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Ciro Villa has been at 3 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Ciro Villa134,454Test Hangout on Air New Horizons Fly Along Real Time Telemetry, No Audio Commentary.Test Hangout on Air New Horizons Fly Along Real Time Telemetry, No Audio Commentary.2015-07-11 01:00:003  
Scott Lewis380,954Heck yes! 500th recording of the @117904790972122493317 podcast!! To celebrate this, @115510485336217794615 and I will be live-tweeting the show at @113166718268343560861, @117350484427668823936 and @101736365103983335412 bring us the amazing science we all know and live from TWIS.  If you're over on Twitter, live-tweet with us using the hash tag #TWIS500   (https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&q=%23TWIS500) When the show goes live, my promo video from @112979228143535385377 will be replaced with the live feed, but just in case you're having trouble finding it, check it out at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSuIbMcKpOw I'm sure Michael and I will be uploading some #selfies  of us watching and tweeting about TWIS and I hope you will too! Just put them down here in the event or on Twitter, I know that the trifecta of TWIS would LOVE to see you all celebrate with them! Also, please consider becoming a patron of TWIS. They do an amazing job bringing science to the WORLD every week and couldn't do it without the support of their listeners. You can do so easily over at their Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/thisweekinscience (also linked as "tickets") #ScienceEveryday   #TWIS   #ThisWeekInScience   #HangoutsOnAir   #Science   #STEM   #Podcast  TWIS500 Viewing Party!!2015-02-05 05:00:0084  
Ciro Villa134,454Let's meet and shake hands and enjoy the IMAX premiere of the movie "Interstellar" at the World Golf Village located in St. Augustine, Florida. If you are available and willing we can meet outside the theater between 7:30 and 7:45 PM EST on Thursday, November 6, 2014.  The movie starts at 08:00 PM EST. It is your responsibility to purchase your ticket at the following link: http://www.museumtix.com/venue/venueinfo.aspx?vid=783&tab=E Once there, select the movie from the drop-down then create an account to pre-purchase your ticket before they sell out. Casual Florida dress. Please RSVP.  Thanks.An Evening At the Movies - Interstellar Premiere in IMAX at WGV2014-11-06 19:30:002  

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Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

1
comments per post
1
reshares per post
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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 6

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2017-03-23 20:28:06 (6 comments; 1 reshares; 11 +1s; )Open 

Interesting..

Most reshares: 18

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2017-03-22 20:37:35 (5 comments; 18 reshares; 29 +1s; )Open 

"Scientists evade the Heisenberg uncertainty principle"

"ICFO Researchers report the discovery of a new technique that could drastically improve the sensitivity of instruments such as magnetic resonance imagers (MRIs) and atomic clocks. The study, published in Nature, reports a technique to bypass the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This technique hides quantum uncertainty in atomic features not seen by the instrument, allowing the scientists to make very high precision measurements."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-scientists-evade-heisenberg-uncertainty-principle.html

Most plusones: 29

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2017-03-22 20:37:35 (5 comments; 18 reshares; 29 +1s; )Open 

"Scientists evade the Heisenberg uncertainty principle"

"ICFO Researchers report the discovery of a new technique that could drastically improve the sensitivity of instruments such as magnetic resonance imagers (MRIs) and atomic clocks. The study, published in Nature, reports a technique to bypass the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This technique hides quantum uncertainty in atomic features not seen by the instrument, allowing the scientists to make very high precision measurements."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-scientists-evade-heisenberg-uncertainty-principle.html

Latest 50 posts

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2017-03-24 18:31:46 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

Save the Date: June 10-11, 2017

The SETI Institute invites all citizen data scientists and technologists to join us as collaborators in our mission to find radio signals from intelligence beyond our solar system.

We are issuing a worldwide, public code challenge and accompanying hackathon for the purpose of expanding our radio telescope signal classification tools using the latest developments in machine- and deep learning. With help from our partners at IBM and Galvanize, we will be launching this code challenge and hackathon this summer.

The hackathon will last two full days at the Galvanize office in San Francisco. It will include presentations on SETI research and data analysis, and hands-on help from SETI researchers, including Jill Tarter, and IBM data scientists. Also, guests from the UC Berkeley SETI Research Center will present their work on the Breakthrough Listen... more »

Save the Date: June 10-11, 2017

The SETI Institute invites all citizen data scientists and technologists to join us as collaborators in our mission to find radio signals from intelligence beyond our solar system.

We are issuing a worldwide, public code challenge and accompanying hackathon for the purpose of expanding our radio telescope signal classification tools using the latest developments in machine- and deep learning. With help from our partners at IBM and Galvanize, we will be launching this code challenge and hackathon this summer.

The hackathon will last two full days at the Galvanize office in San Francisco. It will include presentations on SETI research and data analysis, and hands-on help from SETI researchers, including Jill Tarter, and IBM data scientists. Also, guests from the UC Berkeley SETI Research Center will present their work on the Breakthrough Listen project.

We are really excited about this event, and are very much looking forward to working with you, meeting you online and in person at Galvanize, San Francisco in June! #ML4SETI

More info:___

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2017-03-24 18:23:28 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

d Cephei (d Cep) is the newly discovered star and prototype star of a new class of Cepheid stars, at a distance of about 890 light years away

(Thanks to +NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory)

"A surprising new class of X-ray pulsating variable stars has been discovered by a team of American and Canadian astronomers led by Villanova University's Scott Engle and Edward Guinan.

Part of the Villanova Secret Lives of Cepheids program, the new X-ray observations, obtained by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and published Thursday, March 23rd in the Astrophysical Journal, reveal that the bright prototype of Classical Cepheids, d Cephei, is a periodic pulsed X-ray source."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-discovery-class-pulsating-x-ray-stars.html

d Cephei (d Cep) is the newly discovered star and prototype star of a new class of Cepheid stars, at a distance of about 890 light years away

(Thanks to +NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory)

"A surprising new class of X-ray pulsating variable stars has been discovered by a team of American and Canadian astronomers led by Villanova University's Scott Engle and Edward Guinan.

Part of the Villanova Secret Lives of Cepheids program, the new X-ray observations, obtained by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and published Thursday, March 23rd in the Astrophysical Journal, reveal that the bright prototype of Classical Cepheids, d Cephei, is a periodic pulsed X-ray source."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-discovery-class-pulsating-x-ray-stars.html___

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2017-03-24 18:17:45 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

Entangling Quantum entanglement

"Our understanding of the world is mostly built on basic perceptions, such as that events follow each other in a well-defined order. Such definite orders are required in the macroscopic world, for which the laws of classical physics apply. The current work by a team of physicists from the University of Vienna is the first experimental quantification of such a superposition. It will be published in an upcoming issue of Science Advances."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-quantum-winner-loser.html

Entangling Quantum entanglement

"Our understanding of the world is mostly built on basic perceptions, such as that events follow each other in a well-defined order. Such definite orders are required in the macroscopic world, for which the laws of classical physics apply. The current work by a team of physicists from the University of Vienna is the first experimental quantification of such a superposition. It will be published in an upcoming issue of Science Advances."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-quantum-winner-loser.html___

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2017-03-24 16:09:22 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

Parallel Computation Provides Deeper Insight into Brain Function

New computational software developed by OIST researchers is hundreds of times faster than conventional tools, opening up new opportunities to understand how individual neurons and networks of neurons function.

The research is in Frontiers in Neuroinformatics. (full open access)

Parallel Computation Provides Deeper Insight into Brain Function

New computational software developed by OIST researchers is hundreds of times faster than conventional tools, opening up new opportunities to understand how individual neurons and networks of neurons function.

The research is in Frontiers in Neuroinformatics. (full open access)___

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2017-03-24 16:05:27 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

Meet Nadia, the scarily ‘human’ chatbot who can read your emotions http://tnw.me/vmjOFmd

Meet Nadia, the scarily ‘human’ chatbot who can read your emotions http://tnw.me/vmjOFmd___

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2017-03-24 16:03:58 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

It’s ransomware, Jim, but not as we know it

It’s ransomware, Jim, but not as we know it___

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2017-03-24 16:02:20 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

Friday FAQ: What is stellar magnitude? http://bit.ly/2nHz64p
Brightest stars to the eye are 1st magnitude, dimmest stars are 6th magnitude

Friday FAQ: What is stellar magnitude? http://bit.ly/2nHz64p
Brightest stars to the eye are 1st magnitude, dimmest stars are 6th magnitude___

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2017-03-24 16:01:44 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 11 +1s; )Open 

Need to change what I teach! unexpected finding: The lungs, not bone marrow, house most cells that make platelets. 

Need to change what I teach! unexpected finding: The lungs, not bone marrow, house most cells that make platelets. ___

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2017-03-24 16:01:27 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

Gullies in Winter Shadow

This is an odd-looking image. It shows gullies during the winter while entirely in the shadow of the crater wall. Illumination comes only from the winter skylight.

We acquire such images because gullies on Mars actively form in the winter when there is carbon dioxide frost on the ground, so we image them in the winter, even though not well illuminated, to look for signs of activity. The dark streaks might be signs of current activity, removing the frost, but further analysis is needed.

NB: North is down in the cutout, and the terrain slopes towards the bottom of the image.

The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 62.3 centimeters (24.5 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 187 centimeters (73.6 inches) across are resolved.] North is up.
... more »

Gullies in Winter Shadow

This is an odd-looking image. It shows gullies during the winter while entirely in the shadow of the crater wall. Illumination comes only from the winter skylight.

We acquire such images because gullies on Mars actively form in the winter when there is carbon dioxide frost on the ground, so we image them in the winter, even though not well illuminated, to look for signs of activity. The dark streaks might be signs of current activity, removing the frost, but further analysis is needed.

NB: North is down in the cutout, and the terrain slopes towards the bottom of the image.

The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 62.3 centimeters (24.5 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 187 centimeters (73.6 inches) across are resolved.] North is up.

The University of Arizona, Tucson, operates HiRISE, which was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of Caltech in Pasadena, California, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Larger image: http://buff.ly/2mygOCt___

posted image

2017-03-24 16:00:47 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 10 +1s; )Open 

“We like to extrapolate our Universe back to a singularity, but inflation takes the need for that completely away. Instead, it replaces it with a period of exponential expansion of indeterminate length to the past, and it comes to an end by giving rise to a hot, dense, expanding state we identify as the start of the Universe we know. We are connected to the last tiny fraction of a second of inflation, somewhere between 10^(-30) and 10^(-35) seconds worth of it. Whenever that time happens to be, where inflation ends and the Big Bang begins, that’s when we need to know the size of the Universe.”

13.8 billion years ago, the Universe as we know it came into existence. Today, the part we can observe is 46 billion light years in radius, having grown tremendously thanks to the expansion of the Universe. But if we extrapolate that backwards, we find that the Universe couldn’t have been infinitelysmall a... more »

“We like to extrapolate our Universe back to a singularity, but inflation takes the need for that completely away. Instead, it replaces it with a period of exponential expansion of indeterminate length to the past, and it comes to an end by giving rise to a hot, dense, expanding state we identify as the start of the Universe we know. We are connected to the last tiny fraction of a second of inflation, somewhere between 10^(-30) and 10^(-35) seconds worth of it. Whenever that time happens to be, where inflation ends and the Big Bang begins, that’s when we need to know the size of the Universe.”

13.8 billion years ago, the Universe as we know it came into existence. Today, the part we can observe is 46 billion light years in radius, having grown tremendously thanks to the expansion of the Universe. But if we extrapolate that backwards, we find that the Universe couldn’t have been infinitely small at the moment of its birth, but rather was a finite size at all finite times. We know an awful lot about the moment the Universe can first be described by the hot Big Bang thanks to the last 50 years of modern cosmology. People used to think the Universe could be contained in a volume no bigger than a marble, or that the part accessible to us could have been the size of the Solar System at birth. No more!

Between the size of a soccer ball and a skyscraper-filled city block is the only range left, and the more we learn about inflation, the smaller that range will get. Find out the science behind it today!___

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2017-03-24 16:00:18 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 10 +1s; )Open 

Astronomers identify purest, most massive brown dwarf - An international team of astronomers has identified a record breaking brown dwarf (a star too small for nuclear fusion) with the 'purest' composition and the highest mass yet known. The object, known as SDSS J0104+1535, is a member of the so-called halo – the outermost reaches - of our Galaxy, made up of the most ancient stars. The scientists report the discovery in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Astronomers identify purest, most massive brown dwarf - An international team of astronomers has identified a record breaking brown dwarf (a star too small for nuclear fusion) with the 'purest' composition and the highest mass yet known. The object, known as SDSS J0104+1535, is a member of the so-called halo – the outermost reaches - of our Galaxy, made up of the most ancient stars. The scientists report the discovery in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.___

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2017-03-24 15:59:02 (2 comments; 3 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

Meet the Audi lunar quattro soon to land on the moon

Meet the Audi lunar quattro soon to land on the moon___

posted image

2017-03-24 15:56:16 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 19 +1s; )Open 

Orbital ATK Cygnus Cargo Spacecraft: View 5 | Kennedy Space Center
The payload fairing containing the Orbital ATK Cygnus pressurized cargo module, secured on a KAMAG transporter, approaches the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Horizontal Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The payload will be hoisted up and mated to the ULA Atlas V rocket. The Orbital ATK CRS-7 commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to launch atop the Atlas V from pad 41. Cygnus will deliver 7,600 pounds of supplies, equipment and scientific research materials to the space station.

Credit: NASA/Leif Heimbold
Release Date: March 17, 2017

+NASA's Kennedy Space Center
+Orbital ATK
+United Launch Alliance

#NASA #Space #ISS #Cygnus #Spacecraft #OrbitalATK #Cargo #CRS7 #Commercial... more »

Orbital ATK Cygnus Cargo Spacecraft: View 5 | Kennedy Space Center
The payload fairing containing the Orbital ATK Cygnus pressurized cargo module, secured on a KAMAG transporter, approaches the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Horizontal Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The payload will be hoisted up and mated to the ULA Atlas V rocket. The Orbital ATK CRS-7 commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to launch atop the Atlas V from pad 41. Cygnus will deliver 7,600 pounds of supplies, equipment and scientific research materials to the space station.

Credit: NASA/Leif Heimbold
Release Date: March 17, 2017

+NASA's Kennedy Space Center
+Orbital ATK
+United Launch Alliance

#NASA #Space #ISS #Cygnus #Spacecraft #OrbitalATK #Cargo #CRS7 #Commercial #Payload #CapeCanaveral #AirForce #KSC #Kennedy #Florida #UnitedStates #STEM #Education___

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2017-03-23 20:28:06 (6 comments; 1 reshares; 11 +1s; )Open 

Interesting..

Interesting..___

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2017-03-23 17:24:34 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

Designers of future #Moon missions and bases have to contend with a chilling challenge: how might their creations endure the fortnight-long lunar night? ESA's #GeneralStudies programme has arrived at a low-cost way of surviving.

Designers of future #Moon missions and bases have to contend with a chilling challenge: how might their creations endure the fortnight-long lunar night? ESA's #GeneralStudies programme has arrived at a low-cost way of surviving.___

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2017-03-23 17:24:29 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

Information from ESA’s magnetic field #Swarm mission has led to the discovery of #supersonic #plasma jets high up in our atmosphere that can push temperatures up to almost 10 000°C.

Presenting these findings at this week’s Swarm Science Meeting in Canada, scientists from the University of Calgary explained how they used measurements from the trio of Swarm satellites to build on what was known about vast sheets of electric current in the upper atmosphere.

Information from ESA’s magnetic field #Swarm mission has led to the discovery of #supersonic #plasma jets high up in our atmosphere that can push temperatures up to almost 10 000°C.

Presenting these findings at this week’s Swarm Science Meeting in Canada, scientists from the University of Calgary explained how they used measurements from the trio of Swarm satellites to build on what was known about vast sheets of electric current in the upper atmosphere.___

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2017-03-23 17:23:36 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

A quintuple star system!

"(Phys.org)—A team of astronomers led by Krzysztof Hełminiak of the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Toruń, Poland, has investigated an interesting bright quintuple stellar system in which each of the stars is eclipsed. The quintet, designated KIC 4150611 (also known as HD 181469), given its peculiar pulsations, eclipses, and high-order multiplicity, could provide important information on evolution and structure of multiple-star systems. The new research was published Mar. 2 in a paper on arXiv.org."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-astronomers-rare-multi-eclipsing-quintet-stars.html

A quintuple star system!

"(Phys.org)—A team of astronomers led by Krzysztof Hełminiak of the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Toruń, Poland, has investigated an interesting bright quintuple stellar system in which each of the stars is eclipsed. The quintet, designated KIC 4150611 (also known as HD 181469), given its peculiar pulsations, eclipses, and high-order multiplicity, could provide important information on evolution and structure of multiple-star systems. The new research was published Mar. 2 in a paper on arXiv.org."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-astronomers-rare-multi-eclipsing-quintet-stars.html___

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2017-03-23 17:22:32 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

"Pushing the limits of the largest single-aperture millimeter telescope in the world, and coupling it with gravitational lensing, University of Massachusetts Amherst astronomer Alexandra Pope and colleagues report that they have detected a surprising rate of star formation, four times higher than previously detected, in a dust-obscured galaxy behind a Frontier Fields cluster.

As Pope explains, "This very distant, relatively typical galaxy is known to us, and we knew it was forming stars, but we had no idea what its real star-formation rate was because there is so much dust surrounding it. Previous observations couldn't reach past that. Finding out that 75 percent of its star formation was obscured by dust is remarkable and intriguing. These observations clearly show that we have more to learn."

She adds, "Historians want to know how civilizations were built up,... more »

"Pushing the limits of the largest single-aperture millimeter telescope in the world, and coupling it with gravitational lensing, University of Massachusetts Amherst astronomer Alexandra Pope and colleagues report that they have detected a surprising rate of star formation, four times higher than previously detected, in a dust-obscured galaxy behind a Frontier Fields cluster.

As Pope explains, "This very distant, relatively typical galaxy is known to us, and we knew it was forming stars, but we had no idea what its real star-formation rate was because there is so much dust surrounding it. Previous observations couldn't reach past that. Finding out that 75 percent of its star formation was obscured by dust is remarkable and intriguing. These observations clearly show that we have more to learn."

She adds, "Historians want to know how civilizations were built up, and we astronomers want to know where and how the elements in the universe were formed and where everything is made of, came from." The study is accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-astronomers-unexpected-dust-obscured-star-formation.html___

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2017-03-23 17:21:46 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

A supernova shock wave breaking through a cocoon of gas about 160 million light years away in the Leo constellation.

Want to know more? http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2012/sn2010/

A supernova shock wave breaking through a cocoon of gas about 160 million light years away in the Leo constellation.

Want to know more? http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2012/sn2010/___

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2017-03-23 17:21:39 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

E.T. B. Goode? Tune in today at 2:30pm PDT for a Facebook Live chat about Chuck Berry and the Voyager golden record: http://buff.ly/2nLpl5h

E.T. B. Goode? Tune in today at 2:30pm PDT for a Facebook Live chat about Chuck Berry and the Voyager golden record: http://buff.ly/2nLpl5h___

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2017-03-23 17:18:53 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

"Published on Mar 23, 2017
The Hubble Space Telescope captured an image of a quasar named 3C 186 that is offset from the center of its galaxy. Astronomers hypothesize that this supermassive black hole was jettisoned from the center of its galaxy by the recoil from gravitational waves produced by the merging of two supermassive black holes.

Read more: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/gravitational-wave-kicks-monster-black-hole-out-of-galactic-core

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Katrina Jackson"

"Published on Mar 23, 2017
The Hubble Space Telescope captured an image of a quasar named 3C 186 that is offset from the center of its galaxy. Astronomers hypothesize that this supermassive black hole was jettisoned from the center of its galaxy by the recoil from gravitational waves produced by the merging of two supermassive black holes.

Read more: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/gravitational-wave-kicks-monster-black-hole-out-of-galactic-core

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Katrina Jackson"___

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2017-03-23 01:09:46 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

Congratulations to Chilean astronomer, Dr. María Teresa Ruiz, for her award recognition from L’Oréal-UNESCO's For Women in Science! Each year, five women from each world region are recognized for various scientific accomplishments. This year, Dr. Ruiz represents the Latin America region in the category of Astrophysics.
Dr. Ruiz is currently the Director of the Excellence Center in Astrophysics and Related Technologies of the Universidad de Chile, Pontificia Universidad Católica and Universidad de Concepción in Chile.
Read more about this prestigious award recognition here: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/natural-sciences/priority-areas/gender-and-science/for-women-in-science-programme/2017-awards/.

Congratulations to Chilean astronomer, Dr. María Teresa Ruiz, for her award recognition from L’Oréal-UNESCO's For Women in Science! Each year, five women from each world region are recognized for various scientific accomplishments. This year, Dr. Ruiz represents the Latin America region in the category of Astrophysics.
Dr. Ruiz is currently the Director of the Excellence Center in Astrophysics and Related Technologies of the Universidad de Chile, Pontificia Universidad Católica and Universidad de Concepción in Chile.
Read more about this prestigious award recognition here: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/natural-sciences/priority-areas/gender-and-science/for-women-in-science-programme/2017-awards/.___

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2017-03-22 22:02:56 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 9 +1s; )Open 

Launch of Orbital ATK's #Cygnus cargo craft to the International Space Station postponed after a new booster hydraulic issue found during prelaunch testing: http://go.nasa.gov/2n8B9vc

Launch of Orbital ATK's #Cygnus cargo craft to the International Space Station postponed after a new booster hydraulic issue found during prelaunch testing: http://go.nasa.gov/2n8B9vc___

posted image

2017-03-22 22:02:16 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

"'Spectacular-looking' endangered frog species discovered in Ecuador's cloud forests"

"It's not every day someone gets to say, "I've discovered a new species."

It's a claim that Colorado State University biologist Chris Funk can happily make. Funk and his collaborators, who've spent years exploring the tropical climes of South America to study the region's dizzying biodiversity, have documented a new species of rainfrog they've named the Ecuadorian rainfrog (Pristimantis ecuadorensis). The name, the researchers write, honors the "overwhelming beauty, and cultural and biological diversity," of the Republic of Ecuador, where the frog makes its home. The work is described in the journal PLOS ONE, publishing online March 22."

Read more at:... more »

"'Spectacular-looking' endangered frog species discovered in Ecuador's cloud forests"

"It's not every day someone gets to say, "I've discovered a new species."

It's a claim that Colorado State University biologist Chris Funk can happily make. Funk and his collaborators, who've spent years exploring the tropical climes of South America to study the region's dizzying biodiversity, have documented a new species of rainfrog they've named the Ecuadorian rainfrog (Pristimantis ecuadorensis). The name, the researchers write, honors the "overwhelming beauty, and cultural and biological diversity," of the Republic of Ecuador, where the frog makes its home. The work is described in the journal PLOS ONE, publishing online March 22."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-spectacular-looking-endangered-frog-species-ecuador.html___

posted image

2017-03-22 22:00:53 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 12 +1s; )Open 

"Dozens of scientific journals appointed a fictive scholar to their editorial boards on the strength of a bogus resume, researchers determined to expose "pay to publish" schemes reported Wednesday.

One journal snared in the sting operation offered the imaginary applicant a 60/40 split—60 percent for the journal—of fees collected from scientists seeking to publish their research.

Universities have famously become "publish or perish" ecosystems, making many academics desperate to get their work into print.
Several publications assigned the phantom editor to an unpaid, top-level position.

"It is our pleasure to add your name as our editor-in-chief for this journal, with no responsibilities," responded one within days.

"Many predatory journals hoping to cash in seem to aggressively and indiscriminately recruit academicsto ... more »

"Dozens of scientific journals appointed a fictive scholar to their editorial boards on the strength of a bogus resume, researchers determined to expose "pay to publish" schemes reported Wednesday.

One journal snared in the sting operation offered the imaginary applicant a 60/40 split—60 percent for the journal—of fees collected from scientists seeking to publish their research.

Universities have famously become "publish or perish" ecosystems, making many academics desperate to get their work into print.
Several publications assigned the phantom editor to an unpaid, top-level position.

"It is our pleasure to add your name as our editor-in-chief for this journal, with no responsibilities," responded one within days.

"Many predatory journals hoping to cash in seem to aggressively and indiscriminately recruit academics to build legitimate-looking editorial boards," Katarzyna Pisanski, a social scientist at the University of Wroclaw, Poland, wrote in Nature."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-publish-schemes-rampant-science-journals.html___

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2017-03-22 20:37:57 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

A routine check of the aluminum wheels on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has found two small breaks on the rover's left middle wheel—the latest sign of wear and tear as the rover continues its journey, now approaching the 10-mile (16 kilometer) mark.

The mission's first and second breaks in raised treads, called grousers, appeared in a March 19 image check of the wheels, documenting that these breaks occurred after the last check, on Jan. 27.

"All six wheels have more than enough working lifespan remaining to get the vehicle to all destinations planned for the mission," said Curiosity Project Manager Jim Erickson at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. "While not unexpected, this damage is the first sign that the left middle wheel is nearing a wheel-wear milestone,"

Read more at:

A routine check of the aluminum wheels on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has found two small breaks on the rover's left middle wheel—the latest sign of wear and tear as the rover continues its journey, now approaching the 10-mile (16 kilometer) mark.

The mission's first and second breaks in raised treads, called grousers, appeared in a March 19 image check of the wheels, documenting that these breaks occurred after the last check, on Jan. 27.

"All six wheels have more than enough working lifespan remaining to get the vehicle to all destinations planned for the mission," said Curiosity Project Manager Jim Erickson at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. "While not unexpected, this damage is the first sign that the left middle wheel is nearing a wheel-wear milestone,"

Read more at:___

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2017-03-22 20:37:35 (5 comments; 18 reshares; 29 +1s; )Open 

"Scientists evade the Heisenberg uncertainty principle"

"ICFO Researchers report the discovery of a new technique that could drastically improve the sensitivity of instruments such as magnetic resonance imagers (MRIs) and atomic clocks. The study, published in Nature, reports a technique to bypass the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This technique hides quantum uncertainty in atomic features not seen by the instrument, allowing the scientists to make very high precision measurements."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-scientists-evade-heisenberg-uncertainty-principle.html

"Scientists evade the Heisenberg uncertainty principle"

"ICFO Researchers report the discovery of a new technique that could drastically improve the sensitivity of instruments such as magnetic resonance imagers (MRIs) and atomic clocks. The study, published in Nature, reports a technique to bypass the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This technique hides quantum uncertainty in atomic features not seen by the instrument, allowing the scientists to make very high precision measurements."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-scientists-evade-heisenberg-uncertainty-principle.html___

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2017-03-22 20:33:37 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

SpaceX and NASA have identified 4 possible locations for the first Dragon journey to Mars in 2020.

SpaceX and NASA have identified 4 possible locations for the first Dragon journey to Mars in 2020.___

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2017-03-22 20:32:23 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

See that big rock there? (It’s easy because there’s a big yellow arrow pointing to it.) That’s a 100-foot/30-meter wide boulder that was imaged sitting on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by ESA’s Rosetta on May 2, 2015. Nine months later…

See that big rock there? (It’s easy because there’s a big yellow arrow pointing to it.) That’s a 100-foot/30-meter wide boulder that was imaged sitting on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by ESA’s Rosetta on May 2, 2015. Nine months later…___

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2017-03-22 18:28:30 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

http://go.nature.com/2mQHoBQ

http://go.nature.com/2mQHoBQ___

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2017-03-22 18:28:07 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 14 +1s; )Open 

Central Cygnus Skyscape
In cosmic brush strokes of glowing hydrogen gas, this beautiful skyscape unfolds across the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy near the northern end of the Great Rift and the center of the constellation Cygnus the Swan. A 36 panel mosaic of telescopic image data, the scene spans about six degrees. Bright supergiant star Gamma Cygni (Sadr) to the upper left of the image center lies in the foreground of the complex gas and dust clouds and crowded star fields.

Left of Gamma Cygni, shaped like two luminous wings divided by a long dark dust lane is IC 1318 whose popular name is understandably the Butterfly Nebula. The more compact, bright nebula at the lower right is NGC 6888, the Crescent Nebula. Some distance estimates for Gamma Cygni place it at around 1,800 light-years while estimates for IC 1318 and NGC 6888 range from 2,000 to 5,000 light-years.

Image... more »

Central Cygnus Skyscape
In cosmic brush strokes of glowing hydrogen gas, this beautiful skyscape unfolds across the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy near the northern end of the Great Rift and the center of the constellation Cygnus the Swan. A 36 panel mosaic of telescopic image data, the scene spans about six degrees. Bright supergiant star Gamma Cygni (Sadr) to the upper left of the image center lies in the foreground of the complex gas and dust clouds and crowded star fields.

Left of Gamma Cygni, shaped like two luminous wings divided by a long dark dust lane is IC 1318 whose popular name is understandably the Butterfly Nebula. The more compact, bright nebula at the lower right is NGC 6888, the Crescent Nebula. Some distance estimates for Gamma Cygni place it at around 1,800 light-years while estimates for IC 1318 and NGC 6888 range from 2,000 to 5,000 light-years.

Image & info via APOD
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html
Image Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler, DSS, BYU

#universe #space #skyscape #milkyway #nebula #nasa
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2017-03-22 18:26:24 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

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2017-03-22 18:25:37 (1 comments; 7 reshares; 18 +1s; )Open 

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2017-03-22 18:22:46 (0 comments; 7 reshares; 13 +1s; )Open 

"New light has been shed on the functioning of human gut bacteria which could help to develop medicines in the future to improve health and wellbeing.

Scientists have found that single microorganisms in the human gut have the ability to disassemble the most complex of carbohydrates in our diet.

It is the first time such a discovery has been made and it is hoped that this may be used to one day identify new pre- and pro-biotic products to enhance people's health.

Led by Professor Harry Gilbert, from the Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences at Newcastle University, UK, the study is published today in the leading academic journal, Nature."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-scientists-gut-bacteria-complex-sugars.html

"New light has been shed on the functioning of human gut bacteria which could help to develop medicines in the future to improve health and wellbeing.

Scientists have found that single microorganisms in the human gut have the ability to disassemble the most complex of carbohydrates in our diet.

It is the first time such a discovery has been made and it is hoped that this may be used to one day identify new pre- and pro-biotic products to enhance people's health.

Led by Professor Harry Gilbert, from the Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences at Newcastle University, UK, the study is published today in the leading academic journal, Nature."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-scientists-gut-bacteria-complex-sugars.html___

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2017-03-22 18:21:55 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

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2017-03-22 18:17:24 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

"A new citizen-science project will rescue tens of thousands of potentially valuable cosmic images that are mostly dead to science and bring them fully back to life. Called Astronomy Rewind, the effort, which launches today (22 March 2017), will take photographs, radio maps, and other telescopic images that have been scanned from the pages of dusty old journals and place them in context in digital sky atlases and catalogs. Anyone will then be able to find them online and compare them with modern electronic data from ground- and space-based telescopes, making possible new studies of short- and long-term changes in the heavens.

"There's no telling what discoveries await," says Alyssa Goodman (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, CfA), one of the project's founders. "Turning historical scientific literature into searchable, retrievable data is like turning the key... more »

"A new citizen-science project will rescue tens of thousands of potentially valuable cosmic images that are mostly dead to science and bring them fully back to life. Called Astronomy Rewind, the effort, which launches today (22 March 2017), will take photographs, radio maps, and other telescopic images that have been scanned from the pages of dusty old journals and place them in context in digital sky atlases and catalogs. Anyone will then be able to find them online and compare them with modern electronic data from ground- and space-based telescopes, making possible new studies of short- and long-term changes in the heavens.

"There's no telling what discoveries await," says Alyssa Goodman (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, CfA), one of the project's founders. "Turning historical scientific literature into searchable, retrievable data is like turning the key to a treasure chest."

Astronomy Rewind is the latest citizen-science program on the Zooniverse platform, which debuted at Oxford University a decade ago with Galaxy Zoo and now hosts more than 50 active "people-powered" projects across a variety of scientific disciplines. After going through a short exercise to learn what they're looking for, users will view scanned pages from the journals of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) dating from the 19th century to the mid-1990s, when the Society began publishing electronically. Volunteers' first task will be to determine what types of images the pages contain: photos of celestial objects with (or without) sky coordinates? maps of planetary surfaces with (or without) grids of latitude and longitude? graphs or other types of diagrams?"

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-astronomy-rewind-citizen-scientists-zombie.html___

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2017-03-22 17:53:04 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 10 +1s; )Open 

"The flow of information between cells in our bodies is exceedingly complex: sensing, signaling, and influencing each other in a constant flow of microscopic engagements. These interactions are critical for life, and when they go awry can lead to the illness and injury.

Scientists have isolated thousands of individual cellular interactions, but to chart the network of reactions that leads cells to self-organize into organs or form melanomas has been an extreme challenge.

"We, as a community are drowning in quantitative data coming from functional experiments," says Michael Levin, professor of biology at Tufts University and director of the Allen Discovery Center there. "Extracting a deep understanding of what's going on in the system from the data in order to do something biomedically helpful is getting harder and harder."

Working with Maria... more »

"The flow of information between cells in our bodies is exceedingly complex: sensing, signaling, and influencing each other in a constant flow of microscopic engagements. These interactions are critical for life, and when they go awry can lead to the illness and injury.

Scientists have isolated thousands of individual cellular interactions, but to chart the network of reactions that leads cells to self-organize into organs or form melanomas has been an extreme challenge.

"We, as a community are drowning in quantitative data coming from functional experiments," says Michael Levin, professor of biology at Tufts University and director of the Allen Discovery Center there. "Extracting a deep understanding of what's going on in the system from the data in order to do something biomedically helpful is getting harder and harder."

Working with Maria Lobikin, a Ph.D. student in his lab, and Daniel Lobo, a former post-doc and now assistant professor of biology and computer science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), Levin is using machine learning to uncover the cellular control networks that determine how organisms develop, and to design methods to disrupt them. The work paves the way for computationally-designed cancer treatments and regenerative medicine.

"In the end, the value of machine learning platforms is in whether they can get us to new capabilities, whether for regenerative medicine or other therapeutic approaches," Levin says.

Writing in Scientific Reports in January 2016, the team reported the results of a study where they created a tadpole with a form of mixed pigmentation never before seen in nature. The partial conversion of normal pigment cells to a melanoma-like phenotype—accomplished through a combination of two drugs and a messenger RNA—was predicted by their machine learning code and then verified in the lab."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-03-machine-scientists-reverse-engineer-cellular-networks.html___

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2017-03-22 17:38:14 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

Very impressive trick...although, I do understand how this happens (hint: simple physics). ;-) Do you? Comment..

So, seriously, wait for it...

(explanation here: http://w4t.pw/27)___Very impressive trick...although, I do understand how this happens (hint: simple physics). ;-) Do you? Comment..

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2017-03-22 17:25:39 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

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2017-03-22 17:24:47 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

Sirius is our sky’s brightest star, but only because it's relatively nearby at 8.6 light-years away.
http://bit.ly/2nHjsG0

Sirius is our sky’s brightest star, but only because it's relatively nearby at 8.6 light-years away.
http://bit.ly/2nHjsG0___

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2017-03-22 17:24:28 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

A Swiftly Tilting (Dwarf) Planet: Shadowed, icy craters are a signature of #Ceres’ angled past. News from +NASA's #Dawn mission.

A Swiftly Tilting (Dwarf) Planet: Shadowed, icy craters are a signature of #Ceres’ angled past. News from +NASA's #Dawn mission.___

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2017-03-22 17:24:22 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

The astronauts took a break from spacewalk preparations today and checked out an expandable module and worked on science freezers. 

The astronauts took a break from spacewalk preparations today and checked out an expandable module and worked on science freezers. ___

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2017-03-22 17:24:14 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

IMAGE HIGHLIGHT: Jupiter and Ganymede “Peek-a-Boo" http://hubblesite.org/image/2440/news_release/2008-42

IMAGE HIGHLIGHT: Jupiter and Ganymede “Peek-a-Boo" http://hubblesite.org/image/2440/news_release/2008-42___

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2017-03-22 17:23:38 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 10 +1s; )Open 

Happy World Water Day 💧🌍

We're celebrating by sharing our favorite water planet, Earth!

Viewed from space, the most striking feature of our planet is the water. In both liquid and frozen form, it covers 75% of the Earth’s surface. It fills the sky with clouds. Water is practically everywhere on Earth, from inside the rocky crust to inside our cells.

This detailed, photo-like view of Earth is based largely on observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite. It is one of many images of our watery world featured in a new story examining water in all of its forms and functions. Here is an excerpt: “In all, the Earth’s water content is about 1.39 billion cubic kilometers (331 million cubic miles), with the bulk of it, about 96.5%, being in the global oceans. As for the rest, approximately 1.7% is stored inthe polar ice... more »

Happy World Water Day 💧🌍

We're celebrating by sharing our favorite water planet, Earth!

Viewed from space, the most striking feature of our planet is the water. In both liquid and frozen form, it covers 75% of the Earth’s surface. It fills the sky with clouds. Water is practically everywhere on Earth, from inside the rocky crust to inside our cells.

This detailed, photo-like view of Earth is based largely on observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite. It is one of many images of our watery world featured in a new story examining water in all of its forms and functions. Here is an excerpt: “In all, the Earth’s water content is about 1.39 billion cubic kilometers (331 million cubic miles), with the bulk of it, about 96.5%, being in the global oceans. As for the rest, approximately 1.7% is stored in the polar icecaps, glaciers, and permanent snow, and another 1.7% is stored in groundwater, lakes, rivers, streams, and soil.

Only a thousandth of 1% of the water on Earth exists as water vapor in the atmosphere. Despite its small amount, this water vapor has a huge influence on the planet. Water vapor is a powerful greenhouse gas, and it is a major driver of the Earth’s weather and climate as it travels around the globe, transporting heat with it.

For human needs, the amount of freshwater for drinking and agriculture is particularly important. Freshwater exists in lakes, rivers, groundwater, and frozen as snow and ice. Estimates of groundwater are particularly difficult to make, and they vary widely. Groundwater may constitute anywhere from approximately 22 to 30% of fresh water, with ice accounting for most of the remaining 78 to 70%.”

NASA image by Robert Simmon and Marit Jentoft-Nilsen, based on MODIS data.

Instrument: Terra - MODIS via @NASAEarth___

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2017-03-22 16:40:26 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbors from birthing planets

Fledgling stars try to prevent their neighbors from birthing planets___

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2017-03-22 15:22:30 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

It's aliiiiiiiiive...

It's aliiiiiiiiive...___

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2017-03-22 15:07:27 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

What do you get a swashbuckling starship captain who has everything

What do you get a swashbuckling starship captain who has everything___

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2017-03-22 15:06:02 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

Ever wondered how astronauts brush their teeth in space? Watch Col. Chris Hadfield explain the process! How about where they get all the water they're using (hint: it's not all being shipped up to them!)

If you enjoy the post, consider sharing it on and purchasing a copy of Syncretic Press' children's book that's mentioned at the end of the post. It's a sweet, educational book that will help youngster's establish healthy oral hygiene habits.

Ever wondered how astronauts brush their teeth in space? Watch Col. Chris Hadfield explain the process! How about where they get all the water they're using (hint: it's not all being shipped up to them!)

If you enjoy the post, consider sharing it on and purchasing a copy of Syncretic Press' children's book that's mentioned at the end of the post. It's a sweet, educational book that will help youngster's establish healthy oral hygiene habits.___

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2017-03-22 15:04:21 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

Strong electric currents in the upper atmosphere are known to vary according to the season, but ESA’s #Swarm mission has discovered that this seasonal variation is not the same in the north and south polar regions.

Strong electric currents in the upper atmosphere are known to vary according to the season, but ESA’s #Swarm mission has discovered that this seasonal variation is not the same in the north and south polar regions.___

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2017-03-22 15:04:00 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 14 +1s; )Open 

In 1006 CE, what was thought to be a new star suddenly appeared. In a few days, it was brighter than Venus! SN 1006 may have been the brightest supernova on record.

Want to know more? http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2005/sn1006/

In 1006 CE, what was thought to be a new star suddenly appeared. In a few days, it was brighter than Venus! SN 1006 may have been the brightest supernova on record.

Want to know more? http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2005/sn1006/___

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