Login now

Not your profile? Login and get free access to your reports and analysis.

Tags

Sign in

No tag added here yet.
You can login on CircleCount to add some tags here.

Are you missing a tag in the list of available tags? You can suggest new tags here.

Login now

Do you want to see a more detailed chart? Check your settings and define your favorite chart type.

Or click here to get the detailed chart only once.

Andreas Schou has been at 1 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Nicholas Kristof1,382,013The issue of the moment is Syria, so I'm delighted to host a Google+ hangout in which we'll be able to pose questions to Secretary of State John Kerry about Syria policy. I'll be joined by +Lara Setrakian, a journalist whom I've long admired who specializes in Syria. Andrew Beiter, a social studies  teacher and a regional education coordinator for the Holocaust Memorial Museum, will also be in the Hangout. Most of all, we'll be joined by all of you--so jump into the conversation on this page and leave us your questions. In particular, with this Hangout we want to involve teachers and students, so spread the word in the schools, please, and student questions are particularly welcome!This kind of online interview is something of an experiment, and we're still figuring out how to make it work best. So we also welcome your suggestions and guidance before and criticisms after. Syria: Weighing the U.S. Response2013-09-10 20:00:006991 

Andreas Schou has been shared in 76 public circles

You can see here the 50 latest shared circles.
If this is your profile, you can check your dashboard to see all shared circles you have been included.

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Eduard Dimitrov3,781Start of my "Google must be better place campaign". Week one: This post. People currently working for Google. 114 Google's Google+  profiles to add - people actually working for Google  company.Week 2: Shared circle two: More 100 Google employees next week.Week 3: I will show you how to work with google webspam team to aviod problems in Google Webmaster Tools - the right way, tools and tactics.Week 4: Ethics of non-natural links problems in GWT and communication with google webspam team  in Google Webmaster Tools.If you want to receive notifications from me, add me in separate circle and switch on notifications for this circle.Happy Holidays!  #worksatgoogle #googleteam #googleemployees2014-12-23 14:29:07114011
Sunny CT2,281Increase your following with our Amazing CirclesNext circles to include only those resharing thisEven if you are included in this circle,  Add me, +1 , comment and share this to be included in next 2 circles (after 12 Hours)Want to grow your follower list? Need more followers? Join my circles now To be added to the Circle you have to do these simple steps: 1 - include me in your circles 2 - Click add people and create your circle 3 - share the circle (include yourself) 4 - add +1 to the post(Comment on the original post so that I know you have shared)#powercircle #sharedcircle #topsharedcircle #circleoftheday #sharedcircle #trustinme #circlesharing #circleshare #circles #circleoftheday #sharedpubliccircles #sharedcircles #share #vipsnowballcircle #sharedcircleoftheday #sharewithyou #followme #followers #followback #circle #googleplus #coolpeople #circleshare #sharedcircles #sharedcircle #sharedcircles #sharedpubliccircles #circleshare #circlesharing #fullcircleshare #powercircle #sharedcircle 2014-09-15 09:05:4950111313
Sunny CT1,994Fresh AdditionIncrease your following with our Amazing CirclesNext circles to include only those resharing thisEven if you are included in this circle,  Add me, +1 , comment and share this to be included in next 2 circles (after 12 Hours)Want to grow your follower list? Need more followers? Join my circles now To be added to the Circle you have to do these simple steps: 1 - include me in your circles 2 - Click add people and create your circle 3 - share the circle (include yourself) 4 - add +1 to the post(Comment on the original post so that I know you have shared)#powercircle #sharedcircle #topsharedcircle #circleoftheday #sharedcircle #trustinme #circlesharing #circleshare #circles #circleoftheday #sharedpubliccircles #sharedcircles #share #vipsnowballcircle #sharedcircleoftheday #sharewithyou #followme #followers #followback #circle #googleplus #coolpeople #circleshare #sharedcircles #sharedcircle #sharedcircles #sharedpubliccircles #circleshare #circlesharing #fullcircleshare #powercircle #sha2014-09-12 13:14:5050111415
Sunny CT1,994Fresh AdditionIncrease your following with our Amazing CirclesNext circles to include only those resharing thisEven if you are included in this circle,  Add me, +1 , comment and share this to be included in next 2 circles (after 12 Hours)Want to grow your follower list? Need more followers? Join my circles now To be added to the Circle you have to do these simple steps: 1 - include me in your circles 2 - Click add people and create your circle 3 - share the circle (include yourself) 4 - add +1 to the post(Comment on the original post so that I know you have shared)#powercircle #sharedcircle #topsharedcircle #circleoftheday #sharedcircle #trustinme #circlesharing #circleshare #circles #circleoftheday #sharedpubliccircles #sharedcircles #share #vipsnowballcircle #sharedcircleoftheday #sharewithyou #followme #followers #followback #circle #googleplus #coolpeople #circleshare #sharedcircles #sharedcircle #sharedcircles #sharedpubliccircles #circleshare #circlesharing #fullcircleshare #powercircle #sha2014-09-12 07:07:225017313
Colin Wilson56Increase your following with our Amazing CirclesThis is a super Circle and in it I put together a group of really interesting and active people on Google Plus to add in your circles.If you want to be added to the next Circle you have to do these simple steps:1 - Include me in your circles 2 - Share the circle (Publicly) 3 - Add +1 to the post #circles #shared #share #add #friends #circle #share #sharecircle #circleshare2014-09-08 06:25:20459111619
Becky Collins13,434Mobile Operator Circle:Circle of very #social #engagerspeople and companiesTo be included in my shares (#sharedcircle), be so kind to:1 - Do +1 t the post2 - Comment the post and specify your "category" (job or interest) Ex: Fashion, SEO, Companies, Social Media Marketing, Sailing, Photography, Bloggers/Writers, Web graphics and design, Italy, Artists, Sport, Finance/Economy ...3 - include the circle among your circles4 - share the circle (include yourself)Improve your popularity, be social be cool !Keep yourself updated, enjoy the Shared Circles Hellenic Alliance, you can share your shared circles inside the upcoming Community:https://plus.google.com/communities/112552559573595396104  #socialmedia  #media  #circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing  #circlecircle   #beckyscircle   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles  #sharedcircleoftheday  +Becky Collins ?2014-07-24 05:16:124763112
Maria Morisot31,837Moan Lisa's All Kinds of People Shared Circle06 June, 2014RESHARE if you want to be includedmoanlisa.org2014-06-06 14:31:022928274100
Becky Collins10,282Mobile Circle :Circle of very #social #engagerspeople and companiesTo be included in my shares (#sharedcircle), be so kind to:1 - Do +1 t the post2 - Comment the post and specify your "category" (job or interest) Ex: Fashion, SEO, Companies, Social Media Marketing, Sailing, Photography, Bloggers/Writers, Web graphics and design, Italy, Artists, Sport, Finance/Economy ...3 - include the circle among your circles4 - share the circle (include yourself)Improve your popularity, be social be cool !Keep yourself updated, enjoy the Shared Circles Hellenic Alliance, you can share your shared circles inside the upcoming Community:https://plus.google.com/communities/112552559573595396104  #socialmedia   #media   #circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlecircle   #beckyscircle   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday  +Becky Collins ?2014-05-28 05:03:174777219
Irina Sadokhina19,423Hello my dear friends!!!This is my weekly #mondaycircle   . This #circle    is very important for me because there are people who were with me last time, commented my funny pics, and just made me happy. Also, there are people who RE-shared my last #mondaycircle  . Thank you so much for this!!! And I would like to ask you Re-share this awesome circle  on your stream, please. If you wanna be included in my next #mondaycircle   . Apr. 21st, just:1) plus2)re-share!!!Thank you. You all have a wonderful week.Make sure you share the original version! #circle   #circles   #circlecirclecircle   #circlescirclescircles   #circleshare   #hyperball   #plusmastermind   #crazycircles   #circleoftheweek  2014-04-14 16:53:094558052121
Irina Sadokhina18,499Hello my dear friends!!!This is my weekly #mondaycircle  . This #circle is very important for me because there are people who were with me last time, commented my funny pics, and just made me happy. Also, there are people who RE-shared my last #mondaycircle  . Thank you so much for this!!! And I would like to ask you Re-share this awesome circle  on your stream, please. If you wanna be included in my next #mondaycircle   . Apr. 14th, just:1) plus2)re-share!!!Thank you. You all have a wonderful week.Make sure you share the original version! #circle   #circleshare   #circlescirclescircles   #circlecircle   #circlecirclecircle   #circles   #hyperball   #plusmastermind   #crazycircles  2014-04-08 12:47:424927248106
Irina Sadokhina17,311Hello my dear friends!!!This is my weekly #mondaycircle  . This #circle   is very important for me because there are people who were with me last time, commented my funny pics, and just made me happy. Also, there are people who RE-shared my last #mondaycircle  . Thank you so much for this!!! And I would like to ask you Re-share this awesome circle  on your stream, please. If you wanna be included in my next #mondaycircle . Apr. 7th, just:1) plus2)re-share!!!Thank you. You all have a wonderful week.Make sure you share the original version! #circle   #circlecirclecircle   #circles   #circlescirclescircles   #circleshared   #crazycircles   #hyperball   #plusmastermind   #circleoftheweek  2014-03-31 18:07:204536655108
Irina Sadokhina16,720Hello my dear friends!!! This is my weekly #mondaycircle  . This #circle   is very important for me because there are people who were with me last time, commented my funny pics, and just made me happy. Also, there are people who RE-shared my last mondaycircle . Thank you so much for this!!! And I would like to ask you Re-share this awesome circle    on your stream, please. If you wanna be included in my next  #mondaycircle   , March 31st. just:1) plus2)re-share!!!Thank you. You all have a wonderful week.Make sure you share the original version! #circle   #circles   #circlecirclecircle   #circlecirclecircle   #circlescirclescircles   #hyperball   #crazycircles   #plusmastermind   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circleoftheweek   #circleoftheday  2014-03-24 18:59:534707753123
Irina Sadokhina15,346Hello my dear friends!!!HELLO! This is my weekly  #mondaycircle . This  #circle   is very important for me because there are people who were with me last time, commented my funny pics, and just made me happy. Also, there are people who RE-shared my last  #mondaycircle . Thank you so much for this!!! And I would like to ask you Re-share this awesome  #circle   on your stream, please. If you wanna be included in my next  #mondaycircle   , March 17th just:1) plus2)re-share!!!Thank you. You all have a wonderful week.Make sure you share the original version! #circle   #circles   #circlecircle   #circlescirclescircles   #hyperball   #rustyball   #crazycircles   #plusmastermind  2014-03-11 16:53:09467664993
Константин Вишневский44,825Circle of the Most Active Users of Google+A Very Social CircleКруг наиболее активных пользователей Google+Если вы поделились этим кругом вчера, вы находитесь в нем сегодня. Если вы разделяете его с друзьями сегодня, вы будете в нем и завтра.If you shared this circle yesterday, you are in it today. If you share today, you'll be in tomorrow2014-02-12 15:12:36462483276
Mikhail Petrovsky64,592Good morning / evening to all.This is a Social Circle of interesting people with an active lifestyle in Google+Это социальный круг общения интересных людей с активной жизненной позицией в Google+You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Вам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!#EarthMyMother #ForFriends #photo2014-02-07 07:45:58497543383
Mikhail Petrovsky76,199Good morning / evening to all.This is a Social Circle of interesting people with an active lifestyle in Google+Это социальный круг общения интересных людей с активной жизненной позицией в Google+You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Вам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!#EarthMyMother #ForFriends #photo2014-01-15 08:21:34499531881
Mikhail Petrovsky61,999Good morning / evening to all.This is a Social Circle of interesting people with an active lifestyle in Google+Это социальный круг общения интересных людей с активной жизненной позицией в Google+You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Вам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!#EarthMyMother #ForFriends #photo2014-01-14 04:50:25498451577
Artur Mashnich43,991A Very Social CircleCircle of the Most Active Users of Google+Круг наиболее активных пользователей Google+Если вы поделились этим кругом вчера, вы находитесь в нем сегодня. Если вы разделяете его с друзьями сегодня, вы будете в нем и завтра.If you shared this circle yesterday, you are in it today. If you share today, you'll be in tomorrow.#Forfriends  2014-01-11 14:37:57478411671
Mikhail Petrovsky61,336Good morning / evening to all. You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Вам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!Это социальный круг / This social circle #EarthMyMother #ForFriends #photo2014-01-09 04:51:54498392268
Mikhail Petrovsky59,714This is a Social Circle of interesting people with an active lifestyle in Google+Это социальный круг общения интересных людей с активной жизненной позицией в Google+You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Вам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!#EarthMyMother #ForFriends #photo2013-12-29 11:29:4447830959
Mikhail Petrovsky73,777This is a Social Circle of interesting people with an active lifestyle in Google+Это социальный круг общения интересных людей с активной жизненной позицией в Google+You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Вам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!#EarthMyMother #ForFriends #photo2013-12-29 11:02:20500341261
Константин Вишневский39,554Circle of people, with active life position in Google+Simple To be added PLUS the post Share the post and Add the circle. Once you have done this let me know in the commentsКруг людей с активной жизненной позицией в Гугле+Просто быть добавлены PLUS сообщению Share пост и добавить круг. После того как вы сделали это, дайте мне знать в комментарияхIf you agree that this is a great circle, please re-share!2013-12-29 06:03:17464422473
Vladimir Samsonov23,289Good morning/evening to all. You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Вам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!Это социальный круг This is a Social Circle#ForFriends #photo #EarthMyMother2013-12-05 12:35:51501533078
Константин Вишневский35,785Circle of people, with active life position in Google+Simple To be added PLUS the post Share the post and Add the circle. Once you have done this let me know in the commentsКруг людей с активной жизненной позицией в Гугле+Просто быть добавлены PLUS сообщению Share пост и добавить круг. После того как вы сделали это, дайте мне знать в комментарияхIf you agree that this is a great circle, please re-share!#ForFriends #photo #EarthMyMother2013-11-24 15:07:31464412067
Jan Havrda20,092Deep Thinkers.2013-11-15 00:06:31141216
Matteo Pelucchi3,024Circle of #topengagers  1. Plus this post. (Original post)2. Comment on this post.3. Reshare this circle publically to your stream.4. Don’t be a blue head.Have a wonderful Wednesday increasing your #popularityTnks to +Alessandro Folghera and +Rusty Ferguson  #tuesdaysharedcircle   #topsharedcircle   #circleoftheday   #sharedcircle #trustinme  #circlesharing   #circleshare        #circles        #circleoftheday   #sharedpubliccircles     #sharedcircles    #share  #vipsnowballcircle #sharedcircleoftheday        #sharewithyou        #circlefriday   #circlethursday  #followme     #followers #followback#circle #googleplus    #coolpeople  #circleshare #sharedcircles     #sharedcircle  #sharedcircles       #sharedpubliccircles    #circleshare    2013-09-11 07:31:19397441745
Alessandro Folghera12,080Another special #sharedcircle  to be added among your circlesTo be included in my shares (#sharedcircles), be so kind to:1 - Do +1 t the post2 - Comment the post and specify your "category" (job or interest)      (ex: fashion, photography, seo, social media marketing)3 - include the circle among your circles4 - share the circle (include yourself)If you come accross Google error messages, incorporating my circles, please provide me the error, I'm classifying these errors. Have a wonderful weekend and a better popularityKeep yourself updated, enjoy the Shared Circles Hellenic Alliance, you can share your shared circles inside the upcoming Community:https://plus.google.com/communities/112552559573595396104   #saturdaysharedcircle   #topsharedcircle   #circleoftheday   #sharedcircle #trustinme  #circlesharing   #circleshare        #circles        #circleoftheday   #sharedpubliccircles     #sharedcircles    #share  #vipsnowballcircle #sharedcircleoftheday        #sharewithyou         #followme     #followers #followback #circle #googleplus    #coolpeople  #circleshare #sharedcircles #afo #myseoissocial     #sharedcircle  #sharedcircles       #sharedpubliccircles    2013-09-07 15:52:43397351953
Richard Green25,294Engagers Showcase Circle, September 5 2013If you received a notification, it means that you are included in my Engagers Showcase Circle. “Showcase” means that you are invited to leave a comment (on the original post) with a link to one of your own posts, which ideally should be one of your best recent posts.This circle consists of people who have engaged with one of my recent posts in the form of +1s, comments and reshares. Because I ran out of room, some of the engagers on very recent posts will be included next time.As always, reshares are appreciated, and I look forward to seeing everyone's links. Thanks for reading my posts!2013-09-06 01:37:50501254124248
Brian Wolfe22,328I haven't shared a circle in a long time. Maybe too long.Anyways.. Here is the circle that my browser spends the most time on.   Just in case I become a petulant child and walk away (not that I'm planning on doing so , just in case.)2013-08-22 05:36:251941335
Daniel Mihai Popescu4,968A circle based on +Richard Green's last creation! Add it to yours, share it! They all have some wonderful spark in them!If you're notified, you're in! Sorry to disturb you with the notification! If you want out, just say so :)2013-06-19 09:59:4539032732
Steven Krohn1,616The Popular Choice Circle________________________Richard Green originally shared:Here's version 2 of my Popular Choice circle. The members of this circle were nominated for inclusion here (http://goo.gl/vY07d). Anecdotal evidence suggests that this circle is a pretty good one to add: after the last share, somebody that I follow made the comment:I have to admit I have never had so many people add me back so shortly after adding a shared circle.As guest members of the circle this time, I'm including everyone who has created a circle with me in it in the last four weeks, including +Chris Cota, +Steven Krohn, +Marlo Angelo Tito, +Leo Walsh, +Cesare Riccardo, +Michael Bennett, +1212Scenery, +Daniel Mihai Popescu, +Gai Xinh, +Mithu Hassan, +Daniel Stock, +Marino Puletti, +Christy Sandhoff, +Johnathan Yesson, +Roleta Anedotas, +Linda Dee, +Mariusz Zapart, +César Bustíos Benites, +Andrea Orselli, +Katherine Vucicevic, +Networx, +Rome Heels, +Thumb up your Followers ►, +AyJay Schibig, +Zbynek Kysela, +Ewart Corrigan, +Hamilton Carter, +Don Dobbie, +Brian Buckley, +Wajahat Khan, +Crazy Circles, +Laurent Jean Philippe, +Maria Leoni and +Wolfgang Wodeck.  I'd especially like to thank +Scott Buehler, +Ludovic Moreeuw and +Science on Google+: A Public Database for including me in some particularly exciting circles: the Hyperball, the VIIP Circle and the Smokin' Science Circle, respectively.And now the surprise feature: I invite everyone to leave a comment on (the original post of) this circle share containing a link to one of your own posts. Ideally, this should be something that you posted recently and that you are particularly pleased with. (Don't post spam though; I will delete it.)2013-06-18 14:06:1838425937
Daniel Mihai Popescu4,802I have added version 2 of +Richard Green's  Popular Choice, re-freshed with my nucleus of Invincible circle and brushed of inactive accounts :)If you are notified, you're in, of course :)Thank you for sharing!2013-06-17 10:29:4338924937
Richard Green16,268Here's version 2 of my Popular Choice circle. The members of this circle were nominated for inclusion here (http://goo.gl/vY07d). Anecdotal evidence suggests that this circle is a pretty good one to add: after the last share, somebody that I follow made the comment:I have to admit I have never had so many people add me back so shortly after adding a shared circle.As guest members of the circle this time, I'm including everyone who has created a circle with me in it in the last four weeks, including +Chris Cota, +Steven Krohn, +Marlo Angelo Tito, +Leo Walsh, +Cesare Riccardo, +Michael Bennett, +1212Scenery, +Daniel Mihai Popescu, +Gai Xinh, +Mithu Hassan, +Daniel Stock, +Marino Puletti, +Christy Sandhoff, +Johnathan Yesson, +Roleta Anedotas, +Linda Dee, +Mariusz Zapart, +2013-06-17 04:33:32384693082
Christy Sandhoff10,119Richard Green originally shared:Remember the Much Better than the Average Circle circles I used to share?  Well, this circle is much better even than those.  The people in this circle were recommended for inclusion in response to my call for nominations, and there are some really interesting profiles in here.  If you've never added a circle before, this one would make a good Starter Circle.I'd especially like to thank +Dirk Talamasca, +Ed Ross, +Korinne M Jackman, +Nina MJ and +Tim Utzig, each of whom suggested a large number of profiles for the circle.  I think I added everyone who was tagged in the nomination post; sorry if I missed anyone.And here's the circle.2013-06-04 04:14:1033821830
Richard Green15,407Remember the Much Better than the Average Circle circles I used to share?  Well, this circle is much better even than those.  The people in this circle were recommended for inclusion in response to my call for nominations, and there are some really interesting profiles in here.  If you've never added a circle before, this one would make a good Starter Circle.I'd especially like to thank +Dirk Talamasca, +Ed Ross, +Korinne M Jackman, +Nina MJ and +Tim Utzig, each of whom suggested a large number of profiles for the circle.  I think I added everyone who was tagged in the nomination post; sorry if I missed anyone.And here's the circle.2013-06-02 14:20:43338532176
AyJay Schibig16,440ECLECTIC CIRCLEFeel free to add  and re-share. this  Eclectic Circle of  G Plussers! Circles I am curating:21ST CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHERS (1&2), ALL KINDS, DISCOVERY, FULL CIRCLE,SOCIAL, ECLECTIC,ENGAGERS, AWESOME, NEW HORIZONS and BOOST#circleoftheday   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlesharingforthepeopleplc   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharedcircleday   #publiccirclesproject   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles  #sharedpublicircles   #circle   #circles   #circlemeup  #awesomepeople   #awesomecircle   #circleme   #sharedpoint   #sharewithyou     #ShareYourCircle2013-04-13 06:43:023024213
AyJay Schibig15,217ECLECTIC CIRCLEFeel free to add  and re-share. this  Eclectic Circle of  G Plussers! Circles I am curating:21ST CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHERS (1&2), ALL KINDS, DISCOVERY, FULL CIRCLE,SOCIAL, ECLECTIC,ENGAGERS, AWESOME, NEW HORIZONS and BOOST#circleoftheday   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlesharingforthepeopleplc   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharedcircleday   #publiccirclesproject   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles  #sharedpublicircles   #circle   #circles   #circlemeup  #awesomepeople   #awesomecircle   #circleme   #sharedpoint   #sharewithyou     #ShareYourCircle2013-03-02 11:23:44245206
Mohammad Rahimi2,027I would like to share this circle of people i follow their posts.2013-02-25 05:38:581061928
Ian Herndon8,223Shared Circle Time! - G+ Community Moderators (4 of x)Re-Share to help moderators easily connect with one another!Now that Google has launched Communities there has been a ton of activity by people to create communities relating to their interests, join ones created by others, and meet other creators in an effort to learn more and more new ways to build and contribute to G+ Communities. +Community Moderators is an example of a page/community dedicated specifically to having a single place where all moderators can join in discussion around just that.I have been hard at work creating Circles that consist of Community Moderators and Owners only. My hope is to be able to help others expand their network of friends to also include like minded people dabbling in the Community space too. In the near future I intend to eventually group these moderator circles into smaller more targeted ones tailored to specific interests. So with that said, here's our circles!G+ Community Moderators & Owners Circle (1 of x) - 12/31/2012https://plus.google.com/u/0/110099838681495349209/posts/ETe6deLAMq2G+ Community Moderators & Owners Circle (2 of x) - 12/31/2012https://plus.google.com/u/0/110099838681495349209/posts/7i2DXeQpknnG+ Community Moderators & Owners Circle (3 of x) - 12/31/2012https://plus.google.com/u/0/110099838681495349209/posts/j1rsi9YGGVgG+ Community Moderators & Owners Circle (4 of x) - 1/12/2013https://plus.google.com/u/0/110099838681495349209/posts/VFUjZcifXPQ#Community   #Moderators   #Owners   #Communities   #Circle   #SharedCircles   #CircleShare2013-01-12 15:28:345005210
AyJay Schibig13,588ECLECTIC CIRCLEFeel free to add  and re-share. this  Eclectic Circle of  G Plussers! #circleoftheday   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlesharingforthepeopleplc   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharedcircleday   #publiccirclesproject   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles  #sharedpublicircles   #circle   #circles   #circlemeup  #awesomepeople   #awesomecircle   #circleme   #sharedpoint   #sharewithyou 2013-01-10 07:15:50257003
Nils Tschampel2,828The Cream of the Crop of December 2012What's this?On +CircleCount everyday some very interesting persons are choosen and recommended. These are persons without hundreds of thousands of followers but with a lot of interesting content. You won't find silent people here leading the rankings, but interesting people that are worth to be followed.You can find the Cream of the Crop daily here:http://www.circlecount.com/daily/Past Cream of the Crop circles:November 2012: http://goo.gl/LSQjcOctober 2012: http://goo.gl/ohdceSeptember 2012: http://goo.gl/ie3VNAugust 2012: http://goo.gl/5vUUPJuly 2012: http://goo.gl/oAemEJune 2012: http://goo.gl/YZt1yMay 2012: http://goo.gl/4Tq43April 2012: http://goo.gl/NvbKjMarch 2012: http://goo.gl/3auLoFebruary 2012: http://goo.gl/TWYpKJanuary 2012: http://goo.gl/HBdHbDecember 2011: http://goo.gl/RBCpgNovember 2011: http://goo.gl/x6TJkOctober 2011: http://goo.gl/2xVn92013-01-08 19:52:4728412311
AyJay Schibig12,717ECLECTIC CIRCLEFeel free to add  and re-share. this  Eclectic Circle of  G Plussers! #circleoftheday   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlesharingforthepeopleplc   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharedcircleday   #publiccirclesproject   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles  #sharedpublicircles   #circle   #circles   #circlemeup  #awesomepeople   #awesomecircle   #circleme   #sharedpoint   #sharewithyou 2012-12-21 06:26:433277010
AyJay Schibig12,080ECLECTIC CIRCLEFeel free to add  and re-share. this  Eclectic Circle of  G Plussers! #circleoftheday   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlesharingforthepeopleplc   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharedcircleday   #publiccirclesproject   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles  #sharedpublicircles   #circle   #circles   #circlemeup  #awesomepeople   #awesomecircle   #circleme   #sharedpoint   #sharewithyou 2012-12-12 04:23:1442210216
Zbynek Kysela1,918BEST SHARED CIRCLE - Share, share, share!===================================HOW TO BE PART OF IT: 1) Add this circle to your circles -> Add circle2) Share added circle with option "include yourself in shared circle". Done. You're welcome :) ZbynekMy entire social presence:*****************************http://xeeme.com/bouchac*****************************2012-12-07 20:33:1441920625
Kurt Smith14,400Thought Provokers Circle Share - Who's Made You Think Lately?Who's Made You Think Lately? Are they in this circle? For me, +Dede Craig King had me really going last Monday, +Lacerant Plainer always gets me thinking, and just a few days ago it was +Randy Hilarski.Here's latest round of the Thought Provokers Circle. This is an #awesomesauce  circle of great plussers who will make you think (we're all trying anyway). The cool thing about this circle is that you had to be recommended by someone else to get in.Add & Reshare so others can discover these awesome people to follow. Current members please update your circle. If you'd like to join in, please suggest 3-5 people and tell why they make you think. #circleshare   #circles   #circlesharing   #circleoftheday   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharepubliccircle   #publiccircle   #publicsharedcircles  2012-12-04 15:53:26287653061
Brunner Nathan325Some people that comment and follow back.Don't forget to give a share and a plus one.#circleshare #sharedcircles #sharedcircle #sharedpubliccircles #circlesharing #publiccircle #circles2012-11-29 18:03:5327516419
Mj Bedford0Shared Circle Saturday My #peace   #circle  Thank you allI circle people who circle meand I refresh this circle Peace2012-11-11 04:03:07258426
Kurt Smith6,542Thought Provokers Circle Share -- Plussers Who 'Make You Go Hmm...'Next round of the Thought Provokers Circle. An amazing circle of great plussers who will make you think, well maybe. Here's some of the people and wisdom inside:"And a few of us that make you go "HUH???" from +Bearman Cartoons. " Ummmm.... I suddenly feel like I'm back in grade school again and the entire class is giving me the look... You're going to get your arse kicked at recess!!!! said +Frank Garufi Jr.. Check out and discover some new people - I've met +Dede Craig King, +Susanne Ramharter, +MommyLovesTech.Add & Reshare so others can discover these awesome people to follow. Current members please update your circle. If you'd like to join in, please suggest 3-5 people and why they make you think.#circles   #circle   #circleshare   #circleoftheday   #circlesharing   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles  +Full Circle +Circles +CIRCLES on Google+ 2012-10-31 14:11:37275922881
Kurt Smith4,603Thought Provokers Circle -- Plussers Who 'Make You Go Hmm...'Round 2 of the Thought Provokers Circle. An amazing circle of great plussers who will make you think! New additions include +Thomas Power, +Bobbi Jo Woods and dozens of others.Add & Reshare so others can discover these awesome people to follow. If you'd like to join in, please suggest 3-5 people and why they make you think.#circles   #circle   #circleshare   #circleoftheday   #circlesharing   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles   +Full Circle +Circles +CIRCLES on Google+ 2012-10-17 13:52:172561193675
Tim Moore23,874My Go To Circle when I'm using +Google+ from my mobile --- which is a lot!IF you use +Google+ from your mobile device and want GREAT CONTENT, then this is a money circle for you.  All the guys and gals in here are fantastic and post very shareable items.Created for the circle when you want to reliably find and share great content quickly from your mobile!>>> Help your friends who may be new here to +Google+ - share this circle with them.  They will love you forever......... or at least until payday. :) #greatcontent   #sharing  +Shared Circles on G+ +Public Circles +CircleCount +Nothing but Circles  #sharedcircles   #circlesharing   #circleoftheday  +Shared a circle with you +Full Circle  #mobile  2012-10-02 19:10:48484723561

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

22
comments per post
4
reshares per post
20
+1's per post

1,257
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 148

2014-11-24 21:19:19 (148 comments, 21 reshares, 95 +1s)Open 

Four stories about work:

One: Immediately out of college, I took a job working as the receptionist at a homeless shelter. The social worker quit, and I added those duties to my own, despite not knowing how to execute them. Then the executive director quit, and I took his job.

There was no duty pager for staff. If there were incidents, and there were, the police responded without staff support. I would only find out about the response the next day, from the on-site manager -- who, in general, was a trusted client. The trusted client was cooking meth.

I found a new one. But I took the phone as well. I was the only employee, and so I was the call rotation.

Clients would show up drunk. My phone would ring. There would be fights. My phone would ring. The sheriff would show up to serve summonses. My phone would ring. And although my workday wasn't usually any... more »

Most reshares: 30

posted image

2014-12-28 07:56:55 (76 comments, 30 reshares, 99 +1s)Open 

Historically, those employed to commit violence on behalf of democracies are the greatest threat to those democracies. There is, accordingly, no place for a paramilitary organization which does not respect, even in theory, civilian authority. Were this the actual military, this would be grounds for discharge and forfeiture of pension.

There is no reason to treat this differently. 

Most plusones: 99

posted image

2014-12-28 07:56:55 (76 comments, 30 reshares, 99 +1s)Open 

Historically, those employed to commit violence on behalf of democracies are the greatest threat to those democracies. There is, accordingly, no place for a paramilitary organization which does not respect, even in theory, civilian authority. Were this the actual military, this would be grounds for discharge and forfeiture of pension.

There is no reason to treat this differently. 

Latest 50 posts

posted image

2015-01-29 21:24:56 (14 comments, 1 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Finally, a policy that everyone can hate: a proposal for implementing NIMBYism inside an anarcho-capitalist framework. 

Finally, a policy that everyone can hate: a proposal for implementing NIMBYism inside an anarcho-capitalist framework. ___

posted image

2015-01-29 18:03:52 (28 comments, 1 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

// Amen. Freddie DeBoer writes:

Hey, Alex Pareene. I get it. You can write this kind of piece in your sleep. You will always find work writing pieces like that. It’s easy and it’s fun and you can tell jokes and those same 200 media jerks will give you a thousand pats on the back for it. Do you have any advice for me, here, on campus? Do you know what I’m supposed to say to some shellshocked 19 year old from Terra Haute who, I’m very sorry to say, hasn’t had a decade to absorb bell hooks? Can you maybe do me a favor, and instead of writing a piece designed to get you yet-more retweets from Weird Twitter, tell me how to reach these potential allies when I know that they’re going to get burned terribly for just being typical clumsy kids? Since you’re telling me that if I say a word against people who go nuclear at the slightest provocation, I’m just one of the Jon Chaits, pleaseinform me how I... more »

// Amen. Freddie DeBoer writes:

Hey, Alex Pareene. I get it. You can write this kind of piece in your sleep. You will always find work writing pieces like that. It’s easy and it’s fun and you can tell jokes and those same 200 media jerks will give you a thousand pats on the back for it. Do you have any advice for me, here, on campus? Do you know what I’m supposed to say to some shellshocked 19 year old from Terra Haute who, I’m very sorry to say, hasn’t had a decade to absorb bell hooks? Can you maybe do me a favor, and instead of writing a piece designed to get you yet-more retweets from Weird Twitter, tell me how to reach these potential allies when I know that they’re going to get burned terribly for just being typical clumsy kids? Since you’re telling me that if I say a word against people who go nuclear at the slightest provocation, I’m just one of the Jon Chaits, please inform me how I can act as an educator and an ally and a friend. Because I am out of fucking ideas.

[...]

Jon Chait is an asshole. He’s wrong. I don’t want these kids to be more like Jon Chait. I sure as hell don’t want them to be less left-wing. I want them to be more left-wing. I want a left that can win, and there’s no way I can have that when the actually-existing left sheds potential allies at an impossible rate. But the prohibition against ever telling anyone to be friendlier and more forgiving is so powerful and calcified it’s a permanent feature of today’s progressivism. And I’m left as this sad old 33 year old teacher who no longer has the slightest fucking idea what to say to the many brilliant, passionate young people whose only crime is not already being perfect.___

posted image

2015-01-29 01:18:33 (14 comments, 0 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

a

❝ This was the Golden Age, a time of high adventure, rich living, and hard dying...but nobody thought so. This was a future of fortune and theft, pillage and rapine, culture and vice...but nobody admitted it. This was an age of extremes, a fascinating century of freaks...but nobody loved it. ❞

Thus begins "The Stars My Destination", aka "Tiger! Tiger!", taking it's name from Blake's poem. So much science fiction from the last century has lost its luster, caught up by the speed of change, and become period pieces that we read to recapture our childhood or revisit the naïveté of previous generations. Not so Bester's masterpiece. This is no comic book space opera or recast historical drama. In one brilliant novel a generation ahead of its time, Bester anticipated and inspired the clipped brevity and noir realism of cyberpunk, blended it with the psychological and moral dilemmas of anthropological science fiction, and created a piece which is just as compelling and predictive now as it was in 1956. This is science fiction as a poetry slam; a brutal critique of ogliarchies, unlimited capitalism, and arrogant elitism, all wrapped in language that flows seamlessly from page to reader.

If you've never read it, read it now. If you read it once in the mists of time, read it again. You'll be amazed how much that which once seemed unreal, now seems far too prescient.___a

posted image

2015-01-28 21:34:28 (5 comments, 13 reshares, 34 +1s)Open 

"Neuroscience Meets Cryptography: Designing Crypto Primitives Secure Against Rubber Hose Attacks"
 
Abstract: Cryptographic systems often rely on the secrecy of cryptographic keys given to users. Many schemes, however, cannot resist coercion attacks where the user is forcibly asked by an attacker to reveal the key. These attacks, known as rubber hose cryptanalysis, are often the easiest way to defeat cryptography. We present a defense against coercion attacks using the concept of implicit learning from cognitive psychology. Implicit learning refers to learning of patterns without any conscious knowledge of the learned pattern. We use a carefully crafted computer game to plant a secret password in the participant's brain without the participant having any conscious knowledge of the trained password. While the planted secret can be used for authentication, the... more »

"Neuroscience Meets Cryptography: Designing Crypto Primitives Secure Against Rubber Hose Attacks"
 
Abstract: Cryptographic systems often rely on the secrecy of cryptographic keys given to users. Many schemes, however, cannot resist coercion attacks where the user is forcibly asked by an attacker to reveal the key. These attacks, known as rubber hose cryptanalysis, are often the easiest way to defeat cryptography. We present a defense against coercion attacks using the concept of implicit learning from cognitive psychology. Implicit learning refers to learning of patterns without any conscious knowledge of the learned pattern. We use a carefully crafted computer game to plant a secret password in the participant's brain without the participant having any conscious knowledge of the trained password. While the planted secret can be used for authentication, the participant cannot be coerced into revealing it since he or she has no conscious knowledge of it. We performed a number of user studies using Amazon's Mechanical Turk to verify that participants can successfully re-authenticate over time and that they are unable to reconstruct or even recognize short fragments of the planted secret.
 
Got this from the Schneier blog: https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2015/01/subconscious_ke.html
 
Here is the paper (and video presentation!): https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity12/technical-sessions/presentation/bojinov
 
I'm going to watch the video and go over the slides tonight, but reading that abstract made me immediately think of Johnny Mnemonic (the film and the Gibson story).
 
How freaking cool is this? Would it require cyborg dolphins to brute force the keys? ___

posted image

2015-01-28 19:00:06 (12 comments, 2 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

For the last few years, Yahoo! has been worth somewhat less than the substantial chunk of Alibaba stock that it owns. Like many other Silicon Valley companies, it has historically been the corporate equivalent of a weak constitutional monarchy: it has a powerful CEO, a powerful and entrenched board, and relatively weak shareholders. 

For this reason, the market assumed that they would fritter away their cash on things like "building interesting new products with their huge number of talented engineers," or "buying out interesting companies, taking their engineers, and giving them substantially more runway to revenue." What the market wants is the same thing that activist shareholders prefer: vast share buybacks out of the corporate treasury, then issuing bonds to buy more, then on and on until the company is utterly frozen by illiquidity, unable to do anything useful and... more »

For the last few years, Yahoo! has been worth somewhat less than the substantial chunk of Alibaba stock that it owns. Like many other Silicon Valley companies, it has historically been the corporate equivalent of a weak constitutional monarchy: it has a powerful CEO, a powerful and entrenched board, and relatively weak shareholders. 

For this reason, the market assumed that they would fritter away their cash on things like "building interesting new products with their huge number of talented engineers," or "buying out interesting companies, taking their engineers, and giving them substantially more runway to revenue." What the market wants is the same thing that activist shareholders prefer: vast share buybacks out of the corporate treasury, then issuing bonds to buy more, then on and on until the company is utterly frozen by illiquidity, unable to do anything useful and productive while its engineers first rust, then slowly depart for greener pastures. 

Sustainability? Who cares? The activists have been bought out, and have already departed to raid other vulnerable corporate treasuries.

This article explains, in great detail, the way that American tax law serves as a force multiplier for activist-driven disinvestment. Yahoo! could have done one of two things: taken $26b to reinvest, or paid $40b to its shareholders. After fighting with activists for the past two years, it's now done the "reasonable" thing: paid off the roving bandits, consigning itself to some ignominious merger a few years for now.

It didn't have to be this way. I guess now it is.___

posted image

2015-01-28 17:56:23 (33 comments, 5 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

Basically, this.

The part of the left that has abandoned actual policy in favor of enforcing increasingly baroque standards of etiquette? That's slightly annoying, I guess, although I never think about it unless prompted. But it's just annoying. 

On the other side of the ledger, when a statistically disproportionate number of small impositions affect other people's lives, the aggregate burden is much more than annoying -- even if any one imposition is no more than annoying. Being conscientious of your total misery footprint necessarily involves making sure that you're not adding your own grain of sand to the landslide, and there's no crime in occasionally reminding others of that fact.

Basically, this.

The part of the left that has abandoned actual policy in favor of enforcing increasingly baroque standards of etiquette? That's slightly annoying, I guess, although I never think about it unless prompted. But it's just annoying. 

On the other side of the ledger, when a statistically disproportionate number of small impositions affect other people's lives, the aggregate burden is much more than annoying -- even if any one imposition is no more than annoying. Being conscientious of your total misery footprint necessarily involves making sure that you're not adding your own grain of sand to the landslide, and there's no crime in occasionally reminding others of that fact.___

posted image

2015-01-26 23:18:23 (9 comments, 11 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

Via +Lea Kissner, a novel encryption protocol from Stack Overflow:

function encrypt($string){
    return base64_encode(base64_encode(base64_encode($string)))

Finally, there's a 192-bit replacement for the venerable rot26 protocol. Sure, it won't run in O(0) like rot26 will, but for applications where you can sacrifice the speed, it's a perfectly viable alternative.

LGTM. Ship it.

Via +Lea Kissner, a novel encryption protocol from Stack Overflow:

function encrypt($string){
    return base64_encode(base64_encode(base64_encode($string)))

Finally, there's a 192-bit replacement for the venerable rot26 protocol. Sure, it won't run in O(0) like rot26 will, but for applications where you can sacrifice the speed, it's a perfectly viable alternative.

LGTM. Ship it.___

posted image

2015-01-26 20:56:24 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

In a related issue, ratings of college student readiness work like this:

All professors are members of the ~1/30 of college students who, after graduating from college, went on to receive a doctorate. When rating the preparedness of students, they naturally measure that preparedness against their own, not against the average. Which they'd have a poor idea of. 

Similarly, hiring managers begin their analysis with their own life history -- which includes, at some point, becoming a hiring manager. They then compare recent college graduates against the general applicant pool, which, in recent years, has included a large number of displaced workers applying for, and ready for, jobs far beneath their skills.

In other words, there is a gap, there is a persistent gap, and we should expect the expectations of hiring managers to change based on factors other than students' actual... more »

"""
The results of the test found little difference between those students who graduated from public colleges and those who went to private schools. Not surprisingly, students who graduated from the best colleges did better than everyone else on the test as seniors, but their gains since taking the test as freshmen were actually smaller than those students who graduated from less elite schools.
"""

I am now interested in this study. I've often posited that the signal share of education value is proportional to selectivity on the assumption that the features which make you a good student also make you a perfectly plausible autodidact. The further behind you are in precollegiate signaling, the more college can net you versus never attending.

I'd expect a principal source of error being "late-forming conscientiousness".

As to the main point of the article: it's crap.

The expectations of employers are always higher than the quality of inputs because that is how we think during implicit negotiations. Adjusting our expectations upward is thought to apply pressure. Because the best bullshit, from a credibility perspective, is bullshit you convince yourself of, most employers probably can't tell the difference between setting expectations strategically and setting them realistically.

Our nostalgic impulses can also cause us to misrecall a golden age of hard work and create baseless but aggrandizing narratives.

Ergo you can believe that the quality of workers has been in steady decline since Lucy & Company, at the latest, or heed my advice to mistrust the self-reports of primates.

Hyenas, by contrast, you can trust implicitly....___In a related issue, ratings of college student readiness work like this:

All professors are members of the ~1/30 of college students who, after graduating from college, went on to receive a doctorate. When rating the preparedness of students, they naturally measure that preparedness against their own, not against the average. Which they'd have a poor idea of. 

Similarly, hiring managers begin their analysis with their own life history -- which includes, at some point, becoming a hiring manager. They then compare recent college graduates against the general applicant pool, which, in recent years, has included a large number of displaced workers applying for, and ready for, jobs far beneath their skills.

In other words, there is a gap, there is a persistent gap, and we should expect the expectations of hiring managers to change based on factors other than students' actual preparedness. I am not sure that it's even possible to get any useful data out of a study like this.

2015-01-26 20:26:10 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

From the comments of the previous post, a precise description of the problem I have with Scott Alexander:

Scott Alexander walks into a Starbucks and asks the barista for a recommendation. The Barista suggests the popular new Blood Coffee, and explains how it is made from beans purchased from Congolese warlords to help them fund child armies. Also there is blood in it. Scott is a bit taken aback, but is reluctant to condemn as stupid or evil a drink that so many people find appealing. In an effort to expand his understanding of coffee tastes, and ultimately to more effectively explain why drinking Blood Coffee is a mistake, Scott spends the next 15 minutes making the strongest possible case he can think of for drinking blood coffee. When he is done, the barista asks if he knows what he will have. “Well”, says Scott, “I think I’ll take an espresso, but tomorrow I’ll be back to make thecase agai... more »

From the comments of the previous post, a precise description of the problem I have with Scott Alexander:

Scott Alexander walks into a Starbucks and asks the barista for a recommendation. The Barista suggests the popular new Blood Coffee, and explains how it is made from beans purchased from Congolese warlords to help them fund child armies. Also there is blood in it. Scott is a bit taken aback, but is reluctant to condemn as stupid or evil a drink that so many people find appealing. In an effort to expand his understanding of coffee tastes, and ultimately to more effectively explain why drinking Blood Coffee is a mistake, Scott spends the next 15 minutes making the strongest possible case he can think of for drinking blood coffee. When he is done, the barista asks if he knows what he will have. “Well”, says Scott, “I think I’ll take an espresso, but tomorrow I’ll be back to make the case against Blood Coffee.”

Scott leaves, and everyone in line who heard his argument orders a Blood Coffee.

By relentlessly assuming the good faith of his opponents, and constructing better arguments for their ideas than they themselves have, Scott Alexander has discovered a foolproof method for precisely centering himself in his personal Overton window. Because the milieu in which he is centering himself consists largely of neoreactionaries, libertarians, male liberals, and transhumanists, he has come to a position where he is externally perceived as being the most reasonable variation of the things which he largely opposes. 

In doing so, he has attracted the ire of quite a few people (particularly, feminists) who strongly oppose the things which he appears to be a reasonable version of. And of course he mirrors their affect, meaning -- perversely -- that he is being driven closer and closer to the people with whom he politely disagrees, and away from those who impolitely disagree with him.  

At the moment, he's one of the best, most interesting writers on the Internet, but I do worry that this particular trajectory will lead him to be little more than a bright and convenient whetstone for better ideas than his.___

posted image

2015-01-26 19:10:21 (7 comments, 10 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

From Slate Star Codex, the ontological argument for caffeine:

St. Anselm goes up to the counter and considers the greatest coffee of which it is possible to conceive. Since existence is more perfect than nonexistence, the coffee must exist. He brings it back to his table and drinks it.

Sadly, this appears not to be working for me this morning.

From Slate Star Codex, the ontological argument for caffeine:

St. Anselm goes up to the counter and considers the greatest coffee of which it is possible to conceive. Since existence is more perfect than nonexistence, the coffee must exist. He brings it back to his table and drinks it.

Sadly, this appears not to be working for me this morning.___

posted image

2015-01-22 04:44:28 (17 comments, 8 reshares, 42 +1s)Open 

Are there criminal angel investors? (Devil investors?) Because "it's like Tacocopter, but for meth" is a pretty great elevator pitch.

Bonus: you don't need to worry about FAA regulations! Criminality is already baked into the business model!

Are there criminal angel investors? (Devil investors?) Because "it's like Tacocopter, but for meth" is a pretty great elevator pitch.

Bonus: you don't need to worry about FAA regulations! Criminality is already baked into the business model!___

posted image

2015-01-20 22:10:51 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Over the weekend, you may have seen this headline: Obama Sides With Cameron in Encryption Fight. (http://goo.gl/ZnVeYD). However, I tend to prefer this diametrically opposed article from the Register. 

When conducting a joint press conference with an ally, it's bad practice to simply leave that ally hanging. The closest you're going to get to snubbing their proposal is a Japanese "no:" a regretful apology that what the counterparty is asking for is very difficult. By which you mean "entirely crazy and out of line."

The United States has much more to lose right now than we did when the Clipper chip was first introduced. Some basic operations of the modern web depend on encryption that would have been export-controlled in 1996, and there is tremendous countervailing pressure from continental Europe not to ban robust encryption products, if for no otherr... more »

Over the weekend, you may have seen this headline: Obama Sides With Cameron in Encryption Fight. (http://goo.gl/ZnVeYD). However, I tend to prefer this diametrically opposed article from the Register. 

When conducting a joint press conference with an ally, it's bad practice to simply leave that ally hanging. The closest you're going to get to snubbing their proposal is a Japanese "no:" a regretful apology that what the counterparty is asking for is very difficult. By which you mean "entirely crazy and out of line."

The United States has much more to lose right now than we did when the Clipper chip was first introduced. Some basic operations of the modern web depend on encryption that would have been export-controlled in 1996, and there is tremendous countervailing pressure from continental Europe not to ban robust encryption products, if for no other reason than that the US and UK have gotten caught with their hands in the cookie jar several times before. If we did comply with Cameron's wishes, the consequences for the US economy would likely be severe: US tech companies, which often do more than half of their business in Europe, simply have too much to lose.

In the aftermath of this meeting, there will likely be some pressure put on US tech companies, and possibly some revisions to CALEA regulations, but I would be extraordinarily surprised if any bill like DRIP made it out of committee and onto the floor of the House or Senate. ___

posted image

2015-01-20 21:45:52 (22 comments, 7 reshares, 31 +1s)Open 

If your business model is building a wireless device which can inject arbitrary data into a two-ton hunk of machinery traveling 75 miles an hour, feet away from similarly dangerous two-ton hunks of machinery, it seems like it might be a good idea to secure that device. 

Progressive Insurance, it seems, does not agree. 

(Via +Corey Thuen.)

If your business model is building a wireless device which can inject arbitrary data into a two-ton hunk of machinery traveling 75 miles an hour, feet away from similarly dangerous two-ton hunks of machinery, it seems like it might be a good idea to secure that device. 

Progressive Insurance, it seems, does not agree. 

(Via +Corey Thuen.)___

posted image

2015-01-16 23:48:24 (24 comments, 0 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

While I'm poking holes in data I don't like, I suspect that there also might be a problem with nonrandom attrition in this survey. The CPS survey interviews and reinterviews people at their home addresses, leading it to exclude people who moved from their home address to take another job. 

This means that "people who left education," in the context of the survey, are "people who left education, but who stayed in their homes." In other words, they're people who didn't move to take another job. It seems as though this subset would essentially include all former teachers who left their jobs unexpectedly, but would exclude all teachers who left their previous home to accept work elsewhere. 

Because school districts are usually oligopsony buyers of teacher labor, you would expect the former group -- including teachers who were fired or laid off -- toe... more »

While I'm poking holes in data I don't like, I suspect that there also might be a problem with nonrandom attrition in this survey. The CPS survey interviews and reinterviews people at their home addresses, leading it to exclude people who moved from their home address to take another job. 

This means that "people who left education," in the context of the survey, are "people who left education, but who stayed in their homes." In other words, they're people who didn't move to take another job. It seems as though this subset would essentially include all former teachers who left their jobs unexpectedly, but would exclude all teachers who left their previous home to accept work elsewhere. 

Because school districts are usually oligopsony buyers of teacher labor, you would expect the former group -- including teachers who were fired or laid off -- to experience a decrease in wages. You would expect the latter group to experience an increase in wages. But the data only captures the former group, and not the latter.___

posted image

2015-01-16 23:41:00 (8 comments, 1 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

This is more reasonably phrased as, "Health care for people who are so sick that they can no longer work (or for retired people in long-term care) is incredibly, incredibly expensive." 

Two points:

(1) Of the money spent on welfare, the vast majority of both federal and state contributions are to Medicaid. Because of the power law distribution of health care spending, the vast majority of Medicaid payments are to pay for care for a very small number of patients. Most of those patients are terminally ill, or will be soon, and are in long-term care.

In other words, this is the cost of your grandmother's chemotherapy or nursing home, not the cost of federal bureaucrats or unwed mothers.

(2) Reading this snippet, do you think this means "direct expenditure per year?" Yeah. Me too. Except if you look at the tables, that's not... more »

This is more reasonably phrased as, "Health care for people who are so sick that they can no longer work (or for retired people in long-term care) is incredibly, incredibly expensive." 

Two points:

(1) Of the money spent on welfare, the vast majority of both federal and state contributions are to Medicaid. Because of the power law distribution of health care spending, the vast majority of Medicaid payments are to pay for care for a very small number of patients. Most of those patients are terminally ill, or will be soon, and are in long-term care.

In other words, this is the cost of your grandmother's chemotherapy or nursing home, not the cost of federal bureaucrats or unwed mothers.

(2) Reading this snippet, do you think this means "direct expenditure per year?" Yeah. Me too. Except if you look at the tables, that's not what it means.

This isn't 'per household per year.' This is 'per household, over four years.' It counts revenue-yielding loans and payroll tax refunds as 'expenditures,' snips out Medicare and Social Security sub-expenditures (like the widows and orphans benefit) essentially arbitrarily, and assigns much of the stimulus to various categories. 

Rounding up and deciding borderline cases in favor of the Weekly Standard, it's roughly $12k per year.___

posted image

2015-01-14 20:34:33 (78 comments, 1 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

I am not sure that there is anything unusual going on here. We draw an arbitrary line between children and adults. We acknowledge that it's arbitrary, and extend the full range of adult liberties in stages, starting with less dangerous liberties and proceeding on to those most likely to result in self harm. To give you an idea of where a 17-year-old usually is in that gradation: the patient in this case is not  considered sufficiently autonomous to form a contract that isn't revocable at-will.

Obviously, the decision in this case is far more important than the typical sort of decision that 17-year-olds aren't allowed to make -- whether to smoke; whether to drink,;whether to get a mortgage or a consumer loan. Insofar as there is any justification at all for limiting the autonomy of children under the age of 18, this goes far above and beyond those that are generally given. Decidingt... more »

I am not sure that there is anything unusual going on here. We draw an arbitrary line between children and adults. We acknowledge that it's arbitrary, and extend the full range of adult liberties in stages, starting with less dangerous liberties and proceeding on to those most likely to result in self harm. To give you an idea of where a 17-year-old usually is in that gradation: the patient in this case is not  considered sufficiently autonomous to form a contract that isn't revocable at-will.

Obviously, the decision in this case is far more important than the typical sort of decision that 17-year-olds aren't allowed to make -- whether to smoke; whether to drink,;whether to get a mortgage or a consumer loan. Insofar as there is any justification at all for limiting the autonomy of children under the age of 18, this goes far above and beyond those that are generally given. Deciding to die of a curable disease due to mistaken factual beliefs promoted by your guardian is precisely the sort of thing that longstanding restrictions on child autonomy are meant to prevent. 

I'm willing to accept arguments about moving the dividing line back to another arbitrary birthday (16? 14?), or about changing the laws around capacity and infancy to be far less definite, but far more personalized. But considering that we haven't, this does not seem to be a major deviation from the way the law has and always has treated teens.

Even if we add the parent into the mix, I'm not sure we get anywhere. The patient will almost certainly live if treated. She will almost certainly die if not treated. 

"Culpable omissions" are not a broad category in the law, but omissions resulting in the death of a person you're legally responsible are pretty much the paradigmatic case in which we recognize that people can culpably omit. In other words, while there may be some disagreement about how we implement children's liberties, I am fairly sure that under almost any legal regime we can think of, this would be very close to the border between acceptable and unacceptable.___

posted image

2015-01-08 21:45:36 (105 comments, 6 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

If I imagined that this essay was written in response to nothing in particular, I'd have no problems with what Laurie Penny says. Scott Aaronson and I had huge structural advantages. Our lives came out pretty well. 

But then there are the particulars of the story. And that's where I object.

Imagine that you are an unusual child: a high school freshman who is bright enough to be in college, but whose life experiences are still those of a young teen. Among other things, you're still in the grip of puberty: interested by girls, even though there are none your age around. There are women, sure, but no girls.

And even if there were, you wouldn't be anything like them. You'll eventually grow into a person much like everyone else -- prodigies, if they're lucky, become bright adults, not adult prodigies -- but you're not there yet. Now imagine that you,... more »

If I imagined that this essay was written in response to nothing in particular, I'd have no problems with what Laurie Penny says. Scott Aaronson and I had huge structural advantages. Our lives came out pretty well. 

But then there are the particulars of the story. And that's where I object.

Imagine that you are an unusual child: a high school freshman who is bright enough to be in college, but whose life experiences are still those of a young teen. Among other things, you're still in the grip of puberty: interested by girls, even though there are none your age around. There are women, sure, but no girls.

And even if there were, you wouldn't be anything like them. You'll eventually grow into a person much like everyone else -- prodigies, if they're lucky, become bright adults, not adult prodigies -- but you're not there yet. Now imagine that you, like a lot of undergrads, stumble into the part of feminist thought written by (and largely for) women who have been victims of male sexual violence.

Andrea Dworkin, say.

Imagine you take Dworkin as a true account of women's experience, and that you're conscientious enough to try and avoid the behaviors you think will be perceived as threatening. Imagine that you're trying to do that with social skills that are half-functioning, with a frontal lobe that's at half-capacity, in the midst of puberty.

If you're trying to live as a sexually active feminist dude, without having some exposure to outside culture mores about dating, and after having taken advice from the people most sensitive to, and most skeptical of, male sexuality, you are going to have a very hard time. You were going to have a hard time regardless -- you are, after all, a 14-year-old in college -- but you're going to have a particular sort of hard time. All the embarrassment and uncertainty about your own teenage sexuality is going to be interwoven with a sort of moral horror about male sexuality.

That's where +Scott Aaronson is coming from. And it's where his story and Laurie Penny's diverge: on finding feminism, Penny became the hero of her own story; Aaronson became a peripheral villain lurking on the edges of others' stories. This is a difficult thing to come to terms with, or to gently reject without also rejecting all the ways in which it is approximately true. ___

posted image

2015-01-07 21:38:54 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Ah yes, the “Bird 9”. Meet our rocket: http://imgur.com/nCqs3EQ

Ah yes, the “Bird 9”. Meet our rocket: http://imgur.com/nCqs3EQ___

posted image

2015-01-02 18:38:15 (17 comments, 4 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

So, something you'll rarely hear from me: a product recommendation. This does exactly what it says on the box: this is Comrades at Odds, an R.A. Salvatore book, narrated by Ice-T, who did not know that he was going to be narrating a D&D book when he walked into the studio.

So, something you'll rarely hear from me: a product recommendation. This does exactly what it says on the box: this is Comrades at Odds, an R.A. Salvatore book, narrated by Ice-T, who did not know that he was going to be narrating a D&D book when he walked into the studio.___

posted image

2014-12-28 07:56:55 (76 comments, 30 reshares, 99 +1s)Open 

Historically, those employed to commit violence on behalf of democracies are the greatest threat to those democracies. There is, accordingly, no place for a paramilitary organization which does not respect, even in theory, civilian authority. Were this the actual military, this would be grounds for discharge and forfeiture of pension.

There is no reason to treat this differently. 

Historically, those employed to commit violence on behalf of democracies are the greatest threat to those democracies. There is, accordingly, no place for a paramilitary organization which does not respect, even in theory, civilian authority. Were this the actual military, this would be grounds for discharge and forfeiture of pension.

There is no reason to treat this differently. ___

posted image

2014-12-23 22:23:57 (1 comments, 6 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Hey, if you guys have some extra money for Christmas, or would have paid for anything I did this year for free, you should drop some money in David's pocket.

Long story short: after an incredibly shitty childhood, he dropped out of high school, worked hard, got through community college with flying colors, and made it into Stanford. Then, shortly into his college experience, he had a huge medical emergency. He needs the cash to finish up -- he's only got one more semester, and is almost over the line. 

I'm incredibly proud of him.

Hey, if you guys have some extra money for Christmas, or would have paid for anything I did this year for free, you should drop some money in David's pocket.

Long story short: after an incredibly shitty childhood, he dropped out of high school, worked hard, got through community college with flying colors, and made it into Stanford. Then, shortly into his college experience, he had a huge medical emergency. He needs the cash to finish up -- he's only got one more semester, and is almost over the line. 

I'm incredibly proud of him.___

posted image

2014-12-19 20:17:46 (18 comments, 1 reshares, 43 +1s)Open 

I've been relatively quiet about the Ferguson grand jury, largely because I believe that a conviction would have been virtually impossible. I'd like to point out, however, that McCulloch is admitting to violating the rules of attorney professional conduct by calling Witness 40. She was lying. The prosecutor knew she was lying. He let her go ahead anyway.

From the MRPC:

(a) A lawyer shall not knowingly [...]

(3) offer evidence that the lawyer knows to be false. If a lawyer, the lawyer’s client, or a witness called by the lawyer, has offered material evidence and the lawyer comes to know of its falsity, the lawyer shall take reasonable remedial measures [...]

If he knew that the witness was lying, he had an affirmative professional responsibility not to call her, and not to allow her to offer evidence to the grand jury. Not to do so isg... more »

I've been relatively quiet about the Ferguson grand jury, largely because I believe that a conviction would have been virtually impossible. I'd like to point out, however, that McCulloch is admitting to violating the rules of attorney professional conduct by calling Witness 40. She was lying. The prosecutor knew she was lying. He let her go ahead anyway.

From the MRPC:

(a) A lawyer shall not knowingly [...]

(3) offer evidence that the lawyer knows to be false. If a lawyer, the lawyer’s client, or a witness called by the lawyer, has offered material evidence and the lawyer comes to know of its falsity, the lawyer shall take reasonable remedial measures [...]

If he knew that the witness was lying, he had an affirmative professional responsibility not to call her, and not to allow her to offer evidence to the grand jury. Not to do so is grounds for professional discipline.___

posted image

2014-12-18 17:06:24 (90 comments, 2 reshares, 42 +1s)Open 

Finally: Republicans are getting serious about arbitrary detention and persistent human rights violations in Cuba. 

Oh.

Their arbitrary detention and persistent human rights violations in Cuba. Not ours. 

Not as good.

Finally: Republicans are getting serious about arbitrary detention and persistent human rights violations in Cuba. 

Oh.

Their arbitrary detention and persistent human rights violations in Cuba. Not ours. 

Not as good.___

posted image

2014-12-17 17:29:23 (9 comments, 3 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

Why are Americans strongly favoring torture right now? I'd point to this paper from Reed College on polling about torture from 2001 to 2009:

http://academic.reed.edu/poli_sci/faculty/rejali/articles/us_public_opinion_torture_gronke_rejali.pdf

Figure 1 shows torture gaining popularity starting in late 2004. More than likely, it reflects the spin-up of Republican damage control in response to Abu Ghraib, a scandal which would result in the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005. That is also the year when the CIA went on an aggressive leaking offensive, which included insistence that torture had worked.

So what gets us to the poll +Scott Maxwell shared earlier is likely the consolidation of partisan views behind torture as it becomes more strongly identified with the Bush administration and, though it, with Republican politics. Perversely, the more morally indefensible something... more »

Why are Americans strongly favoring torture right now? I'd point to this paper from Reed College on polling about torture from 2001 to 2009:

http://academic.reed.edu/poli_sci/faculty/rejali/articles/us_public_opinion_torture_gronke_rejali.pdf

Figure 1 shows torture gaining popularity starting in late 2004. More than likely, it reflects the spin-up of Republican damage control in response to Abu Ghraib, a scandal which would result in the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005. That is also the year when the CIA went on an aggressive leaking offensive, which included insistence that torture had worked.

So what gets us to the poll +Scott Maxwell shared earlier is likely the consolidation of partisan views behind torture as it becomes more strongly identified with the Bush administration and, though it, with Republican politics. Perversely, the more morally indefensible something is, the more political defensible it becomes. People's identities are on the line and it becomes very hard to dismiss grave wrongdoing as a mere mistake. Once you reach the nadir of morality, when the wrongs are grave and pervade a leadership, you also reach the zenith of political defense.

I suspect that is what you see in that poll and, likely, all the others which show large measures of support for moral repugnance in the past. Mostly, there aren't any policy results. Those who line up to actually get, f.ex., torture done will largely be over-signalers. The danger is that they can't be excised without tacit admission and, so, moral taint. With the passing of a generation the view will correct as new people lack any connection to the events.___

2014-12-16 20:53:58 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

For Max Huijgen, an index of prior fiction about Hell:

Punishment: http://goo.gl/gg5fV
Justice: http://goo.gl/LxQe2
Memory: http://goo.gl/Dw9MD
Cartography: http://goo.gl/ryfbv
Science: http://goo.gl/EEvWB
History: http://goo.gl/L3mdN
Labor: http://goo.gl/RIE59y
Renunciation: http://goo.gl/MDcZu
Envy: http://goo.gl/18ll9

I think this covers everything I've published on G+.

For Max Huijgen, an index of prior fiction about Hell:

Punishment: http://goo.gl/gg5fV
Justice: http://goo.gl/LxQe2
Memory: http://goo.gl/Dw9MD
Cartography: http://goo.gl/ryfbv
Science: http://goo.gl/EEvWB
History: http://goo.gl/L3mdN
Labor: http://goo.gl/RIE59y
Renunciation: http://goo.gl/MDcZu
Envy: http://goo.gl/18ll9

I think this covers everything I've published on G+.___

posted image

2014-12-15 20:11:34 (9 comments, 4 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

I heard about this on Snap Judgment this weekend.  It's one of the most bizarre things I've ever heard of.  

I heard about this on Snap Judgment this weekend.  It's one of the most bizarre things I've ever heard of.  ___

posted image

2014-12-15 17:53:31 (41 comments, 5 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

Interesting. I'd assumed all along that we were tapping Angela Merkel's phone -- it's aggressive, but it's the sort of thing which states routinely do. But it turns out that we weren't. And it turns out that the document which was provided to Der Spiegel as proof was not a surveillance order from the NSA.

If I had to make a guess about where it came from, I'd finger someone in the orbit of Wikileaks. If I had to make a more specific guess, I'd finger Israel Shamir, who's already known to have peddled fraudulent leaked US documents to the foreign press.

Interesting. I'd assumed all along that we were tapping Angela Merkel's phone -- it's aggressive, but it's the sort of thing which states routinely do. But it turns out that we weren't. And it turns out that the document which was provided to Der Spiegel as proof was not a surveillance order from the NSA.

If I had to make a guess about where it came from, I'd finger someone in the orbit of Wikileaks. If I had to make a more specific guess, I'd finger Israel Shamir, who's already known to have peddled fraudulent leaked US documents to the foreign press.___

posted image

2014-12-13 00:19:46 (36 comments, 2 reshares, 30 +1s)Open 

Q: So, Andy, where in Idaho are you from?

A: Boise. 

Q: Cool art scene, some great restaurants, great bands, good beer, the river -- good football team. But uh, you just lived there for two years. Where are you really from?

A: Fine, fine. Moscow.

Q: Little college town. Bucolic. Looks like the default Windows background. But you just went to college there. Where are you really from?

A: God damn it. Fine, I'm from Pocatello.

Q: Never heard of it. What's there?

A: Well, there's a play about an Olive Garden there. But mostly ... well... see below. 

#CowLivesMatter  

Q: So, Andy, where in Idaho are you from?

A: Boise. 

Q: Cool art scene, some great restaurants, great bands, good beer, the river -- good football team. But uh, you just lived there for two years. Where are you really from?

A: Fine, fine. Moscow.

Q: Little college town. Bucolic. Looks like the default Windows background. But you just went to college there. Where are you really from?

A: God damn it. Fine, I'm from Pocatello.

Q: Never heard of it. What's there?

A: Well, there's a play about an Olive Garden there. But mostly ... well... see below. 

#CowLivesMatter  ___

posted image

2014-12-11 20:55:14 (14 comments, 19 reshares, 53 +1s)Open 

The torture report is remarkably quiet on this issue, quoting the CIA without comment, but as this article points out, there is no such thing as "rectal feeding." If you insert food into someone's rectum, it will fall back out. 

The term they should have used was "violent sexual assault."

The torture report is remarkably quiet on this issue, quoting the CIA without comment, but as this article points out, there is no such thing as "rectal feeding." If you insert food into someone's rectum, it will fall back out. 

The term they should have used was "violent sexual assault."___

posted image

2014-12-11 05:27:09 (9 comments, 2 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

Freddie DeBoer basically captures my feelings on the death of the New Republic. They're short, so I'll just quote them in their entirety here:

The New Republic was never anything but a warmongering racist antileft trashpile and I hope the whole enterprise burns to the ground and if you are nostalgic about it you’re nostalgic for The Bell Curve, the war on Iraq, and Marty Peretz’s Muslim Hating Neo-Fascist Jamboree. The whole enterprise was corrupt right down to its colonialist bones and if some Facebook billionaire wants to turn it into Tinder For Politico Jagbags it could not possibly suffer in comparison. Shedding tears for Leon Wiseltier’s job is like worrying about what became of Stalin’s cat. I only pray for the day that your twisted obsession with Village bric-a-brac is performed by the unpaid interns that are the inevitable future of Big Media, which will be celebrated byyou neo... more »

Freddie DeBoer basically captures my feelings on the death of the New Republic. They're short, so I'll just quote them in their entirety here:

The New Republic was never anything but a warmongering racist antileft trashpile and I hope the whole enterprise burns to the ground and if you are nostalgic about it you’re nostalgic for The Bell Curve, the war on Iraq, and Marty Peretz’s Muslim Hating Neo-Fascist Jamboree. The whole enterprise was corrupt right down to its colonialist bones and if some Facebook billionaire wants to turn it into Tinder For Politico Jagbags it could not possibly suffer in comparison. Shedding tears for Leon Wiseltier’s job is like worrying about what became of Stalin’s cat. I only pray for the day that your twisted obsession with Village bric-a-brac is performed by the unpaid interns that are the inevitable future of Big Media, which will be celebrated by you neoliberal clowns right up until some 17 year old earning nothing but 3 $9,000-a-credit-hour credits literally unplugs the keyboard from your workstation. Tell Stephen Glass I said hey and shut out the lights on your way out.

Basically that. The audience for "center-left but weirdly racist American magazine, except rabidly right-wing on Israeli politics" is basically nobody. Nor has it ever been anyone. It's always been a vanity project funded by the Singer sewing machine corporation, and insofar as it's ever been a real journalistic enterprise, it's only because Marty Peretz was so dedicated to getting his letters to the editor published that he was willing to throw money down a hole for half a century.___

2014-12-10 21:45:51 (60 comments, 0 reshares, 24 +1s)Open 

"In late January 2003, in response to the death of CIA detainee Gul Rahman and the use of a gun and a drill in the CIA interrogations of' Abdal-Rahim al-Nashiri, DCI Tenet signed the first formal interrogation and confinement guidelines for the program."

Notable here is the fact that Jose Rodriguez ordered the destruction of the tapes of Abal-Rahim al-Nishiri's interrogation, and attempted to destroy the documentary evidence. The only remaining evidence from the CIA interrogation consists of peripherally related cables which have not been scrubbed.

Rodriguez now believes that al-Nishiri was, while not innocent, also not at all important to the USS Cole bombing of which he is accused. This is all somewhat moot, of course. We will never know whether he is actually guilty, or what he was guilty of. (Although we will continue to detain him.)

His torture, and... more »

"In late January 2003, in response to the death of CIA detainee Gul Rahman and the use of a gun and a drill in the CIA interrogations of' Abdal-Rahim al-Nashiri, DCI Tenet signed the first formal interrogation and confinement guidelines for the program."

Notable here is the fact that Jose Rodriguez ordered the destruction of the tapes of Abal-Rahim al-Nishiri's interrogation, and attempted to destroy the documentary evidence. The only remaining evidence from the CIA interrogation consists of peripherally related cables which have not been scrubbed.

Rodriguez now believes that al-Nishiri was, while not innocent, also not at all important to the USS Cole bombing of which he is accused. This is all somewhat moot, of course. We will never know whether he is actually guilty, or what he was guilty of. (Although we will continue to detain him.)

His torture, and Rodriguez' destruction of evidence to cover his crimes, have rendered it impossible to prosecute him in any system which vaguely comports with Western values.___

posted image

2014-12-10 21:01:37 (24 comments, 4 reshares, 43 +1s)Open 

From the torture report, some unsurprising data that's gone unmentioned elsewhere: it is difficult to find torturers except among people with a predisposition to torture. From the torture report:

Contrary to statements later made by CIA Director Michael Hayden, and other CIA officials that "[a]ll those involved in the questioning of detainees are carefully chosen and screened for demonstrated professional judgment and maturity," CIA records suggest that the vetting [...] not take place. The Committee reviewed CIA records related to several CIA officers and contractors involved in the CIA's Detention and Interrogation Program, most of whom conducted interrogations. The Committee identified a number of personnel whose backgrounds include notable derogatory information calling into question their eligibility for employment, their access to classified information, and their... more »

From the torture report, some unsurprising data that's gone unmentioned elsewhere: it is difficult to find torturers except among people with a predisposition to torture. From the torture report:

Contrary to statements later made by CIA Director Michael Hayden, and other CIA officials that "[a]ll those involved in the questioning of detainees are carefully chosen and screened for demonstrated professional judgment and maturity," CIA records suggest that the vetting [...] not take place. The Committee reviewed CIA records related to several CIA officers and contractors involved in the CIA's Detention and Interrogation Program, most of whom conducted interrogations. The Committee identified a number of personnel whose backgrounds include notable derogatory information calling into question their eligibility for employment, their access to classified information, and their participation in CIA interrogation activities.

In nearly all cases, the derogatory information was known to the CIA prior to the assignment of the CIA officers to the Detention and Interrogation Program. This group of officers included individuals who, among other issues, had engaged in inappropriate detainee interrogations, had workplace anger management issues, and had reportedly admitted to sexual assault.

After the initial coercive interrogations of AZ at Station ALEC failed to turn up anything of substantial intelligence value, the counterterrorism team stationed there questioned their ability to continue with interrogations they felt to be futile. As the program continued, the career counterterrorism officers were replaced with a broad assortment of incompetent but committed sadists.

As unsurprising as it is depressing.___

posted image

2014-12-10 20:07:48 (6 comments, 5 reshares, 34 +1s)Open 

Torture: A Historical Parable

After a long history of adventurism in the Islamic world, a major world power turned to torture to fight terrorism. Initially justified by exigency, used only in response to imminent threats, it rapidly became a ubiquitous outlet for pure sadism. Its use expanded from high-value targets who were planning attacks directly on that major world power, and it was widely used in its program of extrajudicial detention, both in-theater and outside of it.

When restrictions were finally placed on generals' ability to directly order war crimes, and the world power pulled back its colonial forces, the generals staged a coup. Because, having serially committed war crimes, they could no longer be assured of the law's protection.

Torture is cancerous. Once authorized, it is rapidly institutionalized. Once institutionalized, it is extraordinarily... more »

Torture: A Historical Parable

After a long history of adventurism in the Islamic world, a major world power turned to torture to fight terrorism. Initially justified by exigency, used only in response to imminent threats, it rapidly became a ubiquitous outlet for pure sadism. Its use expanded from high-value targets who were planning attacks directly on that major world power, and it was widely used in its program of extrajudicial detention, both in-theater and outside of it.

When restrictions were finally placed on generals' ability to directly order war crimes, and the world power pulled back its colonial forces, the generals staged a coup. Because, having serially committed war crimes, they could no longer be assured of the law's protection.

Torture is cancerous. Once authorized, it is rapidly institutionalized. Once institutionalized, it is extraordinarily difficult to bring it to heel. ___

posted image

2014-12-10 03:41:43 (0 comments, 8 reshares, 32 +1s)Open 

For many people, gender identity is more complex than just "male" or "female."  Starting today, I'm proud to announce that Google+ will support an infinite number of ways to express gender identity, by giving you the option to customize the way your gender is represented on your profile. 

Previously, we provided options for “Male,” “Female,” and “Other,” to encompass both those who don't fit into the traditional gender labels and those who don't want to declare their gender to the world at large. Now, the gender field on your profile will contain four entries, “Male,” “Female,” “Decline to state,” and “Custom.”  When “Custom” is selected, a freeform text field and a pronoun field will appear. You can still limit who can see your gender, just like you can now. We’ll be rolling this feature out for all users over the next fewdays.

Many thanks to the ... more »

For many people, gender identity is more complex than just "male" or "female."  Starting today, I'm proud to announce that Google+ will support an infinite number of ways to express gender identity, by giving you the option to customize the way your gender is represented on your profile. 

Previously, we provided options for “Male,” “Female,” and “Other,” to encompass both those who don't fit into the traditional gender labels and those who don't want to declare their gender to the world at large. Now, the gender field on your profile will contain four entries, “Male,” “Female,” “Decline to state,” and “Custom.”  When “Custom” is selected, a freeform text field and a pronoun field will appear. You can still limit who can see your gender, just like you can now. We’ll be rolling this feature out for all users over the next few days.

Many thanks to the people and groups who gave us advice on the best ways to do this. Your input has been really valuable to us, and we hope you like the result!___

posted image

2014-12-09 01:06:02 (20 comments, 24 reshares, 86 +1s)Open 

How Terrorism Actually Works in the Real World: A One Act Play By Michael Hayden, Former CIA Chief

Scene: A terrorist training camp in eastern Syria. Two mujihadeen sit around a fire, reading the National Review. Overhead, the buzzing of an American drone; in the distance, the low booming sound of Syrian artillery.

Mujahid #1: Oh, what the fuck is this shit. Hey, Sayyid. Look at the National Review.

Mujahid #2: What? 

Mujahid #1: It says here that back in 2003, the American government was engaging in torture.

Mujahid #2: Oh, that's horrible.

200 meters away, a Hellfire missile blows up in the middle of a field. Both jihadis are knocked out of their seats.

Mujahid #1: [Indecipherable.]

Mujahid #2: I'm sorry -- I guess I'm still a little concussed. Whatw... more »

How Terrorism Actually Works in the Real World: A One Act Play By Michael Hayden, Former CIA Chief

Scene: A terrorist training camp in eastern Syria. Two mujihadeen sit around a fire, reading the National Review. Overhead, the buzzing of an American drone; in the distance, the low booming sound of Syrian artillery.

Mujahid #1: Oh, what the fuck is this shit. Hey, Sayyid. Look at the National Review.

Mujahid #2: What? 

Mujahid #1: It says here that back in 2003, the American government was engaging in torture.

Mujahid #2: Oh, that's horrible.

200 meters away, a Hellfire missile blows up in the middle of a field. Both jihadis are knocked out of their seats.

Mujahid #1: [Indecipherable.]

Mujahid #2: I'm sorry -- I guess I'm still a little concussed. What was that you said?

Mujahid #1: I mean, that's it. That's the absolute last straw. I used to be totally on the fence about the United States, but torture? That's totally over the line.

Mujahid #2: Yeah. I was fine with the war in Afghanistan. Fine with them killing all of our leaders. Totally fine with the war in Iraq. Totally fine about that thing Zawahiri made up about the US Army selling children's organs for dog food. Even this bombing campaign is pretty okay. But the well-reported torture that was in every major media outlet for the past ten years? That's absolutely over the line.

Mujahid #1: Yeah. So, death to America, then?

Mujahid #2: I hate to say it, but yeah: death to America.

Fin.___

posted image

2014-12-08 19:35:11 (15 comments, 2 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

I have a tremendously difficult time sympathizing with any Israeli political discourse. How in God's name did this sentence pass the editors?

"Under Obama the US has switched sides, supporting Iran and its allies, satellites and assets, including the Muslim Brotherhood and Hamas, against America’s Sunni allies and Israel."

US-Israeli relations are certainly colder than they were under Bush II, but they're hardly at historical lows. They were far colder under Bush I -- we even suspended military aid -- and our relationship with the Israeli right was extraordinarily strained under Clinton.

If anything's changed, it's that the demands of the alliance have grown increasingly one-sided. Israel isn't necessary as a regional counterbalance to the USSR, doesn't substantially help with our problems in Iraq, and puts substantial strain on otherr... more »

I have a tremendously difficult time sympathizing with any Israeli political discourse. How in God's name did this sentence pass the editors?

"Under Obama the US has switched sides, supporting Iran and its allies, satellites and assets, including the Muslim Brotherhood and Hamas, against America’s Sunni allies and Israel."

US-Israeli relations are certainly colder than they were under Bush II, but they're hardly at historical lows. They were far colder under Bush I -- we even suspended military aid -- and our relationship with the Israeli right was extraordinarily strained under Clinton.

If anything's changed, it's that the demands of the alliance have grown increasingly one-sided. Israel isn't necessary as a regional counterbalance to the USSR, doesn't substantially help with our problems in Iraq, and puts substantial strain on other relationships. Some of that can be chalked up to geopolitical change and antisemitism in third-party countries, but Israel's unforced errors and completely tone-deaf diplomacy have made it very difficult to work with them on any substantial matters of mutual concern.

If this actually reflects the position of the Israeli right, I can see why.___

posted image

2014-12-05 02:54:49 (32 comments, 12 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

Ayup. From Food Babe's article on microwaving food, the following awesome paragraph:

"Last by not least, Dr. Masaru Emoto, who is famous for taking pictures of various types of waters and the crystals that they formed in the book called “Hidden Messages in Water,” found water that was microwaved did not form beautiful crystals – but instead formed crystals similar to those formed when exposed to negative thoughts or beliefs. If this is happening to just water – I can only imagine what a microwave is doing to the nutrients, energy of our food and to our bodies when we consume microwaved food. For the experiment pictured above, microwaved water produced a similar physical structure to when the words “satan” and “hitler” were repeatedly exposed to the water. "

Ayup. From Food Babe's article on microwaving food, the following awesome paragraph:

"Last by not least, Dr. Masaru Emoto, who is famous for taking pictures of various types of waters and the crystals that they formed in the book called “Hidden Messages in Water,” found water that was microwaved did not form beautiful crystals – but instead formed crystals similar to those formed when exposed to negative thoughts or beliefs. If this is happening to just water – I can only imagine what a microwave is doing to the nutrients, energy of our food and to our bodies when we consume microwaved food. For the experiment pictured above, microwaved water produced a similar physical structure to when the words “satan” and “hitler” were repeatedly exposed to the water. "___

posted image

2014-12-04 21:07:42 (18 comments, 3 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

I. Reviewing the literature on the subject, Scott Alexander concludes that when you control for crime in the neighborhood, past criminal record, socioeconomic status, type of drug arrested for, and type of stop, studies will find that the level of unalloyed racial animus in police behavior is relatively low. But as +Ezra Klein points out, these very things are purported to be causal! 

Scott Alexander agrees. A bit. But then argues with the idea that these structural factors can be called "racist' in any meaningful sense. This isn't exculpatory. It's worse.

Imagine that, tomorrow, we get new police, new prosecutors, new judges, and new juries, none of which have any racial animus whatsoever. Structurally, everything remains precisely the same: minorities are still, in the aggregate, poorer; minority neighborhoods are still more heavily policed; stop-and-friskpo... more »

I. Reviewing the literature on the subject, Scott Alexander concludes that when you control for crime in the neighborhood, past criminal record, socioeconomic status, type of drug arrested for, and type of stop, studies will find that the level of unalloyed racial animus in police behavior is relatively low. But as +Ezra Klein points out, these very things are purported to be causal! 

Scott Alexander agrees. A bit. But then argues with the idea that these structural factors can be called "racist' in any meaningful sense. This isn't exculpatory. It's worse.

Imagine that, tomorrow, we get new police, new prosecutors, new judges, and new juries, none of which have any racial animus whatsoever. Structurally, everything remains precisely the same: minorities are still, in the aggregate, poorer; minority neighborhoods are still more heavily policed; stop-and-frisk policies are still assigned to the same places; criminal records from before the magic shift are still in place. What do we solve?

Basically nothing.

Surprisingly few problems are caused by the attitudes of police themselves. If we cure that, we reduce the conviction rate somewhat. We get more black folks off of death row. We possibly have fewer police shootings -- but maybe not. In a system populated by angels, we have rebuilt a system of mass incarceration on a foundation of perfectly good cops. 

II. It's easy to prefer narratives where causality points in only one direction: poverty causes crime, or long-term neglect of minority interests causes unjust criminalization, or racist cops cause incarceration. When we pick apart bundles of causes or effects, we're trying to produce the most salient threads. But at a high resolution, distinctions disappear.

The pathologies of poverty, of which mass incarceration is one, are linked in ways which are difficult to disentangle. Endemic crime in a community attracts cops, increasing the probability of arrest, and reduces social trust. Mass incarceration breaks social bonds. Discrimination against felons elevates unemployment. And naked racial animus is a thumb always pressed to the scale.

To unravel this toxic hysteresis, it doesn't even matter where we begin. We could end stop-and-frisk. There's perfectly good evidence from Boston that less aggressive techniques work as well or better. We could normalize cocaine sentences. That's easy, and the present policy doesn't even make sense. We could increase the population of diversion programs. We could legalize low-risk drugs.

These are all things that Scott Alexander might agree with, so long as I keep the word "racism" taboo. But how else do we gather together these threads and call them by a single name? What do we gain by keeping to parlor-room-debate rules about an issue of such pressing concern to so many people?___

2014-12-04 17:31:26 (15 comments, 3 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Capsule Review, Black Mirror S01E01: Easily the most affecting short film I've seen about an important political figure fucking a pig -- but 2014 still has four more weeks, so I'm suspending judgment.

Capsule Review, Black Mirror S01E01: Easily the most affecting short film I've seen about an important political figure fucking a pig -- but 2014 still has four more weeks, so I'm suspending judgment.___

2014-12-03 21:16:31 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

"""
Such is the inherent defect of law-enforcement unionism: It’s peopled by those with a material interest in maintaining and enlarging the state’s most indefensible practices. [...] How could empowering police — increasingly militarized and shot through with a culture of preening brutality — yield anything but stepped-up repression? How could the traditional socialist goal of worker self-management result in anything but a dystopia of metastasizing prisons, imperious cops, and Minuteman-esque border-patrol guards? The best we can hope for from police, it seems, is passivity.
"""

"""
Such is the inherent defect of law-enforcement unionism: It’s peopled by those with a material interest in maintaining and enlarging the state’s most indefensible practices. [...] How could empowering police — increasingly militarized and shot through with a culture of preening brutality — yield anything but stepped-up repression? How could the traditional socialist goal of worker self-management result in anything but a dystopia of metastasizing prisons, imperious cops, and Minuteman-esque border-patrol guards? The best we can hope for from police, it seems, is passivity.
"""___

posted image

2014-12-03 21:02:42 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Read.

@a_man_in_black tweetstorms on #gamergate

Most #gamergate-rs are not consciously racist or misogynist, or consciously intending to harass, or consciously aggressive.

[...]

Why would Zoe Quinn talk about her life and the harassment she's been enduring if it weren't to draw attention to herself? Chan thinking.

Channers detest moderation, seeing it as an unnatural intervention into the "natural" emergence of consensus.

Chan culture considers personal reputation meaningless but collective identity sacrosanct.

[...]

Don't you DARE suggest there anything wrong with anonymity or gaming! But if some chick's reputation is ruined, oh well, who cares.

This also explains how #gamergate can be so obviously sexist and racist but also harbor everyone in #notyourshield.

As long as you sublimate yourself to the consensus constructed identity, #gamergate accepts you, no matter who you are!

But if you assert that gamer culture is hostile to women or POC or LGBT people, based on your own experience, you are out of fucking line.


The "Literally Who" women, Quinn, Sarkeesian, Wu, and Harper, are smeared by saying they want to aggrandize themselves somehow.

This goes against the anon culture idea that credit belongs to the whole, not themselves. They're stealing attention away from gamers!

[...]

The slur isn't that I was supposedly banned from WP; it's that I'm a human with a history, instead of just an anon.

Ironically, it's about humanizing their opponents.

Look at the replies to these tweets. I'm being accused of trying to build a reputation off of this writing, despite nobody knowing who I am.

It also explains their paradoxical obsession with and sensitivity to doxxing. It isn't hypocrisy.

Doxxing is the highest crime because it pierces anonymity.

But it's fitting for anyone who draws attention to themselves. Anyone who draws attention to themselves should not be able to escape it.

If they want attention that badly, they can have it.

[...]

It's a fundamental culture clash.

People who are hostile or arguing in bad faith can hide their bad faith behind this approach, but most do not realize how they come off.

This hostility is an implicit but intentional challenge to defend your arguments or shut the fuck up. It's the chan policing behavior.

But channers don't realize that they collectively are not a peer of the people they swarm around.

[...]

#gamergate is a bewildering mass with no spokesmen, leaders, organization, or consistent message. Who do they talk to?

[...]

#gamergate won't accept organization; it runs against their culture. But without organization, they can't collectively interact with anyone.

Conversely, each #gamergate-r won't leave the whole to interact as an individual.

That would mean surrendering both the #gamergate collective identity and the perceived power it entails.

https://storify.com/a_man_in_black/how-chan-style-anonymous-culture-shapes-gamergate___Read.

posted image

2014-12-03 20:50:54 (37 comments, 9 reshares, 39 +1s)Open 

In completely unsurprising news, it turns out that the Solyndra loan program produced a complete bust-and-boom cycle, and is now in the black. Why unsurprising? (And why doesn't it really matter at all?)

(1) This is a venture capital program. For reasons that are near-tautological, investments in projects before the point of commercial viability will typically lose money. Some projects that aren't commercially viable at their inception will turn out to not to be commercially viable at all.

(2) The Solyndra loan was a hedge. When you hedge, one of your positions will lose. The majority of companies the DOE invested in were using polysilicon-based technologies. As demand increased, polysilicon prices increased in step. Solyndra, on the other hand, was using a more expensive but less volatile gallium-arsenide cell. Unless the technologies were roughly comparable (and... more »

In completely unsurprising news, it turns out that the Solyndra loan program produced a complete bust-and-boom cycle, and is now in the black. Why unsurprising? (And why doesn't it really matter at all?)

(1) This is a venture capital program. For reasons that are near-tautological, investments in projects before the point of commercial viability will typically lose money. Some projects that aren't commercially viable at their inception will turn out to not to be commercially viable at all.

(2) The Solyndra loan was a hedge. When you hedge, one of your positions will lose. The majority of companies the DOE invested in were using polysilicon-based technologies. As demand increased, polysilicon prices increased in step. Solyndra, on the other hand, was using a more expensive but less volatile gallium-arsenide cell. Unless the technologies were roughly comparable (and it turns out they weren't), one or both of the technologies would be priced out of the market. 

But even if those weren't the case, it doesn't really matter because:

(3) The government has other ways of recouping a loss. When a private lender pushes out a loan, their profits come from the part of the interest that doesn't just represent the risk premium. When the government pushes out a loan, its profit consists of the interest plus the taxes on additional economic activity created by the loan. As a result, it can make pure economic sense sense for the government to loan on terms that the market won't offer.___

posted image

2014-12-02 20:40:52 (18 comments, 0 reshares, 33 +1s)Open 

From my hometown, a crime committed by a poor woman who only had two possible tracks in life: petty crime or children's television host.

From my hometown, a crime committed by a poor woman who only had two possible tracks in life: petty crime or children's television host.___

posted image

2014-12-01 19:55:33 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

This is probably not a Roman god. It would be surprising if it was.

It seems likely that this is a Hellenized depiction of Tammuz, whose cultic center was about 100 miles away from this site. It's an unusual depiction, but the attending features are correct: the god is reborn from vegetation, and depicted with (perhaps) a stalk of wheat. It would admittedly be more clear if we could see whether there was a head of wheat on top, but we can't.

This is probably not a Roman god. It would be surprising if it was.

It seems likely that this is a Hellenized depiction of Tammuz, whose cultic center was about 100 miles away from this site. It's an unusual depiction, but the attending features are correct: the god is reborn from vegetation, and depicted with (perhaps) a stalk of wheat. It would admittedly be more clear if we could see whether there was a head of wheat on top, but we can't.___

posted image

2014-12-01 19:08:08 (13 comments, 2 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Below, a list of the data sources for intelligence in the President's Daily Brief.

BLARNEY, an upstream data intercept program relying on FISA for its authority, is the single largest source of information in the President's daily brief. FAIRVIEW and STORMBREW, which are also upstream intercepts relying on FISA authority, come in at #6 and #8 respectively.  INCENSER, a similar data intercept program which doesn't rely on FISA, is only #11. 

Here's the terrifying part:

BLARNEY, FAIRVIEW, and STORMBREW are all US-based, and may target US citizens. INCENSER is foreign-based, and targets the Middle East and China. Which means that the data sources with the least legal basis are the primary SIGINT sources the President reads.

Below, a list of the data sources for intelligence in the President's Daily Brief.

BLARNEY, an upstream data intercept program relying on FISA for its authority, is the single largest source of information in the President's daily brief. FAIRVIEW and STORMBREW, which are also upstream intercepts relying on FISA authority, come in at #6 and #8 respectively.  INCENSER, a similar data intercept program which doesn't rely on FISA, is only #11. 

Here's the terrifying part:

BLARNEY, FAIRVIEW, and STORMBREW are all US-based, and may target US citizens. INCENSER is foreign-based, and targets the Middle East and China. Which means that the data sources with the least legal basis are the primary SIGINT sources the President reads.___

2014-11-26 19:19:11 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

At-Will Employment: Family Feuds

A decade before the Civil War, an itinerant Presbyterian preacher and abolitionist named John C. Ingersoll moved from upstate New York to Illinois with his two young sons, Henry and Robert. As tensions rose in the run-up to secession, the Ingersoll family was burned out of their home and forced to flee back to New York.

In his public life, John Ingersoll was intensely moral, but stern and demanding. Which is likely why his two sons lived their entire lives in an attempt to obliterate their father's memory. In the decades after the civil war, Robert Ingersoll became America's most prominent atheist.

His brother, Henry "H.H." Ingersoll, became a lawyer and tireless crusader for the Lost Cause. After the war, he set up a legal practice in Tennessee, helping to restore the franchise of Confederate veterans. And as... more »

At-Will Employment: Family Feuds

A decade before the Civil War, an itinerant Presbyterian preacher and abolitionist named John C. Ingersoll moved from upstate New York to Illinois with his two young sons, Henry and Robert. As tensions rose in the run-up to secession, the Ingersoll family was burned out of their home and forced to flee back to New York.

In his public life, John Ingersoll was intensely moral, but stern and demanding. Which is likely why his two sons lived their entire lives in an attempt to obliterate their father's memory. In the decades after the civil war, Robert Ingersoll became America's most prominent atheist.

His brother, Henry "H.H." Ingersoll, became a lawyer and tireless crusader for the Lost Cause. After the war, he set up a legal practice in Tennessee, helping to restore the franchise of Confederate veterans. And as Reconstruction began to collapse, he was appointed to the Tennessee Supreme Court, where he wrote a series of intensely anti-free-labor opinions. Including the opinion in Payne v. Western Atlantic  which abolished the duty of good faith and fair dealing in labor contracts.

In the years after the decision, Tennessee's mines and railroads shifted sharply toward the use of unfree labor.  And it was another family feud -- this one between brothers -- that brought it to an end.___

posted image

2014-11-26 00:27:50 (8 comments, 0 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

From the cringe files, a detailed account of the worst, most bizarre medical accident that can possibly happen to a human being: direct injection of mercury compounds into the central nervous system.

From the cringe files, a detailed account of the worst, most bizarre medical accident that can possibly happen to a human being: direct injection of mercury compounds into the central nervous system.___

posted image

2014-11-25 17:36:53 (12 comments, 4 reshares, 33 +1s)Open 

We talk about grand juries as though they're impartial fact-finders. But the procedures available to the prosecution make them nothing more than a rubber stamp. Which means that talking about the grand jury "doing its job" misses the point. The point is whether the prosecutor did his job.

What's clear to me is that the Ferguson police department was at war with the population of Ferguson well before Brown was shot: it was a town with more warrants than people, and which funded itself from fines and court costs. It failed to adequately investigate the shooting, and the eyewitnesses were unreliable, as eyewitnesses generally are. Then it made the news by fucking up the backlash beyond all human comprehension.

At that point, could they have gotten probable cause on Wilson? Absolutely. Was there a reasonable doubt? Absolutely. If the police don't do their job, the prosecution... more »

Some explanatory context about the lack of an indictment in Ferguson: while grand juries are nominally one of the checks on executive power, with the prosecutors only able to indict someone if they can convince a grand jury, this hasn't really been the case in decades, if ever. In the famous words of Sol Wachtler, former chief judge of the New York Court of Appeals, district attornies have so much influence over grand juries that they could get them to "indict a ham sandwich" if they wanted.

This is because grand jury proceedings are rather one-sided: there is generally no judge involved, nor any defense, but rather the prosecutor simply presents whatever evidence he or she chooses, and has to convince the grand jury that there is "probable cause" that the person committed a crime, i.e. that a reasonable (ordinary) jury could conceivably convict. If this seems like a rather low bar to you, you're right: quite a few people have argued that grand juries are a complete waste of time, and only half of US states still use them. (The federal government is required to by the fifth amendment; no common-law jurisdiction outside the US still bothers)

In those places which still use them, their main remaining function is to provide plausible deniability to prosecutors who don't wish to pursue a case: just like you could get a grand jury to indict a ham sandwich by only showing one story, you could get a grand jury to refuse to indict Freddy Krueger by showing them enough evidence to make the legitimacy of the state's case unclear.

That's not a common use for grand juries -- prosecutors generally have better things to do with their time than look for plausible deniability. (In the federal courts in 2010, for example, grand juries refused to indict 11 times, out of about 162,000 cases. Given that a prosecutor can generally guess when they don't even have a good enough case to indict, you can assume that those eleven each decided to have the grand jury be the one to say no, instead of them, for a reason)

What this means is that when you're trying to interpret the news and understand what a grand jury verdict means, you can basically take it to be a summary of the prosecutor's decision to prosecute or not to prosecute the case, rather than the verdict of an independent panel. 

(The analysis below notes that, in high-profile cases, there's another important reason that a grand jury may not indict, which is that the prosecutor feels that the case isn't strong enough to actually push through, but nonetheless feels political pressure to try anyway. That's not likely to be the case with today's news, as county prosecutor Bob McCulloch took the rather unusual step of having Darren Wilson, the prospective defendant, testify before the grand jury for several hours. Prosecutors who actually want an indictment generally don't invite the defendant to give their side of the story at length, as this is not considered conducive to getting the desired variety of ham sandwich. So it's fairly safe to read today's headline as "McCulloch decides not to prosecute Wilson," and interpret that as you will.)

If you want to read about the grand jury system in the US, as good a place to start as any is
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_juries_in_the_United_States___We talk about grand juries as though they're impartial fact-finders. But the procedures available to the prosecution make them nothing more than a rubber stamp. Which means that talking about the grand jury "doing its job" misses the point. The point is whether the prosecutor did his job.

What's clear to me is that the Ferguson police department was at war with the population of Ferguson well before Brown was shot: it was a town with more warrants than people, and which funded itself from fines and court costs. It failed to adequately investigate the shooting, and the eyewitnesses were unreliable, as eyewitnesses generally are. Then it made the news by fucking up the backlash beyond all human comprehension.

At that point, could they have gotten probable cause on Wilson? Absolutely. Was there a reasonable doubt? Absolutely. If the police don't do their job, the prosecution can't do its job. And so here we are, pretending that the legal process has done its job. 

It hasn't. It failed. It failed from the day Michael Brown was shot, and failed in increasingly catastrophic ways until yesterday, when the grand jury came back with a decision that had been a foregone conclusion since day one.

2014-11-24 21:19:19 (148 comments, 21 reshares, 95 +1s)Open 

Four stories about work:

One: Immediately out of college, I took a job working as the receptionist at a homeless shelter. The social worker quit, and I added those duties to my own, despite not knowing how to execute them. Then the executive director quit, and I took his job.

There was no duty pager for staff. If there were incidents, and there were, the police responded without staff support. I would only find out about the response the next day, from the on-site manager -- who, in general, was a trusted client. The trusted client was cooking meth.

I found a new one. But I took the phone as well. I was the only employee, and so I was the call rotation.

Clients would show up drunk. My phone would ring. There would be fights. My phone would ring. The sheriff would show up to serve summonses. My phone would ring. And although my workday wasn't usually any... more »

Four stories about work:

One: Immediately out of college, I took a job working as the receptionist at a homeless shelter. The social worker quit, and I added those duties to my own, despite not knowing how to execute them. Then the executive director quit, and I took his job.

There was no duty pager for staff. If there were incidents, and there were, the police responded without staff support. I would only find out about the response the next day, from the on-site manager -- who, in general, was a trusted client. The trusted client was cooking meth.

I found a new one. But I took the phone as well. I was the only employee, and so I was the call rotation.

Clients would show up drunk. My phone would ring. There would be fights. My phone would ring. The sheriff would show up to serve summonses. My phone would ring. And although my workday wasn't usually any longer than ten, eleven hours, several times a week, I would be rousted out of bed to go handle some emergency or another. 

I was bad at my job. This was in part for the usual reasons; viz., that I had no training. But almost every morning at 4 AM, I would wake up shuddering, and drag myself to the bathroom to puke my guts out. I didn't sleep. And so basic things like grant billing and meeting scheduling began to fall apart as fatigue-driven errors crowded in on every side.

Eventually, I left, having kept the organization from imploding. But I did very little other than that: I held on white-knuckled, and managed a hard landing for an organization that could have cratered. But I did an awful job. Even my emails from that era -- some of which I've kept -- are riddled with typos. 

Two: Insofar as I have been successful, I owe my success to that job. Everywhere I've gone, from that point forward, the very first thing written on my resume has been "executive director." It's what took me to ATVP, and what got me into law school, and after law school, this set of things got me my clerkship, and after my clerkship, it convinced people that I was hard-working enough to cut it in the job I got at Google.

And so I've landed here.

Earlier, +David desJardins accused me of being contemptuous of startup culture. I've never worked at a startup. But I've been in a similar place: working insane hours, never being entirely off the clock, cutting my own salary to keep the money from running out before the task was complete. It made me terrible at my job. The more I scrambled to keep the money from running out, the less I deserved it.

There are strong personal incentives to the sort of work which depletes all of your resources; the sort of work that renders you incompetent. I benefited from them. I still benefit from them. But I can still name the people I harmed, and can still trace, in detail, the things I was terrible at.

In the aftermath of negligence, it's tempting to offer yourself the cold comfort that there was no better way. As hard as it is to make decision that makes others suffer, it's tougher still to admit that that decision was unnecessary -- that you passed up an easy win because the incentives were wrong.

Three: We have evidence from medicine that there are probably some easy wins across the board, and across all kinds of high-performing jobs. Since the 1960s, doctors have insisted that working residents 100 hours a week was necessary for training, and that failing to do so would cripple medical productivity. 

The evidence, such as it was, looked fine: doctors unwilling to work the hours washed out, and doctors who worked longer hours were more successful. Not only that, they treated more patients. This seems adequate to empirically demonstrate that working more hours is better.

Of course, when you examine the rate of medical error, you find that overworked doctors are terrible at their jobs. As you would expect, the rate of medical error among people working more than sleeping is tremendous.

So were we rewarding terrible doctors? 

No. Because there's a confound: the same people willing to work hundred-hour weeks are more dedicated to their job, and otherwise better workers. But we had somehow managed to engineer a system which rewarded the production of low-quality work by high-quality workers, and which -- even more perversely -- used the production of low-quality work as a proxy for high-quality status. 

Unless software development is utterly unlike any other human activity -- and the mythical man-month suggests that it's not -- then startup founders are simply engaged in the same status-demonstration game that doctors were, and there's no reason to take them seriously. Conceding that they'd been wasting their time (and others' time) raises troubling questions that they'd rather not answer.

Four: A coda. In medicine, the policy changed. Often, nothing improved, because the incentives didn't change.

Doctors' hours were reduced from thirty-six hour shifts to sixteen-hour shifts. During their previous shifts, doctors slept, but they slept on the job. Now, working sixteen hours at a time, doctors never slept. The fatigue issues that were the core of the problem? They didn't go away. Doctors still needed to signal that they were working hard; the incentives to ignore the policy and exceed its bounds were still there.

Caring about incentives and caring about outcomes are often deeply at odds. Even knowing what I know now about work, I wouldn't change what I did: it was absolutely, unequivocally in my best interest. But the evidence is good that exhaustion makes us vulnerable to catastrophic failure, and that the incentives within subcultures of workaholism are deeply broken.___

2014-11-22 00:08:02 (12 comments, 0 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

At-Will Employment: Even Weirder

There's another simple liberal narrative about at-will employment. It goes like this: in the late 1870s, Horace Gay Wood decided to put his thumb on the scale in favor of employers. He was, after all, a railroad attorney. He worked for some of the most abusive employers in America -- businesses that broke strikes using lethal force, and for whom shedding unions was critically important.

But that's not true, either. Either he thought it would be an improvement over the status quo, or he just made a terrible mistake.

It's true that Horace Gay Wood was, at one point, a railroad attorney. He contracted tuberculosis, quit that job, and retired to Vermont to write legal treatises. Thumbing through his books, it seems as though he was a pretty mainstream reporter of the law. On a random sample of politically sensitive topics of... more »

At-Will Employment: Even Weirder

There's another simple liberal narrative about at-will employment. It goes like this: in the late 1870s, Horace Gay Wood decided to put his thumb on the scale in favor of employers. He was, after all, a railroad attorney. He worked for some of the most abusive employers in America -- businesses that broke strikes using lethal force, and for whom shedding unions was critically important.

But that's not true, either. Either he thought it would be an improvement over the status quo, or he just made a terrible mistake.

It's true that Horace Gay Wood was, at one point, a railroad attorney. He contracted tuberculosis, quit that job, and retired to Vermont to write legal treatises. Thumbing through his books, it seems as though he was a pretty mainstream reporter of the law. On a random sample of politically sensitive topics of time time, he seems to have gotten the law pretty much right. In the aggregate, he doesn't seem to have been biased in favor of employers.

As you would expect.

Because Wood was, among other things which we'll get to later, a member of Vermont's very liberal Whig party, and was elected to the state legislature on that platform. Though the Whigs had largely been broken up by the Civil War and replaced by the Republicans, the few stub Whig parties remaining in northern states were generally advocates of public education, public infrastructure, and free labor. Though there's little indication that he was a trade unionist, he seems to have been a fellow traveler with them.

I mention this not because he was a Whig or a lawyer-- being one in the 1870s was an extremely eccentric political position, the party having effectively dissolved in 1856 -- but rather because he was also a prominent Theosophist. Relatively early on in his career, he wrote a book about his extremely ecumenical, extremely peace-love-and-flowers personal philosophy. 

Sorry, sorry -- I buried the lede.

He didn't really write a book about his personal philosophy. Thomas Paine wrote a book about his personal philosophy. Horace Gay Wood, accidental author of the American doctrine of at-will employment, was just the spirit medium that channeled it. Its general political tenor is anti-wealth, anti-accumulation, anti-monopoly, distributist and ... well ... remarkably progressive for its time. He imagines the afterlives available to Indians and Muslims, condemns the pursuit of wealth, and exalts the spirit of Reason.

I find it hard to believe that this guy -- railroad attorney, sober legal reporter, progressive, and batshit crazy spirit medium -- was somehow acting to sabotage American law. No, that was actually someone else's fault.

Next Up: The two family feuds that sabotaged American labor law.___

Buttons

A special service of CircleCount.com is the following button.

The button shows the number of followers you have directly in a small button. You can add this button to your website, like the +1-Button of Google or the Like-Button of Facebook.






You can add this button directly in your website. For more information about the CircleCount Buttons and the description how to add them to another page click here.

Andreas SchouFacebookCircloscope