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Chris Kim A

Chris Kim A Verified in Google 

Artist. Smart-ass. Big-picture-curious.

Occupation: Artist: Fine, Graphic & Production / (rudimentary) IT (Self)

Location: Venice, California, USA

Followers: 18,157

Views: 20,589,427

Added to CircleCount.com: 11/30/2016That's the date, where Chris Kim A has been indexed by CircleCount.com.
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Chris Kim A has been at 7 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Marie Hélène Visconti58,684*Here is the video* https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhYpgWdPVYI#t=1257 I'll describe my working place and creative process and answer questions about it. it's a first try. 30 minutes of tuning and, if things turn well, 30 minutes of proper showing.From my studio.2014-02-18 18:00:0018  
Shinae Choi Robinson888,630*EGGS OVER EASY - A Chez Shinae HOA* Get it? Eggs?? OVER. EASY??? #ikillmyself :P With weekend breakfasts around the corner, I'll show you how to poach, fry, scramble and omeletize your eggs with ease. If you have any questions you'd like answered, make sure to leave them in the event comments. I'll also be taking questions live during the HOA. If you'd like an invitation to participate in the Hangout, also LMK in comments. I hope you'll join me! :)EGGS OVER EASY - A Chez Shinae HOA2014-02-08 04:15:0030  
Google+13,717,684The Google+ team will be sharing a few updates. RSVP to this event to watch the broadcast live.A Morning with Google+2013-10-29 17:30:0033542  
Rob Michael265,027Internet instrumental supergroup, LegoLand Empire (LLE), will be debuting our new release, _*Solar Particles*_ during a G+ Hangout Listeners Party and you're invited to among the first ears to intersect with this new music. We're psyched! *Have your good headphones on for this one.* We'll be talking about the making of the record, the techniques that were employed during the recording and fielding questions from you! We have a couple of open seats, so if you would like to be in the Hangout On Air with us, give a shout here on this event and we'll invite as many as possible to join us. LLE is an experimental internet project that includes jazz/ fusion musicians from across the US that have collaborated to produce this, our second EP. Keyboard wizard +Neil Alexander  bassist +Trip Wamsley and guitarist +Rob Michael navigate the compositions of +Allen Wentz. We're looking forward to speaking and sharing our new music with you. You will find the broadcast at http://www.youtube.com/user/AtmosMusic/liveListening Party/ CD Release of LegoLand Empire2013-07-20 18:00:0033  
Rob Michael265,027You're invited to Hangout Live with +Rob Michael & The Atmos Trio for our first LIVE +Google+ Hangout On Air in-studio Concert! We're calling this a *Reverse World Tour* since the world is coming to the studio vs us traveling the globe. You want to join us? C'mon over! We are deploying some fun and interesting production ideas that will make this a different hangout experience than other concerts you may have seen here on G+. You'll certainly want ot have your good headphones handy for this one. ;-) Joining Rob is Atmos Trio co-founder and drummer Joe Shotwell and bass virtuoso Wolf Wein. This will be live streamed to +YouTube and  embedded here on this event page. Be sure to RSVP if you would like to be one of the select few invited into the hangout.  We're always doing crazy guerilla-style "hits and splits." The best way to keep up with that stuff is via our spam-free, easy-to-unsubscribe-from-with-with-no-hard-feelings-in-the-event-you hate it  *MAILING LIST!*   Go to : http://eepurl.com/vuoSDAn Evening with Rob Michael & The Atmos Trio2013-04-14 03:00:0062  
Kol Tregaskes55,280Wishing you all a Happy New Year wherever you are and how every you are celebrating it!! #HappyNewYear :-)New Year's Party2012-12-31 13:00:00101  
Fraser Cain988,914To celebrate the landing of NASA's Curiosity Rover - the Mars Science Laboratory - we'll be running a special live hangout.  In conjunction with @106911959181067745693. We'll have all your favorite space/astronomy journalists on hand to discuss the mission in depth, and celebrate the landing live, when it happens. Join Fraser Cain, @109036978092446954908, @108952536790629690817 and @102887292457967781591 for this special event. Over the course of this 4-hour Google+ Hangout on Air, we'll interview members of the Curiosity team live in the hangout, as well as other special guests from the @111419948721791453320 and the @108759765804984663877. @109479143173251353583 and @107051665537162034944 will be on location at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to interview members of the engineering team, and show you what it's like to be at NASA during this amazing moment. We'll update this event as we lock down more of the guests and participants. See you there! You can follow the hashtag #marshangout   (this will replace our regular Sunday night @100902337165997768522)Google+ Hangout - Curiosity Landing Coverage2012-08-06 05:00:004837  

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 21

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2017-01-19 21:29:53 (21 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

This is terribly disturbing, especially if it turns out to be true. It's bad enough that the budgets are tightened and cut, but to eliminate the Endowments for the Arts and Humanities entirely, and scuttle Public Broadcasting off to the private sector, is like taking the color out of Old Glory, removing the music from the Star-Spangled Banner and throwing away our (crazy, mixed-up) heritage all together.

How great can we be (again(?)) without actively and publicly supporting the arts, humanities and public broadcasting to inform, encourage and inspire us in who we were, who we are and who we can be, together?

Donald J. Trump's transition team is reportedly planning to do away with the federal agencies that support the arts, humanities, and public television and radio.

Most reshares: 7

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2017-01-19 13:27:30 (0 comments; 7 reshares; 9 +1s; )Open 

During the height of 1960s space and flight exploration in the United States, Alice King Chatham worked behind the scenes creating partial-pressure pilot suits, test dummies, oxygen masks, space beds, and helmets for NASA and the U.S. Air Force. She even helped design suits for the television show Star Trek.

In the early 1940s, King Chatham was working as an artist and sculptor when she was recruited by the Air Force to help make the first successful oxygen breathing masks worn by all American World War II pilots. She was involved in an array of major experiments, studies, and projects, from creating space helmets for the 1963 first man-in-space program Project Mercury to designing prototype suits for monkeys that flew in the Aerobee sub-orbital rocket tests during the 1940s.

Most plusones: 14

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2017-01-18 16:25:50 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 14 +1s; )Open 

The cyanometer, invented in the 18th century by the Swiss scientist Horace-Bénédict de Saussure, had one evanescent purpose: to measure the blueness of the sky.
..
At the time, mountain climbers had observed that as they climbed higher, the sky turned a deeper blue. “Ce phénomène m’avoit souvent frappé,” Saussure wrote. “This phenomenon had often struck me,” and as he prepared to summit Mont Blanc, he wanted a way to measure the color of the sky. He brought with him pieces of paper colored different shades of blue, to hold up against the sky and match its color.

In the next few years, Saussure refined this idea into a tool for measuring blueness, his cyanomètre, a circle of paper swatches dyed in increasingly deep blues, shading from white to black. Using this tool, which in its most advanced iteration included 52 blues, he showed how the color of the sky changedwith elevation.... more »

Latest 50 posts

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2017-01-19 22:46:10 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

We have gathered together dozens of statistics to show how the nation that Trump inherits (and the rest of the world) has changed over the past eight years.

We have gathered together dozens of statistics to show how the nation that Trump inherits (and the rest of the world) has changed over the past eight years.___

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2017-01-19 22:29:05 (12 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

But this isn't a story about what minorities have done. It's about how many white people have reacted to increasing exposure to nonwhite populations, who are following in their footsteps and pursuing the traditional American dream. The reaction is not always articulated or even intentional; in fact, most people say they want to live in a diverse and integrated community; they, too, have the dream that no one will be judged by the color of their skin.

But data shows that as minorities move into suburbs, white families are making small and personal decisions that add velocity to the momentum of discrimination. They are increasingly choosing to self-segregate into racially isolated communities — "hunkering down," as Lichter likes to call it — and preserving a specific kind of dream.
...
The phrase "way of life" is imprecise, and perhaps it could indicate anall... more »

But this isn't a story about what minorities have done. It's about how many white people have reacted to increasing exposure to nonwhite populations, who are following in their footsteps and pursuing the traditional American dream. The reaction is not always articulated or even intentional; in fact, most people say they want to live in a diverse and integrated community; they, too, have the dream that no one will be judged by the color of their skin.

But data shows that as minorities move into suburbs, white families are making small and personal decisions that add velocity to the momentum of discrimination. They are increasingly choosing to self-segregate into racially isolated communities — "hunkering down," as Lichter likes to call it — and preserving a specific kind of dream.
...
The phrase "way of life" is imprecise, and perhaps it could indicate an allegiance to vague terms like freedom and liberty. But coded in the context is the assumption that our American culture is static — that what we have now, even though this differs for everyone, is more American than what outsiders can bring.
...
There is, however, a small community of people who are taking this in-group favoritism and developing it into a more nativist ideology. The most concise and unfiltered expression comes from former Notre Dame football coach Lou Holtz, who said a few months ago, "I don't want to become you. I don't want to speak your language. I don't want to celebrate your holidays. I sure as hell don't want to cheer for your soccer teams."

While this crude expression of nativism is less common, though perhaps on the upswing, it is a sentiment that has been historically engineered into the fabric of this nation — with xenophobic immigration laws, with discriminatory housing laws, with Jim Crow laws, with slavery. There’s less overt discrimination now, but we’re still at the mercy of this segregating momentum that our past has inflicted upon us. It still decides where we live and whom we live with.
...
When it comes time for the housing search, black and Latino residents look in neighborhoods that are as diverse as they say they want.

White residents "give a socially acceptable answer in the abstract," Krysan said, but they end up searching and living in much less diverse areas.

What this shows is that it's not black and Latino people who are self-segregating into neighborhoods — a myth that is often perpetuated, Krysan said. Rather, it's white residents who say they want more diversity but end up looking in less diverse areas.
...
Research led by Lichter, the Cornell sociologist, shows that in the past 25 years, the segregation between white people and minorities hasn't changed much within cities; racial groups are still very separate, though slightly less so. What has changed, though, is how segregated one town is from another.
...
This is what is exceedingly clear: Many white families in America, many of whom have ancestors who fulfilled the journey of the American dream, want to live in a certain type of community and want their kids to be educated in a certain type of school. It's often not malicious, not overt, and not articulated. It's just the broad pattern of how white Americans move about this land, and perhaps that's the definition of a privilege that is increasingly being called out.

Unfortunately, that doesn't always leave room for racial and ethnic minorities to do the same.

--
(via +Cara Evangelista)___

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2017-01-19 21:29:53 (21 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

This is terribly disturbing, especially if it turns out to be true. It's bad enough that the budgets are tightened and cut, but to eliminate the Endowments for the Arts and Humanities entirely, and scuttle Public Broadcasting off to the private sector, is like taking the color out of Old Glory, removing the music from the Star-Spangled Banner and throwing away our (crazy, mixed-up) heritage all together.

How great can we be (again(?)) without actively and publicly supporting the arts, humanities and public broadcasting to inform, encourage and inspire us in who we were, who we are and who we can be, together?

Donald J. Trump's transition team is reportedly planning to do away with the federal agencies that support the arts, humanities, and public television and radio.

This is terribly disturbing, especially if it turns out to be true. It's bad enough that the budgets are tightened and cut, but to eliminate the Endowments for the Arts and Humanities entirely, and scuttle Public Broadcasting off to the private sector, is like taking the color out of Old Glory, removing the music from the Star-Spangled Banner and throwing away our (crazy, mixed-up) heritage all together.

How great can we be (again(?)) without actively and publicly supporting the arts, humanities and public broadcasting to inform, encourage and inspire us in who we were, who we are and who we can be, together?

Donald J. Trump's transition team is reportedly planning to do away with the federal agencies that support the arts, humanities, and public television and radio.___

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2017-01-19 15:28:04 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

Low-cost DNA sequencer uses Nokia 1020's camera as a microscope http://engt.co/2jcBt9x

Low-cost DNA sequencer uses Nokia 1020's camera as a microscope http://engt.co/2jcBt9x___

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2017-01-19 15:26:01 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

Could geometry help explain puzzling differences in behavior shown by some rapidly rotating stars, also known as pulsars? Data from our Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests yes: http://go.nasa.gov/2jsbpYE

Could geometry help explain puzzling differences in behavior shown by some rapidly rotating stars, also known as pulsars? Data from our Chandra X-ray Observatory suggests yes: http://go.nasa.gov/2jsbpYE___

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2017-01-19 15:23:27 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

An enigma no more? The CIA just put millions of declassified documents online for anyone to search and view.

An enigma no more? The CIA just put millions of declassified documents online for anyone to search and view.___

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2017-01-19 14:18:57 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 10 +1s; )Open 

Shepard Fairey probably first crossed your radar when he drew the iconic “Hope” poster so associated with Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign. Now, he returns with another set of posters to help protest the inauguration of one Donald J. Trump. If you head over to the Amplifier Foundation web site, you can download and print a series of posters (shown above) by Fairey. The same applies to a number of posters designed by other artists, including Jessica Sabogal and Ernesto Yerena.

The images capture the “shared humanity of our diverse America” and condemn the exclusionary policies of the incoming administration. And thanks to the $1.3 million raised through a successful Kickstarter campaign, these posters will figure into a larger Inauguration Day plan. Here’s how it will work:

Much of Washington will be locked down on Inauguration Day, and in some areasthere will ... more »

Shepard Fairey probably first crossed your radar when he drew the iconic “Hope” poster so associated with Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign. Now, he returns with another set of posters to help protest the inauguration of one Donald J. Trump. If you head over to the Amplifier Foundation web site, you can download and print a series of posters (shown above) by Fairey. The same applies to a number of posters designed by other artists, including Jessica Sabogal and Ernesto Yerena.

The images capture the “shared humanity of our diverse America” and condemn the exclusionary policies of the incoming administration. And thanks to the $1.3 million raised through a successful Kickstarter campaign, these posters will figure into a larger Inauguration Day plan. Here’s how it will work:

Much of Washington will be locked down on Inauguration Day, and in some areas there will be severe restrictions on signs and banners. But we’ve figured out a hack. It’s called the newspaper! On January 20th, if this campaign succeeds, we’re going to take out full-page ads in the Washington Post with these images, so that people across the capitol and across the country will be able to carry them into the streets, hang them in windows, or paste them on walls.

You’re welcome to print and post these posters around your town–wherever it’s legally permitted to do so. To download the posters, go to: http://theamplifierfoundation.org/#download___

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2017-01-19 14:14:09 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

Ullmann and Bergman’s cinematic legacies are inextricably linked. When you think of one, you think of the other. And yet Ullmann had an acting career before and after Bergman. Above, you can watch The Danish Poet, narrated by Ullmann herself. Winner of the 2007 Oscar for Best Animated Short Film, The Danish Poet follows “Kasper, a poet whose creative well has run dry, on a holiday to Norway to meet the famous writer, Sigrid Undset. As Kasper’s quest for inspiration unfolds, it appears that a spell of bad weather, an angry dog, slippery barn planks, a careless postman, hungry goats and other seemingly unrelated factors might play important roles in the big scheme of things after all.”

Ullmann and Bergman’s cinematic legacies are inextricably linked. When you think of one, you think of the other. And yet Ullmann had an acting career before and after Bergman. Above, you can watch The Danish Poet, narrated by Ullmann herself. Winner of the 2007 Oscar for Best Animated Short Film, The Danish Poet follows “Kasper, a poet whose creative well has run dry, on a holiday to Norway to meet the famous writer, Sigrid Undset. As Kasper’s quest for inspiration unfolds, it appears that a spell of bad weather, an angry dog, slippery barn planks, a careless postman, hungry goats and other seemingly unrelated factors might play important roles in the big scheme of things after all.”___

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2017-01-19 14:06:15 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

In development for 13 years before it joined the U.S. Army fleet, the AH-64 Apache’s future was never certain. Today, it’s the most trusted member of the team. See how it got there on Air Warriors tonight at 8. http://bitly.com/ApacheAirWarrior

In development for 13 years before it joined the U.S. Army fleet, the AH-64 Apache’s future was never certain. Today, it’s the most trusted member of the team. See how it got there on Air Warriors tonight at 8. http://bitly.com/ApacheAirWarrior___

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2017-01-19 13:47:07 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

Lyle Lovett and John Hiatt, two of America's most admired singer-songwriters, share the stage for an intimate acoustic evening of unforgettable stories and iconic songs, delivering one of the most compelling concerts on the road.

Sunset Center, Carmel, CA
Saturday, March 11, 2017, 8:00 pm
All proceeds to benefit the Beacon House.
Tickets: Level I $137 / Level II $80

Lyle Lovett and John Hiatt, two of America's most admired singer-songwriters, share the stage for an intimate acoustic evening of unforgettable stories and iconic songs, delivering one of the most compelling concerts on the road.

Sunset Center, Carmel, CA
Saturday, March 11, 2017, 8:00 pm
All proceeds to benefit the Beacon House.
Tickets: Level I $137 / Level II $80___

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2017-01-19 13:41:21 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

The Most Vermin-Infested American Cities

Every two years, the government statistical agency conducts the American Housing Survey (AHS) to paint a picture of the country’s residential stock. The online survey asks respondents about the homes they live in—how homeowners financed their abodes, the public subsidies renters enjoy, and an array of other information, including whether they think their neighborhood is safe, or whether their home is musty.

Also, whether they have seen evidence of cockroaches, rats, and mice.

The Most Vermin-Infested American Cities

Every two years, the government statistical agency conducts the American Housing Survey (AHS) to paint a picture of the country’s residential stock. The online survey asks respondents about the homes they live in—how homeowners financed their abodes, the public subsidies renters enjoy, and an array of other information, including whether they think their neighborhood is safe, or whether their home is musty.

Also, whether they have seen evidence of cockroaches, rats, and mice.___

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2017-01-19 13:33:59 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

___

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2017-01-19 13:27:30 (0 comments; 7 reshares; 9 +1s; )Open 

During the height of 1960s space and flight exploration in the United States, Alice King Chatham worked behind the scenes creating partial-pressure pilot suits, test dummies, oxygen masks, space beds, and helmets for NASA and the U.S. Air Force. She even helped design suits for the television show Star Trek.

In the early 1940s, King Chatham was working as an artist and sculptor when she was recruited by the Air Force to help make the first successful oxygen breathing masks worn by all American World War II pilots. She was involved in an array of major experiments, studies, and projects, from creating space helmets for the 1963 first man-in-space program Project Mercury to designing prototype suits for monkeys that flew in the Aerobee sub-orbital rocket tests during the 1940s.

During the height of 1960s space and flight exploration in the United States, Alice King Chatham worked behind the scenes creating partial-pressure pilot suits, test dummies, oxygen masks, space beds, and helmets for NASA and the U.S. Air Force. She even helped design suits for the television show Star Trek.

In the early 1940s, King Chatham was working as an artist and sculptor when she was recruited by the Air Force to help make the first successful oxygen breathing masks worn by all American World War II pilots. She was involved in an array of major experiments, studies, and projects, from creating space helmets for the 1963 first man-in-space program Project Mercury to designing prototype suits for monkeys that flew in the Aerobee sub-orbital rocket tests during the 1940s.___

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2017-01-19 13:19:09 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

___

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2017-01-19 03:17:38 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

According to lore, the story of El Camino Real, alternately known as the "Royal Road" or the "King’s Highway," starts in the early days of California under Spanish colonial rule. The story goes that there was a trail that hooked up the 21 missions established by the Franciscans so that any distance between the settlements was only a day away by horseback.

Honoring that old route with a string of lovely bells hanging from shepherds’ staffs would be a great way to commemorate its vaunted history, if only that history were true.

According to lore, the story of El Camino Real, alternately known as the "Royal Road" or the "King’s Highway," starts in the early days of California under Spanish colonial rule. The story goes that there was a trail that hooked up the 21 missions established by the Franciscans so that any distance between the settlements was only a day away by horseback.

Honoring that old route with a string of lovely bells hanging from shepherds’ staffs would be a great way to commemorate its vaunted history, if only that history were true.___

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2017-01-19 03:14:14 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

They look a little like crop circles and a little like artistic earthworks. Around the world, they have many names: in the Namib Desert of Africa, they're called "fairy circles;" in Brazil they're dubbed "murundus," and in North America they're known as "Mima mounds." In a recent paper for Nature, Princeton ecologist Corina E. Tarnita and her colleagues call them "landscapes of overdispersed (evenly spaced) elements." All are regions where plants grow into such perfectly symmetrical, large-scale patterns that they seem unnatural.

Debates rage among ecologists about whether these patterned environments have a common cause and what it might be. Two of the leading hypotheses involve plant cooperation and insect rivalries. In areas where water resources are scarce or irregular, plants are known to engage in "scale-dependent feedbacks,"... more »

They look a little like crop circles and a little like artistic earthworks. Around the world, they have many names: in the Namib Desert of Africa, they're called "fairy circles;" in Brazil they're dubbed "murundus," and in North America they're known as "Mima mounds." In a recent paper for Nature, Princeton ecologist Corina E. Tarnita and her colleagues call them "landscapes of overdispersed (evenly spaced) elements." All are regions where plants grow into such perfectly symmetrical, large-scale patterns that they seem unnatural.

Debates rage among ecologists about whether these patterned environments have a common cause and what it might be. Two of the leading hypotheses involve plant cooperation and insect rivalries. In areas where water resources are scarce or irregular, plants are known to engage in "scale-dependent feedbacks," where plants over a wide area grow into clusters rather than spreading out over a big area. The plant clumps limit their sizes to make the best use of water, and this strategy leads to reproductive success. It also might explain why we see patterns of plant growth that are characteristic of fairy circles and Mima mounds.___

2017-01-19 03:01:11 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

Canadian Forces will send two acoustic specialists north to the nearby town of Igloolik, where, aided by their own ranger patrol, they will talk to locals to learn more about the tricky sound.

What they do after that remains to be seen. Best of luck, acousticians, and beware Cthulthu.

Canadian Forces will send two acoustic specialists north to the nearby town of Igloolik, where, aided by their own ranger patrol, they will talk to locals to learn more about the tricky sound.

What they do after that remains to be seen. Best of luck, acousticians, and beware Cthulthu.___

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2017-01-19 01:02:55 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

Even in the infamously expensive San Francisco housing market, the story of one woman’s staggering rent increase – from $2,145 to $8,900 a month – caused a stir

Even in the infamously expensive San Francisco housing market, the story of one woman’s staggering rent increase – from $2,145 to $8,900 a month – caused a stir___

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2017-01-18 21:05:04 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

Vizio's living room devices already play nicely with Google services, but wouldn't it be nice if you could use Google voice control as well? You can now. All of Vizio's SmartCast-equipped devices, including recent TVs, soundbars and speakers, just got support for Google Home. If you want to watch a movie on Netflix, you don't even have to wake your TV -- say the right words to Google's smart speaker and it'll start playing on your set. You can also pause, skip songs and tweak the volume without touching a button.

Vizio's living room devices already play nicely with Google services, but wouldn't it be nice if you could use Google voice control as well? You can now. All of Vizio's SmartCast-equipped devices, including recent TVs, soundbars and speakers, just got support for Google Home. If you want to watch a movie on Netflix, you don't even have to wake your TV -- say the right words to Google's smart speaker and it'll start playing on your set. You can also pause, skip songs and tweak the volume without touching a button.___

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2017-01-18 18:55:09 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

Earth has now had three consecutive years of record-breaking heat, as confirmed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Earth has now had three consecutive years of record-breaking heat, as confirmed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration.___

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2017-01-18 18:51:17 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

"In spite of our best efforts, there are still customers using the recalled phones who have not returned or exchanged their Note 7 to the point of purchase," a Verizon spokesperson told Fortune yesterday. "The recalled Note 7s pose a safety risk to our customers and those around them."

From now on, "all outgoing calls not directed toward the 911 emergency service will only connect to customer service," the report said. "Because Note 7 users have also already been reimbursed for the cost of the long-since recalled Note 7, Verizon is also saying it might bill the holdouts for the full retail cost of the phone."

"In spite of our best efforts, there are still customers using the recalled phones who have not returned or exchanged their Note 7 to the point of purchase," a Verizon spokesperson told Fortune yesterday. "The recalled Note 7s pose a safety risk to our customers and those around them."

From now on, "all outgoing calls not directed toward the 911 emergency service will only connect to customer service," the report said. "Because Note 7 users have also already been reimbursed for the cost of the long-since recalled Note 7, Verizon is also saying it might bill the holdouts for the full retail cost of the phone."___

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2017-01-18 18:49:12 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

Around 3,500 BCE, the ancient Egyptians began to practice a ritual that has long perplexed archaeologists. They buried their dead in recycled ceramic food jars similar to Greek amphorae.
...
Burial in pots took many forms. Egyptians buried their dead in all types of ceramic vessels, and, sometimes, the body was simply placed underneath a pot in a grave. Though pot burials were popular, especially for children, people also used coffins and even stone-lined pits to inter their loved ones. The practice of pot burial probably came to Egypt from the Levant region, where pot burials date back to at least 2,000 years before the first known examples in Egypt.

Around 3,500 BCE, the ancient Egyptians began to practice a ritual that has long perplexed archaeologists. They buried their dead in recycled ceramic food jars similar to Greek amphorae.
...
Burial in pots took many forms. Egyptians buried their dead in all types of ceramic vessels, and, sometimes, the body was simply placed underneath a pot in a grave. Though pot burials were popular, especially for children, people also used coffins and even stone-lined pits to inter their loved ones. The practice of pot burial probably came to Egypt from the Levant region, where pot burials date back to at least 2,000 years before the first known examples in Egypt.___

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2017-01-18 18:46:02 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

It's long been a conundrum for visitors to Japan: how do you actually use the toilet? For more than 35 years, the "washlet"—also known in some parts as the "super toilet"—has baffled the unwary traveller with its incredibly confusing array of additional functions.

Each of these space-age super toilets comes with a panel of buttons festooned with inscrutable icons. Press the wrong one and you can easily end up with a sharp jet of cold water at an uncomfortable angle, or even an unexpected blow-dry for your junk. What makes the whole affair exponentially more confusing is the fact that, until now, the makers of these Swiss army-knife commodes couldn't agree on a way to standardise the images they put on the buttons.
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At a press conference on Tuesday, representatives from the nine companies that make up Japan's Sanitary Equipment Industry Associationunv... more »

It's long been a conundrum for visitors to Japan: how do you actually use the toilet? For more than 35 years, the "washlet"—also known in some parts as the "super toilet"—has baffled the unwary traveller with its incredibly confusing array of additional functions.

Each of these space-age super toilets comes with a panel of buttons festooned with inscrutable icons. Press the wrong one and you can easily end up with a sharp jet of cold water at an uncomfortable angle, or even an unexpected blow-dry for your junk. What makes the whole affair exponentially more confusing is the fact that, until now, the makers of these Swiss army-knife commodes couldn't agree on a way to standardise the images they put on the buttons.
...
At a press conference on Tuesday, representatives from the nine companies that make up Japan's Sanitary Equipment Industry Association unveiled eight new symbols to accompany the various key functions for each new loo. Models released from April this year will all be standardised, and the manufacturers hope it might even become an international standard.___

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2017-01-18 18:37:21 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

Wendy Carlos, under her birth name Walter, came to prominence by doing what many a film composer does, interpreting the work of classical composers. But her reworkings of Beethoven, Bach, and Mozart are unique, made on early Moog synthesizers, which she had a hand in designing while a student at Columbia University’s Electronic Music Center in the sixties. Her album Switched on Bach, released the same year as 2001, won the composer three Grammy Awards, put Baroque music on the pop charts, garnered the highest praise from no less a keyboard authority than Glenn Gould, and “made electronic music mainstream.”

The album also put Carlos on Kubrick’s radar and he hired her and producer Rachel Elkind to compose the score for 1972’s A Clockwork Orange. Much of the music Carlos wrote or interpreted for the film wound up being cut, but what remained—the haunting arrangementof Henry Pu... more »

Wendy Carlos, under her birth name Walter, came to prominence by doing what many a film composer does, interpreting the work of classical composers. But her reworkings of Beethoven, Bach, and Mozart are unique, made on early Moog synthesizers, which she had a hand in designing while a student at Columbia University’s Electronic Music Center in the sixties. Her album Switched on Bach, released the same year as 2001, won the composer three Grammy Awards, put Baroque music on the pop charts, garnered the highest praise from no less a keyboard authority than Glenn Gould, and “made electronic music mainstream.”

The album also put Carlos on Kubrick’s radar and he hired her and producer Rachel Elkind to compose the score for 1972’s A Clockwork Orange. Much of the music Carlos wrote or interpreted for the film wound up being cut, but what remained—the haunting arrangement of Henry Purcell in the film’s opening title, for example—has become inseparable from the classical and futuristic elements commingled in Kubrick’s adaptation of Anthony Burgess. Carlos’ complete original score has since been released as a CD, which you can purchase. The first track, “Timesteps,” as the album’s liner notes inform us, was both the only original composition that made it into the film and the first recording Carlos sent to Kubrick.___

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2017-01-18 18:24:48 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

It took a Cuban illustrator to really capture the essence of Cold War intelligence and counter-intelligence for the MAD-reading public.

It took a Cuban illustrator to really capture the essence of Cold War intelligence and counter-intelligence for the MAD-reading public.___

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2017-01-18 18:12:00 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

The manufacturer of the world’s largest passenger airplane is setting its sights on a much smaller form of air travel. As Reuters reports, Airbus aims to have a single-person flying car prototype ready for demonstration by the end of 2017.

Since last year, Airbus has been looking into building autonomous aircraft that can be summoned through an app, just like ground-based ride-hailing services. At this year’s DLD digital tech conference in Munich, Airbus CEO Tom Enders revealed just how close they are to reaching that goal. According to Enders, the project is "in an experimentation phase" and a demo vehicle could be ready for takeoff within the year. In addition to personal flying cars, Airbus is also exploring self-piloted helicopter-style aircraft for transporting multiple passengers at once.

The manufacturer of the world’s largest passenger airplane is setting its sights on a much smaller form of air travel. As Reuters reports, Airbus aims to have a single-person flying car prototype ready for demonstration by the end of 2017.

Since last year, Airbus has been looking into building autonomous aircraft that can be summoned through an app, just like ground-based ride-hailing services. At this year’s DLD digital tech conference in Munich, Airbus CEO Tom Enders revealed just how close they are to reaching that goal. According to Enders, the project is "in an experimentation phase" and a demo vehicle could be ready for takeoff within the year. In addition to personal flying cars, Airbus is also exploring self-piloted helicopter-style aircraft for transporting multiple passengers at once.___

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2017-01-18 18:06:26 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

Instructables user Ruth Grace brings us this DIY Leave Me Alone Sweater. It acts as a regular sweater, but is also equipped with a zipper so you can close yourself off to the world! Perfect sweater for people who hate people and hermits.

Instructables user Ruth Grace brings us this DIY Leave Me Alone Sweater. It acts as a regular sweater, but is also equipped with a zipper so you can close yourself off to the world! Perfect sweater for people who hate people and hermits.___

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2017-01-18 18:03:45 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

Pop-Tarts are already frightening enough, containing over 18g of sugar each. Not to mention the way they violently spring from the toaster.

Graphic artist and horror movie enthusiast, Newt Cloninger-Clements, wants to terrorize your breakfast further with Horror Movie Pop-Tarts. Imagine a frosted and sprinkled Jason Voorhees emerging from your toaster when you least expect it. And, don’t think just because you ate him that he won’t be back.

Pop-Tarts are already frightening enough, containing over 18g of sugar each. Not to mention the way they violently spring from the toaster.

Graphic artist and horror movie enthusiast, Newt Cloninger-Clements, wants to terrorize your breakfast further with Horror Movie Pop-Tarts. Imagine a frosted and sprinkled Jason Voorhees emerging from your toaster when you least expect it. And, don’t think just because you ate him that he won’t be back.___

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2017-01-18 17:58:35 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

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2017-01-18 17:51:10 (5 comments; 1 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

In a recent survey, 56 percent of Americans said they have less than $1,000 in their checking and savings accounts combined, Forbes reports. Nearly a quarter (24.8 percent) have less than $100 to their name. Meanwhile, 38 percent said they would pay less than their full credit card balance this month, and 11 percent said they would make the minimum payment—meaning they would likely be mired in debt for years and pay more in interest than they originally borrowed. It paints a daunting picture of the average American coming out of the spend-heavy holiday season: steeped in credit card debt, living paycheck-to-paycheck, at serious risk of financial ruin if the slightest thing goes wrong.

In a recent survey, 56 percent of Americans said they have less than $1,000 in their checking and savings accounts combined, Forbes reports. Nearly a quarter (24.8 percent) have less than $100 to their name. Meanwhile, 38 percent said they would pay less than their full credit card balance this month, and 11 percent said they would make the minimum payment—meaning they would likely be mired in debt for years and pay more in interest than they originally borrowed. It paints a daunting picture of the average American coming out of the spend-heavy holiday season: steeped in credit card debt, living paycheck-to-paycheck, at serious risk of financial ruin if the slightest thing goes wrong.___

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2017-01-18 17:36:44 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

Mud pie, anyone? +NASA's #Curiosity rover is examining possible mud cracks preserved in rock on the surface of #Mars.


Mud pie, anyone? +NASA's #Curiosity rover is examining possible mud cracks preserved in rock on the surface of #Mars.
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2017-01-18 17:29:58 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

For democracy to prevail, we need to learn to learn the hard work of making good conclusions with good information. Instruction in the basics of argument can help us recognize such dangers and should be welcomed by anyone, regardless of their political beliefs.

Debate is supposed to allow good arguments to triumph over bad ones; truth to persevere against falsehood.

But rigorously filtering out deception and bias is difficult, time-consuming, and sometimes downright boring. Many of us tend to seek out information to confirm what we already believe rather than forming our opinions after balanced investigation.

For democracy to prevail, we need to learn to learn the hard work of making good conclusions with good information. Instruction in the basics of argument can help us recognize such dangers and should be welcomed by anyone, regardless of their political beliefs.

Debate is supposed to allow good arguments to triumph over bad ones; truth to persevere against falsehood.

But rigorously filtering out deception and bias is difficult, time-consuming, and sometimes downright boring. Many of us tend to seek out information to confirm what we already believe rather than forming our opinions after balanced investigation.___

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2017-01-18 17:25:08 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s; )Open 

Flickr iOS App Update

What's New in Version 4.1.0
We're back with some small tweaks and fixes:
- Stability and performance enhancements.
- Follow your groups straight from your feed with new groups cards.
- Create an account with any email, no Yahoo email address required.
- Edit albums.
- Lots of other bits and bobs to smooth over the user experience.
Stay tuned for more frequent updates and new features.

Flickr iOS App Update

What's New in Version 4.1.0
We're back with some small tweaks and fixes:
- Stability and performance enhancements.
- Follow your groups straight from your feed with new groups cards.
- Create an account with any email, no Yahoo email address required.
- Edit albums.
- Lots of other bits and bobs to smooth over the user experience.
Stay tuned for more frequent updates and new features.___

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2017-01-18 17:09:56 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

2016 was the hottest year on record, continuing a decades-long warming trend. Surface temperatures were the warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880. Learn more: http://go.nasa.gov/2jnVLxx

2016 was the hottest year on record, continuing a decades-long warming trend. Surface temperatures were the warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880. Learn more: http://go.nasa.gov/2jnVLxx___

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2017-01-18 16:58:07 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

Ooops, we did it again

Again, we just experienced the hottest year on record - CNN___Ooops, we did it again

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2017-01-18 16:41:55 (7 comments; 0 reshares; 9 +1s; )Open 

The company makes a 3D face camera for mobile devices that scans your face in high res with crazy detail, an accomplishment. Once it's scanned, the company can send you a file that you can then send to a 3D printer to make into a mask.

The company makes a 3D face camera for mobile devices that scans your face in high res with crazy detail, an accomplishment. Once it's scanned, the company can send you a file that you can then send to a 3D printer to make into a mask.___

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2017-01-18 16:35:14 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

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2017-01-18 16:25:50 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 14 +1s; )Open 

The cyanometer, invented in the 18th century by the Swiss scientist Horace-Bénédict de Saussure, had one evanescent purpose: to measure the blueness of the sky.
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At the time, mountain climbers had observed that as they climbed higher, the sky turned a deeper blue. “Ce phénomène m’avoit souvent frappé,” Saussure wrote. “This phenomenon had often struck me,” and as he prepared to summit Mont Blanc, he wanted a way to measure the color of the sky. He brought with him pieces of paper colored different shades of blue, to hold up against the sky and match its color.

In the next few years, Saussure refined this idea into a tool for measuring blueness, his cyanomètre, a circle of paper swatches dyed in increasingly deep blues, shading from white to black. Using this tool, which in its most advanced iteration included 52 blues, he showed how the color of the sky changedwith elevation.... more »

The cyanometer, invented in the 18th century by the Swiss scientist Horace-Bénédict de Saussure, had one evanescent purpose: to measure the blueness of the sky.
..
At the time, mountain climbers had observed that as they climbed higher, the sky turned a deeper blue. “Ce phénomène m’avoit souvent frappé,” Saussure wrote. “This phenomenon had often struck me,” and as he prepared to summit Mont Blanc, he wanted a way to measure the color of the sky. He brought with him pieces of paper colored different shades of blue, to hold up against the sky and match its color.

In the next few years, Saussure refined this idea into a tool for measuring blueness, his cyanomètre, a circle of paper swatches dyed in increasingly deep blues, shading from white to black. Using this tool, which in its most advanced iteration included 52 blues, he showed how the color of the sky changed with elevation.___

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2017-01-18 16:17:43 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 10 +1s; )Open 

In northern England, wedged between the counties of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, there is a limestone gorge brimming with cliffs and riddled with caves. Just outside the village of Creswell, the caverns contain fossils of ancient beasts, tools of early humans, and the northernmost ice age cave art in all of Europe.

The site is known as Creswell Crags, and it offers a unique glimpse into cave use during the Upper Paleolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic, Bronze, and Roman ages. There are four main cavities to explore (one is called Robin Hood’s Cave–it is close to Nottingham after all), as well as several shallow crevices and craggy bluffs.

In northern England, wedged between the counties of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, there is a limestone gorge brimming with cliffs and riddled with caves. Just outside the village of Creswell, the caverns contain fossils of ancient beasts, tools of early humans, and the northernmost ice age cave art in all of Europe.

The site is known as Creswell Crags, and it offers a unique glimpse into cave use during the Upper Paleolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic, Bronze, and Roman ages. There are four main cavities to explore (one is called Robin Hood’s Cave–it is close to Nottingham after all), as well as several shallow crevices and craggy bluffs.___

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2017-01-18 16:16:21 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

For some, 43 wax likenesses of U.S. presidents in a maze of dimly lit rooms is a ready-made nightmare. For others, they’re a solid business investment.

When Gettysburg’s Hall of Presidents and First Ladies Museum announced it would be closing back in November, they also scheduled an auction of their life-like commander-in-chiefs. The bidding finally kicked off shortly after 10 a.m. on a dreary recent Saturday morning. Wax President George Washington quickly sold for $5,100. Next, John Adams went for $1,600. Then Jefferson at $2,400, and so on, until every president—and first lady—from Washington to Obama (who fetched $2,000) had found a new home.

“We really did not expect them to go that high,” says Carol Metzler, vice president of Gettysburg Heritage Enterprises, the company that owned the museum. “But it was a very pleasant surprise.”

For some, 43 wax likenesses of U.S. presidents in a maze of dimly lit rooms is a ready-made nightmare. For others, they’re a solid business investment.

When Gettysburg’s Hall of Presidents and First Ladies Museum announced it would be closing back in November, they also scheduled an auction of their life-like commander-in-chiefs. The bidding finally kicked off shortly after 10 a.m. on a dreary recent Saturday morning. Wax President George Washington quickly sold for $5,100. Next, John Adams went for $1,600. Then Jefferson at $2,400, and so on, until every president—and first lady—from Washington to Obama (who fetched $2,000) had found a new home.

“We really did not expect them to go that high,” says Carol Metzler, vice president of Gettysburg Heritage Enterprises, the company that owned the museum. “But it was a very pleasant surprise.”___

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2017-01-18 16:14:30 (12 comments; 0 reshares; 11 +1s; )Open 

Think ghost town and you’ll probably imagine ruins —roofless houses, dirty broken windows, rotting floors, but at Kitsault, on the North Coast of British Columbia, Canada, you’ll find rows upon rows of immaculately kept houses, shopping centers, restaurants, banks, pubs and theaters, all abandoned and sitting empty but untouched and spotless. The town’s lights are always on, the streets are lined with neatly trimmed trees and there are freshly mowed lawns, yet no one has called Kitsault home since 1982.

The town of Kitsault, near the Alaskan border, situated about 115 kilometers down the gravel road from Terrace, had a very brief existence. It began in 1979 as a community of workers of the molybdenum mines. Molybdenum forms hard, stable carbides in alloys, and is often used to provide hardness and corrosion resistance properties to steel. But just as life was getting started in thispristin... more »

Think ghost town and you’ll probably imagine ruins —roofless houses, dirty broken windows, rotting floors, but at Kitsault, on the North Coast of British Columbia, Canada, you’ll find rows upon rows of immaculately kept houses, shopping centers, restaurants, banks, pubs and theaters, all abandoned and sitting empty but untouched and spotless. The town’s lights are always on, the streets are lined with neatly trimmed trees and there are freshly mowed lawns, yet no one has called Kitsault home since 1982.

The town of Kitsault, near the Alaskan border, situated about 115 kilometers down the gravel road from Terrace, had a very brief existence. It began in 1979 as a community of workers of the molybdenum mines. Molybdenum forms hard, stable carbides in alloys, and is often used to provide hardness and corrosion resistance properties to steel. But just as life was getting started in this pristine mountain utopia, the market for molybdenum crashed and the entire town of some 1,200 residents abandoned it.___

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2017-01-18 16:09:25 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

The Art of Cartooning
—B.Kliban

The Art of Cartooning
—B.Kliban___

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2017-01-18 15:51:04 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 14 +1s; )Open 

Increase your knowledge of connoisseurship, conservation and attribution of Renaissance art works with our MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture, in conjunction with the The Warburg Institute. Find out more here: http://bit.ly/26uj3on

Increase your knowledge of connoisseurship, conservation and attribution of Renaissance art works with our MA in Art History, Curatorship and Renaissance Culture, in conjunction with the The Warburg Institute. Find out more here: http://bit.ly/26uj3on___

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2017-01-17 22:08:39 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 12 +1s; )Open 

The right of working journalists to do their jobs should not be up for debate when a new administration takes office (or at any other time). But it disturbingly seems to be, writes NPR Senior Vice President Michael Oreskes.

The right of working journalists to do their jobs should not be up for debate when a new administration takes office (or at any other time). But it disturbingly seems to be, writes NPR Senior Vice President Michael Oreskes.___

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2017-01-17 19:30:01 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

Kangaroo Light, A Portable, Flexible LED Light That Can Be Shaped to Fit a Variety of Uses

Kangaroo Light, A Portable, Flexible LED Light That Can Be Shaped to Fit a Variety of Uses___

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2017-01-17 19:29:40 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 9 +1s; )Open 

Strengthening rural institutions and developing organizational capacity at local and national level are central to #UNFAO’s efforts for ending hunger and reducing rural poverty. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2ifV24i

Strengthening rural institutions and developing organizational capacity at local and national level are central to #UNFAO’s efforts for ending hunger and reducing rural poverty. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2ifV24i___

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2017-01-17 19:24:06 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

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2017-01-17 19:20:56 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

Many modern artists shunned advertising work, but in Moholy-Nagy’s case, the transition seems perfectly natural and consistent with his theory. He also needed the money. Having fled the Nazis and settled in London in 1935, the artist found himself, notes Hyperallergic, “looking to pick up some work to support his displaced life.”

He found it in 1936 through the UK’s Imperial Airways, who commissioned him to apply “his constructivist style” to a map (view it in a larger format here) intended to reassure nervous potential customers of the safety of air travel, a still new and frightening prospect for most travelers. He did so in a way that “makes air travel seem as approachable as stepping on the subway,” with his officiously color-coded “Map of Empire & European Air Routes.” The map, according to Rumsey, “draws on the pioneering information design work of Harry Beck andhis London subway map... more »

Many modern artists shunned advertising work, but in Moholy-Nagy’s case, the transition seems perfectly natural and consistent with his theory. He also needed the money. Having fled the Nazis and settled in London in 1935, the artist found himself, notes Hyperallergic, “looking to pick up some work to support his displaced life.”

He found it in 1936 through the UK’s Imperial Airways, who commissioned him to apply “his constructivist style” to a map (view it in a larger format here) intended to reassure nervous potential customers of the safety of air travel, a still new and frightening prospect for most travelers. He did so in a way that “makes air travel seem as approachable as stepping on the subway,” with his officiously color-coded “Map of Empire & European Air Routes.” The map, according to Rumsey, “draws on the pioneering information design work of Harry Beck and his London subway maps,” made in 1933 and “originally considered too radical.”___

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2017-01-17 19:17:35 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

Over the years, we’ve featured numerous readings of Edgar Allan Poe’s famous narrative poem, “The Raven” (1845). Narrations by Christopher Walken, Vincent Price, Christopher Lee, Neil Gaiman, Stan Lee and John Astin (think The Addams Family)–they’ve all gotten some airtime here on Open Culture. Now you can add The Grateful Dead to the list. Kind of.

In April 19, 1982, the Dead played their final show of an East Coast tour in Baltimore, the town where Poe lived and eventually died (under mysterious circumstances, I might add). About 15 songs into their set, the band wheeled two giants tanks of nitrous oxide onstage and launched into their long improvs “Drums” and “Space.” In what’s since been dubbed “Raven Space” (listen above), an eerie soundscape unfolds. Then bassist Phil Lesh, says grimly “Quoth the Raven ‘Nevermore,'” letting you know what idea they’reriffing on. No complete narration... more »

Over the years, we’ve featured numerous readings of Edgar Allan Poe’s famous narrative poem, “The Raven” (1845). Narrations by Christopher Walken, Vincent Price, Christopher Lee, Neil Gaiman, Stan Lee and John Astin (think The Addams Family)–they’ve all gotten some airtime here on Open Culture. Now you can add The Grateful Dead to the list. Kind of.

In April 19, 1982, the Dead played their final show of an East Coast tour in Baltimore, the town where Poe lived and eventually died (under mysterious circumstances, I might add). About 15 songs into their set, the band wheeled two giants tanks of nitrous oxide onstage and launched into their long improvs “Drums” and “Space.” In what’s since been dubbed “Raven Space” (listen above), an eerie soundscape unfolds. Then bassist Phil Lesh, says grimly “Quoth the Raven ‘Nevermore,'” letting you know what idea they’re riffing on. No complete narration of “The Raven” follows. The homage to Poe is more conceptual than literal, just as you might expect from the Dead.

You can listen to the Dead’s complete Baltimore show here. https://goo.gl/kx8zg3___

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2017-01-17 19:14:32 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

The first bumblebee species, Bombus affinis, is now on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's endangered species list.

The first bumblebee species, Bombus affinis, is now on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's endangered species list.___

Buttons

A special service of CircleCount.com is the following button.

The button shows the number of followers you have directly on a small button. You can add this button to your website, like the +1-Button of Google or the Like-Button of Facebook.






You can add this button directly in your website. For more information about the CircleCount Buttons and the description how to add them to another page click here.

Chris Kim ACircloscope