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Derya Unutmaz

Derya Unutmaz Verified in Google 

Occupation: Scientist, Professor of Microbiology, Pathology and Medicine. (The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine)

Location: Farmington, CT

Followers: 162,121

Following: 4,906

Views: 15,300,289

Cream of the Crop: 10/28/2011

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 9

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2016-02-21 18:06:14 (9 comments; 0 reshares; 18 +1s; )Open 

A controversial genetic technology able to wipe out the mosquito carrying the Zika virus will be available within months, scientists say.

The technology, called a “gene drive,” was demonstrated only last year in yeast cells, fruit flies, and a species of mosquito that transmits malaria. It uses the gene-snipping technology CRISPR to force a genetic change to spread through a population as it reproduces.

Three U.S. labs that handle mosquitoes, two in California and one in Virginia, say they are already working toward a gene drive for Aedes aegypti, the type of mosquito blamed for spreading Zika. If deployed, the technology could theoretically drive the species to extinction.

Most reshares: 40

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2015-07-11 15:52:20 (4 comments; 40 reshares; 77 +1s; )Open 

Ocean life looks unreal in this time-lapsed and hyper-focused video

It's rare that you get a close-up peek at the hidden wonders of the world. Especially when it's a glance at the multi-colored, pulsating creatures that live deep in the ocean's trenches.
Sandro Bocci, an Italian film and documentary maker who specializes in experimenting with filming nature, shot a hypnotic underwater time-lapse of some strange-looking, alien-like aquatic animals in a marine aquarium in San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/beautiful-time-lapse-video-of-creatures-of-the-ocean-2015-7#ixzz3fbB7F7BZ

Most plusones: 77

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2015-07-11 15:52:20 (4 comments; 40 reshares; 77 +1s; )Open 

Ocean life looks unreal in this time-lapsed and hyper-focused video

It's rare that you get a close-up peek at the hidden wonders of the world. Especially when it's a glance at the multi-colored, pulsating creatures that live deep in the ocean's trenches.
Sandro Bocci, an Italian film and documentary maker who specializes in experimenting with filming nature, shot a hypnotic underwater time-lapse of some strange-looking, alien-like aquatic animals in a marine aquarium in San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/beautiful-time-lapse-video-of-creatures-of-the-ocean-2015-7#ixzz3fbB7F7BZ

Latest 50 posts

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2016-05-24 21:53:51 (4 comments; 9 reshares; 40 +1s; )Open 

 Biochemists Solve the Structure of Cell's DNA Gatekeeper
Caltech scientists have produced the most detailed map yet of the massive protein machine that controls access to the DNA-containing heart of the cell.
In a new study, a team led by André Hoelz, an assistant professor of biochemistry, reports the successful mapping of the structure of the symmetric core of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), a cellular gatekeeper that determines what molecules can enter and exit the nucleus, where a cell's genetic information is stored.
The study appears in the April 15, 2016 issue of the journal Science, featured on the cover.
The findings are the culmination of more than a decade of work by Hoelz's research group and could lead to new classes of medicine against viruses that subvert the NPC in order to hijack infected cells and that could treat various diseases associated with NPCd... more »

 Biochemists Solve the Structure of Cell's DNA Gatekeeper
Caltech scientists have produced the most detailed map yet of the massive protein machine that controls access to the DNA-containing heart of the cell.
In a new study, a team led by André Hoelz, an assistant professor of biochemistry, reports the successful mapping of the structure of the symmetric core of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), a cellular gatekeeper that determines what molecules can enter and exit the nucleus, where a cell's genetic information is stored.
The study appears in the April 15, 2016 issue of the journal Science, featured on the cover.
The findings are the culmination of more than a decade of work by Hoelz's research group and could lead to new classes of medicine against viruses that subvert the NPC in order to hijack infected cells and that could treat various diseases associated with NPC dysfunction.
http://www.caltech.edu/news/biochemists-solve-structure-cells-dna-gatekeeper-50446___

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2016-05-01 11:05:34 (7 comments; 3 reshares; 23 +1s; )Open 

Scientists say that a diverse gut microbiome is a healthy one, and it turns out that your lifestyle plays a huge role in shaping that. In a new study out of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, researchers examined specific foods and beverages that either contributed to or impaired microbiota diversity, and found that coffee, wine and tea all helped improve people’s gut bacteria.

Scientists say that a diverse gut microbiome is a healthy one, and it turns out that your lifestyle plays a huge role in shaping that. In a new study out of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, researchers examined specific foods and beverages that either contributed to or impaired microbiota diversity, and found that coffee, wine and tea all helped improve people’s gut bacteria.___

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2016-04-04 16:56:16 (2 comments; 3 reshares; 13 +1s; )Open 

Very well explained, must watch. An international team working at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has captured the first high-resolution 3-D images from individual double-helix DNA segments attached at either end to gold nanoparticles. The images detail the flexible structure of the DNA segments, which appear as nanoscale jump ropes.
News link:
http://newscenter.lbl.gov/2016/03/30/revealing-the-fluctuations-of-flexible-dna-in-3-d/


Very well explained, must watch. An international team working at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has captured the first high-resolution 3-D images from individual double-helix DNA segments attached at either end to gold nanoparticles. The images detail the flexible structure of the DNA segments, which appear as nanoscale jump ropes.
News link:
http://newscenter.lbl.gov/2016/03/30/revealing-the-fluctuations-of-flexible-dna-in-3-d/
___

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2016-04-04 16:53:50 (1 comments; 14 reshares; 27 +1s; )Open 

Everything you thought you knew about DNA's shape is wrong.

In recent years, scientists have made tremendous progress in reading the sequence of our DNA. But the three-dimensional shape of DNA remains mostly mysterious. In fact, it’s only recently that scientists have even begun to get a glimpse at how our DNA is folded. Today, scientists focus on the ways that gene mutations cause diseases like cancer. But totally normal genes can still malfunction if they get folded in the wrong way. It’s possible that ongoing research may eventually reveal a hidden world of “folding diseases.”

Everything you thought you knew about DNA's shape is wrong.

In recent years, scientists have made tremendous progress in reading the sequence of our DNA. But the three-dimensional shape of DNA remains mostly mysterious. In fact, it’s only recently that scientists have even begun to get a glimpse at how our DNA is folded. Today, scientists focus on the ways that gene mutations cause diseases like cancer. But totally normal genes can still malfunction if they get folded in the wrong way. It’s possible that ongoing research may eventually reveal a hidden world of “folding diseases.”___

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2016-03-27 16:41:46 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 17 +1s; )Open 

Liam completes an iPhone disassembly process every 11 seconds, with dozens running through the system at all times. About 350 units are turned around each hour, equivalent to 1.2 million iPhones each year. About 350 units are turned around each hour, equivalent to 1.2 million iPhones each year. Apple wouldn't say when Liam started its work, but emphasized the project is still in the research and development stages.

Via @Mashable

Liam completes an iPhone disassembly process every 11 seconds, with dozens running through the system at all times. About 350 units are turned around each hour, equivalent to 1.2 million iPhones each year. About 350 units are turned around each hour, equivalent to 1.2 million iPhones each year. Apple wouldn't say when Liam started its work, but emphasized the project is still in the research and development stages.

Via @Mashable___

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2016-02-21 18:27:25 (3 comments; 29 reshares; 53 +1s; )Open 

"The Bullshit Asymmetry Principle" formulated by Alberto Brandolini, an Italian programmer, states that:

"The amount of energy needed to refute bullshit is an order of magnitude bigger than to produce it."

"The Bullshit Asymmetry Principle" formulated by Alberto Brandolini, an Italian programmer, states that:

"The amount of energy needed to refute bullshit is an order of magnitude bigger than to produce it."___

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2016-02-21 18:06:14 (9 comments; 0 reshares; 18 +1s; )Open 

A controversial genetic technology able to wipe out the mosquito carrying the Zika virus will be available within months, scientists say.

The technology, called a “gene drive,” was demonstrated only last year in yeast cells, fruit flies, and a species of mosquito that transmits malaria. It uses the gene-snipping technology CRISPR to force a genetic change to spread through a population as it reproduces.

Three U.S. labs that handle mosquitoes, two in California and one in Virginia, say they are already working toward a gene drive for Aedes aegypti, the type of mosquito blamed for spreading Zika. If deployed, the technology could theoretically drive the species to extinction.

A controversial genetic technology able to wipe out the mosquito carrying the Zika virus will be available within months, scientists say.

The technology, called a “gene drive,” was demonstrated only last year in yeast cells, fruit flies, and a species of mosquito that transmits malaria. It uses the gene-snipping technology CRISPR to force a genetic change to spread through a population as it reproduces.

Three U.S. labs that handle mosquitoes, two in California and one in Virginia, say they are already working toward a gene drive for Aedes aegypti, the type of mosquito blamed for spreading Zika. If deployed, the technology could theoretically drive the species to extinction.___

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2016-02-21 17:57:28 (0 comments; 6 reshares; 28 +1s; )Open 

Lasers Can Stimulate The Natural Healing Of Deeper Skin Wounds.

The “nano-suturing” technique involves the use of a medical dye, called rose bengal, that links up the skin’s collagen structural proteins. When collagen is lacking an electron, it will bond with other nearby collagen molecules. Blasting the rose bengal dye with a laser beam causes it to steal an electron from the collagen, leaving it with an odd number of electrons. In order to resolve the electron’s unpaired state, the collagen will fuse with its neighbors, hence creating a natural seal. Unlike more intrusive means of sealing wounds (like stitches and staples), this method won’t cause any inflammation or mild trauma to the skin.

In the study, the researcher tested their technique on a 10-millimeter-deep (0.39-inch-deep) cut on a deceased pig’s skin. Within 15 minutes, the wound wasbonded.
more »

Lasers Can Stimulate The Natural Healing Of Deeper Skin Wounds.

The “nano-suturing” technique involves the use of a medical dye, called rose bengal, that links up the skin’s collagen structural proteins. When collagen is lacking an electron, it will bond with other nearby collagen molecules. Blasting the rose bengal dye with a laser beam causes it to steal an electron from the collagen, leaving it with an odd number of electrons. In order to resolve the electron’s unpaired state, the collagen will fuse with its neighbors, hence creating a natural seal. Unlike more intrusive means of sealing wounds (like stitches and staples), this method won’t cause any inflammation or mild trauma to the skin.

In the study, the researcher tested their technique on a 10-millimeter-deep (0.39-inch-deep) cut on a deceased pig’s skin. Within 15 minutes, the wound was bonded.

http://bit.ly/1mt28zi
Study: doi:10.1038/ncomms10374___

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2016-02-21 15:28:12 (2 comments; 9 reshares; 29 +1s; )Open 

In what may be a timely move, the FDA has issued clearance to RevMedX to introduce its XStat Rapid Hemostasis System for treating gunshot wounds in the civilian population. Last year the device received FDA clearance to be used on the battlefield, but now ambulances in the U.S. will have the option of carrying XStats as well.

The device contains a bunch of tablet-sized sponges that are injected, similar to using a typical syringe, deep into the wound. The tablets absorb blood and rapidly expand to fill the cavity that they find themselves in. The patient is then transported to a trauma ward where the sponges are removed and treatment can continue.

In what may be a timely move, the FDA has issued clearance to RevMedX to introduce its XStat Rapid Hemostasis System for treating gunshot wounds in the civilian population. Last year the device received FDA clearance to be used on the battlefield, but now ambulances in the U.S. will have the option of carrying XStats as well.

The device contains a bunch of tablet-sized sponges that are injected, similar to using a typical syringe, deep into the wound. The tablets absorb blood and rapidly expand to fill the cavity that they find themselves in. The patient is then transported to a trauma ward where the sponges are removed and treatment can continue.___

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2016-02-20 20:29:55 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 14 +1s; )Open 

It's an oft-repeated idea that blind people can compensate for their lack of sight with enhanced hearing or other abilities. The musical talents of Stevie Wonder and Ray Charles, both blinded at an early age, are cited as examples of blindness conferring an advantage in other areas. Then there's the superhero Daredevil, who is blind but uses his heightened remaining senses to fight crime.

It is commonly assumed that the improvement in the remaining senses is a result of learned behavior; in the absence of vision, blind people pay attention to auditory cues and learn how to use them more efficiently. But there is mounting evidence that people missing one sense don't just learn to use the others better. The brain adapts to the loss by giving itself a makeover. If one sense is lost, the areas of the brain normally devoted to handling that sensory information do not go unused — they getr... more »

It's an oft-repeated idea that blind people can compensate for their lack of sight with enhanced hearing or other abilities. The musical talents of Stevie Wonder and Ray Charles, both blinded at an early age, are cited as examples of blindness conferring an advantage in other areas. Then there's the superhero Daredevil, who is blind but uses his heightened remaining senses to fight crime.

It is commonly assumed that the improvement in the remaining senses is a result of learned behavior; in the absence of vision, blind people pay attention to auditory cues and learn how to use them more efficiently. But there is mounting evidence that people missing one sense don't just learn to use the others better. The brain adapts to the loss by giving itself a makeover. If one sense is lost, the areas of the brain normally devoted to handling that sensory information do not go unused — they get rewired and put to work processing other senses.___

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2016-02-20 19:48:59 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 29 +1s; )Open 

It’s one of the big mysteries of cell biology. Why do mitochondria—the oval-shaped structures that power our cells—have their own DNA, and why have they kept it when the cell itself has plenty of its own genetic material? A new study may have found an answer.

Scientists think that mitochondria were once independent single-celled organisms until, more than a billion years ago, they were swallowed by larger cells. Instead of being digested, they settled down and developed a mutually beneficial relationship developed with their hosts that eventually enabled the rise of more complex life, like today’s plants and animals.

It’s one of the big mysteries of cell biology. Why do mitochondria—the oval-shaped structures that power our cells—have their own DNA, and why have they kept it when the cell itself has plenty of its own genetic material? A new study may have found an answer.

Scientists think that mitochondria were once independent single-celled organisms until, more than a billion years ago, they were swallowed by larger cells. Instead of being digested, they settled down and developed a mutually beneficial relationship developed with their hosts that eventually enabled the rise of more complex life, like today’s plants and animals.___

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2016-02-13 02:19:57 (1 comments; 5 reshares; 27 +1s; )Open 

Humans, like all social animals, have a fundamental need for contact with others. This deeply ingrained instinct helps us to survive; it’s much easier to find food, shelter, and other necessities with a group than alone. Deprived of human contact, most people become lonely and emotionally distressed.

In a study appearing in the Feb. 11 issue of Cell, MIT neuroscientists have identified a brain region that represents these feelings of loneliness. This cluster of cells, located near the back of the brain in an area called the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), is necessary for generating the increased sociability that normally occurs after a period of social isolation, the researchers found in a study of mice.

Humans, like all social animals, have a fundamental need for contact with others. This deeply ingrained instinct helps us to survive; it’s much easier to find food, shelter, and other necessities with a group than alone. Deprived of human contact, most people become lonely and emotionally distressed.

In a study appearing in the Feb. 11 issue of Cell, MIT neuroscientists have identified a brain region that represents these feelings of loneliness. This cluster of cells, located near the back of the brain in an area called the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), is necessary for generating the increased sociability that normally occurs after a period of social isolation, the researchers found in a study of mice.___

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2016-02-11 13:54:52 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 16 +1s; )Open 

Just as Wall Street needs to break the hold of the bonus culture, which drives risk-taking that is rational for individuals but damaging to the financial system, so science must break the tyranny of the luxury journals. The result will be better research that better serves science and society.

Just as Wall Street needs to break the hold of the bonus culture, which drives risk-taking that is rational for individuals but damaging to the financial system, so science must break the tyranny of the luxury journals. The result will be better research that better serves science and society.___

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2016-02-03 16:40:18 (3 comments; 5 reshares; 24 +1s; )Open 

Researchers have created male mice with no trace of a Y chromosome, supposedly the defining hallmark of being male.

Reproductive biologist Monika Ward of the University of Hawaii in Honolulu and colleagues started with mice that have only one X chromosome (and no second sex chromosome). Normally those animals would develop as females. But when the researchers manipulated genes found on the X and another chromosome, the mice became males that could produce immature sperm. Those engineered males fathered offspring with reproductive assistance from the researchers, who injected the immature sperm into eggs, Ward and colleagues report in the Jan. 29 Science.

Researchers have created male mice with no trace of a Y chromosome, supposedly the defining hallmark of being male.

Reproductive biologist Monika Ward of the University of Hawaii in Honolulu and colleagues started with mice that have only one X chromosome (and no second sex chromosome). Normally those animals would develop as females. But when the researchers manipulated genes found on the X and another chromosome, the mice became males that could produce immature sperm. Those engineered males fathered offspring with reproductive assistance from the researchers, who injected the immature sperm into eggs, Ward and colleagues report in the Jan. 29 Science.___

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2016-01-13 17:23:56 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 10 +1s; )Open 

The Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI): Launched by President Obama early in 2015, the PMI will continue to be an attention grabber. A huge amount of work has been done to develop the proposed initiative programs in the relatively short interval since, but much more progress is needed once the funding is in hand.



The Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI): Launched by President Obama early in 2015, the PMI will continue to be an attention grabber. A huge amount of work has been done to develop the proposed initiative programs in the relatively short interval since, but much more progress is needed once the funding is in hand.

___

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2016-01-11 00:56:04 (2 comments; 6 reshares; 24 +1s; )Open 

Stunning 3D biological animation!

Stunning 3D biological animation!___

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2016-01-10 15:17:45 (0 comments; 8 reshares; 22 +1s; )Open 

British scientists believe they have made a huge step forward in the understanding of the mechanisms of human intelligence. That genetic inheritance must play some part has never been disputed. Despite occasional claims later dismissed, no-one has yet produced a single gene that controls intelligence.

But Michael Johnson of Imperial College London, a consultant neurologist and colleagues report in Nature Neuroscience that they may have discovered a very different answer: two networks of genes, perhaps controlled by some master regulatory system, lie behind the human gift for lateral thinking, mental arithmetic, pub quizzes, strategic planning, cryptic crosswords and the ability to laugh at limericks.

British scientists believe they have made a huge step forward in the understanding of the mechanisms of human intelligence. That genetic inheritance must play some part has never been disputed. Despite occasional claims later dismissed, no-one has yet produced a single gene that controls intelligence.

But Michael Johnson of Imperial College London, a consultant neurologist and colleagues report in Nature Neuroscience that they may have discovered a very different answer: two networks of genes, perhaps controlled by some master regulatory system, lie behind the human gift for lateral thinking, mental arithmetic, pub quizzes, strategic planning, cryptic crosswords and the ability to laugh at limericks.___

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2016-01-03 17:11:46 (7 comments; 20 reshares; 52 +1s; )Open 

Amazing Lego Mindstorm robot creation playing the guitar!

Amazing Lego Mindstorm robot creation playing the guitar!___

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2016-01-01 01:15:38 (5 comments; 10 reshares; 44 +1s; )Open 

Happy and healthy new year friends! 
Wishing you all "to put a dent in your universe" in 2016! 
Stay hungry, Stay foolish :)

Happy and healthy new year friends! 
Wishing you all "to put a dent in your universe" in 2016! 
Stay hungry, Stay foolish :)___

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2016-01-01 01:00:23 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 18 +1s; )Open 

___

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2015-12-31 20:15:44 (3 comments; 8 reshares; 19 +1s; )Open 

Ending 2015 with yet another breakthrough medical advance enabled by CRISPR technology. 

"The red-hot genome editing tool known as CRISPR has scored another achievement: Researchers have used it to treat a severe form of muscular dystrophy in mice. Three groups report today in Science that they wielded CRISPR to snip out part of a defective gene in mice with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), allowing the animals to make an essential muscle protein. The approach is the first time CRISPR has been successfully delivered throughout the body to treat grown animals with a genetic disease."

Ending 2015 with yet another breakthrough medical advance enabled by CRISPR technology. 

"The red-hot genome editing tool known as CRISPR has scored another achievement: Researchers have used it to treat a severe form of muscular dystrophy in mice. Three groups report today in Science that they wielded CRISPR to snip out part of a defective gene in mice with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), allowing the animals to make an essential muscle protein. The approach is the first time CRISPR has been successfully delivered throughout the body to treat grown animals with a genetic disease."___

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2015-12-27 15:40:14 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 17 +1s; )Open 

The science of hope. 5 terrible illnesses that genetic engineering could eliminate forever.

"It has been only about a decade since we first read the human genome (so ) we should exercise great caution before we begin to rewrite it." But while more discussion and regulation is necessary before these tools become a free-for-all, "genome editing also holds great therapeutic promise."

http://goo.gl/VU1jM6
Study: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1506446 (ungated)
Image credit tc.pbs.org

The science of hope. 5 terrible illnesses that genetic engineering could eliminate forever.

"It has been only about a decade since we first read the human genome (so ) we should exercise great caution before we begin to rewrite it." But while more discussion and regulation is necessary before these tools become a free-for-all, "genome editing also holds great therapeutic promise."

http://goo.gl/VU1jM6
Study: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1506446 (ungated)
Image credit tc.pbs.org___

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2015-12-27 15:38:04 (4 comments; 8 reshares; 28 +1s; )Open 

Want to lose abdominal fat, get smarter and live longer? New research led by USC’s Valter Longo shows that periodically adopting a diet that mimics the effects of fasting may yield a wide range of health benefits.

In a new study, Longo and his colleagues show that cycles of a four-day low-calorie diet that mimics fasting (FMD) cut visceral belly fat and elevated the number of progenitor and stem cells in several organs of old mice — including the brain, where it boosted neural regeneration and improved learning and memory.

Want to lose abdominal fat, get smarter and live longer? New research led by USC’s Valter Longo shows that periodically adopting a diet that mimics the effects of fasting may yield a wide range of health benefits.

In a new study, Longo and his colleagues show that cycles of a four-day low-calorie diet that mimics fasting (FMD) cut visceral belly fat and elevated the number of progenitor and stem cells in several organs of old mice — including the brain, where it boosted neural regeneration and improved learning and memory.___

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2015-12-25 17:47:05 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 15 +1s; )Open 

Biology’s breakout star this year is definitely CRISPR, a precise genome-editing tool that has inspired talk of “designer babies,” hundreds of millions of dollars poured into CRISPR companies, and an international summit about the ethics of it all.

So it’s pretty hard to top CRISPR, but biology had plenty of other big stories in 2015. In fact, we’ve got (“female Viagra”), death (rhinos), and drugs (yeast heroin). And also poop...

Biology’s breakout star this year is definitely CRISPR, a precise genome-editing tool that has inspired talk of “designer babies,” hundreds of millions of dollars poured into CRISPR companies, and an international summit about the ethics of it all.

So it’s pretty hard to top CRISPR, but biology had plenty of other big stories in 2015. In fact, we’ve got (“female Viagra”), death (rhinos), and drugs (yeast heroin). And also poop...___

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2015-12-24 16:08:57 (3 comments; 4 reshares; 40 +1s; )Open 

Spectacular shot!

"The company of three" ... strange relationship between three red-footed falcons.

Credit: Winner of Wildlife photographer of 2015 Amir Ben-Dov

Source: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/wpy/gallery/2015/images/birds/4931/the-company-of-three.html

Spectacular shot!

"The company of three" ... strange relationship between three red-footed falcons.

Credit: Winner of Wildlife photographer of 2015 Amir Ben-Dov

Source: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/wpy/gallery/2015/images/birds/4931/the-company-of-three.html___

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2015-12-12 19:17:29 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 22 +1s; )Open 

Cool!

Van Dough.

Engineered colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast grew to create this farmhouse scene.

http://goo.gl/QGhYcM___Cool!

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2015-12-05 20:40:37 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

A short film celebrating the centennial of Einstein's theory of General Relativity.

A short film celebrating the centennial of Einstein's theory of General Relativity.___

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2015-11-21 22:20:09 (3 comments; 5 reshares; 20 +1s; )Open 

Amazing Lattice light-sheet microscopy animations!

Amazing Lattice light-sheet microscopy animations!___

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2015-11-18 02:01:40 (0 comments; 6 reshares; 27 +1s; )Open 

Gut Vascular Barrier (GVB): new anatomical structure discovered by Italian scientists.

Researchers describe a barrier in mice between the intestine and the adjacent blood vessels that restricts the size of particles that can pass through. Although this barrier appears to prevent most bacteria from entering the bloodstream, certain pathogenic species—including some Salmonella—are capable of establishing infections in the blood, liver and other organs.

The Scientist, http://goo.gl/pMI7az

Study: Spadoni et al., “A gut-vascular barrier controls the systemic dissemination of bacteria,” Science, 350:830-34, 2015.
Salmonella Bacteria, image source https://goo.gl/IFZGfb

Gut Vascular Barrier (GVB): new anatomical structure discovered by Italian scientists.

Researchers describe a barrier in mice between the intestine and the adjacent blood vessels that restricts the size of particles that can pass through. Although this barrier appears to prevent most bacteria from entering the bloodstream, certain pathogenic species—including some Salmonella—are capable of establishing infections in the blood, liver and other organs.

The Scientist, http://goo.gl/pMI7az

Study: Spadoni et al., “A gut-vascular barrier controls the systemic dissemination of bacteria,” Science, 350:830-34, 2015.
Salmonella Bacteria, image source https://goo.gl/IFZGfb___

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2015-10-20 03:01:13 (1 comments; 5 reshares; 32 +1s; )Open 

New #starwars trailer is out !!

New #starwars trailer is out !!___

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2015-10-16 19:24:35 (1 comments; 10 reshares; 66 +1s; )Open 

2015 Photomicrography Competition Winners.

Live imaging of perfused vasculature in a mouse brain with glioblastoma.

More: http://goo.gl/jFpKBj

2015 Photomicrography Competition Winners.

Live imaging of perfused vasculature in a mouse brain with glioblastoma.

More: http://goo.gl/jFpKBj___

posted image

2015-10-16 19:24:16 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 16 +1s; )Open 

Platelet release in the lung observed by mouse intravital imaging.

Platelets are a component of the blood circulation critical for hemostasis and thrombosis and increasingly implicated in immune responses. Platelets are fragments of the largest cell in the body, megakaryocytes. The fragmentation of megakaryocytes, leading to the production of platelets (thrombopoiesis), has been described to occur in the bone marrow. Using two-photon intravital imaging, we imaged megakaryocytes and platelets in the adult mouse lung during homeostasis. The structure of the lung can be observed in red and platelets and megakaryocytes are tagged in green (PF4-cre x mTmG). In this movie, a large green cell (megakaryocyte) is undergoing pro-platelet formation in the lung microcirculation. This intravital movie shows for the first time the critical role of the lung in thrombopoiesis.

Platelet release in the lung observed by mouse intravital imaging.

Platelets are a component of the blood circulation critical for hemostasis and thrombosis and increasingly implicated in immune responses. Platelets are fragments of the largest cell in the body, megakaryocytes. The fragmentation of megakaryocytes, leading to the production of platelets (thrombopoiesis), has been described to occur in the bone marrow. Using two-photon intravital imaging, we imaged megakaryocytes and platelets in the adult mouse lung during homeostasis. The structure of the lung can be observed in red and platelets and megakaryocytes are tagged in green (PF4-cre x mTmG). In this movie, a large green cell (megakaryocyte) is undergoing pro-platelet formation in the lung microcirculation. This intravital movie shows for the first time the critical role of the lung in thrombopoiesis.___

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2015-10-08 20:42:19 (3 comments; 4 reshares; 23 +1s; )Open 

Every year, local communities on either side of the Apurimac River Canyon use traditional Inka engineering techniques to rebuild the Q'eswachaka Bridge. The old bridge is taken down and the new bridge is built in only three days. The bridge has been rebuilt in this same location continually since the time of the Inka. 

Every year, local communities on either side of the Apurimac River Canyon use traditional Inka engineering techniques to rebuild the Q'eswachaka Bridge. The old bridge is taken down and the new bridge is built in only three days. The bridge has been rebuilt in this same location continually since the time of the Inka. ___

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2015-10-05 21:13:50 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 24 +1s; )Open 

Remembering Steve Jobs, who died 4 years ago on October 5th ... he is dearly missed. 

Remembering Steve Jobs, who died 4 years ago on October 5th ... he is dearly missed. ___

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2015-09-23 20:22:56 (1 comments; 6 reshares; 23 +1s; )Open 

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases explains food allergy and offers tips on how to manage the condition.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases explains food allergy and offers tips on how to manage the condition.___

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2015-09-15 22:46:16 (8 comments; 13 reshares; 68 +1s; )Open 

The point of view is not always what it seems ... :)

The point of view is not always what it seems ... :)___

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2015-09-12 17:21:11 (3 comments; 6 reshares; 36 +1s; )Open 

An ancient giant virus from Siberia's frozen wasteland

French researchers have announced the discovery of Mollivirus sibericum in the frozen wastelands of Siberia. The virus is believed to be  30,000-year-old giant virus that so far remains dormant in the cold environment. As the global warming accelerates, it could potentially awaken dormant microbes like Mollivirus sibericum.

An ancient giant virus from Siberia's frozen wasteland

French researchers have announced the discovery of Mollivirus sibericum in the frozen wastelands of Siberia. The virus is believed to be  30,000-year-old giant virus that so far remains dormant in the cold environment. As the global warming accelerates, it could potentially awaken dormant microbes like Mollivirus sibericum.___

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2015-08-30 17:40:41 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 34 +1s; )Open 

Very sad news that legendary neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks has passed away  :(  

He had recently joined NYU School of medicine where I had the chance to see him there last year. He will be missed and remembered through his remarkable books on the condition of human mind. 

#OliverSacks

Very sad news that legendary neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks has passed away  :(  

He had recently joined NYU School of medicine where I had the chance to see him there last year. He will be missed and remembered through his remarkable books on the condition of human mind. 

#OliverSacks___

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2015-08-06 13:44:24 (2 comments; 6 reshares; 25 +1s; )Open 

I am very proud of all my colleagues and working +The Jackson Laboratory  which is expanding its efforts for personalized medicine in many diseases and extending the healthy human lifespan, to make the world better place!

http://www.acceleratingdiscovery.com

"The Jackson Laboratory is leading the search for cures through the science of genetics, genomics and precision medicine. Learn more about how the Laboratory’s scientists are accelerating discovery in order to find more effective, precise and personalized ways to treat, prevent and cure diseases like cancer — and about how philanthropy makes our mission possible.

Gifts from friends are vital to sustaining The Jackson Laboratory's historic mission and keeping us at the forefront of scientific discovery. "

I am very proud of all my colleagues and working +The Jackson Laboratory  which is expanding its efforts for personalized medicine in many diseases and extending the healthy human lifespan, to make the world better place!

http://www.acceleratingdiscovery.com

"The Jackson Laboratory is leading the search for cures through the science of genetics, genomics and precision medicine. Learn more about how the Laboratory’s scientists are accelerating discovery in order to find more effective, precise and personalized ways to treat, prevent and cure diseases like cancer — and about how philanthropy makes our mission possible.

Gifts from friends are vital to sustaining The Jackson Laboratory's historic mission and keeping us at the forefront of scientific discovery. "___

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2015-08-01 15:27:16 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 18 +1s; )Open 

Another great educational video from Vsauce

Q: "What's an anagram of Banach-Tarski?" 
A: "Banach-Tarski Banach-Tarski."

Another great educational video from Vsauce

Q: "What's an anagram of Banach-Tarski?" 
A: "Banach-Tarski Banach-Tarski."___

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2015-08-01 15:11:31 (0 comments; 27 reshares; 40 +1s; )Open 

In a piece of brain tissue smaller than a dust mite, there are thousands of brain cell branches and connections. Researchers from Harvard University in Boston, MA have mapped them all in a new study appearing in Cell. They find some unexpected insights about how the cells talk to each other.

In a piece of brain tissue smaller than a dust mite, there are thousands of brain cell branches and connections. Researchers from Harvard University in Boston, MA have mapped them all in a new study appearing in Cell. They find some unexpected insights about how the cells talk to each other.___

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2015-07-12 19:11:58 (9 comments; 6 reshares; 27 +1s; )Open 

Experiences of a woman who participated in a psychedelic drug (LSD) research recorded in 1960s.

Experiences of a woman who participated in a psychedelic drug (LSD) research recorded in 1960s.___

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2015-07-11 15:52:20 (4 comments; 40 reshares; 77 +1s; )Open 

Ocean life looks unreal in this time-lapsed and hyper-focused video

It's rare that you get a close-up peek at the hidden wonders of the world. Especially when it's a glance at the multi-colored, pulsating creatures that live deep in the ocean's trenches.
Sandro Bocci, an Italian film and documentary maker who specializes in experimenting with filming nature, shot a hypnotic underwater time-lapse of some strange-looking, alien-like aquatic animals in a marine aquarium in San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/beautiful-time-lapse-video-of-creatures-of-the-ocean-2015-7#ixzz3fbB7F7BZ

Ocean life looks unreal in this time-lapsed and hyper-focused video

It's rare that you get a close-up peek at the hidden wonders of the world. Especially when it's a glance at the multi-colored, pulsating creatures that live deep in the ocean's trenches.
Sandro Bocci, an Italian film and documentary maker who specializes in experimenting with filming nature, shot a hypnotic underwater time-lapse of some strange-looking, alien-like aquatic animals in a marine aquarium in San Benedetto del Tronto, Italy.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/beautiful-time-lapse-video-of-creatures-of-the-ocean-2015-7#ixzz3fbB7F7BZ___

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2015-07-11 15:30:52 (6 comments; 10 reshares; 39 +1s; )Open 

Driving Around New York City  in 1928 ...

Driving Around New York City  in 1928 ...___

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2015-07-11 14:57:45 (6 comments; 3 reshares; 35 +1s; )Open 

Get ready for some incomprehensibly big numbers.

Scientists are predicting that genomics — the field of sequencing human DNA — will soon take the lead as the biggest data beast in the world, eventually creating more digital information than astronomy, particle physics and even popular Internet sites like YouTube.

The claim, published Tuesday in a PLOS Biology study, is a testament to the awesome complexity of the human genome, but it also illustrates a pressing challenge for the 15-year-old field. As genomics expands at an exponential rate, finding the digital space to store and manage all of the data is a major hurdle for the industry.

Get ready for some incomprehensibly big numbers.

Scientists are predicting that genomics — the field of sequencing human DNA — will soon take the lead as the biggest data beast in the world, eventually creating more digital information than astronomy, particle physics and even popular Internet sites like YouTube.

The claim, published Tuesday in a PLOS Biology study, is a testament to the awesome complexity of the human genome, but it also illustrates a pressing challenge for the 15-year-old field. As genomics expands at an exponential rate, finding the digital space to store and manage all of the data is a major hurdle for the industry.___

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2015-07-11 14:55:49 (5 comments; 3 reshares; 24 +1s; )Open 

Tribute to Omar Sherif who died yesterday.

Somewhere My Love (Lara's Theme)" from the movie Doctor Zhivago ~ Omar Sharif, Julie Christie. 1965

Tribute to Omar Sherif who died yesterday.

Somewhere My Love (Lara's Theme)" from the movie Doctor Zhivago ~ Omar Sharif, Julie Christie. 1965___

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2015-07-11 14:52:44 (1 comments; 8 reshares; 20 +1s; )Open 

In 2001, Joshua Lederberg, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist, coined the term "microbiome," naming the trillions of microorganisms that reside in and on our bodies. Today, if you type that word into Google, you'll turn up thousands of hits linking gut bacteria to a laundry list of health problems, from food allergies to Ebola. Between 2007 and 2012, the number of journal articles published on the microbiome increased by nearly 250 percent. Our bodily inhabitants are quickly being cast as culprits or saviors for a diverse array of ailments.

The hype has kicked off a gold rush. Big food companies—including Nestle, PepsiCo, Monsanto, and General Mills—have funded gut bacteria studies, and some have even opened centers to develop foods that interact with the microbiome, such as probiotics. According to Transparency Market Research the global probiotics market is expected to reach anast... more »

In 2001, Joshua Lederberg, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist, coined the term "microbiome," naming the trillions of microorganisms that reside in and on our bodies. Today, if you type that word into Google, you'll turn up thousands of hits linking gut bacteria to a laundry list of health problems, from food allergies to Ebola. Between 2007 and 2012, the number of journal articles published on the microbiome increased by nearly 250 percent. Our bodily inhabitants are quickly being cast as culprits or saviors for a diverse array of ailments.

The hype has kicked off a gold rush. Big food companies—including Nestle, PepsiCo, Monsanto, and General Mills—have funded gut bacteria studies, and some have even opened centers to develop foods that interact with the microbiome, such as probiotics. According to Transparency Market Research the global probiotics market is expected to reach an astonishing $45 billion by 2018.

Still, despite the optimism, some researchers caution that much of what we hear about microbiome science isn't always, well, science. Dr. Lita Proctor heads the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Human Microbiome Project (HMP), an outgrowth of the Human Genome Project. "We are discovering a whole new ecosystem," she says. But "I do have some fear—we all do in the field—that the hype and the potential overpromise, and the idea that somehow this is going to be different—there is a terrific fear that it will all backfire."___

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2015-07-04 19:17:10 (2 comments; 19 reshares; 48 +1s; )Open 

Scientists have created a revolutionary new electronic membrane that could replace pacemakers, fitting over a heart to keep it beating regularly over an indefinite period of time.

The device uses a “spider-web-like network of sensors and electrodes” to continuously monitor the heart’s electrical activity and could, in the future, deliver electrical shocks to maintain a healthy heart-rate.

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis used computer modelling technology and a 3D-printer to create a prototype membrane and fit it to a rabbit’s heart, keeping the organ operating perfectly “outside of the body in a nutrient and oxygen-rich solution”.

Scientists have created a revolutionary new electronic membrane that could replace pacemakers, fitting over a heart to keep it beating regularly over an indefinite period of time.

The device uses a “spider-web-like network of sensors and electrodes” to continuously monitor the heart’s electrical activity and could, in the future, deliver electrical shocks to maintain a healthy heart-rate.

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis used computer modelling technology and a 3D-printer to create a prototype membrane and fit it to a rabbit’s heart, keeping the organ operating perfectly “outside of the body in a nutrient and oxygen-rich solution”.___

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2015-07-04 17:50:52 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 36 +1s; )Open 

Happy Independence Day!

Cherishing the freedoms we have in the U.S.A. !

#4thofjuly  

Happy Independence Day!

Cherishing the freedoms we have in the U.S.A. !

#4thofjuly  ___

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2015-07-03 20:40:33 (0 comments; 4 reshares; 18 +1s; )Open 

Artificial Platelets Promote Clotting.

Researchers have developed platelet-like particles (PLPs) that seem to overcome previous limitations, being able to move toward sites where clotting is occurring and contracting the clots much like natural platelets do.

Artificial Platelets Promote Clotting.

Researchers have developed platelet-like particles (PLPs) that seem to overcome previous limitations, being able to move toward sites where clotting is occurring and contracting the clots much like natural platelets do.___

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