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Shared Circles including Brendan Walters

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The Google+ Collections of Brendan Walters

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 6

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2013-09-24 05:26:09 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

On-point satire from Vaughan Bell. 
This complex and tragic event supports my own view http://wp.me/ptsTD-7cB "Due to the huge negative reaction this article has received, I would like to make some minor concession to my critics while accusing them of dishonesty and implying that they are to blame for innocent deaths. Clearly, we should be united by in the face of such terrible events and I am going to appeal to your emotions to emphasise that not standing behind my ideas suggests that you are against us as a country and a community."

Most reshares: 2

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2013-09-29 02:45:16 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Kitty cat tricked!

#cat 

Most plusones: 10

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2013-09-29 02:45:16 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Kitty cat tricked!

#cat 

Latest 50 posts

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2013-10-04 09:08:24 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Common Sense is Sometimes Wrong, and Research Is How We Figure That Out

Then more research can help figure out why, and that leads to better understanding of the world, in this case biomechanics and human health. Plus, as in this case, it can lead to further interesting questions, such as "does running help prevent arthritis?"

This finding provides a persuasive biomechanical explanation for why so few runners develop knee arthritis, said Ross Miller, now an assistant professor of kinesiology at the University of Maryland, who led the study. Measured over a particular distance, “running and walking are essentially indistinguishable,” in terms of the wear and tear they may inflict on knees.

Common Sense is Sometimes Wrong, and Research Is How We Figure That Out

Then more research can help figure out why, and that leads to better understanding of the world, in this case biomechanics and human health. Plus, as in this case, it can lead to further interesting questions, such as "does running help prevent arthritis?"

This finding provides a persuasive biomechanical explanation for why so few runners develop knee arthritis, said Ross Miller, now an assistant professor of kinesiology at the University of Maryland, who led the study. Measured over a particular distance, “running and walking are essentially indistinguishable,” in terms of the wear and tear they may inflict on knees.___

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2013-10-04 09:01:28 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Universal Health Care is a Critical Emergency Service

The mandate is a rough and inefficient solution to the political impossibility of a true single-payer system, but forcing someone to share the cost of universal health care (particularly emergency care which is unpredictable and can strike anyone) is like forcing them to pay for the police whether they get robbed this year or not . . . which they do, generally without complaining.

This story touches on two of the main reasons why universal health care is important (through whatever means) - without it, random events can financially ruin even a reasonably employed person, and after that financial ruin, the only care available is the least efficient and most expensive - emergency room visits when problems become acute enough, followed by not paying the bills. And for some problems, there's a very real risk of dying... more »

This is important.  Why Health Insurance is important.  Well, in USA anyway.  Most other countries are sane about shit like this.

http://www.kameronhurley.com/?p=13291___Universal Health Care is a Critical Emergency Service

The mandate is a rough and inefficient solution to the political impossibility of a true single-payer system, but forcing someone to share the cost of universal health care (particularly emergency care which is unpredictable and can strike anyone) is like forcing them to pay for the police whether they get robbed this year or not . . . which they do, generally without complaining.

This story touches on two of the main reasons why universal health care is important (through whatever means) - without it, random events can financially ruin even a reasonably employed person, and after that financial ruin, the only care available is the least efficient and most expensive - emergency room visits when problems become acute enough, followed by not paying the bills. And for some problems, there's a very real risk of dying anyway.

Getting everyone covered can head off stories like this one right when they start, potentially saving money and at the least cutting dramatically into the $40+ billion in "uncompensated care" given by hospitals (particularly emergency rooms) that helps drive up health care costs every year.

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2013-10-04 08:02:50 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

STEM Interview contest for young women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

Know any girls in 9-12th grades interested in STEM fields? There's a contest on involving interviewing successful women in STEM, for a chance to participate in a documentary on leading women in science.

Cool contest alert! ___STEM Interview contest for young women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

Know any girls in 9-12th grades interested in STEM fields? There's a contest on involving interviewing successful women in STEM, for a chance to participate in a documentary on leading women in science.

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2013-10-03 05:36:29 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

An Unusual View of Awesome Engineering In Action

All rocket footage is cool, but this narrated pad view is both interesting and informative even if you've seen tons of rocket-tracking or attached-to-rocket cams. The narrator explains the role of both the obvious (water deluge) and less obvious (special ablative white paint) protective systems, as well as commenting on engineering tidbits like the "dark" streaks coming from the engine bells, which are due to relatively cold gas being vented along the surface to insulate it (basically, keeping the rocket from melting its own nozzles).

Also, showing your daughter amazing and gorgeous engineering is an excellent parenting idea! The rocket goes "foomp!" ( Riding the Booster with enhanced sound ; shuttle booster-cam footage with enhanced sound, which is both beautiful and mesmerizing )

h/t +Yonatan... more »

This is power

Every now and then, I see a stream of facts about "top fuel racing in perspective."  It seems legitimate, and it's impressive, until you compare it to something that's a bit... grander.

In particular, it calls out that the dragsters are 8,000-10,000 hp, and consume about 11 gallons of fuel a second.

Well, this is power.

Saturn V primary stage produces 7.6 million pounds of thrust, consuming >28,000 lbs of fuel a second.

The primary stage was, by weight, about 95% fuel.

(inspired by +Aleatha Parker-Wood showing our daughter video clips of rockets and the Mars Explorers on YouTube)___An Unusual View of Awesome Engineering In Action

All rocket footage is cool, but this narrated pad view is both interesting and informative even if you've seen tons of rocket-tracking or attached-to-rocket cams. The narrator explains the role of both the obvious (water deluge) and less obvious (special ablative white paint) protective systems, as well as commenting on engineering tidbits like the "dark" streaks coming from the engine bells, which are due to relatively cold gas being vented along the surface to insulate it (basically, keeping the rocket from melting its own nozzles).

Also, showing your daughter amazing and gorgeous engineering is an excellent parenting idea! The rocket goes "foomp!" ( Riding the Booster with enhanced sound ; shuttle booster-cam footage with enhanced sound, which is both beautiful and mesmerizing )

h/t +Yonatan Zunger, who shares and has interesting things to say about all sorts of cool stuff, tech-related and otherwise.

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2013-10-03 03:35:19 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

The W3C continues to dig its own grave

Bowing to pressure for one form of DRM in the standard has opened the floodgates; everyone else who has clamored for protecting their chosen media type in the past (up to and including text) will now be inspired to press their case again. Plus, if this gets implemented, people are going to need to mod their browsers to retain control of their experience, and there will be plenty of interest in doing so, defeating the purpose of a standard. Looks like we have to turn to the WHATWG again.

Still, even if the W3C has made the wrong decision, that doesn't mean the Web will. The W3C has parted ways with the wider Web before: in the early 2000s, its choice to promote XHTML (an unpopular and restrictive variant of HTML) as the future led to Mozilla, Apple and Opera forming the independent WHATWG. It was WHATWG's vision of a dynamic,... more »

The W3C and its Director, Tim Berners-Lee, just overrode our objection to inclusion the playback of "protected content" as part of their HTML standards process. Here's why we think they're wrong—and the how it will damage the W3C as much as the idea of the open Web.___The W3C continues to dig its own grave

Bowing to pressure for one form of DRM in the standard has opened the floodgates; everyone else who has clamored for protecting their chosen media type in the past (up to and including text) will now be inspired to press their case again. Plus, if this gets implemented, people are going to need to mod their browsers to retain control of their experience, and there will be plenty of interest in doing so, defeating the purpose of a standard. Looks like we have to turn to the WHATWG again.

Still, even if the W3C has made the wrong decision, that doesn't mean the Web will. The W3C has parted ways with the wider Web before: in the early 2000s, its choice to promote XHTML (an unpopular and restrictive variant of HTML) as the future led to Mozilla, Apple and Opera forming the independent WHATWG. It was WHATWG's vision of a dynamic, application-oriented Web that won—so decisively, in fact, that the W3C later re-adopted it and made it the W3C's own HTML5 deliverable.

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2013-10-03 02:37:59 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

The only actual non-essentials I see are the ones causing this mess (who will of course always make sure THEY get paid . . .).

Beyond NASA, other poor choices of "non-essential" include aviation safety inspectors ( http://www.wired.com/autopia/2013/10/faa-inspectors-furloughed/ ), the FDA's food inspectors ( http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2013/10/01/shutdown-furlough-surprises/2901143/ ), and a variety of safety professionals . . .

People just don't know how much good nasa does. It is truly one of our national treasures. ___The only actual non-essentials I see are the ones causing this mess (who will of course always make sure THEY get paid . . .).

Beyond NASA, other poor choices of "non-essential" include aviation safety inspectors ( http://www.wired.com/autopia/2013/10/faa-inspectors-furloughed/ ), the FDA's food inspectors ( http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2013/10/01/shutdown-furlough-surprises/2901143/ ), and a variety of safety professionals . . .

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2013-10-03 00:01:32 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Ah good, I'm not the only one.

Ah good, I'm not the only one.___

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2013-10-02 21:41:33 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Great Science Museum Ads Intrigue and Educate

Some of these are quite clever in addition to being catchy and possibly informative. I like.

Great Science Museum Ads Intrigue and Educate

Some of these are quite clever in addition to being catchy and possibly informative. I like.___

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2013-10-02 20:43:53 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

An Analysis of the Root of the Shutdown

It has to do with politics internal to the Republican party and to an informal rule of action that has been developed over the past couple decades by both parties in the House, one that overemphasizes party action and makes major issues ripe for unnecessary deadlock even when sufficient votes to end said deadlock exist.

An Analysis of the Root of the Shutdown

It has to do with politics internal to the Republican party and to an informal rule of action that has been developed over the past couple decades by both parties in the House, one that overemphasizes party action and makes major issues ripe for unnecessary deadlock even when sufficient votes to end said deadlock exist.___

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2013-10-02 20:10:44 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

This is great - it seems that not only has student response to tech restriction been rapid, it has also been widespread. While many of them are probably just following recipes from friends, this is still the  direction that should be taken with tech in education - freedom to tinker is freedom to learn.

In the days since the story broke about the Indiana and California students’ “hacking” their iPads, the districts’ poor planning and preparation has been roundly criticized. But more important perhaps than pointing a finger at any one security or administrative issue here, we should recognize that the real failure may be more widespread and more insidious: a profound lack of vision about how students themselves could use—want to use—these new technologies to live and to learn at their fullest potential.

___This is great - it seems that not only has student response to tech restriction been rapid, it has also been widespread. While many of them are probably just following recipes from friends, this is still the  direction that should be taken with tech in education - freedom to tinker is freedom to learn.

In the days since the story broke about the Indiana and California students’ “hacking” their iPads, the districts’ poor planning and preparation has been roundly criticized. But more important perhaps than pointing a finger at any one security or administrative issue here, we should recognize that the real failure may be more widespread and more insidious: a profound lack of vision about how students themselves could use—want to use—these new technologies to live and to learn at their fullest potential.

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2013-10-02 19:29:19 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Sometimes, monarchies have lovely simple solutions to silly problems.

How cool!

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/10/01/australia-had-a-government-shutdown-once-it-ended-with-the-queen-firing-everyone-in-parliament/___Sometimes, monarchies have lovely simple solutions to silly problems.

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2013-10-01 05:40:25 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

A Model for Doing the Impossible in Human Health

Saw this a while ago and didn't read it. Just read it, and was impressed. While it was only a local experiment, it seems that they succeeded in eradicating "the world’s second leading cause of infectious blindness" in a population of over 120,000 where it had been pronounced unachievable, and on a very limited budget. The grassroots model they used could scale, and might eventually make this problem tractable on a global scale.

I know I saw this in my stream some time ago but now I can't find it, so h/t somebody :-/

A Model for Doing the Impossible in Human Health

Saw this a while ago and didn't read it. Just read it, and was impressed. While it was only a local experiment, it seems that they succeeded in eradicating "the world’s second leading cause of infectious blindness" in a population of over 120,000 where it had been pronounced unachievable, and on a very limited budget. The grassroots model they used could scale, and might eventually make this problem tractable on a global scale.

I know I saw this in my stream some time ago but now I can't find it, so h/t somebody :-/___

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2013-10-01 00:34:43 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

This is cute, and potentially helpful, so worth sharing. :-)

Hey you! Yes, you. This. This! This!!

This image is in response to the following request: Boggle, please tell me something encouraging. I'm feeling very depressed right now.
http://boggletheowl.tumblr.com/post/49366909092

Last week I shared an image about what anxiety feels like. Thankfully, +Patrick Hoolahan was able to find the source, and I am now totally enamored with this wonderful owl. I hope you will enjoy Boggle too.

But this post especially. It is especially special. Just like you!

Note: If you have us both circled, you may have been inundated with Boggle the Owl this week. I do not apologize, because Boggle is just that awesome. Moar Boggle!___This is cute, and potentially helpful, so worth sharing. :-)

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2013-10-01 00:00:14 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

This is one of the more amusing headlines on the development of a method to make "photon molecules", and while almost completely inaccurate, it stems from a quote by one of the scientists:

"It's not an in-apt analogy to compare this to light sabers," Lukin added. "When these photons interact with each other, they're pushing against and deflect each other. The physics of what's happening in these molecules is similar to what we see in the movies."

http://phys.org/news/2013-09-scientists-never-before-seen.html

Most of the properties of light we know about originate from the fact that photons are massless and do not interact," said Harvard university physics professor Mikhail Lukin. "What we have done is create a special type of medium in which photons interact with each other so strongly that they act as though they have mass, and bind together to form molecules. It's not an in-apt analogy to compare this to lightsabers. When these photons interact with each other, they're pushing against and deflect each other. The physics of what's happening in these molecules is similar to what we see in the movies."

Inexplicably, reports suggest that physicists have not yet begun the process of using the technology to build actual lightsaber-style weapons, nor have they perfected the THHHHHHWWWWOM! sound traditionally manifested when duelling Jedis do battle. 

#geekhumor   #scienceeveryday  ___This is one of the more amusing headlines on the development of a method to make "photon molecules", and while almost completely inaccurate, it stems from a quote by one of the scientists:

"It's not an in-apt analogy to compare this to light sabers," Lukin added. "When these photons interact with each other, they're pushing against and deflect each other. The physics of what's happening in these molecules is similar to what we see in the movies."

http://phys.org/news/2013-09-scientists-never-before-seen.html

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2013-09-30 23:14:10 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Thought I'd shared this ages ago, but apparently I did not. It came up again in a few things I read today. Sure, it's at least in part a cynical move by Acxiom to position themselves as part of the solution (particularly since now consumer-privacy legislation might be a way for Congress to deflect concerns about NSA spying without actually doing anything about it), but it's also interesting to be able to see a bit of what they have on you.

Of course it'd be better to see the data streams but there's no way they'd give really useful or method-revealing info out.

What does the data know about you?

Do with this as you wish, update, opt out, ignore, or otherwise. But Axiom is letting you see the results of the data they have on you. (Note: not the actual data that they use to make these guesses)

For more info: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/05/technology/acxiom-lets-consumers-see-data-it-collects.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

(Shared using #DoShare)___Thought I'd shared this ages ago, but apparently I did not. It came up again in a few things I read today. Sure, it's at least in part a cynical move by Acxiom to position themselves as part of the solution (particularly since now consumer-privacy legislation might be a way for Congress to deflect concerns about NSA spying without actually doing anything about it), but it's also interesting to be able to see a bit of what they have on you.

Of course it'd be better to see the data streams but there's no way they'd give really useful or method-revealing info out.

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2013-09-29 22:19:32 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

This is a rather large (and growing!) chart with to-scale pictures of all sorts of spacecraft from a wide range of SciFi, including Star Wars, Star Trek, Warhammer 40k, Firefly, Red Dwarf, Lexx, EVE Online, Halo, Alien, Dead Space, Wall-E, Spaceballs, Titan A.E., Wing Commander, Starcraft, Homeworld, BattleTech, Robotech, 2001, Freespace, Mass Effect, Babylon 5, Crusade, Battlestar Galactica ('78 and 2k3), a few anime shows, and more.

The picture preview doesn't work with this direct link to the full-size version:
http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/271/1/b/size_comparison___science_fiction_spaceships_by_dirkloechel-d6lfgdf.jpg

And relatedly, http://www.merzo.net/ is home to "STARSHIP DIMENSIONS - A Museum of Speculative Fiction inspired Spaceships", a huge collection of scaled ship models with detailed information on some key members and handy navigation by... more »

This is a rather large (and growing!) chart with to-scale pictures of all sorts of spacecraft from a wide range of SciFi, including Star Wars, Star Trek, Warhammer 40k, Firefly, Red Dwarf, Lexx, EVE Online, Halo, Alien, Dead Space, Wall-E, Spaceballs, Titan A.E., Wing Commander, Starcraft, Homeworld, BattleTech, Robotech, 2001, Freespace, Mass Effect, Babylon 5, Crusade, Battlestar Galactica ('78 and 2k3), a few anime shows, and more.

The picture preview doesn't work with this direct link to the full-size version:
http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/271/1/b/size_comparison___science_fiction_spaceships_by_dirkloechel-d6lfgdf.jpg

And relatedly, http://www.merzo.net/ is home to "STARSHIP DIMENSIONS - A Museum of Speculative Fiction inspired Spaceships", a huge collection of scaled ship models with detailed information on some key members and handy navigation by size. Also, the text there is real text so you can use "find" to look for your favorite ship on the appropriate page (and the scale goes from ~human to ringworld, so nothing should be left out for size reasons).

h/t +Liz Quilty and +Nes Anderson ___

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2013-09-29 05:58:38 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

I like this concept a great deal.

A petition we can all support.___I like this concept a great deal.

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2013-09-29 04:43:24 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

It's not just post-docs who are seriously underpaid

I knew that adjunct faculty were poorly paid, but this is worse than I thought. Apparently there is tremendous variation, as pointed out in this article about a project to collect and present data on adjunct pay nationwide: http://chronicle.com/article/Adjunct-Project-Shows-Wide/136439/

It's not just post-docs who are seriously underpaid

I knew that adjunct faculty were poorly paid, but this is worse than I thought. Apparently there is tremendous variation, as pointed out in this article about a project to collect and present data on adjunct pay nationwide: http://chronicle.com/article/Adjunct-Project-Shows-Wide/136439/___

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2013-09-29 04:29:49 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

This looks like a backpedal, but it's welcome

The fact that some users are reporting problems using the freedom they theoretically have supports the hypothesis that the original plan was for a real region-lock, just as it appeared to be from earlier communication.

It seems unlikely they'd not have made this clear up front if it were the initial plan, given the inevitable backlash.

Hopefully the lesson has been learned here both by Samsung and other players, and it'll be a while before we see the next round of attempted lock-down in Android devices.

This looks like a backpedal, but it's welcome

The fact that some users are reporting problems using the freedom they theoretically have supports the hypothesis that the original plan was for a real region-lock, just as it appeared to be from earlier communication.

It seems unlikely they'd not have made this clear up front if it were the initial plan, given the inevitable backlash.

Hopefully the lesson has been learned here both by Samsung and other players, and it'll be a while before we see the next round of attempted lock-down in Android devices.___

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2013-09-29 04:12:29 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

There seems to be quite a bit of focus on the Ctrl+Alt+Del comment in this interview, but there's a lot of interesting material in there, particularly about the Foundation and philanthropy.

(On C+A+D, personally I like that it's one-hand chordable and think sharing a command for all critical system-address stuff is smart . . . and a three key combo is harder to accidentally press and interrupt work than a single key [last commonly seen with SysRq on first-gen PC/AT 84-key keyboards] would be.)

h/t +fan tai, who posts all sorts of neat stuff, a lot of it tech-related.

There seems to be quite a bit of focus on the Ctrl+Alt+Del comment in this interview, but there's a lot of interesting material in there, particularly about the Foundation and philanthropy.

(On C+A+D, personally I like that it's one-hand chordable and think sharing a command for all critical system-address stuff is smart . . . and a three key combo is harder to accidentally press and interrupt work than a single key [last commonly seen with SysRq on first-gen PC/AT 84-key keyboards] would be.)

h/t +fan tai, who posts all sorts of neat stuff, a lot of it tech-related.___

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2013-09-29 03:02:41 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

I'm not sure I completely agree on all points, but I do agree with the overall message and I love they way they animated it. I particularly like the yoda bit.

I really don't know what to think about the Abrams choice at this point (not that my opinion ever mattered, even before it was set in stone). He's said some good things on the topic, and while I agree with the "one guy should not be doing both Star Trek and Star Wars" concept, he may be a better fit on the Star Wars side. We shall see.

Some excellent advice for J.J. Abrams before he locks in his plan for the renewed Star Wars universe.  And I agree with the points in this lovely little video!  

http://io9.com/a-beautifully-animated-open-letter-to-j-j-abrams-about-1397273170

Still, as you all probably know, my quibbles run a whole lot deeper, down at the level where the prequels actually betrayed the fundamental moral elements of the earlier trilogy!  Where they actually started conveying some truly vile messages. Or at least, that was my case as "prosecutor" in the fantastically fun (and wise!) volume STAR WARS ON TRIAL.  

http://www.davidbrin.com/starwarsontrial.html___I'm not sure I completely agree on all points, but I do agree with the overall message and I love they way they animated it. I particularly like the yoda bit.

I really don't know what to think about the Abrams choice at this point (not that my opinion ever mattered, even before it was set in stone). He's said some good things on the topic, and while I agree with the "one guy should not be doing both Star Trek and Star Wars" concept, he may be a better fit on the Star Wars side. We shall see.

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2013-09-29 02:45:16 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Huh, this is both cute and informative: this visual illusion works on (at least some) kitties too!

Caturday: it can haz educations too!

(Also, next time I have a color print job, this is getting added so I can repeat the experiment on our kitty. For science, of course!)

Kitty cat tricked!

#cat ___Huh, this is both cute and informative: this visual illusion works on (at least some) kitties too!

Caturday: it can haz educations too!

(Also, next time I have a color print job, this is getting added so I can repeat the experiment on our kitty. For science, of course!)

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2013-09-29 02:38:35 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

I sniffled.

Drama with a happy ending, for your Caturday enjoyment.

h/t +La Vergne Lestermeringolo Thatch, academic coach and mother of an awesome kid, both of which feature in many of her posts.

Trigger warning: hero at work saving a kitten from a fire.___I sniffled.

Drama with a happy ending, for your Caturday enjoyment.

h/t +La Vergne Lestermeringolo Thatch, academic coach and mother of an awesome kid, both of which feature in many of her posts.

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2013-09-28 21:55:02 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

A point that shouldn't have to be made but thanks to a variety of factors, it's now necessary.

“So if we say it’s virtually certain, that means it’s 99-100% likelihood that this observation is real.   Because the media often wants to treat this as a contentious issue, they want to show both sides, they actually get the impression there are two sides.  And in fact the reality is, there really isn’t another side to this.”

UIUC Climate Experts tell meteorologist Tom Skilling of their findings for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change- I.P.C.C. as it released its latest findings in Stockholm today.

Read more: http://wgntv.com/2013/09/26/tom-skilling-reports-on-climate-change/#ixzz2g9BWheHT___A point that shouldn't have to be made but thanks to a variety of factors, it's now necessary.

“So if we say it’s virtually certain, that means it’s 99-100% likelihood that this observation is real.   Because the media often wants to treat this as a contentious issue, they want to show both sides, they actually get the impression there are two sides.  And in fact the reality is, there really isn’t another side to this.”

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2013-09-25 10:13:35 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

I love these every year.

The deadline to turn in videos of dancing your PhD is October 1!

Time to turn in your "Dance Your PhD" video submissions! Can't wait to see this year's lot!___I love these every year.

The deadline to turn in videos of dancing your PhD is October 1!

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2013-09-25 09:16:37 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

This is shared less for the crypto paper (which, while cute, isn't particularly convincing, particularly when they focus on the single-iteration case wherein a known-plaintext attack defeats half of the algorithm trivially [flat images], something they fail to mention despite listing the attack as something crypto algorithms should resist) than for the fact that this is the verified account of +Erno Rubik , of Rubik's Cube fame. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ern%C5%91_Rubik )
He hasn't many followers yet and thus far mainly posts all sorts of neat Rubik's-and-other cube-related things.

h/t +Richard Green, a math professor who posts mainly on math, photography, and getting the most out of Google+, as well as regularly identifying Plussers who routinely engage with the community and are worth following.

Rubik's Cube and Image Encryption

Internet security is of great concern nowadays, especially after the recent headlines describing possible illegal activities by media sources and governments. To combat this intrusion on privacy, researchers are hard at work devising new encryption methods that provide the security users expect during online communication.

The "Rubik's Cube principle" forms the basis for a new encryption method for digital images described in a 2012 paper from researchers with Laval University in Canada.

This method repositions the pixels in a image by scrambling and rotating the pixels in a way similar to how one scrambles the Rubik's Cube, i.e., by rotating the cube to a new configuration.

The researchers discovered that this method achieves good encryption with perfect hiding ability and can defend well against a variety of cyber-attacks.

Article Info

Link: http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jece/2012/173931/

Journal: Journal of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 173931, 13 pages

Title: A Secure Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Rubik's Cube Principle

Authors: Khaled Loukhaoukha, Jean-Yves Chouinard, Abdellah Berdai
Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Laval University, QC, Canada

Abstract

In the past few years, several encryption algorithms based on chaotic systems have been proposed as means to protect digital images against cryptographic attacks. These encryption algorithms typically use relatively small key spaces and thus offer limited security, especially if they are one-dimensional. In this paper, we proposed a novel image encryption algorithm based on Rubik's cube principle. The original image is scrambled using the principle of Rubik's cube. Then, XOR operator is applied to rows and columns of the scrambled image using two secret keys. Finally, the experimental results and security analysis show that the proposed image encryption scheme not only can achieve good encryption and perfect hiding ability but also can resist exhaustive attack, statistical attack, and differential attack.
_________________

#rubikscube   #encryption     #internetsecurity  ___This is shared less for the crypto paper (which, while cute, isn't particularly convincing, particularly when they focus on the single-iteration case wherein a known-plaintext attack defeats half of the algorithm trivially [flat images], something they fail to mention despite listing the attack as something crypto algorithms should resist) than for the fact that this is the verified account of +Erno Rubik , of Rubik's Cube fame. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ern%C5%91_Rubik )
He hasn't many followers yet and thus far mainly posts all sorts of neat Rubik's-and-other cube-related things.

h/t +Richard Green, a math professor who posts mainly on math, photography, and getting the most out of Google+, as well as regularly identifying Plussers who routinely engage with the community and are worth following.

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2013-09-25 08:24:07 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

This looks pretty neat; I suspect the capabilities will be sufficiently inferior to pricier models that it won't exactly be a competitor, nor will all the purchasers ultimately be happy with it, but the price point is impressively low, and the design concept is cool. At worst, this is a way to get more people interested in and playing with 3D printing, even if many find they need to eventually invest more to get the results they want.

(And I'd love to be wrong on that! If this is as good as the pitch implies, that'd be great!)

There's an interesting discussion in the comments on the OP, on points including materials cost and some potential weaknesses in the design.

Sub $100 3d printer? Hooray!___This looks pretty neat; I suspect the capabilities will be sufficiently inferior to pricier models that it won't exactly be a competitor, nor will all the purchasers ultimately be happy with it, but the price point is impressively low, and the design concept is cool. At worst, this is a way to get more people interested in and playing with 3D printing, even if many find they need to eventually invest more to get the results they want.

(And I'd love to be wrong on that! If this is as good as the pitch implies, that'd be great!)

There's an interesting discussion in the comments on the OP, on points including materials cost and some potential weaknesses in the design.

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2013-09-25 07:38:52 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

It's unfortunate that they've deemed this necessary, but they seem to have data on their side - this is a principled move intended to reduce the polarizing effect of the existence of even a minority of asinine comments.

And because comments sections tend to be a grotesque reflection of the media culture surrounding them, the cynical work of undermining bedrock scientific doctrine is now being done beneath our own stories, within a website devoted to championing science.

It's a pity that this seems necessary, but I think they deserve kudos for doing it, given that it will likely cause at least a small drop in ad revenue (less discussion on-site == fewer and shorter visits).

However, there are good counter-arguments, including this article:
http://boundaryvision.com/2013/09/25/please-dont-blindly-follow-popscis-lead-and-get-rid-of-comment-spaces/
which... more »

Starting today, PopularScience.com will no longer accept comments on new articles. Here's why.___It's unfortunate that they've deemed this necessary, but they seem to have data on their side - this is a principled move intended to reduce the polarizing effect of the existence of even a minority of asinine comments.

And because comments sections tend to be a grotesque reflection of the media culture surrounding them, the cynical work of undermining bedrock scientific doctrine is now being done beneath our own stories, within a website devoted to championing science.

It's a pity that this seems necessary, but I think they deserve kudos for doing it, given that it will likely cause at least a small drop in ad revenue (less discussion on-site == fewer and shorter visits).

However, there are good counter-arguments, including this article:
http://boundaryvision.com/2013/09/25/please-dont-blindly-follow-popscis-lead-and-get-rid-of-comment-spaces/
which looks at the study used to justify the change, and argues that Popular Science mis-interpreted and exaggerated the results, and then goes on to highlight the tremendous value that can be found in comment sections.

I wonder whether forcing people to discuss science articles in smaller external communities rather than together on articles from major publications might also contribute to the problem of filter bubbles, since now those at the edges of science-denying communities will be likely to have greater immersion in their echo chambers and even less contact with experts.

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2013-09-24 18:45:23 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

There is evidence suggesting that happiness actually improves the odds of achieving success (in a variety of metrics). This is a fun little (far-too-small-for-statistical-significance) test of the impact of happiness on problem-solving ability, nicely presented and properly disclaimed.

h/t +Paula Rizzuto who posts all sorts of interesting things on a wide range of topics.

I love Soul Pancake. It's so much fun.___There is evidence suggesting that happiness actually improves the odds of achieving success (in a variety of metrics). This is a fun little (far-too-small-for-statistical-significance) test of the impact of happiness on problem-solving ability, nicely presented and properly disclaimed.

h/t +Paula Rizzuto who posts all sorts of interesting things on a wide range of topics.

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2013-09-24 17:42:34 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

This looks quite useful for all and could be particularly useful in really really important situations, i.e. the drafting of new constitutions.

The project itself can be found here:
https://www.constituteproject.org/

It's nicely presented and easy to browse.

h/t +Idrialis Castillo, who posts a wide variety of fascinating science/tech-related links.

Every year approximately five new constitutions are written, and 20-30 are amended or revised. A critical part of drafting a new constitution is referencing and comparing existing constitutional documents—but until now, these documents have been hard to access. With this in mind, +Google Ideas supported the Comparative Constitutions Project to build and launch Constitute (http://goo.gl/wj3iIO)—a new site that digitizes the world's constitutions and makes them searchable by anyone. ___This looks quite useful for all and could be particularly useful in really really important situations, i.e. the drafting of new constitutions.

The project itself can be found here:
https://www.constituteproject.org/

It's nicely presented and easy to browse.

h/t +Idrialis Castillo, who posts a wide variety of fascinating science/tech-related links.

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2013-09-24 17:31:18 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

There are a lot of good, very-needed reforms packaged into this one; it stands a chance of being quite useful even after getting the inevitable watering-down.

Following this one with interest!

In a new discussion draft, Rep. Bob Goodlatte introduces a promising new set of patent troll-killing reforms.___There are a lot of good, very-needed reforms packaged into this one; it stands a chance of being quite useful even after getting the inevitable watering-down.

Following this one with interest!

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2013-09-24 16:59:37 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Huh, looks like the peer review process might need a better source-verification layer. It isn't just the news industry that's having problems with story hijacking (see the recent iphone fingerprint sensor bounty mess).

Mystery over obesity ‘fraud’: Researcher baffled after his results appear in bogus paper. http://www.nature.com/news/mystery-over-obesity-fraud-1.13810___Huh, looks like the peer review process might need a better source-verification layer. It isn't just the news industry that's having problems with story hijacking (see the recent iphone fingerprint sensor bounty mess).

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2013-09-24 05:26:09 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

As a number of other re-sharers have commented . . . this article sounds quite familiar!

Also, check out the comments. Poe's Law ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poe's_law ) strikes by comment #2 and then recursively throughout the comment chain. As one might expect in this case, but still amusing for the rapidity and then frequency at which it applied.

On-point satire from Vaughan Bell. 
This complex and tragic event supports my own view http://wp.me/ptsTD-7cB "Due to the huge negative reaction this article has received, I would like to make some minor concession to my critics while accusing them of dishonesty and implying that they are to blame for innocent deaths. Clearly, we should be united by in the face of such terrible events and I am going to appeal to your emotions to emphasise that not standing behind my ideas suggests that you are against us as a country and a community."___As a number of other re-sharers have commented . . . this article sounds quite familiar!

Also, check out the comments. Poe's Law ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poe's_law ) strikes by comment #2 and then recursively throughout the comment chain. As one might expect in this case, but still amusing for the rapidity and then frequency at which it applied.

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2013-09-24 04:47:11 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

As he says: feathered dinosaurs (a.k.a. birds, see: http://xkcd.com/1211/ ) are friggin' hardcore.

Also, that's a cool shot, and quite lucky that the takedown happened in the right place to get picked up by an unrelated experiment.

Eagle Versus Bambi
For those Jurassic Park fanboys who still think "feathered dinosaurs aren't scary", check out this golden eagle attacking a deer. The below article also linked to a paper about golden eagle snatching up a bear cub. 
Feathered dinosaurs are friggin' hardcore.
h/t +Raven Amos 
#animalbehaviour   #predator   #birdofprey  ___As he says: feathered dinosaurs (a.k.a. birds, see: http://xkcd.com/1211/ ) are friggin' hardcore.

Also, that's a cool shot, and quite lucky that the takedown happened in the right place to get picked up by an unrelated experiment.

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2013-09-24 03:34:35 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Hey, did you know that back in the day, someone patented the idea of running ads before copyrighted content on the internet? Not any implementation, just the idea of what youtube, hulu and pretty much every other video site (among others) now does. It's kind of a poster child for terrible patents that should not have been granted and should probably be ruled "not patentable" as a class. The EFF has been working to get this particular problematic precedent removed for quite a while now.

EFF to the Supreme Court (again): It's time to rein in the worst of the bad patents.___Hey, did you know that back in the day, someone patented the idea of running ads before copyrighted content on the internet? Not any implementation, just the idea of what youtube, hulu and pretty much every other video site (among others) now does. It's kind of a poster child for terrible patents that should not have been granted and should probably be ruled "not patentable" as a class. The EFF has been working to get this particular problematic precedent removed for quite a while now.

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2013-09-19 03:46:55 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Yet another story about a small, ultraconservative parent group hijacking a school system. This time over profanity, in a book that actually treats that as a negative, and has a valuable, affirming message for teens (one wonders whether that is somehow the real reason for their opposition).

No surprise that this is the same county that made the news last year for their war on gay teens. (It spawned Michele Bachmann, no surprises there either.)


And that’s just it. Eleanor & Park isn’t some dystopian fantasy about a world where teenagers swear and are cruel to each other, and some kids have terrible parents. Teenagers swear and are cruel to each other. Some kids have terrible parents. Some girls have terrible stepdads who shout profanity at them and call them sluts – and some of those girls still manage to rise above it.
When these people call Eleanor & Park anobscene... more »

Yet another story about a small, ultraconservative parent group hijacking a school system. This time over profanity, in a book that actually treats that as a negative, and has a valuable, affirming message for teens (one wonders whether that is somehow the real reason for their opposition).

No surprise that this is the same county that made the news last year for their war on gay teens. (It spawned Michele Bachmann, no surprises there either.)


And that’s just it. Eleanor & Park isn’t some dystopian fantasy about a world where teenagers swear and are cruel to each other, and some kids have terrible parents. Teenagers swear and are cruel to each other. Some kids have terrible parents. Some girls have terrible stepdads who shout profanity at them and call them sluts – and some of those girls still manage to rise above it.
When these people call Eleanor & Park an obscene story, I feel like they’re saying that rising above your situation isn’t possible. That if you grow up in an ugly situation, your story isn’t even fit for good people’s ears. That ugly things cancel out everything beautiful.___

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2013-09-19 03:05:18 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

We need more of this!

And possibly legal fixes, because there are a lot of patent trolls out there, and plenty of target companies who can't afford to defend themselves.

___We need more of this!

And possibly legal fixes, because there are a lot of patent trolls out there, and plenty of target companies who can't afford to defend themselves.

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2013-09-18 21:17:49 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Treating Inmates Like People Reduces Re-Offender Rates

In the US, prisons are often called "corrections facilities" and the government agencies responsible for them are "Departments of Corrections" . . . but the primary focus often leans toward punishment and vengeance - they did something wrong, and should therefore be made to suffer.

This Norwegian prison is an example of actually implementing the concept of a "corrections facility" - they're trying to help offenders to fix themselves for the public good, and the results speak for themselves, with very low recidivism rates.

Certainly there exist people who need to be removed from society for extended periods of time or perhaps indefinitely, but for the vast majority of offenders, providing better treatment and job training would actually be in the interest of everyone else,b... more »

Interesting concept for prisons, i kind of like the idea after reading the article.___Treating Inmates Like People Reduces Re-Offender Rates

In the US, prisons are often called "corrections facilities" and the government agencies responsible for them are "Departments of Corrections" . . . but the primary focus often leans toward punishment and vengeance - they did something wrong, and should therefore be made to suffer.

This Norwegian prison is an example of actually implementing the concept of a "corrections facility" - they're trying to help offenders to fix themselves for the public good, and the results speak for themselves, with very low recidivism rates.

Certainly there exist people who need to be removed from society for extended periods of time or perhaps indefinitely, but for the vast majority of offenders, providing better treatment and job training would actually be in the interest of everyone else, because a gainfully employed ex-con can contribute to society and lower crime rates, whereas an angry one with no job skills or prospects is likely to repeat his mistakes, causing further harm in the process.

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2013-09-18 02:26:04 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

This is a worldwide problem. Plenty of folks love the results that science gives them, but they don't vote for politicians who care in the least about funding science, nor do they make any noise when science funding falls behind everything else. And it's not as though scientists are rolling in cash: as the article points out, "There are many NYC sanitation workers and subway conductors who make more than postdocs" (the people with 5-10 years of graduate training and experience who do most of the heavy lifting in academic research). People in academic science are sacrificing a lot to serve the public good, and the least those professing a love for their results can do is to support policies that support them.

If you loved science, you’d be voting based on candidates who want to increase funding for it.  You’d be making it an issue that actually gets debated in the media,that... more »

If You Love It, Put Some Fund In It
With Canadian scientists being censored (http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/sep/16/canadian-scientists-government-censorship) and the newly-elected Australian displaying complete apathy (or might even say contempt) for science (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-16/science-experts-question-new-cabinet/4961214), this post is more pertinent than ever. How many people who are fans of the "I Fucking Love Science" page or claim that they "Fucking Love Science" actually do so and vote accordingly?
#scienceeveryday   #sciencefunding  ___This is a worldwide problem. Plenty of folks love the results that science gives them, but they don't vote for politicians who care in the least about funding science, nor do they make any noise when science funding falls behind everything else. And it's not as though scientists are rolling in cash: as the article points out, "There are many NYC sanitation workers and subway conductors who make more than postdocs" (the people with 5-10 years of graduate training and experience who do most of the heavy lifting in academic research). People in academic science are sacrificing a lot to serve the public good, and the least those professing a love for their results can do is to support policies that support them.

If you loved science, you’d be voting based on candidates who want to increase funding for it.  You’d be making it an issue that actually gets debated in the media, that sees equal time with the wars we fight and the bills we pay our aging workforce.  These other things are priorities too, but if you think that science comes after these things, you’re dead wrong: science is the reason we’ve gotten so damned good at these things.

If you really love science, you’ll start making noise about this issue.  You’ll start asking why the US is shooting itself—and the world—in the foot, by putting science on the back burner.  We can spend as much as we want on other things, but in the end, if we’re not funding science, we’re moving backwards.

So show science some love.  For your sake, at the very least.

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2013-09-17 09:36:20 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Feynman's Lectures on Physics, free on the web
complete with clean, infinitely zoomable vector-graphics figures.

Another thing I thought I'd shared, lost to bad internet connection (I presume).

I've lost count of the number of people who have said that the Feynman Lectures got them through physics. In addition to making tremendous contributions on the frontiers of physics, Feynman was a skilled instructor with a knack for clearly explaining even complex topics in the simplest, most comprehensible manner.

note: if you get visible LaTeX notation in your text (e.g. \label{Eq:I:19:1} \FLPR_{\text{CM}}=\frac{\sum m_i\FLPr_i}{\sum m_i}. \end{equation} ), you need to permit scripts from caltech.edu and mathjax.org .


The Feynman Lectures on Physics series come to the web

In a massive project, Caltech brings the first volume of Richard Feynman's seminal lecture series to the web in a format suitable for pretty much any platform. Volume I brings us the topics of mechanics, radiation and heat. 

http://feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/___Feynman's Lectures on Physics, free on the web
complete with clean, infinitely zoomable vector-graphics figures.

Another thing I thought I'd shared, lost to bad internet connection (I presume).

I've lost count of the number of people who have said that the Feynman Lectures got them through physics. In addition to making tremendous contributions on the frontiers of physics, Feynman was a skilled instructor with a knack for clearly explaining even complex topics in the simplest, most comprehensible manner.

note: if you get visible LaTeX notation in your text (e.g. \label{Eq:I:19:1} \FLPR_{\text{CM}}=\frac{\sum m_i\FLPr_i}{\sum m_i}. \end{equation} ), you need to permit scripts from caltech.edu and mathjax.org .

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2013-09-17 08:37:29 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Those Who Sacrifice Liberty For Security Deserve Neither

(I disagree with Franklin in that I think even those foolish enough to make that tradeoff still deserve both rights; I think they won't receive them though.)

I'm a few days late on this, but I strongly agree with this sentiment:

As we mourn the terrible and tragic deaths of those who died on 9/11, we should reflect too on the loss of those rights that could have been avoided and can still be restored.

Veteran Boston journalist, David Boeri, reflects on the loss of freedoms that Americans have experienced in the aftermath of 9/11.___Those Who Sacrifice Liberty For Security Deserve Neither

(I disagree with Franklin in that I think even those foolish enough to make that tradeoff still deserve both rights; I think they won't receive them though.)

I'm a few days late on this, but I strongly agree with this sentiment:

As we mourn the terrible and tragic deaths of those who died on 9/11, we should reflect too on the loss of those rights that could have been avoided and can still be restored.

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2013-09-17 08:29:52 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

A Handy Guide to Spying-Limitation Bills in Congress

And the significant holes they do not cover, of course.

For now, here's a quick summary of the bills in Congress drafted after the June leaks that have a chance to go forward. They try to fix Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act, curtail the secret law being created by the surveillance court overseeing the spying (The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, or FISA Court), and change how the FISA Court operates. Unfortunately, there is no bill in Congress with prospects of moving forward that tackles Section 702 of FISA—the section used for PRISM.

The EFF has been keeping tabs on this issue since well before it was a widely acknowledged issue (e.g. https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/12/why-we-should-all-care-about-senates-vote-fisa-amendments-act-warrantless-domestic ); expect updates as bills get edited and/or newo... more »

There are over a dozen bills in Congress addressing the NSA spying. Here's EFF's guide about what they do: https://eff.org/r.c8b6___A Handy Guide to Spying-Limitation Bills in Congress

And the significant holes they do not cover, of course.

For now, here's a quick summary of the bills in Congress drafted after the June leaks that have a chance to go forward. They try to fix Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act, curtail the secret law being created by the surveillance court overseeing the spying (The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, or FISA Court), and change how the FISA Court operates. Unfortunately, there is no bill in Congress with prospects of moving forward that tackles Section 702 of FISA—the section used for PRISM.

The EFF has been keeping tabs on this issue since well before it was a widely acknowledged issue (e.g. https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/12/why-we-should-all-care-about-senates-vote-fisa-amendments-act-warrantless-domestic ); expect updates as bills get edited and/or new ones are introduced.

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2013-09-17 08:13:21 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

This is pretty and also pretty awesome.

I do look forward to a ride on this thing entering my price range. :-)

Video: take a ride on board the tail of SpaceShipTwo as +Virgin Galactic go over 1000mph http://virg.in/wvg___This is pretty and also pretty awesome.

I do look forward to a ride on this thing entering my price range. :-)

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2013-09-17 08:10:15 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

MRI of Neuronal Recovery after Low-Dose Methamphetamine Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

OK, this is really quite cool. Properly applied, many things can be useful, particularly those that are dangerously powerful. Turns out that (medically applied, extremely-low-dose) methamphetamine can assist in recovery from traumatic brain injury.

+h/t an awesome cyborg who limited-shared (and is thus mostly unnamed), and who made this clever point:
A metaphor: Methamphetamine is the botulism of the brain. Methamphetamine is neurotoxic and addictive, a very bad combination. But much like Botox, in small controlled doses it can be used for good. Some antidepressants metabolize into methamphetamine. Now its ability to remodel the brain may help TBI.

Disclaimer: Meth of the Breaking Bad variety is nasty stuff. I am not advocating anyone use it, ever.
... more »

MRI of Neuronal Recovery after Low-Dose Methamphetamine Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

OK, this is really quite cool. Properly applied, many things can be useful, particularly those that are dangerously powerful. Turns out that (medically applied, extremely-low-dose) methamphetamine can assist in recovery from traumatic brain injury.

+h/t an awesome cyborg who limited-shared (and is thus mostly unnamed), and who made this clever point:
A metaphor: Methamphetamine is the botulism of the brain. Methamphetamine is neurotoxic and addictive, a very bad combination. But much like Botox, in small controlled doses it can be used for good. Some antidepressants metabolize into methamphetamine. Now its ability to remodel the brain may help TBI.

Disclaimer: Meth of the Breaking Bad variety is nasty stuff. I am not advocating anyone use it, ever.

--------------------
fta:

Methamphetamine is a potent psychostimulant that alters the release and reuptake of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. Large doses of methamphetamine result in neuronal toxicity and the induction of cell death throughout the brain. However, low dose methamphetamine may be protective after oxygen glucose deprivation by decreasing excitatory synaptic potential, and prevents cell death by modulating cytokines and neurotrophic factors. Recently, in a lateral fluid percussion injury model of rat, low dose methamphetamine treatment at three hours after TBI significantly increased the presence of immature neurons, and reduced apoptotic cell death, as well as improved both behavioral and cognitive dysfunctions.

In summary, very low dose (a bolus injection of 0.42 mg/kg followed by an infusion of 0.05 mg/kg/hr for 24 hrs) methamphetamine treatment starting at 8 hours after TBI in rats did not significantly reduce lesion volume and brain atrophy, however, it did affect white matter structure and remodeling, and neurological function at 6 weeks after traumatic insult. In addition, MRI provided sensitive and insightful indices underlying this functional benefit.

#meth #neuroscience  ___

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2013-09-17 07:55:00 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

NPR story on the living gear

For reasons probably related to the awfulness of Time Warner Cable, a number of posts I though I'd made over the last week [at least] haven't actually appeared. So, here's a different article about the recent Science paper than the Popular Mechanics one that seems most prevalent on Google+ at the moment.

In particular, I prefer the electron micrograph in this article, as it gives a better impression of the gear structure. Furthermore, the header image demonstrates a demeshing and what appears to be a tooth mismatch at the top, which is interesting.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/environment/the-first-gear-discovered-in-nature-15916433
is the article most shared here, which does contain more information about the planthopper, particularly the interesting fact that this system goes away in the final molt, probably... more »

NPR story on the living gear

For reasons probably related to the awfulness of Time Warner Cable, a number of posts I though I'd made over the last week [at least] haven't actually appeared. So, here's a different article about the recent Science paper than the Popular Mechanics one that seems most prevalent on Google+ at the moment.

In particular, I prefer the electron micrograph in this article, as it gives a better impression of the gear structure. Furthermore, the header image demonstrates a demeshing and what appears to be a tooth mismatch at the top, which is interesting.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/environment/the-first-gear-discovered-in-nature-15916433
is the article most shared here, which does contain more information about the planthopper, particularly the interesting fact that this system goes away in the final molt, probably because gear breakage would be a huge issue once they can't replace them. (The fact that this mechanical system beats nervous system speeds significantly suggests that there would be no issues with adapting to a broken gear and having to re-adapt after molting - there does not appear to be any means by which to do so.)

Final note: http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/353208/description/Young_insect_legs_have_real_meshing_gears mentions another interesting mechanism: a screw-and-nut joint in a beetle.___

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2013-09-16 22:56:21 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

This is quite cool - a nice mix of clever choreography and editing, and excellent interplay between audio and visuals.

Go. Watch. Now.___This is quite cool - a nice mix of clever choreography and editing, and excellent interplay between audio and visuals.

2013-09-16 05:11:38 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Un-deletable YouTube Channels

https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/55759?hl=en

If you're using a Google+ profile (full name) identity on YouTube, you can't separately delete your YouTube channel. To remove your channel, you must delete your Google+ profile.

So, since I mis-clicked once and generated a Youtube channel while signed into G+, I can never delete it. Thanks ever so much. >:-(

Sure, there's nothing in it, but I really very much wanted as much YouTube stuff as possible to remain un-enabled. Now I have to keep an eye on more privacy settings, and I believe there used to be helpful pop-ups stopping action when I mis-clicked something on a YouTube page, although now I can't determine exactly what differences there may have been.

I'd love to just have a way to be signed out of G+ everywhere except on G+ itself... more »

Un-deletable YouTube Channels

https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/55759?hl=en

If you're using a Google+ profile (full name) identity on YouTube, you can't separately delete your YouTube channel. To remove your channel, you must delete your Google+ profile.

So, since I mis-clicked once and generated a Youtube channel while signed into G+, I can never delete it. Thanks ever so much. >:-(

Sure, there's nothing in it, but I really very much wanted as much YouTube stuff as possible to remain un-enabled. Now I have to keep an eye on more privacy settings, and I believe there used to be helpful pop-ups stopping action when I mis-clicked something on a YouTube page, although now I can't determine exactly what differences there may have been.

I'd love to just have a way to be signed out of G+ everywhere except on G+ itself without having to run separate browser instances, which can be a hassle to keep track of (particularly given the number of links I launch from G+ posts).___

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2013-09-13 17:30:34 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

The little space probe that could

Fast and long-lived, these guys are pretty cool.

NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft officially is the first human-made object to venture into interstellar space. The 36-year-old probe is about 12 billion miles (19 billion kilometers) from our sun. 

New and unexpected data indicate Voyager 1 has been traveling for about one year through plasma, or ionized gas, present in the space between stars. Voyager is in a transitional region immediately outside the solar bubble, where some effects from our sun are still evident. A report on the analysis of this new data, an effort led by Don Gurnett and the plasma wave science team at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, is published in Thursday's edition of the journal Science. 

Voyager 1 and its twin, Voyager 2, were launched 16 days apart in 1977. Both spacecraft flew by Jupiter and Saturn. Voyager 2 also flew by Uranus and Neptune. Voyager 2, launched before Voyager 1, is the longest continuously operated spacecraft. It is about 9.5 billion miles (15 billion kilometers) away from our sun. 

Scientists do not know when Voyager 1 will reach the undisturbed part of interstellar space where there is no influence from our sun. They also are not certain when Voyager 2 is expected to cross into interstellar space, but they believe it is not very far behind.

For a sound file of the oscillations detected by Voyager in interstellar space, animations and other information, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager

What's YOUR #MessageToVoyager?

Read more:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-277

#NASA   #Penny4NASA   #Voyager  ___The little space probe that could

Fast and long-lived, these guys are pretty cool.

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2013-09-13 06:23:18 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Putin's NYT Op-Ed, helpfully annotated

Also, not behind a paywall. I'm a bit surprised that the original is, as I'd have thought they could have (and would have) paid to prevent that. I suppose that there was no need, since they also released the text widely elsewhere.

Nothing surprising here, although I find their analysis of the closing part (possibly a Putin signature, indicating that he was at least very involved in the writing) particularly interesting.

#Syria   #Putin   #NYT  

Putin's NYT Op-Ed, helpfully annotated

Also, not behind a paywall. I'm a bit surprised that the original is, as I'd have thought they could have (and would have) paid to prevent that. I suppose that there was no need, since they also released the text widely elsewhere.

Nothing surprising here, although I find their analysis of the closing part (possibly a Putin signature, indicating that he was at least very involved in the writing) particularly interesting.

#Syria   #Putin   #NYT  ___

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2013-09-11 18:41:22 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Apple does seem to have a timing problem . . .

I must admit that I like the idea of not having to type my password in every time I unlock my phone... but, well... before Snowdon's leaks I'd have taken this sort of thing as all rather silly... surely Apple wouldn't synchronise your fingerprint from your device to 'the cloud'.. right?   #prism    ___Apple does seem to have a timing problem . . .

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