sleep and wake cycles, offering hope for a drug that could help reset sleep.

The research is in eLife. (full open access)

Research: “Lhx1 maintains synchrony among circadian oscillator neurons of the SCN” by Megumi Hatori, Shubhroz Gill, Ludovic S Mure, Martyn Goulding, Dennis DM O’Leary, Satchidananda Panda in eLife. doi:10.7554/eLife.03357

Image: A peptide responsible for cell communication in the brain, Vip (green) is reduced in the brains of mice that have little or no Lhx1 (right). Credit Salk Institute.

#genetics   #neuroscience   #sleep  ___

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2014-08-13 20:08:32 (0 comments, 7 reshares, 22 +1s)

Reduction of Tau Protein Improves Symptoms in Model of Severe Childhood Epilepsy

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/dravet-syndrome-tau-neurology-1208.

Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes have shown that reducing brain levels of the protein tau effectively blocks the development of disease in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome, a severe intractable form of childhood epilepsy. This therapeutic strategy not only suppressed seizure activity and premature death, but also improved cognitive and behavioral abnormalities that can accompany this syndrome..

The research is in Annals of Neurology, Science and Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: “Tau reduction prevents disease in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome” by Ania L. Gheyara, Ravikumar Ponnusamy, Biljana Djukic, Ryan J. Craft, Kaitlyn Ho, Weikun Guo, Mariel M.Fin... more »

Reduction of Tau Protein Improves Symptoms in Model of Severe Childhood Epilepsy

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/dravet-syndrome-tau-neurology-1208.

Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes have shown that reducing brain levels of the protein tau effectively blocks the development of disease in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome, a severe intractable form of childhood epilepsy. This therapeutic strategy not only suppressed seizure activity and premature death, but also improved cognitive and behavioral abnormalities that can accompany this syndrome..

The research is in Annals of Neurology, Science and Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: “Tau reduction prevents disease in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome” by Ania L. Gheyara, Ravikumar Ponnusamy, Biljana Djukic, Ryan J. Craft, Kaitlyn Ho, Weikun Guo, Mariel M. Finucane, Pascal E. Sanchez and Lennart Mucke in Annals of Neurology. doi:10.1002/ana.24230

“Reducing Endogenous Tau Ameliorates Amyloid ß-Induced Deficits in an Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model” by Erik D. Roberson, Kimberly Scearce-Levie, Jorge J. Palop, Fengrong Yan, Irene H. Cheng, Tiffany Wu, Hilary Gerstein, Gui-Qiu Yu, and Lennart Mucke in Science. doi:10.1126/science.1141736

“Amyloid-β/Fyn–Induced Synaptic, Network, and Cognitive Impairments Depend on Tau Levels in Multiple Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease” by Erik D. Roberson, Brian Halabisky, Jong W. Yoo, Jinghua Yao, Jeannie Chin, Fengrong Yan, Tiffany Wu, Patricia Hamto, Nino Devidze, Gui-Qiu Yu, Jorge J. Palop, Jeffrey L. Noebels, and Lennart Mucke in Journal of Neuroscience. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4152-10.2011

Image: Researchers reduced the level of the protein tau by genetically engineering Dravet mouse models, “knocking out” the gene associated with tau production. This image is for illustrative purposes and is not connected to the research. Credit NIH/NIA.

#neurology   #neuroscience  ___

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2014-08-13 18:53:59 (0 comments, 7 reshares, 18 +1s)

Researchers Reveal Weakness in Defenses of Deadly Brain Tumor

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/apkc-glioblastoma-cancer-neurology-1207.

Glioblastoma is a complex, deadly, and hard-to-treat brain cancer, but Yale School of Medicine researchers may have found the tumor’s Achilles heel.

The research is in Science Signaling. (full access paywall)

Research: “Targeting aPKC disables oncogenic signaling by both the EGFR and the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα in glioblastoma” by Yael Kusne, Eugenio A. Carrera-Silva, Anthony S. Perry, Elisabeth J. Rushing, Edward K. Mandell, Justin D. Dietrich, Andrea E. Errasti, Daniel Gibbs, Michael E. Berens, Joseph C. Loftus, Christopher Hulme, Weiwei Yang, Zhimin Lu, Kenneth Aldape, Nader Sanai, Carla V. Rothlin, and Sourav Ghosh in Science Signaling. doi:10.1126/scisignal.2005196
I... more »

Researchers Reveal Weakness in Defenses of Deadly Brain Tumor

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/apkc-glioblastoma-cancer-neurology-1207.

Glioblastoma is a complex, deadly, and hard-to-treat brain cancer, but Yale School of Medicine researchers may have found the tumor’s Achilles heel.

The research is in Science Signaling. (full access paywall)

Research: “Targeting aPKC disables oncogenic signaling by both the EGFR and the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα in glioblastoma” by Yael Kusne, Eugenio A. Carrera-Silva, Anthony S. Perry, Elisabeth J. Rushing, Edward K. Mandell, Justin D. Dietrich, Andrea E. Errasti, Daniel Gibbs, Michael E. Berens, Joseph C. Loftus, Christopher Hulme, Weiwei Yang, Zhimin Lu, Kenneth Aldape, Nader Sanai, Carla V. Rothlin, and Sourav Ghosh in Science Signaling. doi:10.1126/scisignal.2005196

Image: Glioblastomas are hard to treat because they grow rapidly, spread quickly, and are resistant to current treatments. Credit Yale.___

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2014-08-12 22:55:53 (0 comments, 13 reshares, 35 +1s)

A Gene Linked to Disease Found to Play a Critical Role in Normal Memory Development

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/huntingtin-long-term-memory-genetics-1206.

It has been more than 20 years since scientists discovered that mutations in the gene huntingtin cause the devastating progressive neurological condition Huntington’s disease, which involves involuntary movements, emotional disturbance and cognitive impairment. Surprisingly little, however, has been known about the gene’s role in normal brain activity.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: “Huntingtin Is Critical Both Pre- and Postsynaptically for Long-Term Learning-Related Synaptic Plasticity in Aplysia” by Yun-Beom Choi, Beena M. Kadakkuzha, Xin-An Liu, Komolitdin Akhmedov, Eric R. Kandel, and Sathyanarayanan V. Puthanveettil in PLOS ONE.doi:10.... more »

A Gene Linked to Disease Found to Play a Critical Role in Normal Memory Development

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/huntingtin-long-term-memory-genetics-1206.

It has been more than 20 years since scientists discovered that mutations in the gene huntingtin cause the devastating progressive neurological condition Huntington’s disease, which involves involuntary movements, emotional disturbance and cognitive impairment. Surprisingly little, however, has been known about the gene’s role in normal brain activity.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: “Huntingtin Is Critical Both Pre- and Postsynaptically for Long-Term Learning-Related Synaptic Plasticity in Aplysia” by Yun-Beom Choi, Beena M. Kadakkuzha, Xin-An Liu, Komolitdin Akhmedov, Eric R. Kandel, and Sathyanarayanan V. Puthanveettil in PLOS ONE. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0103004

Image: mRNA in situ analysis shows that ApHTT mRNAs are expression in Aplysia sensory neurons, motor neurons, and glial cells. Fluorescently labeled ribo probes were used to examine the distribution of ApHTT mRNAs. Confocal projection image is shown. The scale bar represents 20 µm. Credit Choi et al./PLOS ONE.

#neuroscience #memory #genetics___

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2014-08-12 22:23:08 (4 comments, 15 reshares, 45 +1s)

New Study Points to a Brain Region Key to Contextual Memories

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/contextual-memory-retrosplenial-cortex-1205.

Dartmouth researchers demonstrate in a new study that a previously understudied part of the brain, the retrosplenial cortex, is essential for forming the basis for contextual memories, which help you to recall events ranging from global disasters to where you parked your car.

The research will appear in Journal of Neuroscience.

Research: The research will appear in Journal of Neuroscience.

Image: The importance of this finding is underscored by two recent studies showing that the hippocampus, another key brain region involved in contextual memories, is not itself active or necessary for forming the initial associations that underlie contextual memory. This image is for illustrative... more »

New Study Points to a Brain Region Key to Contextual Memories

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/contextual-memory-retrosplenial-cortex-1205.

Dartmouth researchers demonstrate in a new study that a previously understudied part of the brain, the retrosplenial cortex, is essential for forming the basis for contextual memories, which help you to recall events ranging from global disasters to where you parked your car.

The research will appear in Journal of Neuroscience.

Research: The research will appear in Journal of Neuroscience.

Image: The importance of this finding is underscored by two recent studies showing that the hippocampus, another key brain region involved in contextual memories, is not itself active or necessary for forming the initial associations that underlie contextual memory. This image is for illustrative purposes only. Credit OpenClips.

#neuroscience   #memory  ___

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2014-08-12 21:33:00 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 21 +1s)

Neurons at Work

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/alternative-splicing-neurons-genetics-1204.

Research provides a clearer view of ‘alternative splicing’.

The research is in Molecular Cell. (full access paywall)

Research: “A Pair of RNA-Binding Proteins Controls Networks of Splicing Events Contributing to Specialization of Neural Cell Types” by Adam D. Norris, Shangbang Gao, Megan L. Norris, Debashish Ray, Arun K. Ramani, Andrew G. Fraser, Quaid Morris, Timothy R. Hughes, Mei Zhen, John A. Calarco in Molecular Cell. doi:10.1016/j.molcel.2014.05.004

Image: Through their research on “alternative splicing,” John Calarco (left), a Bauer Fellow at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Center for Systems Biology, and postdoctoral researcher Adam Norris have a better understanding of how the process works in differentneurons. Th... more »

Neurons at Work

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/alternative-splicing-neurons-genetics-1204.

Research provides a clearer view of ‘alternative splicing’.

The research is in Molecular Cell. (full access paywall)

Research: “A Pair of RNA-Binding Proteins Controls Networks of Splicing Events Contributing to Specialization of Neural Cell Types” by Adam D. Norris, Shangbang Gao, Megan L. Norris, Debashish Ray, Arun K. Ramani, Andrew G. Fraser, Quaid Morris, Timothy R. Hughes, Mei Zhen, John A. Calarco in Molecular Cell. doi:10.1016/j.molcel.2014.05.004

Image: Through their research on “alternative splicing,” John Calarco (left), a Bauer Fellow at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Center for Systems Biology, and postdoctoral researcher Adam Norris have a better understanding of how the process works in different neurons. Their findings could also uncover insights on how it can go awry and lead to disorders such as epilepsy. Credit Rose Lincoln.

#neuroscience   #genetics  ___

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2014-08-12 20:42:31 (0 comments, 7 reshares, 17 +1s)

Overhaul of Our Understanding of Why Autism Potentially Occurs

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/autism-trigger-threshold-target-psychology-1203.

An analysis of autism research covering genetics, brain imaging, and cognition led by Laurent Mottron of the University of Montreal has overhauled our understanding of why autism potentially occurs, develops and results in a diversity of symptoms.

The research will appear in Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews.

Research: “Linking Neocortical, Cognitive and Genetic Variability in Autism with Alterations of Brain Plasticity: the Trigger-Threshold-Target Model” by Dr. Laurent Mottron, M.D., Ph.D., Sylvie Belleville, Ph.D., Dr. Guy Rouleau, MD. Ph.D, and Olivier Collignon, Ph.D will be published in Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews.

Image: The researchers developed themod... more »

Overhaul of Our Understanding of Why Autism Potentially Occurs

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/autism-trigger-threshold-target-psychology-1203.

An analysis of autism research covering genetics, brain imaging, and cognition led by Laurent Mottron of the University of Montreal has overhauled our understanding of why autism potentially occurs, develops and results in a diversity of symptoms.

The research will appear in Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews.

Research: “Linking Neocortical, Cognitive and Genetic Variability in Autism with Alterations of Brain Plasticity: the Trigger-Threshold-Target Model” by Dr. Laurent Mottron, M.D., Ph.D., Sylvie Belleville, Ph.D., Dr. Guy Rouleau, MD. Ph.D, and Olivier Collignon, Ph.D will be published in Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews.

Image: The researchers developed the model by examining the effect of mutations involved in autism together with the brain activity of autistic people as they undertake perceptual tasks. This image is for illustrative purposes only. Credit Columbia University School of Nursing / CTRPhotos.

#autism #neuroscience #psychology ___

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2014-08-12 19:23:49 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 11 +1s)

Hijacking the Brain’s Blood Supply

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/glioma-brain-cancer-blood-vessels-1202.

Dangerous brain tumors hijack the brain’s existing blood supply throughout their progression, by growing only within narrow potential spaces between and along the brain’s thousands of small blood vessels, new research shows for the first time.

The research is in Neoplasia. (full access paywall)

Research: “Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy12″ by Gregory J. Baker, Viveka Nand Yadav, Sebastien Motsch, Carl Koschmann, Anda-Alexandra Calinescu, Yohei Mineharu, Sandra Ines Camelo-Piragua, Daniel Orringer, Serguei Bannykh, Wesley S. Nichols, Ana C. deCarvalho, Tom Mikkelsen, MariaG. Castro... more »

Hijacking the Brain’s Blood Supply

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/glioma-brain-cancer-blood-vessels-1202.

Dangerous brain tumors hijack the brain’s existing blood supply throughout their progression, by growing only within narrow potential spaces between and along the brain’s thousands of small blood vessels, new research shows for the first time.

The research is in Neoplasia. (full access paywall)

Research: “Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy12″ by Gregory J. Baker, Viveka Nand Yadav, Sebastien Motsch, Carl Koschmann, Anda-Alexandra Calinescu, Yohei Mineharu, Sandra Ines Camelo-Piragua, Daniel Orringer, Serguei Bannykh, Wesley S. Nichols, Ana C. deCarvalho, Tom Mikkelsen, Maria G. Castro, and Pedro R. Lowenstein in Neoplasia. doi:10.1016/j.neo.2014.06.003

Image: This microscopic view of a mouse brain tumor shows small clusters of tumor cells, marked with white arrows, growing along tiny blood vessels in the brain. Credit University of Michigan.

#neurology   #cancer   #neuroscience  ___

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2014-08-12 18:03:25 (1 comments, 5 reshares, 25 +1s)

Toxic Proteins Damage Nerve Cells

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/als-genetic-mutation-neurology-1201/.

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne and University College London have now unearthed the way in which a specific genetic mutation leads to neuronal damage in two serious afflictions. In rare cases, patients may even suffer from these two diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, at the same time.

The research is in Science Express. (full access paywall)

Research: “C9orf72 repeat expansions cause neurodegeneration in Drosophila through arginine-rich proteins” by Sarah Mizielinska, Sebastian Grönke, Teresa Niccoli, Charlotte E. Ridler, Emma L. Clayton, Anny Devoy, Thomas Moens, Frances E. Norona, Ione O.C. Woollacott, Julian Pietrzyk, Karen Cleverley, Andrew J. Nicoll,Stua... more »

Toxic Proteins Damage Nerve Cells

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/als-genetic-mutation-neurology-1201/.

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne and University College London have now unearthed the way in which a specific genetic mutation leads to neuronal damage in two serious afflictions. In rare cases, patients may even suffer from these two diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, at the same time.

The research is in Science Express. (full access paywall)

Research: “C9orf72 repeat expansions cause neurodegeneration in Drosophila through arginine-rich proteins” by Sarah Mizielinska, Sebastian Grönke, Teresa Niccoli, Charlotte E. Ridler, Emma L. Clayton, Anny Devoy, Thomas Moens, Frances E. Norona, Ione O.C. Woollacott, Julian Pietrzyk, Karen Cleverley, Andrew J. Nicoll, Stuart Pickering-Brown, Jacqueline Dols, Melissa Cabecinha, Oliver Hendrich, Pietro Fratta, Elizabeth M.C. Fisher, Linda Partridge, and Adrian M. Isaacs in Science Express. doi:10.1126/science.1256800

Image: In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, scientists in basic biomedical research can study very well how neurodegeneration works and how nerve cells are damaged. The picture shows the brain of an adult fly (glial cells are stained green, cell nuclei purple). Credit Dr. Teresa Niccoli/University College London.

#genetics   #neurology   #als  ___

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2014-08-11 23:13:13 (0 comments, 16 reshares, 59 +1s)

Bioengineers Create Functional 3D Brain-Like Tissue

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/3d-brain-tissue-model-neuroscience-1200/.

Bioengineers have created three-dimensional brain-like tissue that functions like and has structural features similar to tissue in the rat brain and that can be kept alive in the lab for more than two months.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: “Bioengineered functional brain-like cortical tissue” by Min D. Tang-Schomer, James D. White, Lee W. Tien, L. Ian Schmitt, Thomas M. Valentin, Daniel J. Graziano, Amy M. Hopkins, Fiorenzo G. Omenetto, Philip G. Haydon, and David L. Kaplan in PNAS. doi:10.1073/pnas.1324214111

Image: Confocal microscope image of neurons (greenish yellow) attached to silk-based scaffold (blue). The neurons formed functional networks throughout thesca... more »

Bioengineers Create Functional 3D Brain-Like Tissue

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/3d-brain-tissue-model-neuroscience-1200/.

Bioengineers have created three-dimensional brain-like tissue that functions like and has structural features similar to tissue in the rat brain and that can be kept alive in the lab for more than two months.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: “Bioengineered functional brain-like cortical tissue” by Min D. Tang-Schomer, James D. White, Lee W. Tien, L. Ian Schmitt, Thomas M. Valentin, Daniel J. Graziano, Amy M. Hopkins, Fiorenzo G. Omenetto, Philip G. Haydon, and David L. Kaplan in PNAS. doi:10.1073/pnas.1324214111

Image: Confocal microscope image of neurons (greenish yellow) attached to silk-based scaffold (blue). The neurons formed functional networks throughout the scaffold pores (dark areas). Credit Tufts University.

#neuroscience   #bioengineering  ___

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2014-08-11 22:21:44 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 17 +1s)

“Seeing” Through Virtual Touch is Believing

Full article at http://goo.gl/a7qKk6.

Surprising results from University of Cincinnati research could lead to new ways to help the visually impaired better navigate everyday life.

The research was presented at the American Psychological Association National Convention in Washington D.C.

Research: “Augmenting the Sensory Judgment Abilities of the Visually Impaired” by Luis H. Favela, Michael A. Riley, Kevin Shockley and Anthony Chemero was presented on August 8 2014 at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention in Washington D.C.

Image: Favela observes Mary Jean Amon, a test subject, as she uses the Enactive Torch during a demonstration of Favela’s experiment. Credit Colleen Kelley/University of Cincinnati.

#neuroscience   #vision  

“Seeing” Through Virtual Touch is Believing

Full article at http://goo.gl/a7qKk6.

Surprising results from University of Cincinnati research could lead to new ways to help the visually impaired better navigate everyday life.

The research was presented at the American Psychological Association National Convention in Washington D.C.

Research: “Augmenting the Sensory Judgment Abilities of the Visually Impaired” by Luis H. Favela, Michael A. Riley, Kevin Shockley and Anthony Chemero was presented on August 8 2014 at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention in Washington D.C.

Image: Favela observes Mary Jean Amon, a test subject, as she uses the Enactive Torch during a demonstration of Favela’s experiment. Credit Colleen Kelley/University of Cincinnati.

#neuroscience   #vision  ___

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2014-08-11 19:21:22 (3 comments, 20 reshares, 60 +1s)

Important Advance in Brain Mapping and Memory

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/visual-memory-brain-mapping-neuroscience-1198/.

“When a tiger starts to move towards you, you need to know whether it is something you are actually seeing or whether it’s just something that you remember or have imagined,” says Prof. Julio Martinez-Trujillo of McGill’s Department of Physiology. The researcher and his team have discovered that there is a clear frontier in the brain between the area that encodes information about what is immediately before the eyes and the area that encodes the abstract representations that are the product of our short-term memory or imagination. It is an important advance in brain mapping and opens the doors to further research in the area of short-term memory.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)
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Important Advance in Brain Mapping and Memory

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/visual-memory-brain-mapping-neuroscience-1198/.

“When a tiger starts to move towards you, you need to know whether it is something you are actually seeing or whether it’s just something that you remember or have imagined,” says Prof. Julio Martinez-Trujillo of McGill’s Department of Physiology. The researcher and his team have discovered that there is a clear frontier in the brain between the area that encodes information about what is immediately before the eyes and the area that encodes the abstract representations that are the product of our short-term memory or imagination. It is an important advance in brain mapping and opens the doors to further research in the area of short-term memory.

The research is in Nature Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: “Sharp emergence of feature-selective sustained activity along the dorsal visual pathway” by Diego Mendoza-Halliday, Santiago Torres and Julio C Martinez-Trujillo in Nature Neuroscience. doi:10.1038/nn.3785

Image: The study is an important advance in brain mapping and opens the doors to further research in the area of short-term memory. The image shows two of the researchers reviewing data on a computer. Credit McGill University.

#neuroscience   #memory   #vision  ___

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2014-07-28 21:24:00 (0 comments, 8 reshares, 23 +1s)

Learning the Smell of Fear

Full article at http://goo.gl/etWcyF.

Babies can learn what to fear in the first days of life just by smelling the odor of their distressed mothers, new research suggests. And not just “natural” fears: If a mother experienced something before pregnancy that made her fear something specific, her baby will quickly learn to fear it too — through the odor she gives off when she feels fear.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: “Intergenerational transmission of emotional trauma through amygdala-dependent mother-to-infant transfer of specific fear” by Jacek Debiec and Regina Marie Sullivan in PNAS. doi:10.1073/pnas.1316740111

Image: Even when just the odor of the frightened mother was piped in to a chamber where baby rats were exposed to peppermint smell, the babies developed a fearof the sa... more »

Learning the Smell of Fear

Full article at http://goo.gl/etWcyF.

Babies can learn what to fear in the first days of life just by smelling the odor of their distressed mothers, new research suggests. And not just “natural” fears: If a mother experienced something before pregnancy that made her fear something specific, her baby will quickly learn to fear it too — through the odor she gives off when she feels fear.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: “Intergenerational transmission of emotional trauma through amygdala-dependent mother-to-infant transfer of specific fear” by Jacek Debiec and Regina Marie Sullivan in PNAS. doi:10.1073/pnas.1316740111

Image: Even when just the odor of the frightened mother was piped in to a chamber where baby rats were exposed to peppermint smell, the babies developed a fear of the same smell, and their blood cortisol levels rose when they smelled it. Credit University of Michigan.

#psychology   #fear   #learning  ___

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2014-07-28 20:55:15 (1 comments, 24 reshares, 57 +1s)

Memory Relies on Astrocytes, the Brain’s Lesser Known Cells

Full article at http://goo.gl/b1s6vT.

In a study published July 28 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Salk researchers report a new, unexpected strategy to turn down gamma oscillations, by disabling not neurons but astrocytes—cells types traditionally thought to provide more of a support role in the brain. In the process, the team showed that astrocytes, and the gamma oscillations they help shape, are critical for some forms of memory.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: “Astrocytes contribute to gamma oscillations and recognition memory” by Hosuk Sean Lee, Andrea Ghetti, António Pinto-Duarte, Xin Wang, Gustavo Dziewczapolski, Francesco Galimi, Salvador Huitron-Resendiz, Juan C. Piña-Crespo, Amanda J. Roberts, Inder M. Verma, Terrence J.Sejnowski... more »

Memory Relies on Astrocytes, the Brain’s Lesser Known Cells

Full article at http://goo.gl/b1s6vT.

In a study published July 28 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Salk researchers report a new, unexpected strategy to turn down gamma oscillations, by disabling not neurons but astrocytes—cells types traditionally thought to provide more of a support role in the brain. In the process, the team showed that astrocytes, and the gamma oscillations they help shape, are critical for some forms of memory.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: “Astrocytes contribute to gamma oscillations and recognition memory” by Hosuk Sean Lee, Andrea Ghetti, António Pinto-Duarte, Xin Wang, Gustavo Dziewczapolski, Francesco Galimi, Salvador Huitron-Resendiz, Juan C. Piña-Crespo, Amanda J. Roberts, Inder M. Verma, Terrence J. Sejnowski, and Stephen F. Heinemann in PNAS. doi:10.1073/pnas.1410893111

Image: The results were surprising, in part because astrocytes operate on a seconds- or longer timescale whereas neurons signal far faster, on the millisecond scale. Because of that slower speed, no one suspected astrocytes were involved in the high-speed brain activity needed to make quick decisions. Credit Salk Institute.___

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2014-07-28 19:31:29 (0 comments, 15 reshares, 33 +1s)

New Protein Structure Could Help Treat Alzheimer’s and Related Diseases

Full article at http://goo.gl/ICTex9.

University of Washington bioengineers have a designed a peptide structure that can stop the harmful changes of the body’s normal proteins into a state that’s linked to widespread diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and Lou Gehrig’s disease. The synthetic molecule blocks these proteins as they shift from their normal state into an abnormally folded form by targeting a toxic intermediate phase.

The research is in eLife. (full open access)

Research: “Designed α-sheet peptides inhibit amyloid formation by targeting toxic oligomers” by Gene Hopping, Jackson Kellock, Ravi Pratap Barnwal, Peter Law, James Bryers, Gabriele Varani, Byron Caughey, Valerie Daggett in eLife. doi:10.7554/eLife.01681(http://dx.doi.o... more »

New Protein Structure Could Help Treat Alzheimer’s and Related Diseases

Full article at http://goo.gl/ICTex9.

University of Washington bioengineers have a designed a peptide structure that can stop the harmful changes of the body’s normal proteins into a state that’s linked to widespread diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and Lou Gehrig’s disease. The synthetic molecule blocks these proteins as they shift from their normal state into an abnormally folded form by targeting a toxic intermediate phase.

The research is in eLife. (full open access)

Research: “Designed α-sheet peptides inhibit amyloid formation by targeting toxic oligomers” by Gene Hopping, Jackson Kellock, Ravi Pratap Barnwal, Peter Law, James Bryers, Gabriele Varani, Byron Caughey, Valerie Daggett in eLife. doi:10.7554/eLife.01681 (http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01681)

Image: In this diagram, a normal protein begins to convert into a toxic, intermediate state (above center). The UW’s compound can bind with the toxic species and neutralize it (below center), preventing amyloid fibrils from forming. Credit University of Washington.

#neurology   #genetics   #alzheimersdisease  ___

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2014-07-28 18:46:35 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 20 +1s)

Study Suggests Disruptive Effects of Anesthesia on Brain Cell Connections Are Temporary

Full article at http://goo.gl/mJD79Z.

A study of juvenile rat brain cells suggests that the effects of a commonly used anesthetic drug on the connections between brain cells are temporary.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: “Isoflurane Reversibly Destabilizes Hippocampal Dendritic Spines by an Actin-Dependent Mechanism” by Jimcy Platholi, Karl F. Herold, Hugh C. Hemmings, and Shelley Halpain in PLOS ONE. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102978 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102978)

Image: Hippocampal cells with neuron in green showing hundreds of the small protrusions known as dendritic spines. The dendrites of other dendrites are labeled in blue, and adjacent glial cells are shown in red. Credit BarbaraCal... more »

Study Suggests Disruptive Effects of Anesthesia on Brain Cell Connections Are Temporary

Full article at http://goo.gl/mJD79Z.

A study of juvenile rat brain cells suggests that the effects of a commonly used anesthetic drug on the connections between brain cells are temporary.

The research is in PLOS ONE. (full open access)

Research: “Isoflurane Reversibly Destabilizes Hippocampal Dendritic Spines by an Actin-Dependent Mechanism” by Jimcy Platholi, Karl F. Herold, Hugh C. Hemmings, and Shelley Halpain in PLOS ONE. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102978 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102978)

Image: Hippocampal cells with neuron in green showing hundreds of the small protrusions known as dendritic spines. The dendrites of other dendrites are labeled in blue, and adjacent glial cells are shown in red. Credit Barbara Calabrese.

#neuroscience  ___

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2014-07-27 23:42:11 (1 comments, 6 reshares, 29 +1s)

Scientists Find Six New Genetic Risk Factors for Parkinson’s

Full article at http://goo.gl/r7FbS7.

Using data from over 18,000 patients, scientists have identified more than two dozen genetic risk factors involved in Parkinson’s disease, including six that had not been previously reported. The study, published in Nature Genetics, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and led by scientists working in NIH laboratories.

The research is in Nature Genetics. (full access paywall)

Research: “Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson’s disease” by Mike A Nalls, Nathan Pankratz, Christina M Lill, Chuong B Do, Dena G Hernandez, Mohamad Saad, Anita L DeStefano, Eleanna Kara, Jose Bras, Manu Sharma, Claudia Schulte, Margaux F Keller, Sampath Arepalli, ChristopherLetson, C... more »

Scientists Find Six New Genetic Risk Factors for Parkinson’s

Full article at http://goo.gl/r7FbS7.

Using data from over 18,000 patients, scientists have identified more than two dozen genetic risk factors involved in Parkinson’s disease, including six that had not been previously reported. The study, published in Nature Genetics, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and led by scientists working in NIH laboratories.

The research is in Nature Genetics. (full access paywall)

Research: “Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson’s disease” by Mike A Nalls, Nathan Pankratz, Christina M Lill, Chuong B Do, Dena G Hernandez, Mohamad Saad, Anita L DeStefano, Eleanna Kara, Jose Bras, Manu Sharma, Claudia Schulte, Margaux F Keller, Sampath Arepalli, Christopher Letson, Connor Edsall, Hreinn Stefansson, Xinmin Liu, Hannah Pliner, Joseph H Lee, Rong Cheng, International Parkinson’s Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC), Parkinson’s Study Group (PSG) Parkinson’s Research: The Organized GENetics Initiative (PROGENI), 23andMe, GenePD, NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), Hussman Institute of Human Genomics (HIHG), The Ashkenazi Jewish Dataset Investigator, Cohorts for Health and Aging Research in Genetic Epidemiology (CHARGE), North American Brain Expression Consortium (NABEC), United Kingdom Brain Expression Consortium (UKBEC), Greek Parkinson’s Disease Consortium, Alzheimer Genetic Analysis Group, M Arfan Ikram, John P A Ioannidis, Georgios M Hadjigeorgiou, Joshua C Bis, Maria Martinez, Joel S Perlmutter, Alison Goate, Karen Marder, Brian Fiske, Margaret Sutherland, Georgia Xiromerisiou, Richard H Myers, Lorraine N Clark, Kari Stefansson, John A Hardy, Peter Heutink, Honglei Chen, Nicholas W Wood, Henry Houlden, Haydeh Payami, Alexis Brice, William K Scott, Thomas Gasser, Lars Bertram, Nicholas Eriksson, Tatiana Foroud and Andrew B Singleton in Nature Genetics. Published online July 27 2014 doi:10.1038/ng.3043

Image: Scientists used gene chips to help discover new genes that may be involved with Parkinson’s disease. Credit National Human Genome Research Institute.

#genetics   #parkinsonsdisease   #neurology  ___

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2014-07-27 23:09:53 (0 comments, 13 reshares, 45 +1s)

New Tools Help Neuroscientists Analyze Big Data

Full article at http://goo.gl/pvKBU1.

In an age of “big data,” a single computer cannot always find the solution a user wants. Computational tasks must instead be distributed across a cluster of computers that analyze a massive data set together. It’s how Facebook and Google mine your web history to present you with targeted ads, and how Amazon and Netflix recommend your next favorite book or movie. But big data is about more than just marketing.

The research is in Nature Methods. (full access paywall)

Research: “Light-sheet functional imaging in fictively behaving zebrafish” by Nikita Vladimirov, Yu Mu, Takashi Kawashima, Davis V Bennett, Chao-Tsung Yang, Loren L Looger, Philipp J Keller, Jeremy Freeman and Misha B Ahrens in Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3040

“Mapping brainactivity at... more »

New Tools Help Neuroscientists Analyze Big Data

Full article at http://goo.gl/pvKBU1.

In an age of “big data,” a single computer cannot always find the solution a user wants. Computational tasks must instead be distributed across a cluster of computers that analyze a massive data set together. It’s how Facebook and Google mine your web history to present you with targeted ads, and how Amazon and Netflix recommend your next favorite book or movie. But big data is about more than just marketing.

The research is in Nature Methods. (full access paywall)

Research: “Light-sheet functional imaging in fictively behaving zebrafish” by Nikita Vladimirov, Yu Mu, Takashi Kawashima, Davis V Bennett, Chao-Tsung Yang, Loren L Looger, Philipp J Keller, Jeremy Freeman and Misha B Ahrens in Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3040

“Mapping brain activity at scale with cluster computing” by Jeremy Freeman, Nikita Vladimirov, Takashi Kawashima, Yu Mu, Nicholas J Sofroniew, Davis V Bennett, Joshua Rosen, Chao-Tsung Yang, Loren L Looger and Misha B Ahrens in Nature Methods. doi:10.1038/nmeth.3041

Image: Techniques known as dimensionality reduction can help find patterns in the recorded activity of thousands of neurons. Rather than look at all responses at once, these methods find a smaller set of dimensions — in this case three — that capture as much structure in the data as possible. Each trace in these graphics represents the activity of the whole brain during a single presentation of a moving stimulus, and different versions of the analysis capture structure related either to the passage of time (left) or the direction of the motion (right). The raw data is the same in both cases, but the analyses finds different patterns. Credit Jeremy Freeman, Nikita Vladimirov, Takashi Kawashima, Yu Mu, Nicholas Sofroniew, Davis Bennett, Joshua Rosen, Chao-Tsung Yang, Loren Looger, Philipp Keller, Misha Ahrens.

#neuroscience   #technology   #bigdata  ___

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2014-07-27 22:16:37 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 15 +1s)

Neuroscience Event: The 28th Annual Symposium of The Protein Society

Detail available here http://goo.gl/m5Xlfl.

The 28th Annual Symposium of The Protein Society will be a nexus for scientists from all disciplines, and at all stages of career development, who share a common research interest in protein structure, function, dynamics, design and their implications with regard to human health. The Symposium is designed to facilitate the dissemination of protein-related knowledge outside the silos of discipline and sector, and features an outstanding line up of renowned speakers.

Event Detail: The symposium will be hosted at the Manchester Grand Hyatt, San Diego. The event runs between July 27 - 30 2014.

#neuroscience   #protsci2014   #scienceconferences  

Neuroscience Event: The 28th Annual Symposium of The Protein Society

Detail available here http://goo.gl/m5Xlfl.

The 28th Annual Symposium of The Protein Society will be a nexus for scientists from all disciplines, and at all stages of career development, who share a common research interest in protein structure, function, dynamics, design and their implications with regard to human health. The Symposium is designed to facilitate the dissemination of protein-related knowledge outside the silos of discipline and sector, and features an outstanding line up of renowned speakers.

Event Detail: The symposium will be hosted at the Manchester Grand Hyatt, San Diego. The event runs between July 27 - 30 2014.

#neuroscience   #protsci2014   #scienceconferences  ___

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2014-07-25 20:12:16 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 29 +1s)

Anti-Inflammatory Drug Can Prevent Neuron Loss in Parkinson’s Model

Full article at http://goo.gl/UJRpz0.

An experimental anti-inflammatory drug can protect vulnerable neurons and reduce motor deficits in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have shown.

The research is in Journal of Parkinson's Disease. (full access paywall)

Research: “Peripheral Administration of the Selective Inhibitor of Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) XPro1595 Attenuates Nigral Cell Loss and Glial Activation in 6-OHDA Hemiparkinsonian Rats” by Christopher J. Barnum, Xi Chen, Jaegwon Chung, Jianjun Chang, Martha Williams, Nelly Grigoryan, Raymond J. Tesi, and Malú G. Tansey in Journal of Parkinson’s Disease. doi:10.3233/JPD-140410

Image: An anti-inflammatory drug that interferes with tumornecrosis f... more »

Anti-Inflammatory Drug Can Prevent Neuron Loss in Parkinson’s Model

Full article at http://goo.gl/UJRpz0.

An experimental anti-inflammatory drug can protect vulnerable neurons and reduce motor deficits in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have shown.

The research is in Journal of Parkinson's Disease. (full access paywall)

Research: “Peripheral Administration of the Selective Inhibitor of Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) XPro1595 Attenuates Nigral Cell Loss and Glial Activation in 6-OHDA Hemiparkinsonian Rats” by Christopher J. Barnum, Xi Chen, Jaegwon Chung, Jianjun Chang, Martha Williams, Nelly Grigoryan, Raymond J. Tesi, and Malú G. Tansey in Journal of Parkinson’s Disease. doi:10.3233/JPD-140410

Image: An anti-inflammatory drug that interferes with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) may be able to slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease, results from an animal model of Parkinson’s suggest. Credit Emory.

#neurology   #parkinsonsdisease  ___

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2014-07-25 19:10:31 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 23 +1s)

Faster Fish Thanks to nMLF Neurons

Full article at http://goo.gl/QsLbRQ.

As we walk along a street, we can stroll at a leisurely pace, walk quickly, or run. The various leg movements needed to do this are controlled by special neuron bundles in the spinal cord. It is not quite clear how these central pattern generators know how quickly the legs are to be moved. An international team working with scientists from Harvard University and the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried has now discovered individual neurons in the brain of zebrafish larvae that control the animals’ swimming speed. Human movements are also controlled by central pattern generators. The results represent an important step in gaining a better understanding of how rhythmic movements are modulated.

The research is in Neuron. (full access paywall)

Research: “Neuralcon... more »

Faster Fish Thanks to nMLF Neurons

Full article at http://goo.gl/QsLbRQ.

As we walk along a street, we can stroll at a leisurely pace, walk quickly, or run. The various leg movements needed to do this are controlled by special neuron bundles in the spinal cord. It is not quite clear how these central pattern generators know how quickly the legs are to be moved. An international team working with scientists from Harvard University and the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried has now discovered individual neurons in the brain of zebrafish larvae that control the animals’ swimming speed. Human movements are also controlled by central pattern generators. The results represent an important step in gaining a better understanding of how rhythmic movements are modulated.

The research is in Neuron. (full access paywall)

Research: “Neural control and modulation of swimming speed in the larval zebrafish” by Kristen E. Severi, Ruben Portugues, João C. Marques, Donald M. O’Malley, Michael B. Orger, and Florian Engert in Neuron. doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2014.06.032

Image: Looking into the brain of a zebrafish larva. The neurons in the retina (green) send their signals from the eyes (yellow) to the brain. The cells linking the brain and spinal cord appear in red. Credit MPI of Neurobiology / Portugues.

#neuroscience  ___

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2014-07-24 22:18:04 (0 comments, 11 reshares, 38 +1s)

Brain’s Dynamic Duel Underlies Win-Win Choices

Full article at http://goo.gl/RbNqY1.

People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: “Neural correlates of dueling affective reactions to win–win choices” by Amitai Shenhav and Randy L. Buckner in PNAS. doi:10.1073/pnas.1405725111

Image: Positive and anxious feelings about making choices were associated with activity in different regions of the brain. Positive feelings correlated with activity in the lower parts of the striatum and the prefrontalcortex ... more »

Brain’s Dynamic Duel Underlies Win-Win Choices

Full article at http://goo.gl/RbNqY1.

People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

Research: “Neural correlates of dueling affective reactions to win–win choices” by Amitai Shenhav and Randy L. Buckner in PNAS. doi:10.1073/pnas.1405725111

Image: Positive and anxious feelings about making choices were associated with activity in different regions of the brain. Positive feelings correlated with activity in the lower parts of the striatum and the prefrontal cortex (green), while anxious feelings were correlated with the upper parts of these brain regions (red). Credit PNAS.

#neuroscience   #psychology  ___

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