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Kaj Sotala has been shared in 24 public circles

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Brian Mcquillan13,393New Public CircleThis is a public circle of people that would like to be circulated in order to discover new people with similar interest and to gain more followers, if you would like to be included please follow these steps.1. Follow/Add our page(this is needed in order for us to add you to the circle).2. Share the circle publicly.3. (Optional) if you would like to be include in a more specialized circle click on this link #sharedcircleoftheday #fullcircleshare  #addmetoyourcircles #awesomeness  #awesomepeople #awesomecircle  #awesome   #awesomesauce #awesomeness #awesomepeople2014-11-11 08:27:25464438
Angie Rocio50To be added to my Circle you have to do these simple steps:1 - Include me in your circles 2 - Plus, Comment and Reshare this post° in PUBLIC 2014-06-17 17:20:394483311
Angie Rocio40This is a super Circle and in it I put together a group of really interesting and active people on Google Plus to add in your circles.I'm talking about the top   Google + users that share unique and original contents.Follow   this advice and grow your G+ community with people that share amazing content that will surprise you:boost   visibility on Google+ - Share the circle!If you want to be added to the next Circle you have to do these simple steps:1 - Include me in your circles 3 - Share the circle (Publicly) 4 - Add +1 to the post 5 - Follow  your dreams and smile to life.More you share More you get! :)Thanks!2014-06-15 08:09:44448119
Dina Tika0Here is a group of Active Engagers, Circle Sharers, Awesome Plus Oners, and Cool People on Google Plus!   Circle Sharing is an awesome way to increase your followers and active engagers on your profile. Some of my favorite people that I've met here on Google + through Circle Sharing.    Want to be in the next Circle of Awesomeness? Follow the Steps Below!  ☛ Add the circle ☛ Share in the Public ☛ Plus 1 the Post. ☛ Comment. 2014-06-10 05:53:52479001
Krzysztof Skomra4,828New circle 201404031. Plus this post2. Leave a comment (introduce yourself, if you’d like)3. Add this circle to your circles4. Add yourself to the circle5. Share this circle publicly to your stream1. Dodaj Plus dla postu 2. Zostaw komentarz (przedstaw ślad po sobie, jeśli chcesz) 3. Dodaj ten krąg do swoich kręgów 4. Dodaj się do kręgu 5. Poleć ten krąg publicznie do strumienia #techlover   #photographers   #bloggers   #circle   #circleshare   #circlesharing  #circles   #share   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircles   #sharemycircles  #sharemycircle   #iwillfollow   #followback   #followers#cardphoto   #circle #circles #publiccircle #circleshare #circlesharing #sharedcircles #sharedcircle #morefollowers #sharingcircles #circleshare#sharedpubliccircles #sharedpublicircles #sharedcircle #AddCircle #FindCircles #AwesomeCircle #addcircle #addpeople #circlemeup 2014-04-03 21:55:02501349
Aleksander Adamczyk0New circle 201404031. Dodaj Plus dla postu 2. Zostaw komentarz (przedstaw ślad po sobie, jeśli chcesz) 3. Dodaj ten krąg do swoich kręgów 4. Dodaj się do kręgu 5. Poleć ten krąg publicznie do strumienia EN.1. Plus this post2. Leave a comment (introduce yourself, if you’d like)3. Add this circle to your circles4. Add yourself to the circle5. Share this circle publicly to your stream#techlover   #photographers   #bloggers   #circle   #circleshare   #circlesharing  #circles   #share   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircles   #sharemycircles  #sharemycircle   #iwillfollow   #followback   #followers#cardphoto   #circle #circles #publiccircle #circleshare #circlesharing#sharedcircles #sharedcircle #morefollowers #sharingcircles #circleshare#sharedpubliccircles #sharedpublicircles #sharedcircle #AddCircle #FindCircles#AwesomeCircle #addcircle #addpeople #circlemeup #circlesdiscovery  2014-04-03 21:29:32501011
Timo Kiviluoma9,935A full circle of MEN from FINLAND! Crazy but true. We Finns are artistic, witty and bit shy - you need to add this circle and fin us! #circleshare   #circles   #finland   #men   #sharedcircles  2014-04-03 13:07:45132014
Timo Kiviluoma6,945MEN FROM FINLAND. A very dedicated circle of men, all from Finland. Strange, isn't it? Anyway, add these witty and generous gentlemen and find the true character of Finland. .-) #finland   #men   #circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #sharedcircle   #sharedcircleoftheday  +Circles 2014-01-08 14:25:32131165
Timo Kiviluoma5,304KOKONAINEN PIIRILLINEN SUOMALAISIA MIEHIÄGoogleplussaa sanotaan aavekaupungiksi. Tottahan tuuli humisee tyhjässä saluunassa, jos et ole lisännyt piireihisi sinua kiinnostavia ihmisiä.Tässä piirissä on noin 130 suomalaista miestä. Fiksua, taiteellista ja hauskojakin ovat. Osa postaa suomeksi, osa englanniksi. Sinuna antaisin heille mahdollisuuden. :-)ELI HYVÄ IHMINEN LISÄÄ TÄMÄ PIIRI ITSELLESI! (ja jaa eteenpäin...) #piirit   #sharedcircles   #suomipiiri   #suomi  2013-10-30 18:06:22131115
Max Huijgen41,136Europe calling: the old giant wakes up and calls on its peeps! A new circle of Europeans as I promised long ago to connect the people who responded and share them. See for the first shared circle this post https://plus.google.com/112352920206354603958/posts/PDUi13o9dB1The original post was shared 225 times. You can find it here:https://plus.google.com/112352920206354603958/posts/CdhmHGbYjgiPart 2 is still open and can be found here:https://plus.google.com/112352920206354603958/posts/NDAhG4fP2a7If you didn´t do so already, post there and as long as I have spots free, I will circle you as I want to see my streams come alive during European hours.There was a shared feeling that it would be great to get some attention from G+ for Europe with official hangouts from the community managers during European times, feature roll-outs from Google no longer restricted to the US, having some central point to share European circles and last but not least the desire to have hangouts without having to burn the midnight oil. To help solve this and get Europeans together on the same page I created +Europeans on G+  It already has multiple managers out of the community and that initiative recently span off +European Photo  but feel to offer a bit of your time for this community project. Circle the page if you didn´t already do so. We need more peeps from all over Europe to participate and enjoy G+I hope these posts can do the rounds through Europe and gets us firmly on the G+ map. So even if you´re not European yourself, but sympathize with the initiatives to form a community here, help spread the word and share it.And don´t forget: we all love the other continents and most of us have circles which encompass the whole world. So it´s not against others, but pro us :)2013-03-15 15:05:14291532076
Andrey Mashnich51,420Круг людей с активной жизненной позицией в Гугле+Circle of people, with active life position in Google+#ForFriends #photo #EarthMyMother   #circleshare #sharedcircles #sharedcircle #sharedpubliccircles #circlesharing #publiccircle2013-01-23 10:40:00479321639
J. M. Weber812I don't always share circles, but when I do I put some thought into creating them.This is a circle with some of the most interesting people I have in my circles. There are a few rules I follow when selecting:- Only people (no pages or communities)- No NSFW content, not overly political- You can expect these people to engage / be active on G+- Not more than 30 people. Sorry if you're not in it, maybe you will be next time.My goal is to share a circle than can be added without second thoughts. In my experience, adding a circle with up to a few hundred profiles will likely mess up your circles so bad it's rarely worth adding them.I hope this circle will be of use to some of you. Recommendations are always welcome.2012-12-15 01:36:3730403
Jaana Nyström431,855Finnish active people and Pages circle:Suomalaisia postaavia piiri Marraskuu 2012UUTTA:  Piiriläisten päivittäisiä postauksia!http://publiccircles.appspot.com/dailycircle/jaana_nystr_m-finnisch_circle/2012-11-22* * *Kävin läpi omia piirejäni sekä useita eri sivustoja:http://www.circlecount.com/fi/http://www.googleplussuomi.com/mybestfriends/?googleid=101780786123023132934http://www.googleplussuomi.com/Lisäsin sellaiset jotka ovat postanneet julkisesti, varsinkin kahden viime viikon aikana.Postauskieli vaihtelee suomesta englantiin.Tallentakaa koko piiri uutena ja napsikaa sitten pois porukkaa joiden sisältö ei teitä kiinnosta. Tai valikoikaa! :-)Hauskoja hetkiä näiden aktiivisten Plussaajien parissa:  Vinkatkaa lisää profiileja kommenteissa, väsähdin parin tunnin setvimisen jälkeen.Saa jakaa, mielellään kiitos.Katsele piiriläisiä Circlecount.com:issa:http://www.circlecount.com/fi/sharedcircle/?id=z120f1eoezn1t5lms22celljpvm0wvzfs #Piiri   #Suomi   #Gplussa  2012-11-23 07:52:26111451737
John Ward4,989This is a circle I have set up for people who enjoy Science Fiction or Fantasy. If you'd like to be added to the circle, please let me know in the comments. Also, make sure you guys add the circle as well; so you can see other people's recommendations on the subject. Feel free to re-share this post. #circlesharesunday  2012-06-24 22:05:395014938
Max Huijgen24,852Europe calling: the old giant wakes up and calls on its peeps! Part IIAccording to the latest figures 426.9 million Europeans now use the InternetThere is a is feeling that it would be great to get some attention from G+ for Europe with official hangouts from the community managers during European times, feature roll-outs from Google no longer restricted to the US, and last but not least the desire to have hangouts and interaction without having to burn the midnight oil. To help solve this and get Europeans together on the same page I created +Europeans on G+  It already has four managers out of the community but feel to offer a bit of your time if you want to contribute. Circle the page if you didn´t already do so. I also organized a "I will circle you" project. If people commented that they came from Europe I would circle them instead of the other way. The intention was to share this circle back to the community and the first circle of 500 went out. You can find them here https://plus.google.com/112352920206354603958/posts/PDUi13o9dB1Now as promised it´s time for round 2: 300 people and a few European pages. Some very well known, some relatively unknown, but all certified active posters from Europe who will spice up your streams during European hours.Check them out and please share the circle as the intention is to get much more Europeans united!if you were left out while you signed up: my excuses as it´s a tedious job to manage all these circles. I checked all but I am only human :)2012-06-01 14:51:14301843557
Kevin Medeiros3,101Yeah yeah, this is a huge circle to share. These guys and girls are a bunch of geeks. Geeks of what type you might ask? Well, of all sorts..you'll just have to find out. I've gone through and weeded out some of the inactive users myself in order to stay under the 500 person limit. These guys make up a big portion of my stream and never fail to keep me informed about awesome shit.You may also be asking why I didn't sort them out into sub-geek categories? The answer to that is because I'm not your damn secretary :-)Just check'em out :)2012-05-26 19:20:2947711714
Peter Edenist1,213Final share of this circle for #scififans for some time. This has been one of the oldest circles I have curated and I wouldn't remove one person from here !Plus 1 if you want in! #projectslowboat #scifi #scifisunday #scifichat #sciencefiction #scienceeveryday #scienceisawesome2012-04-22 14:47:445007414
Mike Clancy3,739I promised to reshare this sci-fi fans circle if I got a lot of new subscribers and I did ... over 100! As before, if you are not already listed in in this circle, but would like to be, please just +1 this post. If you are already in the circle and would like it to grow, please just share. That is all..2012-04-06 13:37:293196322
Mike Clancy3,675Ok, here's the new and improved sci-fi interests circle. Non-posters have been removed. As before, if you are not already listed in in this circle, but would like to be, please just +1 this post. If you are already in the circle and would like it to grow, please just share. That is all.2012-04-05 13:39:1521813834
Mike Clancy3,583My sci-fi fan circle ... +1 if you want to be added, share if you already are.2012-04-04 17:18:421343113
Kevin Medeiros2,549This is my circle of geeks. Definitely an active circle that share geeky shit that "others" may not understand, but you do, right?Circle them if you want instant fun. Seriously..I weed out the lame ones all the time..be prepared for the onslaught of awesome when you add this circle!2012-03-23 21:02:4544913918
Mike Clancy2,938Final edition of my sci-fi circle for now ... +1 and share if you want to be added to future releases2012-03-20 02:15:081335212
Mike Clancy1,885My select group of true Sci-Fi fans. If you think you should be added to it, just +12012-03-05 00:31:231514217
Jaana Nyström35,188#suomi #piiri #Finncircle Lauantain iloksi:Enemmän suomalaisia virtaan!Tämä piiri sisältää niin vanhoja kettuja kuin uusia tulokkaitakin.Kerään koko ajan lisää kotimaista settiä, käykäähän kommentoimassa postauksia niin tiedän lisätä uusia.Te joilla ei vielä ole profiili hyvässä hapessa, lukaiskaa tämä:http://googleplussa.blogspot.com/2012/01/google-kayton-aloitus-profiilivinkit.html2012-03-03 12:32:55186216

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 18

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2014-10-25 11:03:12 (18 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

> Modern computer science is dominated by men. But it hasn't always been this way.

> A lot of computing pioneers — the people who programmed the first digital computers — were women. And for decades, the number of women studying computer science was growing faster than the number of men. But in 1984, something changed. The percentage of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged, even as the share of women in other technical and professional fields kept rising.

> What happened?

> We spent the past few weeks trying to answer this question, and there's no clear, single answer.

> But here's a good starting place: The share of women in computer science started falling at roughly the same moment when personal computers started showing up in U.S. homes in significant numbers.

> These early personal computerswer... more »

Most reshares: 6

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2014-10-25 12:16:25 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

You think engineers are bad at making instructions that actual people can use? Try philosophers.

Most plusones: 21

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2014-11-07 22:34:53 (6 comments, 2 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

This was beautiful.

> I spent much of last night holding my wife as she sobbed in only the way someone who’s lost their mother can, stroking her hair, muttering all the nonsense things you do when someone’s passed on.

> And in the middle of all this, she stopped and said, “This must be hard for you.  Knowing there’s nothing you can say to comfort me.” [...]

> We here at La Casa McJuddMetz hew closely to the “tree theory” of relationships, which is to say that any couple lives on a small island with one tree.  When things get bad, one person – and only one person – climbs into the tree to have their freakout, while it’s the other person’s job to stay on the ground and talk them down.

> Very Bad Things arise when both people need to be in the freakout tree at once.  So we have a strict tree protocol in that we may alternatepositions in the tree more »

Latest 50 posts

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2014-11-19 22:46:29 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

After a lot of distractions, my game is hopefully finally on track to actually getting done someday. Here's a taste...

After a lot of distractions, my game is hopefully finally on track to actually getting done someday. Here's a taste...___

2014-11-18 07:59:01 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

17th century fencing hall rules.

On the various gentlemanly methods and manners that should be observed in the salle

In the salle you should acknowledge everyone, and not touch the swords without permission from the master, nor play without his permission, and at the end of play the two gentleman should acknowledge each other, taking off their hats.

If however one gentleman is more elevated than another, he should have the honour of taking up his sword first.

Students should always welcome foreigners, and should always play with all modesty and prudence, and in silence. That is to say they should not come into dispute, saying: “this isn’t the custom in other schools; this isn’t correct; you shouldn’t do this; this isn’t normal; this is no good; my master didn’t have these rules” because each school is different from every other, just as the opinions and humours of each man are different.

You should not play with malevolence or spite, nor be vindictive for the love of blows. Neither should you dispute the blows, saying: “I touched you; you didn’t touch me; I touched you first; I could have done this or that” because it’s unwarranted, and in poor taste.

At the end of play it is always good to declare the last assault, so as not to offend the person you are playing with. Nonetheless I always praise the man who will ease off after having received a blow, rather than having given one, because it is in better taste, and he will be held in higher esteem, not being considered overbearing.

At the end you should put down your sword with every care, thanking the person you have exercised with, and also the master, and not cast the sword aimlessly to the ground, which is taken for disdain or arrogance.

Finally you should not dispute with, and presume to know more than the master, since it often happens that you go to the salle for pleasure, but leave disgusted.

All these things I have discussed, are necessary and advisable for a decent gentleman. I pray that other gentleman might pardon me however, if my discourse is too liberal and frank, speaking only with sincere goodwill, without ulterior motives.”
— Rudimentary salle etiquette, from the Manuscript of Giovanni Battista Maffani (1629), fencing master to Archduke Wilhelm Leopold, the youngest son of Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand II.
-via Piermarco Terminiello  
(via thescholarsruminations)___17th century fencing hall rules.

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2014-11-16 22:48:18 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

This is an interesting article. It seems to attribute Matt Taylor's shirt to misogyny and disrespect for women:

> Still, Taylor's personal apology doesn't make up for the fact that no one at ESA saw fit to stop him from representing the Space community with clothing that demeans 50 percent of the world's population. No one asked him to take it off, because presumably they didn't think about it. It wasn't worth worrying about.

> This is the sort of casual misogyny that stops women from entering certain scientific fields. They see a guy like that on TV and they don't feel welcome. They see a poster of greased up women in a colleague's office and they know they aren't respected.

My first reaction to this would have been that, as an inference of the attitudes the guy with the shirt or the guy with the poster, it's clearly false. I... more »

This is an interesting article. It seems to attribute Matt Taylor's shirt to misogyny and disrespect for women:

> Still, Taylor's personal apology doesn't make up for the fact that no one at ESA saw fit to stop him from representing the Space community with clothing that demeans 50 percent of the world's population. No one asked him to take it off, because presumably they didn't think about it. It wasn't worth worrying about.

> This is the sort of casual misogyny that stops women from entering certain scientific fields. They see a guy like that on TV and they don't feel welcome. They see a poster of greased up women in a colleague's office and they know they aren't respected.

My first reaction to this would have been that, as an inference of the attitudes the guy with the shirt or the guy with the poster, it's clearly false. I have a picture of a half-naked girl ( http://vashperado.deviantart.com/art/r-e-c-h-a-r-g-e-384275509 ) as my desktop wallpaper right now, that doesn't mean that I'd disrespect women any more than all of my women friends who have pictures of hot men as their desktops implies that they'd disrespect men. People just like to look at pictures of people-they-find-hot, and that doesn't imply that they wouldn't respect people for their other attributes, too.

But this analysis neglects the social signaling aspect of it. One can reasonably make the argument that the picture you have as your computer wallpaper is essentially something for your private consumption, whereas putting up a poster in your office, or wearing a shirt in a global TV broadcast, are acts that also convey a message. Most of the time you don't even see your own shirt whereas others do, so one could quite reasonably argue that the pictures on your shirt are more about social signaling than anything else.

Now the criticism begins to make more sense. Even if these images didn't directly imply that the person in question had a disrespectful attitude towards women, the person's choice to publicly wear them suggests that he might be supportive of cultures and attitudes that do - because if someone were to publicly signal their support for such attitudes, this kind of clothing would probably be what they'd wear. To put it technically, the probability for misogyny given the shirt is low, but the probability for the shirt given commitment to misogyny seems higher. Furthermore, since one knows (or "should know") that people of the marginalized group would interpret the imagery as such, choosing to regardless wear it indicates a knowing choice to disrespect their feelings.

On the other hand, that's not the only thing that such a shirt could signal. It could also signal general sex-positivity, for instance, and in some subcultures it would be read as such. (That's how I'd interpret it if anyone of my friends would be wearing such a shirt.) It seems troubling to say that it's inappropriate to wear a piece of clothing simply because it may be used to signal allegiance to a group with bad values. To me, this looks like there's a group of people who feel that any shirt with pictures of half-naked women on it signals disrespect for women, and hasn't stopped to consider the possibility that that might not be the actual intended message - if any message was even intended in the first place.

And then there's the official nature of the event where the shirt was worn. I would agree that a university professor holding their office hours shouldn't put up posters that someone could take the wrong way, whether those posters were of hot people or the political party that the professor supported, because part of a professor's job is to make their students comfortable and to minimize anything that could threaten that. Should ESA have similarly censored the shirt, due to the fact that some viewers might take the shirt as an endorsement of misogyny?

Clearly many people feel quite strongly that ESA should have, as a part of their mission as a publicly funded agency. This doesn't feel like so much as a question of ethics anymore, but rather a question of whether ESA's mission should include a priority on minimizing everything that might make a part of the population offended. (And which part of the population - if Taylor had worn, say, a shirt with pictures of two men kissing, presumably the people who are now attacking him would be much more favorable to the presumed pro-gay message, even though that message would also have offended a large part of the population.)

It's not obvious to me that the people who say ESA should have censored the shirt are right, but it's also not obvious that they're wrong. In any case, we could be having this discussion in much more civil terms.___

2014-11-16 21:04:04 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

> As I have previously remarked, Hollywood thinks “genius” is being good at chess or inventing amazing gidgets. Not only is this a dead dull cliche, it is all without exception what TV Tropes calls an Informed Ability. You can tell me that a character is good at chess, but you can’t show me that they’re good at chess.

> Or rather, to show me that a character is a chess genius, you would have to show me their brilliance in a chess game.  You would have to put the current chess position in a graphic, have me think that the black player looks doomed, and then show the black player making an incredibly brilliant move whose genius I can perceive. This requires that I, the reader, be an excellent chess player myself—-and even then it probably won’t work as literature.

> So how do you actually show a character being a genius?

> As I have previously remarked, Hollywood thinks “genius” is being good at chess or inventing amazing gidgets. Not only is this a dead dull cliche, it is all without exception what TV Tropes calls an Informed Ability. You can tell me that a character is good at chess, but you can’t show me that they’re good at chess.

> Or rather, to show me that a character is a chess genius, you would have to show me their brilliance in a chess game.  You would have to put the current chess position in a graphic, have me think that the black player looks doomed, and then show the black player making an incredibly brilliant move whose genius I can perceive. This requires that I, the reader, be an excellent chess player myself—-and even then it probably won’t work as literature.

> So how do you actually show a character being a genius?___

2014-11-16 21:01:24 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

> I can’t describe the creative process behind my character-generation in very much detail, because it mostly consisted of waiting for my brain to come up with a suggestion that would not be rejected on grounds of unoriginality. But I can tell you about the straightforward part, which was the rejection rule, the law of continuation: Don’t do stuff that’s already been done. Any time my brain came up with something that wasn’t sufficiently new, I continued searching, because my brain didn’t mark the search as being over.

> I don’t remember exactly what I thought while I was trying to decide “What will I do with Draco’s henchmen, Crabbe and Goyle?” but the process went something like this:

> Crabbe and Goyle are idiots—-it’s been done, you’ve read that a dozen times before.

> Okay, try inverting the cliche: Crabbe and Goyle are secretmasterminds. No, that r... more »

> I can’t describe the creative process behind my character-generation in very much detail, because it mostly consisted of waiting for my brain to come up with a suggestion that would not be rejected on grounds of unoriginality. But I can tell you about the straightforward part, which was the rejection rule, the law of continuation: Don’t do stuff that’s already been done. Any time my brain came up with something that wasn’t sufficiently new, I continued searching, because my brain didn’t mark the search as being over.

> I don’t remember exactly what I thought while I was trying to decide “What will I do with Draco’s henchmen, Crabbe and Goyle?” but the process went something like this:

> Crabbe and Goyle are idiots—-it’s been done, you’ve read that a dozen times before.

> Okay, try inverting the cliche: Crabbe and Goyle are secret masterminds. No, that requires Draco to be an idiot, which doesn’t fit, and this story has enough secret masterminds already.

> Crabbe and Goyle are Mr. Vandemar and Mr. Croup from Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere (the brute enforcer who rumbles and the clever enforcer who speaks formally; what TV tropes would call Those Two Bad Guys). Still no. I can’t remember it being done in the Harry Potter fanfiction that I remember reading, but it’s still a cliche, and it doesn’t really fit the surrounding story…

> And that was the point at which my trope-subverter module blurted out, “Crabbe and Goyle are eleven-year-olds who’ve grown up watching plays with Those Two Bad Guys in them, and that’s who they think they ought to be”. Which I’d never seen done in Harry Potter fanfiction, which I’d never seen done anywhere, and it fit and it was awesome; so there the search stopped.

> The initial step in this art is learning how to reject the first idea that pops into your head—-the part where you immediately think that Crabbe and Goyle are idiots, or you immediately think that the witch is going to be torn between dating the werewolf and the vampire, or where you automatically assume that since you’re writing Oz fanfiction the Wizard of Oz must necessarily be a fraud from Kansas. Even if your first idea hasn’t been done before, it is often wiser to reject the first idea that pops into your head (unless the first idea that pops into your head is truly awesome). The first thing that comes to mind is often the pattern-completing answer, the obvious answer, the unsurprising answer. Sometimes there is no way to be emotionally true to your story but to go with the obvious answer, but more often it is just your brain being lazy. A closely related skill to Don’t Do Stuff That’s Already Been Done is Don’t Take The Easy Way Out.___

2014-11-16 20:55:37 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

> There’s something very raw about being young. I remember reading a psychotherapy book that, like most psychotherapy books, talks about childhood trauma. Their prescription was that it gets buried under lots of layers of unconscious baggage, and you need to bring it to the surface. Once it’s at the surface, the patient’s reaction should be something like “That? That was what bothered me all this time?” Because when you’re a child, everything is more intense. Yeah, some childhood trauma is getting beaten or abused. But other childhood trauma is getting called names on the playground, or being left alone without knowing where your parents were. I find a lot of the “inner child” school of psychology to be kind of bunk, but I find interesting the idea of your inner child as somebody who you’re much stronger than, somebody who they respect because you’ve developed really powerfulpsychological copin... more »

> There’s something very raw about being young. I remember reading a psychotherapy book that, like most psychotherapy books, talks about childhood trauma. Their prescription was that it gets buried under lots of layers of unconscious baggage, and you need to bring it to the surface. Once it’s at the surface, the patient’s reaction should be something like “That? That was what bothered me all this time?” Because when you’re a child, everything is more intense. Yeah, some childhood trauma is getting beaten or abused. But other childhood trauma is getting called names on the playground, or being left alone without knowing where your parents were. I find a lot of the “inner child” school of psychology to be kind of bunk, but I find interesting the idea of your inner child as somebody who you’re much stronger than, somebody who they respect because you’ve developed really powerful psychological coping mechanisms they could never dream of, so that you’re a protector figure.

> Ozy talks about this a lot in the context of their borderline personality disorder. I tend to think of a lot of symptoms of borderline as being associated with neoteny – a preservation of childlikeness into adulthood (I don’t know how orthodox this is). For Ozy, everything is still raw, maybe will always be raw. Every even slightly good thing that happens delights them. Every even slightly bad thing that happen traumatizes them.

> The flip side of childhood trauma is childhood wonder. When you’re young, and to a lesser degree when you’re a teenager and even in your early twenties, you have a great capacity to be amazed at the raw beauty of the world. As you grow older, you get less direct exposure to things as you have more and more schemas to put them in: “Oh, yeah, that’s a beautiful sunset, it looks a lot like the five thousand other sunsets I’ve seen. I’ll just tag it ‘sunset’ and move on.” [...]

> ...part of Erikson’s “role confusion” is thinking “Wait, I was the guy who was going to cure cancer. I can feel my status slipping away from me as I become more and more mediocre. What am I going to do to prove that I really am that cool?”

> I think a lot of the pathologies of adolescence are part of that urge, hollow promises of regaining lost status. The key is to provide a narrative in which you are great and which is impervious to external disconfirmation. Extremist politics, mysticism and fashion all fit the bill for different personalities. [...]

> Byron talks of “reading your Bible and minding your purse”. Chesterton talks about “we have marriage and a creed”. I read these as kind of similar. It’s about finding an ideology – in contrast to the constant ideology-searching of youth where you get your Communists and your Daoist and your anarchists and whatever. And then it’s about turning to be more interested in the everyday world of things like marriage and family and relationships and balancing your checkbook.

> If this were about suddenly ceasing to care about ideas, then it would be monstrous and I’d be trying to resist it every way I can. But neither Chesterton nor Byron became intellectual lightweights in their old age. I think of it as getting to participate in the world of ideas because you want to, rather than because you have to. In Jung’s words, “swimming rather than drowning”. Or since the ocean of thought is maybe too big for a swimming metaphor, you’re still out at sea, but you’ve got a nice sturdy ship instead of a Neurath’s boat where you have to build your vessel while you’re sailing on it.

> In an unhealthy society, it can be dangerous to lose revolutionary fervor. But in a healthy society, it seems to be a natural and important process. I don’t know if our society is healthy enough for me to be entirely comfortable with it. There are a lot of people who can’t get a stable career, people who are trying as hard as they can. But even in a revolution you need a couple of people to keep things running and maybe donate money earned at a stable job to the people with more zeal (see: Engels), and in the spirit of satisficing rather than optimizing I’m pretty okay with this role.

> …or maybe you stay an anarchist or a Daoist or a communist. But then it’s because you’re set in that philosophy and you like it and you’re making a stand there, rather than because it’s your Experiment Of The Month. It’s good to have Experiments Of The Month – high expected value of information, low transaction costs for changing your mind – but it’s also a relief to be done with that. Identity in place of role confusion. As for the adult world of relationships and checkbooks, it’s a different and lower-variance way of contributing to the community, and if you’re lucky you can have kids and start the whole cycle over again.___

2014-11-16 20:30:59 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

This seems like a major, recurring problem online: individual people can become targeted, either by individual harasserrs or worse, groups of them. There's a fundamental asmmetry in that the amount of harm the harassers can do is disproportionately larger than the amount of effort it takes for one of them to cause the harm, and they can remain anonymous or adopt new accounts whereas their victim can't, unless said victim is willing to stop using their identity online entirely. Is there anything that could be done about it?

* http://www.rifters.com/crawl/?p=5370

> Benjanun-This-Week has been very busy over a number of years, wearing a number of guises. She has stalked, harassed, and threatened. Some of her actions have proven actionable, to the point that authorities are now apparently involved.  She drove at least one person to attempt suicide, has induced PTSD symptoms in... more »

This seems like a major, recurring problem online: individual people can become targeted, either by individual harasserrs or worse, groups of them. There's a fundamental asmmetry in that the amount of harm the harassers can do is disproportionately larger than the amount of effort it takes for one of them to cause the harm, and they can remain anonymous or adopt new accounts whereas their victim can't, unless said victim is willing to stop using their identity online entirely. Is there anything that could be done about it?

* http://www.rifters.com/crawl/?p=5370

> Benjanun-This-Week has been very busy over a number of years, wearing a number of guises. She has stalked, harassed, and threatened. Some of her actions have proven actionable, to the point that authorities are now apparently involved.  She drove at least one person to attempt suicide, has induced PTSD symptoms in a number of others. She has told people who disagree with her that they should be raped by dogs, dismembered, and/or have acid thrown in their faces. She habitually deleted these comments shortly after making them, then gaslighted her targets (fortunately there are archives, and screenshots).

* http://seriouspony.com/trouble-at-the-koolaid-point :

> I actually got off easy, then. Most of the master trolls weren’t active on Twitter in 2007. Today, they, along with their friends, fans, followers, and a zoo of anonymous sock puppet accounts are. The time from troll-has-an-idea to troll-mobilizes-brutal-assault has shrunk from weeks to minutes. Twitter, for all its good, is a hate amplifier. Twitter boosts signal power with head-snapping speed and strength. Today, Twitter (and this isn’t a complaint about Twitter, it’s about what Twitter enables) is the troll’s best weapon for attacking you. And by “you”, I mean “you the server of Koolaid.” You who must be stopped.

> It begins with simple threats. You know, rape, dismemberment, the usual. It’s a good place to start, those threats, because you might simply vanish once those threats include your family. Mission accomplished.

* http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/oct/18/am-i-being-catfished-an-author-confronts-her-number-one-online-critic :

> “Blythe was involved in an [online] attack on a 14-year-old girl back in May 2012,” Parker said. The teenager had written a glowing review of a book Blythe hated, obliquely referencing Blythe’s hatred for it: “Dear Haters,” the review read. “Everyone has his or her own personal opinion, but expressing that through profanity is not the answer. Supposedly, this person is an English teacher at a middle school near where I lived… People can get hurt,” the review concluded.

> In response, Blythe rallied her followers. Adults began flooding the girl’s thread, saying, among other things, “Fuck you.”___

2014-11-16 12:41:42 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Adorable couples: a pair of linguists needed a place to stay while in Helsinki, and I let them crash at my place. While here, they kept speaking with each other in what sounded like half a dozen different languages. They told me that Sundays are their Catalan Days, which was the reason why they were talking in Catalan today.

Well, of course. Obviously Sundays have to be Catalan Days.

Adorable couples: a pair of linguists needed a place to stay while in Helsinki, and I let them crash at my place. While here, they kept speaking with each other in what sounded like half a dozen different languages. They told me that Sundays are their Catalan Days, which was the reason why they were talking in Catalan today.

Well, of course. Obviously Sundays have to be Catalan Days.___

2014-11-16 11:26:41 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Hey, person with a rare fetish you feel is embarrassing or shameful: it's cool. 

It doesn't matter if you happen to like amputation, animals (anthropomorphic or otherwise), anime characters, armpits, being eaten alive, buildings, castration, corpses, cross-dressing, cuckolding, cutting, diapers, disabilities, exhibitionism, feces, feeding, God, hermaphrodites, humiliation, incest, insects, knives, lactation, menstruation, noses, old people, pony play, pregnancy, queening, rape fantasies, serial killers, slaves, sleeping people, trans people, underage people, vomit, watersports, Xena, Yale students, Zorro, or anything else.

If you have some fetish or have fantasies about it, act it out with a consenting partner, or otherwise seek to fulfill it in ways that are mutually pleasurable, awesome! (Yes, there are a few things on the list that imply doing things to non-consenting... more »

Hey, person with a rare fetish you feel is embarrassing or shameful: it's cool. 

It doesn't matter if you happen to like amputation, animals (anthropomorphic or otherwise), anime characters, armpits, being eaten alive, buildings, castration, corpses, cross-dressing, cuckolding, cutting, diapers, disabilities, exhibitionism, feces, feeding, God, hermaphrodites, humiliation, incest, insects, knives, lactation, menstruation, noses, old people, pony play, pregnancy, queening, rape fantasies, serial killers, slaves, sleeping people, trans people, underage people, vomit, watersports, Xena, Yale students, Zorro, or anything else.

If you have some fetish or have fantasies about it, act it out with a consenting partner, or otherwise seek to fulfill it in ways that are mutually pleasurable, awesome! (Yes, there are a few things on the list that imply doing things to non-consenting subjects, which is obviously uncool - but no barrier to e.g. role-playing it out with someone willing.) I'm just glad that you have a fantasy that you get pleasure from, and I hope that you'll find company in which you can be open about it and enjoy it together with someone.

(Posted because while the circles I frequent are quite good with supporting the more common uncommon sexualities, the rarer stuff doesn't get explicitly mentioned in a supportive manner very often - and sometimes even gets made fun of.)___

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2014-11-15 16:31:31 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Misty dawn.

From http://nature.desktopnexus.com/wallpaper/1853383/ , via +Hannah Finley.

Misty dawn.

From http://nature.desktopnexus.com/wallpaper/1853383/ , via +Hannah Finley.___

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2014-11-15 16:26:42 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

Bass Lake, California, during a recent wildfire. Photograph by Darvin Atkeson.

Source: http://framework.latimes.com/2014/09/16/pictures-in-the-news-979/#/0 , via +Hannah Finley.

Bass Lake, California, during a recent wildfire. Photograph by Darvin Atkeson.

Source: http://framework.latimes.com/2014/09/16/pictures-in-the-news-979/#/0 , via +Hannah Finley.___

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2014-11-15 13:25:02 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

As war drones improve, disturbing questions arise. As John Markoff says in the NYTimes: “Britain’s “fire and forget” Brimstone missiles, for example, can distinguish among tanks and cars and buses without human assistance, and can hunt targets in a predesignated region without oversight. The Brimstones also communicate with one another, sharing their targets.”

The US Defense Dept actually takes these issues seriously: “In a directive published in 2012, the Pentagon drew a line between semiautonomous weapons, whose targets are chosen by a human operator, and fully autonomous weapons that can hunt and engage targets without intervention.   ...   Weapons of the future, the directive said, must be “designed to allow commanders and operators to exercise appropriate levels of human judgment over the use of force.”
http://www.nytime... more »

As war drones improve, disturbing questions arise. As John Markoff says in the NYTimes: “Britain’s “fire and forget” Brimstone missiles, for example, can distinguish among tanks and cars and buses without human assistance, and can hunt targets in a predesignated region without oversight. The Brimstones also communicate with one another, sharing their targets.”

The US Defense Dept actually takes these issues seriously: “In a directive published in 2012, the Pentagon drew a line between semiautonomous weapons, whose targets are chosen by a human operator, and fully autonomous weapons that can hunt and engage targets without intervention.   ...   Weapons of the future, the directive said, must be “designed to allow commanders and operators to exercise appropriate levels of human judgment over the use of force.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/12/science/weapons-directed-by-robots-not-humans-raise-ethical-questions.html?_r=0___

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2014-11-15 13:24:27 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

> "Viola" had an interesting history. Completed in 1893 in Pori, she was originally intended to become the private yacht of the industrialist Wilhelm Rosenlew, but that never happened. She was named "Fredrik Wilhelm" and set to run a coastal route between Pori and Vyborg, then to traffic between Turku and Mariehamn, and then returned to coastal traffic up to Vaasa. In 1913 she was named "Viola" and ran between Helsinki and Tallinn.

> In 1917, during the Finnish Civil War, she was seized by Russia to be used for lodging troops. She was given to the Reds in March 1918, and was captured by the Whites in April. She was in traffic on the Gulf of Finland up until World War II. During and after the war operated in Mariehamn, and in 1944-45 she briefly served as the lodging of the Allied Control Commission. When this picture was taken in the early 1950s, she was... more »

> "Viola" had an interesting history. Completed in 1893 in Pori, she was originally intended to become the private yacht of the industrialist Wilhelm Rosenlew, but that never happened. She was named "Fredrik Wilhelm" and set to run a coastal route between Pori and Vyborg, then to traffic between Turku and Mariehamn, and then returned to coastal traffic up to Vaasa. In 1913 she was named "Viola" and ran between Helsinki and Tallinn.

> In 1917, during the Finnish Civil War, she was seized by Russia to be used for lodging troops. She was given to the Reds in March 1918, and was captured by the Whites in April. She was in traffic on the Gulf of Finland up until World War II. During and after the war operated in Mariehamn, and in 1944-45 she briefly served as the lodging of the Allied Control Commission. When this picture was taken in the early 1950s, she was serving a route from Turku to Stockholm.

> In 1955 she was renamed to "Korsholm II" and operated in Kvarken. In 1962 she was sold to the Navy and was given the name "Korsholm". In 1967 she was sold for shipbreaking, but only had her deck buildings removed and continued operating under the name "Messina I", transporting sand. She was finally broken in 1998, after having reached the respectable age of 105 years.

(The above is my translation of Otis Othman's original. Picture by my late grandfather, Hans Othman. Copyrighted; from Henrik Othman's collection.)___

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2014-11-15 12:47:06 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Helsinki street and some elegant ladies, early 1950s. Picture by my late grandfather, Hans Othman. Copyrighted; from Henrik Othman's collection.

Helsinki street and some elegant ladies, early 1950s. Picture by my late grandfather, Hans Othman. Copyrighted; from Henrik Othman's collection.___

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2014-11-15 05:04:17 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

> The most popular proposed causes [for why children of divorce have worse life outcomes] are “children in divorced families lose the benefits of having two parents”, “children in divorced families are in economic trouble”, and “children in divorced families have to deal with stressful family conflict.”

> Although there’s a little bit of evidence for all three, in general the evidence lines up for the last one of these – the family conflict hypothesis. 

> If the problem is not enough parents or not enough money, then having the custodial parent (usually a single mom) remarry ought to help a lot, especially if she marries somebody wealthy. But usually this doesn’t help very much at all.

> If the problem is not enough money, then children of divorce should do no worse than children of poor two-parent families. But in fact they do, and children ofdivorce still do w... more »

> The most popular proposed causes [for why children of divorce have worse life outcomes] are “children in divorced families lose the benefits of having two parents”, “children in divorced families are in economic trouble”, and “children in divorced families have to deal with stressful family conflict.”

> Although there’s a little bit of evidence for all three, in general the evidence lines up for the last one of these – the family conflict hypothesis. 

> If the problem is not enough parents or not enough money, then having the custodial parent (usually a single mom) remarry ought to help a lot, especially if she marries somebody wealthy. But usually this doesn’t help very much at all.

> If the problem is not enough money, then children of divorce should do no worse than children of poor two-parent families. But in fact they do, and children of divorce still do worse when controlled for income.

> If the problem is not enough parents or not enough money, then these ought to persist over time if the custodial parent doesn’t remarry or get richer. But if the problem is stressful conflict, then it ought to get better over time, since the stress and conflict of the divorce gradually becomes more and more remote. Although there are some dueling studies here, the best studies seem to find the latter pattern – bad outcomes of divorce gradually decrease over time.

> If the problem is stressful conflict, then children of divorce ought to do no worse than children in families full of stressful conflict who are nevertheless staying together. Indeed, controlling for the amount of stressful conflict within a family gets rid of most of the negative effect of divorce.___

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2014-11-15 04:58:57 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

> By observing these types of interactions, Gottman can predict with up to 94 percent certainty whether couples — straight or gay, rich or poor, childless or not — will be broken up, together and unhappy, or together and happy several years later. Much of it comes down to the spirit couples bring to the relationship. Do they bring kindness and generosity; or contempt, criticism, and hostility?

> “There’s a habit of mind that the masters have,” Gottman explained in an interview, “which is this: they are scanning social environment for things they can appreciate and say thank you for. They are building this culture of respect and appreciation very purposefully. Disasters are scanning the social environment for partners’ mistakes.”

> “It’s not just scanning environment,” chimed in Julie Gottman. “It’s scanning the partner for what the partner is doingright or scanning him for... more »

> By observing these types of interactions, Gottman can predict with up to 94 percent certainty whether couples — straight or gay, rich or poor, childless or not — will be broken up, together and unhappy, or together and happy several years later. Much of it comes down to the spirit couples bring to the relationship. Do they bring kindness and generosity; or contempt, criticism, and hostility?

> “There’s a habit of mind that the masters have,” Gottman explained in an interview, “which is this: they are scanning social environment for things they can appreciate and say thank you for. They are building this culture of respect and appreciation very purposefully. Disasters are scanning the social environment for partners’ mistakes.”

> “It’s not just scanning environment,” chimed in Julie Gottman. “It’s scanning the partner for what the partner is doing right or scanning him for what he’s doing wrong and criticizing versus respecting him and expressing appreciation.”

> Contempt, they have found, is the number one factor that tears couples apart. People who are focused on criticizing their partners miss a whopping 50 percent of positive things their partners are doing and they see negativity when it’s not there.___

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2014-11-15 04:53:02 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

___

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2014-11-15 04:51:36 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

> I don't know if you have heard the term "Nice Guy." Ironically, it does not actually refer to any nice guy. It refers to a sort of Internet phenomenon of a guy who complains about how girls won't date him and prefer jerks, and therefore all women are bad and shallow and are too dumb to know who's good for them. Such guys existed before the internet, but their inescapable public complaining is the part made possible by the miracle of technology.

> A lot has been said about the Nice Guy and what is wrong with him, so I don't feel the need to repeat it. What I do want to talk about is his mirror image, the Nice Girl -- the female who goes a little nuts after failing to get guys. I know a lot about this type, because I was this type for a long, long time. It's pretty sad, but I always say: if you can't mock the embarrassing parts of your past, what's the... more »

> I don't know if you have heard the term "Nice Guy." Ironically, it does not actually refer to any nice guy. It refers to a sort of Internet phenomenon of a guy who complains about how girls won't date him and prefer jerks, and therefore all women are bad and shallow and are too dumb to know who's good for them. Such guys existed before the internet, but their inescapable public complaining is the part made possible by the miracle of technology.

> A lot has been said about the Nice Guy and what is wrong with him, so I don't feel the need to repeat it. What I do want to talk about is his mirror image, the Nice Girl -- the female who goes a little nuts after failing to get guys. I know a lot about this type, because I was this type for a long, long time. It's pretty sad, but I always say: if you can't mock the embarrassing parts of your past, what's the point of having lived them?

> Now, Nice Guys and Nice Girls aren't exact parallels, as men and women have different roles and expectations in society or whatever, but there are some similarities. Let's play high school English class and compare and contrast.___

2014-11-15 02:00:14 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

"Dear Kaj Sotala,
I am pleased to inform you that your paper:
Concept learning for safe autonomous AI :
Has been accepted to be presented as a poster and in the printed proceedings of the AAAI-15 workshop on AI and Ethics."

\o/

"Dear Kaj Sotala,
I am pleased to inform you that your paper:
Concept learning for safe autonomous AI :
Has been accepted to be presented as a poster and in the printed proceedings of the AAAI-15 workshop on AI and Ethics."

\o/___

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2014-11-09 16:06:47 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

"Murtaja" ("Breaker") was Finland's first icebreaker. She was built in 1890 and wasn't scrapped until 1959. This picture shows her helping clear Turku harbor, in around 1948. Picture by my late grandfather, Hans Othman. Copyrighted; from Henrik Othman's collection.

"Murtaja" ("Breaker") was Finland's first icebreaker. She was built in 1890 and wasn't scrapped until 1959. This picture shows her helping clear Turku harbor, in around 1948. Picture by my late grandfather, Hans Othman. Copyrighted; from Henrik Othman's collection.___

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2014-11-09 15:55:53 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Picture from Aleksanterinkatu, Helsinki; Hotel Andrea ceased to exist around 1956. Picture by my late grandfather, Hans Othman. Copyrighted; from Henrik Othman's collection.

Picture from Aleksanterinkatu, Helsinki; Hotel Andrea ceased to exist around 1956. Picture by my late grandfather, Hans Othman. Copyrighted; from Henrik Othman's collection.___

2014-11-08 21:18:14 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

At the risk of everyone telling me that I'm the last person on Earth to realize this, here's a fun thing that I discovered today. A bit of visualization ability is required.

Look at a digital clock that shows the seconds. (You could do a similar trick with an analog clock too, but it works better for me with a digital one.) Watch the seconds go by for a while, then on each second start visualizing the next one. E.g. when the second display shows :25, picture in your mind it showing the numbers :26. When it shows :26, picture it showing :27, and so on.

What happens is that you'll form in your mind the next number, then a moment later it changes to show the number that you just imagined, and you start feeling like you're controlling the clock with your mind.

At the risk of everyone telling me that I'm the last person on Earth to realize this, here's a fun thing that I discovered today. A bit of visualization ability is required.

Look at a digital clock that shows the seconds. (You could do a similar trick with an analog clock too, but it works better for me with a digital one.) Watch the seconds go by for a while, then on each second start visualizing the next one. E.g. when the second display shows :25, picture in your mind it showing the numbers :26. When it shows :26, picture it showing :27, and so on.

What happens is that you'll form in your mind the next number, then a moment later it changes to show the number that you just imagined, and you start feeling like you're controlling the clock with your mind.___

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2014-11-08 19:00:10 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Bus station in Porvoo, Finland, circa 1952. Picture by my late grandfather, Hans Othman. Copyrighted; from Henrik Othman's collection.

Bus station in Porvoo, Finland, circa 1952. Picture by my late grandfather, Hans Othman. Copyrighted; from Henrik Othman's collection.___

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2014-11-08 10:04:13 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Guy takes afl, a program designed to generate test cases for code, and asks it to keep feeding a text string to a program (djpeg) that expects as JPEG image as input. djpeg rejects the input as not being a valid image, so afl starts mutating the input string, stumbles upon one of the magic bytes identifying a JPEG file, and notices that starting the input with this byte triggers a slightly different internal code path in djpeg. Eventually afl manages to synthesize a valid JPEG file header and then, after a day of running, a set of valid picture files.

I'm continually impressed what dumb software + brute force computation can do; in this case, a fuzzer, by tracing an image viewer executable, slowly 'learns' how to create JPEG files starting with an empty file.___Guy takes afl, a program designed to generate test cases for code, and asks it to keep feeding a text string to a program (djpeg) that expects as JPEG image as input. djpeg rejects the input as not being a valid image, so afl starts mutating the input string, stumbles upon one of the magic bytes identifying a JPEG file, and notices that starting the input with this byte triggers a slightly different internal code path in djpeg. Eventually afl manages to synthesize a valid JPEG file header and then, after a day of running, a set of valid picture files.

2014-11-08 09:28:21 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Nanowrimo day 8: 8832, behind by about 5000 words but hoping to catch up tomorrow. Scattered observations:

* I'm trying to write epic fantasy, only to have my brain go "No, let's ONLY come up with ideas for the completely mundane love triangle plot!"
* People acting like reasonable adults is great in real life but your characters doing it is a pain, because it doesn't help generate the conflict the story needs.

Choice piece of dialogue: "Yeah, well, I... think I love you, if I'm to be perfectly honest." "Fuck."

Nanowrimo day 8: 8832, behind by about 5000 words but hoping to catch up tomorrow. Scattered observations:

* I'm trying to write epic fantasy, only to have my brain go "No, let's ONLY come up with ideas for the completely mundane love triangle plot!"
* People acting like reasonable adults is great in real life but your characters doing it is a pain, because it doesn't help generate the conflict the story needs.

Choice piece of dialogue: "Yeah, well, I... think I love you, if I'm to be perfectly honest." "Fuck."___

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2014-11-07 22:34:53 (6 comments, 2 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

This was beautiful.

> I spent much of last night holding my wife as she sobbed in only the way someone who’s lost their mother can, stroking her hair, muttering all the nonsense things you do when someone’s passed on.

> And in the middle of all this, she stopped and said, “This must be hard for you.  Knowing there’s nothing you can say to comfort me.” [...]

> We here at La Casa McJuddMetz hew closely to the “tree theory” of relationships, which is to say that any couple lives on a small island with one tree.  When things get bad, one person – and only one person – climbs into the tree to have their freakout, while it’s the other person’s job to stay on the ground and talk them down.

> Very Bad Things arise when both people need to be in the freakout tree at once.  So we have a strict tree protocol in that we may alternatepositions in the tree more »

This was beautiful.

> I spent much of last night holding my wife as she sobbed in only the way someone who’s lost their mother can, stroking her hair, muttering all the nonsense things you do when someone’s passed on.

> And in the middle of all this, she stopped and said, “This must be hard for you.  Knowing there’s nothing you can say to comfort me.” [...]

> We here at La Casa McJuddMetz hew closely to the “tree theory” of relationships, which is to say that any couple lives on a small island with one tree.  When things get bad, one person – and only one person – climbs into the tree to have their freakout, while it’s the other person’s job to stay on the ground and talk them down.

> Very Bad Things arise when both people need to be in the freakout tree at once.  So we have a strict tree protocol in that we may alternate positions in the tree very rapidly, but we never both shimmy up that trunk simultaneously.

> And so when Gini said, “This must be hard for you,” that was stupid because if there’s any time when someone gets reserved VIP privileges in the tree for the rest of the week, it’s after their goddamned mother’s just died.

> But it was sweet, her checking in on me. [...]

> I think one of the reasons that we function so well, my friends and my family and I, is because we make it pretty damn easy to do the things required of us.  It would be easy for us to use our deepest sorrow to climb high into the tree, so high we can’t even see the ground any more, so high we forget the rest of the world exists -

> - and yet we take care of our caretakers.  We acknowledge the difficulty in being there for someone when there’s not much to say.  We thank each other for helping, even when we’d have a damned fine excuse to forget their existence.

> We love each other.  We mark each other’s sacrifice.  And even in the middle of such overlapping sorrows that some days we feel like we will be borne away by cascading waves of tears, we appreciate those who try to hold us tight to shore.

> There’s more sorrow coming.  More grief.  And there’s nothing I can do, and I am so very tired of condolences, and I am so very tired of holding people while they cry and muttering all the usual stupid things one says in the face of death.

> But for one moment, in an hour so dark it struck us all blind, Gini reached a hand down from the freakout tree and asked if I needed to come up.

> I didn’t.  But it lent me strength to know that I could.___

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2014-11-07 22:28:01 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

> The song of the hermit thrush, a common North American songbird, is renowned for its apparent musicality and has attracted the attention of musicians and ornithologists for more than a century. Here we show that hermit thrush songs, like much human music, use pitches that are mathematically related by simple integer ratios and follow the harmonic series. Our findings add to a small but growing body of research showing that a preference for small-integer ratio intervals is not unique to humans and are thus particularly relevant to the ongoing nature/nurture debate about whether musical predispositions such as the preference for consonant intervals are biologically or culturally driven. 

> The song of the hermit thrush, a common North American songbird, is renowned for its apparent musicality and has attracted the attention of musicians and ornithologists for more than a century. Here we show that hermit thrush songs, like much human music, use pitches that are mathematically related by simple integer ratios and follow the harmonic series. Our findings add to a small but growing body of research showing that a preference for small-integer ratio intervals is not unique to humans and are thus particularly relevant to the ongoing nature/nurture debate about whether musical predispositions such as the preference for consonant intervals are biologically or culturally driven. ___

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2014-11-07 22:25:58 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

___

2014-11-02 17:46:09 (3 comments, 5 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

Realistic villains don't think that they're villains, and don't act in ways that make them completely evil:

> Maybe someone could mistake [villains having their good sides as well as internally consistent belief systems that make them appear as the good guys] for Gray vs. Grey morality, if they’re accustomed to Tolkien heroes fighting orcs and Sauron, or if they don’t realize how little it means for a character to think they’re justified - how little that tells you about their position on the good-evil axis.  Adolf Hitler was an outspoken opponent of animal vivisection, who at some dinners would give graphic accounts of animal cruelty in an attempt to convince those present to not eat meat.  Apparently Hitler also didn’t get his Villain Letter.  He probably even wore clothes that weren’t black.  That’s the difference between the children’s-book Voldemort,and Adolf Hitler ... more »

Realistic villains don't think that they're villains, and don't act in ways that make them completely evil:

> Maybe someone could mistake [villains having their good sides as well as internally consistent belief systems that make them appear as the good guys] for Gray vs. Grey morality, if they’re accustomed to Tolkien heroes fighting orcs and Sauron, or if they don’t realize how little it means for a character to think they’re justified - how little that tells you about their position on the good-evil axis.  Adolf Hitler was an outspoken opponent of animal vivisection, who at some dinners would give graphic accounts of animal cruelty in an attempt to convince those present to not eat meat.  Apparently Hitler also didn’t get his Villain Letter.  He probably even wore clothes that weren’t black.  That’s the difference between the children’s-book Voldemort, and Adolf Hitler in real life.

> Of course it’s not just villains who try to justify themselves.  Self-justification is cheap, and any character who is even slightly clever will be able to purchase it by the truckload.  A large part of the art of rationality is learning to make self-justifications more expensive and difficult to purchase.  Any character who is not being depicted as a master-level rationalist should have no trouble at all coming up with a story that makes them the good guy, irrespective of what they’re currently doing. [...]

> The economist Bryan Caplan invented an improved version of steelmanning called the Ideological Turing Test. In the Ideological Turing Test, you must write an argument for an opposing position which is realistic enough that an adherent of the position cannot tell the difference between what you have written, and something that was written by an actual advocate. The Ideological Turing Test is stricter than ‘steelmanning’, since it is far too easy to persuade yourself that you have generated the ‘strongest argument’, and much less easy to fool someone who actually believes the opposing position into thinking that you were sincerely doing your best to advocate it.  It is a test of understanding; a trial to make sure you really understand the arguments you say you don’t believe. [...]

> When I’m writing HPMOR’s Death Eaters, I’m trying to pass the Ideological Turing Test for Death Eaters—-when I write Draco Malfoy’s viewpoint, I’m writing about Death Eaters the way that Draco Malfoy would see them. The goal is that a real Death Eater would read my Draco Malfoy viewpoint and not say, “Aha! This was clearly written not by the real Draco Malfoy, but by someone who wanted to make Death Eaters look bad.” (Except, of course, that Draco Malfoy’s thoughts are inwardly optimized to look good to his friends and social circle, not to look good to pro-Enlightenment Muggle readers.)

> Professor Quirrell is being written with a goal of making sure that the real Professor Quirrell wouldn’t be able to point to one of his lines and say, “What? I wouldn’t say that. There are much more persuasive arguments for a nation that stands strong under a strong ruler, like—-“

> I’m often nervous about how many people say they find Professor Quirrell to be extremely persuasive, when his viewpoints are not things I feel undecided about (to put it mildly), but at least it shows I’m doing my job right.

> There is a saying that everyone believes themselves to be the hero of their own story. This is not even close to being literally true; so far as I can tell a majority of the world consists of people who explicitly believe themselves to be NPCs, and are viscerally shocked and disbelieving at any suggestion that it could be possible for them to involve themselves in the story’s plot. There are also people who believe themselves to be the antiheroes or outright villains of their own stories. But these are exceptions, especially on a literary level; as a first approximation, most active characters in a story should believe themselves to be the hero.

> Similarly, every active character should also live in a mental world that has their own existence at the center, not your protagonist’s. When you’re writing Bob’s viewpoint, every object should be mentioned as often as it is relevant to Bob. Ron Weasley barely exists at all in Harry’s world; but as soon as we switch to Hermione’s world, Ron exists again. Draco sees all things as they relate to Draco; Professor McGonagall sees all things as they relate to Hogwarts.  Dumbledore is still constantly thinking about the huge events with Grindelwald that dominated the first part of his life.  To pass Daphne Greengrass’s Turing Test, I have to write her viewpoint in such a way that someone reading her thoughts can’t tell that anyone else (like Harry Potter) is the real center of the universe. [...]

> What we really believe doesn’t feel to us like a belief, it feels like the way the world is.  Really believing that the sky is blue doesn’t feel like being a Blue-Skyer, it feels like the sky being blue.

> The process of creating and becoming a character isn’t just the invention of a personality.  It’s the extrapolation of the universe that is that character’s mental world - not what they ‘believe’, but the surrounding universe that this viewpoint will appear to live in.___

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2014-11-02 17:29:51 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Every now and then real life mimics Paranoia. I am not greatly surprised this happens in Russia: "With some Russian grenades, users were given a box of various delay fuses, including 0, 5, and 13 second variations -- the 0 second fuses were for tripwire detonation traps.  Hilarity ensued when people mixed up the fuses."

http://qr.ae/DcDJ7

Ping +Daniel Davis and my other trusted traitors!

Every now and then real life mimics Paranoia. I am not greatly surprised this happens in Russia: "With some Russian grenades, users were given a box of various delay fuses, including 0, 5, and 13 second variations -- the 0 second fuses were for tripwire detonation traps.  Hilarity ensued when people mixed up the fuses."

http://qr.ae/DcDJ7

Ping +Daniel Davis and my other trusted traitors!___

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2014-11-02 17:25:19 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Good advice on writing.

> Here is the planned schedule of sections, with already-posted sections linked:

> Level 1 Intelligent characters. Writing characters with an inner spark of life and optimization; not characters that do super-amazing clever things, but characters that are trying in routine ways to optimize their own life in a reasonably self-aware fashion.

> Intelligence via empathy and respect. You can’t write an intelligent character without putting yourself in their shoes and imagining yourself in their place, which is empathy; and you may have trouble empathizing with a character that you can’t respect. Two obvious tricks for writing intelligent characters, then, are (first) to actually imagine yourself in their place, and (second) to start with a character template based on some real or fictional person who you respect.

> Thoughtfulres... more »

Good advice on writing.

> Here is the planned schedule of sections, with already-posted sections linked:

> Level 1 Intelligent characters. Writing characters with an inner spark of life and optimization; not characters that do super-amazing clever things, but characters that are trying in routine ways to optimize their own life in a reasonably self-aware fashion.

> Intelligence via empathy and respect. You can’t write an intelligent character without putting yourself in their shoes and imagining yourself in their place, which is empathy; and you may have trouble empathizing with a character that you can’t respect. Two obvious tricks for writing intelligent characters, then, are (first) to actually imagine yourself in their place, and (second) to start with a character template based on some real or fictional person who you respect.

> Thoughtful responses and intelligent mistakes. Every Level 1 Intelligent character wants to toss your precious plot out the window and will seize any available chance to do so. You must craft their situations so that their optimizing responses drive the plot in the direction it needs to go. If they must make mistakes, have them be intelligent mistakes; ideally, have the reader not see it either on a first reading.

> True moral conflicts. Orson Scott Card said that while a Good vs. Evil story can be riveting, it won’t be half as riveting as Good vs. Good. Strong moral conflicts are constructed around moral questions you feel genuinely open about, or by bringing two untainted high ideals into conflict such that even you aren’t sure about the resolution.

> Realistic villains and viewpoints.  As in Bryan Caplan’s Ideological Turing Test, any realistic villain should be constructed so that if a real-world version of the villain could read your dialogue for them, they would nod along and say, “Yes, that is how I would argue that.”  Every viewpoint character perceives themselves as being at the center of the universe.

> Originality. The key to originality isn’t easy, but it is simple: Don’t Do Stuff That’s Already Been Done. This may require thinking past the first thought that pops into your head. A closely related rule is Don’t Take the Easy Way Out.

> Genre savviness. Level 1 Intelligent characters will often have done some equivalent of having read the same books you have, which requires that you give them plots which cannot be solved just by having read similar books.

> Level 2 Intelligent characters. The key to writing characters that can exhibit impressive moments of cognitive work is the Fair Play Mystery, or its conjugate the Fair Play Insight: the background facts must be clear enough for the reader to see, in the instant of revelation, that the character’s genius solution is indeed a cognitive solution; i.e., it must have been possible for the reader to think of by reading the story.

> Inexploitability. If the character does something novel or unexpected using widely available tools, the surrounding civilization must be such that other people wouldn’t have thought of it already.

> Solvable mysteries. Thanks to the Illusion of Transparency, the best way to construct a mystery is to have some latent fact about the story, known to you, that is not spelled out explicitly in the text, and then make absolutely no effort to conceal this fact, except that you never literally say it out loud.

> Real learning. To put real knowledge into a story you must (1) know the actual material sufficiently well, (2) be able to cross-domain transfer and concretely visualize the knowledge for the story situation, (3) be able to explain that knowledge to other people; (4) master the art of relevance and invoke only those facts such that the story’s plot would be different if those facts were different; (5) translate your knowledge out of standard words and standard concepts so that you can explain only what is relevant.

> Level 3 Intelligent characters. The strongest impression of character intelligence is made when that intelligence is vivid enough, and real enough, to be contagious to the reader. The secret to this is—___

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2014-11-02 17:07:35 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

The article's back from 2003, but at least +gwern branwen thought that the trends quoted in the article had kept up (I didn't check myself):

> Like a lot of people these days, I'm a recovering secularist. Until September 11 I accepted the notion that as the world becomes richer and better educated, it becomes less religious. Extrapolating from a tiny and unrepresentative sample of humanity (in Western Europe and parts of North America), this theory holds that as history moves forward, science displaces dogma and reason replaces unthinking obedience. A region that has not yet had a reformation and an enlightenment, such as the Arab world, sooner or later will.

> It's now clear that the secularization theory is untrue. The human race does not necessarily get less religious as it grows richer and better educated. We are living through one of the great periods of... more »

The article's back from 2003, but at least +gwern branwen thought that the trends quoted in the article had kept up (I didn't check myself):

> Like a lot of people these days, I'm a recovering secularist. Until September 11 I accepted the notion that as the world becomes richer and better educated, it becomes less religious. Extrapolating from a tiny and unrepresentative sample of humanity (in Western Europe and parts of North America), this theory holds that as history moves forward, science displaces dogma and reason replaces unthinking obedience. A region that has not yet had a reformation and an enlightenment, such as the Arab world, sooner or later will.

> It's now clear that the secularization theory is untrue. The human race does not necessarily get less religious as it grows richer and better educated. We are living through one of the great periods of scientific progress and the creation of wealth. At the same time, we are in the midst of a religious boom.

> Islam is surging. Orthodox Judaism is growing among young people, and Israel has gotten more religious as it has become more affluent. The growth of Christianity surpasses that of all other faiths. In 1942 this magazine published an essay called "Will the Christian Church Survive?" Sixty years later there are two billion Christians in the world; by 2050, according to some estimates, there will be three billion. As Philip Jenkins, a Distinguished Professor of History and Religious Studies at Pennsylvania State University, has observed, perhaps the most successful social movement of our age is Pentecostalism (see "The Next Christianity," October Atlantic). Having gotten its start in Los Angeles about a century ago, it now embraces 400 million people—a number that, according to Jenkins, could reach a billion or more by the half-century mark. 

> Moreover, it is the denominations that refuse to adapt to secularism that are growing the fastest, while those that try to be "modern" and "relevant" are withering. Ecstatic forms of Christianity and "anti-modern" Islam are thriving. The Christian population in Africa, which was about 10 million in 1900 and is currently about 360 million, is expected to grow to 633 million by 2025, with conservative, evangelical, and syncretistic groups dominating. In Africa churches are becoming more influential than many nations, with both good and bad effects.___

2014-11-01 18:12:08 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Been playing with the idea of setting up a Patreon account. How many people would be willing to automatically pay a small sum ($1 and up) each time I posted an essay or article of reasonable depth (defined in more detail below), up to a monthly cap of your choice?

---

Basically, an article or essay that I post is of a reasonable depth if I deem it to be. That said, here are the kinds of articles that I would deem such:

Book reviews and summaries. These summarize the parts of the book that I find the most interesting and valuable. Past examples of the such reviews include my review of Gregory Cochran & Henry Harpending's The 10,000-Year Explosion ( http://lesswrong.com/lw/28k/the_psychological_diversity_of_mankind/ ) , as well as my multi-part review of Keith Stanovich's What Intelligence Tests Miss: The psychology of rational thought (... more »

Been playing with the idea of setting up a Patreon account. How many people would be willing to automatically pay a small sum ($1 and up) each time I posted an essay or article of reasonable depth (defined in more detail below), up to a monthly cap of your choice?

---

Basically, an article or essay that I post is of a reasonable depth if I deem it to be. That said, here are the kinds of articles that I would deem such:

Book reviews and summaries. These summarize the parts of the book that I find the most interesting and valuable. Past examples of the such reviews include my review of Gregory Cochran & Henry Harpending's The 10,000-Year Explosion ( http://lesswrong.com/lw/28k/the_psychological_diversity_of_mankind/ ) , as well as my multi-part review of Keith Stanovich's What Intelligence Tests Miss: The psychology of rational thought ( http://lesswrong.com/tag/whatintelligencetestsmiss/ ). 

Paper summaries. These summarize scientific papers published in peer-reviewed journals, in a way that makes it comprehensible for laymen with a basic level of scientific literacy. For previous examples of such summaries, see my articles I Was Not Almost Wrong But I Was Almost Right: Close-Call Counterfactuals and Bias ( http://lesswrong.com/lw/akr/i_was_not_almost_wrong_but_i_was_almost_right/ ), as well as Fallacies as Weak Bayesian Evidence ( http://lesswrong.com/lw/aq2/fallacies_as_weak_bayesian_evidence/ ). Journals that are most likely to have articles I'll summarize: Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Behavioral and Brain Sciences.

Discussions of a specific concept from a book or paper. Sometimes a source goes into so much detail about a concept that the concept is worth discussing in its own article. For a previous example of such an article, see The Substitution Principle ( http://lesswrong.com/lw/9l3/the_substitution_principle/ ).

Discussion of a broader concept, drawing on several sources. Sometimes I have an idea or point that was born from combining several different sources, such as Doing Good in the Addiction Economy ( http://kajsotala.fi/2013/09/doing-good-in-the-addiction-economy/ ), Technology will destroy human nature ( http://kajsotala.fi/2012/10/technology-will-destroy-human-nature/ ), Avoid misinterpreting your emotions ( lesswrong.com/lw/9z0/avoid_misinterpreting_your_emotions/ ), and Don't trust people, trust their components ( http://kajsotala.fi/2014/02/dont-trust-people-trust-their-components/ ).

In-depth CogSci Stack Exchange answers. Sometimes I might provide a long answer to a question that someone has posted on the Cognitive Sciences Stack Exchange. If it seems interesting and detailed enough for others, I will cross-post it to my blog. Previous examples include my answers to the questions "Does super-intelligence necessary lead to consciousness, self awareness, freewill or emotion" ( http://cogsci.stackexchange.com/a/528/262 ) and "Is variation in human brain size related to mental functioning" ( http://cogsci.stackexchange.com/a/277/262 ).

---

So how does this Patreon thing work? You sign up and choose some pledge level. Each time that I release a post on my blog an article that I consider to belong in one of the above categories, I will mark it as a Paid work, and an amount corresponding to your pledge will be deducted from you and paid to me. This will happen each time that I release a new Paid work, but you can set a monthly limit on how much you're willing to pay me in total.

Any article that I release will be reasonably in-depth, around the same length as the examples above. I do also post shorter stuff on my blog, but I won't mark any of that as Paid content.

I have no idea of how often I'd actually post. I'm currently focusing on my Master's thesis, but I'm hoping that this would be a nice source of extra income that would encourage me to write useful articles every now and then. Because you only pay when I post something relevant, I won't feel pressured to update if I don't feel like it.___

2014-11-01 12:05:57 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Day 1: 1766 words out of 1667.

(I'm pretty sure I don't actually have the time for this this month, but hey.)

Day 1: 1766 words out of 1667.

(I'm pretty sure I don't actually have the time for this this month, but hey.)___

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2014-11-01 10:32:01 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

> A team led by Benjamin Winegard thinks part of the reason [why evolutionary psychology has a bad reputation is] because of the misrepresentation of evolutionary psychology in textbooks, especially social science textbooks on the topics of sex and gender. Based on their analysis of eight types of error in 12 widely used books in this genre, the researchers conclude that the treatment of their subject is "shoddy".

> Winegard and his colleagues chose to focus on sex and gender textbooks that were published since 2005 and that are used widely on sociology and psychology university courses in the US. Among the books studied: The Psychology of Gender (4th ed.) by V.S. Helgeson and Gender Roles: A Sociological Perspective (5th ed.) by L. Lindsey.

> The categories of error that the researchers looked for included the claim that evolutionary psychologists think biology... more »

> A team led by Benjamin Winegard thinks part of the reason [why evolutionary psychology has a bad reputation is] because of the misrepresentation of evolutionary psychology in textbooks, especially social science textbooks on the topics of sex and gender. Based on their analysis of eight types of error in 12 widely used books in this genre, the researchers conclude that the treatment of their subject is "shoddy".

> Winegard and his colleagues chose to focus on sex and gender textbooks that were published since 2005 and that are used widely on sociology and psychology university courses in the US. Among the books studied: The Psychology of Gender (4th ed.) by V.S. Helgeson and Gender Roles: A Sociological Perspective (5th ed.) by L. Lindsey.

> The categories of error that the researchers looked for included the claim that evolutionary psychologists think biology determines or explains all of behaviour, or that evolutionary psychologists think some phenomena are influenced by nature while others are influenced by nurture (rather than reflecting an interaction between the two). Other error categories: that evolutionary psychologists have a conservative ideological agenda; that they endorse the "naturalistic fallacy" (that the natural way of things is morally desirable); and that evolutionary psychologists think people consciously attempt to boost their "evolutionary fitness" and are aware of the "evolutionary logic" of their behaviour, an error known as the "intentionalistic fallacy".

> There was an average of 5.75 errors per book and all contained at least one error. The most common type of error was miscellaneous and placed into a general "straw man" category (for example, the mistaken claim that evolutionary psychology ignores and cannot account for homosexuality). The next most common type of error related to biological determinism and nature/nurture, and after that came the Naturalistic and Intentionalistic Fallacies.

> For each error, the researchers provide examples from the texts they studied, and then they provide refutational evidence, either citing from works by evolutionary psychologists, or by pointing out straight facts, such as that there are many female evolutionary psychologists (countering the claim in one textbook that the field is androcentric), and that a survey of evolutionary psychologists found their political views matched those of social scientists in general (countering the claim that the field has a conservative agenda). 

> Winegard and his team said their analysis has furnished "a well-defined catalog of errors in the presentation of evolutionary psychology and [demonstrated] that these errors occur frequently in undergraduate sex and gender textbooks." They added: "Evolutionary psychologists have frequently addressed these errors, but our results demonstrate that, despite these efforts, errors persist."___

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2014-10-31 22:27:20 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Today I Learned: if you're an academic, a university in Saudi Arabia is possibly one of the best places in the world to work at, and it's great for raising a family, too.

> KAUST is exempt from a number of the social customs that are in effect throughout the rest of the country. [...] I brought a wife and two young children (my third was born here). They are happy here -- if not, we wouldn't have stayed! Frankly, KAUST is an ideal place to raise a family. My children have friends from almost every imaginable culture, religion, and race. They take lessons in things like piano, swimming, and ballet. The schools are excellent and the community is extremely safe (I don't even lock my bike). I'll often bike to my childrens' school and take them to the park for lunch; everything is within five minutes by bicycle here. I live 1 block from the beach and my morning commute is a... more »

Today I Learned: if you're an academic, a university in Saudi Arabia is possibly one of the best places in the world to work at, and it's great for raising a family, too.

> KAUST is exempt from a number of the social customs that are in effect throughout the rest of the country. [...] I brought a wife and two young children (my third was born here). They are happy here -- if not, we wouldn't have stayed! Frankly, KAUST is an ideal place to raise a family. My children have friends from almost every imaginable culture, religion, and race. They take lessons in things like piano, swimming, and ballet. The schools are excellent and the community is extremely safe (I don't even lock my bike). I'll often bike to my childrens' school and take them to the park for lunch; everything is within five minutes by bicycle here. I live 1 block from the beach and my morning commute is a short bicycle ride through beautiful surroundings. [...]

> I came to KAUST because it was an adventure and chance to build something new and worthwhile. My initial plan was to spend perhaps 3-4 years at KAUST and then go back to the US. However, I have since realized that I have the ideal academic job (by my own criteria, at least):

> * Extremely generous funding with no need to write grant proposals (KAUST has one of the world's largest endowments and only about 120 faculty).
> * Light teaching load (1 MS level course and 1 PhD level course per year), which also has allowed me the time to be bit innovative and try things like inquiry-based learning.
> * A relatively light administrative load, compared to what I hear from colleagues in the US. This is largely due to having excellent and plentiful support staff.
> * Long-term job security with the freedom to do research along any direction I wish (university positions generally include this, but other careers I considered do not).
> * Essentially unlimited access to a world-class supercomputer (200 Tflops, upgrading to 5 Pflops next spring). This is relevant to my particular field; other researchers here get similar benefits from other exceptional facilities.

> Now I suppose the last bit of this post sounds like an advertisement, and I can't really help that. In light of all this, I don't plan to leave any time soon.___

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2014-10-31 22:22:10 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

> I just bought a new TV. [...] The only problem is that I’m now afraid to use it. You would be too — if you read through the 46-page privacy policy.

> The amount of data this thing collects is staggering. It logs where, when, how, and for how long you use the TV. It sets tracking cookies and beacons designed to detect “when you have viewed particular content or a particular email message.” It records “the apps you use, the websites you visit, and how you interact with content.” It ignores “do-not-track” requests as a considered matter of policy.

> It also has a built-in camera — with facial recognition. The purpose is to provide “gesture control” for the TV and enable you to log in to a personalized account using your face. On the upside, the images are saved on the TV instead of uploaded to a corporate server. On the downside, the Internet connectionmakes the whole TV vu... more »

> I just bought a new TV. [...] The only problem is that I’m now afraid to use it. You would be too — if you read through the 46-page privacy policy.

> The amount of data this thing collects is staggering. It logs where, when, how, and for how long you use the TV. It sets tracking cookies and beacons designed to detect “when you have viewed particular content or a particular email message.” It records “the apps you use, the websites you visit, and how you interact with content.” It ignores “do-not-track” requests as a considered matter of policy.

> It also has a built-in camera — with facial recognition. The purpose is to provide “gesture control” for the TV and enable you to log in to a personalized account using your face. On the upside, the images are saved on the TV instead of uploaded to a corporate server. On the downside, the Internet connection makes the whole TV vulnerable to hackers who have demonstrated the ability to take complete control of the machine.

> More troubling is the microphone. The TV boasts a “voice recognition” feature that allows viewers to control the screen with voice commands. But the service comes with a rather ominous warning: “Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party.” Got that? Don’t say personal or sensitive stuff in front of the TV.___

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2014-10-31 22:08:55 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

___

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2014-10-31 22:05:24 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Your daily dose of what.

Your daily dose of what.___

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2014-10-26 17:34:20 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

> The studies surrounding Alcoholics Anonymous are some of the most convoluted, hilariously screwed-up research I have ever seen. They go wrong in ways I didn’t even realize research could go wrong before. Just to give some examples:

> – In several studies, subjects in the “not attending Alcoholics Anonymous” condition attended Alcoholics Anonymous more than subjects in the “attending Alcoholics Anonymous” condition.

> – Almost everyone’s belief about AA’s retention rate is off by a factor of five because one person long ago misread a really confusing graph and everyone else copied them without double-checking.

> – The largest study ever in the field, a $30 million effort over 8 years following thousands of patients, had no control group.

> Not only are the studies poor, but the people interpreting them are heavily politicized.The entire field of... more »

> The studies surrounding Alcoholics Anonymous are some of the most convoluted, hilariously screwed-up research I have ever seen. They go wrong in ways I didn’t even realize research could go wrong before. Just to give some examples:

> – In several studies, subjects in the “not attending Alcoholics Anonymous” condition attended Alcoholics Anonymous more than subjects in the “attending Alcoholics Anonymous” condition.

> – Almost everyone’s belief about AA’s retention rate is off by a factor of five because one person long ago misread a really confusing graph and everyone else copied them without double-checking.

> – The largest study ever in the field, a $30 million effort over 8 years following thousands of patients, had no control group.

> Not only are the studies poor, but the people interpreting them are heavily politicized. The entire field of addiction medicine has gotten stuck in the middle of some of the most divisive issues in our culture, like whether addiction is a biological disease or a failure of willpower, whether problems should be solved by community and peer groups or by highly trained professionals, and whether there’s a role for appealing to a higher power in any public organization. AA’s supporters see it as a scruffy grassroots organization of real people willing to get their hands dirty, who can cure addicts failed time and time again by a system of glitzy rehabs run by arrogant doctors who think their medical degrees make them better than people who have personally fought their own battles. Opponents see it as this awful cult that doesn’t provide any real treatment and just tells addicts that they’re terrible people who will never get better unless they sacrifice their identity to the collective.

> As a result, the few sparks of light the research kindles are ignored, taken out of context, or misinterpreted.

> The entire situation is complicated by a bigger question. We will soon find that AA usually does not work better or worse than various other substance abuse interventions. That leaves the sort of question that all those fancy-shmancy people with control groups in their studies don’t have to worry about – does anything work at all?___

2014-10-26 05:18:18 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

One thing that frustrates me is when people assume that others are stupid or irrational on the basis of a moral disagreement. The thing is that the validity of a moral claim depends entirely on your moral intuitions, so somebody's moral claim coming off as irrational simply means that you have differing intuitions on what is moral!

Moral reasoning is at its heart arational, both in the sense of most of our moral reasoning happening at a pre-verbal level that we have poor conscious access to and can't properly verbalize and thus formalize using language, and also in the sense that the validity of different inference steps is judged on the basis of your existing moral intuitions which cannot be derived from rational principles.

(For supporting evidence for these claims, see: the is-ought gap, moral foundations theory, moral dumbfounding / social intuitionism, philosophy's... more »

One thing that frustrates me is when people assume that others are stupid or irrational on the basis of a moral disagreement. The thing is that the validity of a moral claim depends entirely on your moral intuitions, so somebody's moral claim coming off as irrational simply means that you have differing intuitions on what is moral!

Moral reasoning is at its heart arational, both in the sense of most of our moral reasoning happening at a pre-verbal level that we have poor conscious access to and can't properly verbalize and thus formalize using language, and also in the sense that the validity of different inference steps is judged on the basis of your existing moral intuitions which cannot be derived from rational principles.

(For supporting evidence for these claims, see: the is-ought gap, moral foundations theory, moral dumbfounding / social intuitionism, philosophy's persistent failure to come up with a satisfactory formalization of ethics, limited human introspective access in general, the limited to extent to which formal ethical theories actually affect most people's day-to-day behavior; see also http://lesswrong.com/lw/jyl/two_arguments_for_not_thinking_about_ethics_too/ )

None of this means that it would entirely impossible to change people's minds about moral judgments based on debate, of course: we don't have strong moral intuitions about everything, and it's possible for reason to affect the components that we don't have a strong intuition about, or to arrange them in a different framework. I'm definitely not saying "never try to change anyone's mind about a moral question using verbal arguments", because obviously verbal arguments do work sometimes, and they may convince your audience if they don't convince the people you're talking with.

Rather, what I'm saying is just that you shouldn't assume that the person you're arguing with is an idiot simply because you disagree on a moral question: they may still be engaged in hopelessly biased and irrational reasoning, but to judge that, you should debate them on an empirical issue, not a moral one.

That said, people's rationality can be judged on the extent to which they seem to be misrepresenting empirical facts and claims to support their desired moral conclusions. But then you need to be careful to make sure that you really are judging their rationality based on their empirical-claims-that-happen-to-be-relevant-for-the-moral-disagreement, as opposed to judging their rationality based on their purely moral claims.___

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2014-10-25 12:40:14 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

[content warning: discussion of abuse, domestic violence]

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> During the course of the relationship and for a long time after it, I was hesitant to call it abusive. There were no black eyes or broken bones; no trips to the hospital or cops called. We’re conditioned to believe that abuse looks or feels a certain way, so much in fact that when you experience it, it’s not always clear it’s happening. When you grow up in a home where overt violence was baseline normal, your boyfriend punching the wall next to your head or pushing you to the ground as he shoves past you doesn’t seem so bad.

> As a child, I learned to detect the slightest change in atmosphere, the way an exasperated sigh, the incremental rise of a voice or the stiffening of a body meant fight or flight. In my first serious relationship, I did the same, learning to walk on eggshells. I thought I lovedhim and... more »

[content warning: discussion of abuse, domestic violence]

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> During the course of the relationship and for a long time after it, I was hesitant to call it abusive. There were no black eyes or broken bones; no trips to the hospital or cops called. We’re conditioned to believe that abuse looks or feels a certain way, so much in fact that when you experience it, it’s not always clear it’s happening. When you grow up in a home where overt violence was baseline normal, your boyfriend punching the wall next to your head or pushing you to the ground as he shoves past you doesn’t seem so bad.

> As a child, I learned to detect the slightest change in atmosphere, the way an exasperated sigh, the incremental rise of a voice or the stiffening of a body meant fight or flight. In my first serious relationship, I did the same, learning to walk on eggshells. I thought I loved him and I thought he loved me. Before the yelling, cursing, and name calling became normal for us, there was that first-love giddiness. It took a long time before he violently laid hands on me. [...]

> During this time, I didn’t have the tools to connect the dots between the abuse I experienced in my home and why enduring abuse in my first romantic relationship came so easily to me. I’d identified as a feminist since I was 12, swearing I’d be nothing like my mother, yet there I was – and it pained me. In retrospect, I realize this reasoning was ridiculous. Simply claiming the “feminist” label couldn’t save me from domestic violence or help me understand generations of abuse I was unknowingly perpetuating. Why did I stay? Because it’s what I knew, that’s why. No matter how you identify or who you are, you can find yourself in an abusive relationship and there will be reasons why you stay, as powerfully detailed by Vanessa Mártir and Jessica Valenti and Charity Morton and Val Willingham and Erin Matson and women who would rather remain anonymous.

> If anything, my identification as a feminist made the idea of disclosing the abuse even more difficult, because I thought it was something I was letting happen to me and it embarrassed me. Again: perception. If I was perceived as strong, wasn’t I? If my relationship was perceived as loving, wasn’t it? Wasn’t it just the drugs that made him behave this way? Maybe I was just fucked up and sensitive? [...]

> My brother went to school with a black eye and when asked by a teacher, decided to be honest about what happened. Before long, Child Protective Services was at my middle school and I was sitting across from a woman who wanted to know if my dad hit me. Instinctively, I knew to say no. Not just to avoid a beating, but because if I was honest, everything I knew would explode.

> That instinct, to lie or protect the men who abuse us, is hard to explain. It comes from being afraid of the person who is abusing you, of course, but also afraid for the changes that honesty will force. We don’t want to endanger the men who hurt us, because we love them and we don’t think we can live without them. [...]

> I was lucky my abusive relationship didn’t escalate further. I was lucky mine ended rather unceremoniously. I have been lucky to not enter another. It is luck, really. At least for me. I assume there will be people who don’t understand this, who grew up in the kind of home that taught them to view an abusive relationship as something you choose to be in, with the only possible option — the only option that means you’re a person worthy of respect — being to leave. I do not write this for those people.

> I write this for women like Janay Rice, who has become the spark for a national conversation about domestic violence; the subject of headlines and think pieces; the inspiration for hashtags; the butt of jokes. I don’t have answers for her, or for women like her, who are hearing from their communities the same things they’ve heard from their abusers: that they’re “stupid,” that what’s happening to them is their fault, even if the context is “because you haven’t left.” I don’t have answers but I do wish them well, and support them.

> Despite being there and living through it, I have little to say to women who find themselves in abusive relationships. Every situation is different. Women leave when they can or when they must or not at all. I can tell them I see them and I hear them and they matter; that I understand and I don’t understand; that I want them to leave, but I know sometimes they can’t; that there is a life on the other side that is in no way out of the realm of possibility; that they deserve love that doesn’t hurt or damage or kill. I can extend my hand repeatedly and not judge them if they don’t accept help initially or at all. But that is all that I can do, and I will keep doing it.___

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2014-10-25 12:16:25 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

You think engineers are bad at making instructions that actual people can use? Try philosophers.

You think engineers are bad at making instructions that actual people can use? Try philosophers.___

2014-10-25 11:41:45 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

> I don’t think that very many people would make the argument that “traditionally female professions aren’t as valuable as traditionally male professions” out loud, but that belief is implicit in anyone telling me that “we need more women in science and engineering.” Because all the women working as primary school teachers and childcare workers aren’t doing anything valuable for society?

> It feels like the project of convincing society that women are just as valuable as men in the workforce, is being premised on a definition of ‘value’ that centres around traditionally male jobs, as opposed to taking underrated, traditionally female jobs and trying to award them the status they ought to have for the social value they provide.

> Of course it’s a bad thing if girls feel pressured not to go into science or engineering, because they’re “boy jobs”, toochallenging, too competit... more »

> I don’t think that very many people would make the argument that “traditionally female professions aren’t as valuable as traditionally male professions” out loud, but that belief is implicit in anyone telling me that “we need more women in science and engineering.” Because all the women working as primary school teachers and childcare workers aren’t doing anything valuable for society?

> It feels like the project of convincing society that women are just as valuable as men in the workforce, is being premised on a definition of ‘value’ that centres around traditionally male jobs, as opposed to taking underrated, traditionally female jobs and trying to award them the status they ought to have for the social value they provide.

> Of course it’s a bad thing if girls feel pressured not to go into science or engineering, because they’re “boy jobs”, too challenging, too competitive and girls can’t do math. Etc. And there’s something to the consequentialist argument that Miranda-the-engineer could be a role model for other girls. I suppose that’s what my high school teachers were trying to get at.

> But why can’t Miranda-the-nurse be a role model for other girls AND boys?

> This probably seems like a bit of a rant. It’s not like all I get out of being a nurse is whining that I ought to be a better feminist. I get a ton of respect and kudos from a lot of people for being a nurse. I get empathy points and conscientiousness points and gets-shit-done points. I get a lot of conversations like this: “You’re a nurse? Are you liking that? You love it? Awesome, that’s great that you have a job you really love.”

> Except for a certain subset of my friends, maybe 10-15% percent, who fit into a certain class of nerdy, ambitious, self-conscious about status, and mostly male.

> I don’t think the thoughts actually going through my geeky male friends’ heads are “nursing is a lame women’s job and medicine is a high-status traditionally male job; why did my otherwise intelligent and reasonable friend become a nurse?” But I do think that a less explicit version of that thought might be happening, of the form “Miranda’s cool, and doctors are cool, Miranda would make an awesome doctor.”

> So what are my current reasons for being a nurse?

> I love my job. I look forwards to going to work in the mornings. Every day, I get to step into a chapter of someone’s life. Usually a fairly exciting chapter. My life would make a surreal TV show.

> Not all of the time, but often, there’s a warmth and camaraderie in working with nurses that fills a void in me. Someone once told me that nursing is like going back to high school with a bunch of gossipy girls. Well, and so? Apparently part of my monkey brain is starved for gossip, or at least for the kind of nearly-content-free conversations that are almost pure signalling of social acceptance. Chatting about salad recipes is a sort of verbal grooming, even if it takes place while working together to bathe a sedated intubated patient.

> I can throw my heart and soul into my work–for an arbitrary number of hours of my choice. Part-time nursing is a fully legitimate thing. Switching specialties, too. My hours are annoying sometimes, but constrained. I can have a life outside of work, to write blog posts and novels and try to be a community builder.___

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2014-10-25 11:03:12 (18 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

> Modern computer science is dominated by men. But it hasn't always been this way.

> A lot of computing pioneers — the people who programmed the first digital computers — were women. And for decades, the number of women studying computer science was growing faster than the number of men. But in 1984, something changed. The percentage of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged, even as the share of women in other technical and professional fields kept rising.

> What happened?

> We spent the past few weeks trying to answer this question, and there's no clear, single answer.

> But here's a good starting place: The share of women in computer science started falling at roughly the same moment when personal computers started showing up in U.S. homes in significant numbers.

> These early personal computerswer... more »

> Modern computer science is dominated by men. But it hasn't always been this way.

> A lot of computing pioneers — the people who programmed the first digital computers — were women. And for decades, the number of women studying computer science was growing faster than the number of men. But in 1984, something changed. The percentage of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged, even as the share of women in other technical and professional fields kept rising.

> What happened?

> We spent the past few weeks trying to answer this question, and there's no clear, single answer.

> But here's a good starting place: The share of women in computer science started falling at roughly the same moment when personal computers started showing up in U.S. homes in significant numbers.

> These early personal computers weren't much more than toys. You could play pong or simple shooting games, maybe do some word processing. And these toys were marketed almost entirely to men and boys.

> This idea that computers are for boys became a narrative. It became the story we told ourselves about the computing revolution. It helped define who geeks were, and it created techie culture.

> Movies like Weird Science, Revenge of the Nerds and War Games all came out in the '80s. And the plot summaries are almost interchangeable: awkward geek boy genius uses tech savvy to triumph over adversity and win the girl.

> In the 1990s, researcher Jane Margolis interviewed hundreds of computer science students at Carnegie Mellon University, which had one of the top programs in the country. She found that families were much more likely to buy computers for boys than for girls — even when their girls were really interested in computers.___

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2014-10-25 10:05:10 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

The main road connecting Mike Watt's village to the rest of the world is undergoing repairs for several months, so he decides to build his own toll road as a temporary replacement, without asking permission from anyone. When the local council hears, they grumble but ultimately don't object, and the rest of the locals seem happy. Are there any entrepreneurship medals? This guy deserves one.

The main road connecting Mike Watt's village to the rest of the world is undergoing repairs for several months, so he decides to build his own toll road as a temporary replacement, without asking permission from anyone. When the local council hears, they grumble but ultimately don't object, and the rest of the locals seem happy. Are there any entrepreneurship medals? This guy deserves one.___

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2014-10-25 09:51:07 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

On how politics involves spinning everything into a part of a Grand Narrative, and selectively emphasizing the parts of news that fit into that narrative and trying to pretend that the rest don't exist. (I'm excerpting the bit that's the most critical of the Blue tribe, since I and probably most of my readers are Blue-leaning and we probably benefit the most from having our own narrative critiqued, but the post itself is on balance equally critical of everyone.)

> Suppose the Red Tribe has a Grand Narrative. The Narrative is something like “We Americans are right-thinking folks with a perfectly nice culture. But there are also scary foreigners who hate our freedom and wish us ill. Unfortunately, there are also traitors in our ranks – in the form of the Blue Tribe – who in order to signal sophistication support foreigners over Americans and want to undermine our culture. Theydo th... more »

On how politics involves spinning everything into a part of a Grand Narrative, and selectively emphasizing the parts of news that fit into that narrative and trying to pretend that the rest don't exist. (I'm excerpting the bit that's the most critical of the Blue tribe, since I and probably most of my readers are Blue-leaning and we probably benefit the most from having our own narrative critiqued, but the post itself is on balance equally critical of everyone.)

> Suppose the Red Tribe has a Grand Narrative. The Narrative is something like “We Americans are right-thinking folks with a perfectly nice culture. But there are also scary foreigners who hate our freedom and wish us ill. Unfortunately, there are also traitors in our ranks – in the form of the Blue Tribe – who in order to signal sophistication support foreigners over Americans and want to undermine our culture. They do this by supporting immigration, accusing anyone who is too pro-American and insufficiently pro-foreigner of “racism”, and demanding everyone conform to “multiculturalism” and “diversity”, as well as lionizing any group within America that tries to subvert the values of the dominant culture. Our goal is to minimize the subversive power of the Blue Tribe at home, then maintain isolation from foreigners abroad, enforced by a strong military if they refuse to stay isolated.”

> And the Blue Tribe also has a Grand Narrative. The Narrative is something like “The world is made up of a bunch of different groups and cultures. The wealthier and more privileged groups, played by the Red Tribe, have a history of trying to oppress and harass all the other groups. This oppression is based on ignorance, bigotry, xenophobia, denial of science, and a false facade of patriotism. Our goal is to call out the Red Tribe on its many flaws, and support other groups like foreigners and minorities in their quest for justice and equality, probably in a way that involves lots of NGOs and activists.” [...]

> The Rotherham scandal was an incident in an English town where criminal gangs had been grooming and blackmailing thousands of young girls, then using them as sex slaves. This had been going on for at least ten years with minimal intervention by the police. An investigation was duly launched, which discovered that the police had been keeping quiet about the problem because the gangs were mostly Pakistani and the victims mostly white, and the police didn’t want to seem racist by cracking down too heavily. Researchers and officials who demanded that the abuse should be publicized or fought more vigorously were ordered to attend “diversity training” to learn why their demands were offensive. The police department couldn’t keep it under wraps forever, and eventually it broke and was a huge scandal.

> The Left then proceeded to totally ignore it, and the Right proceeded to never shut up about it for like an entire month, and every article about it had to include the “diversity training” aspect, so that if you type “rotherham d…” into Google, your two first options are “Rotherham Daily Mail” and “Rotherham diversity training”.

> I don’t find this surprising at all. The Rotherham incident ties in perfectly to the Red Tribe narrative – scary foreigners trying to hurt us, politically correct traitors trying to prevent us from noticing. It doesn’t do anything for the Blue Tribe narrative, and indeed actively contradicts it at some points. So the Red Tribe wants to trumpet it to the world, and the Blue Tribe wants to stay quiet and distract. [...]

> John Durant did an interesting analysis of media coverage of the Rotherham scandal versus the “someone posted nude pictures of Jennifer Lawrence” scandal.

> He found left-leaning news website Slate had one story on the Rotherham child exploitation scandal, but four stories on nude Jennifer Lawrence.

> He also found that feminist website Jezebel had only one story on the Rotherham child exploitation scandal, but six stories on nude Jennifer Lawrence.

> Feministing gave Rotherham a one-sentence mention in a links roundup (just underneath “five hundred years of female portrait painting in three minutes”), but Jennifer Lawrence got two full stories. [...]

> This doesn’t surprise me much. Yes, you would think that the systematic rape of thousands of women with police taking no action might be a feminist issue. Or that it might outrage some people on Tumblr, a site which has many flaws but which has never been accused of being slow to outrage. But the goal here isn’t to push some kind of Platonic ideal of what’s important, it’s to support a certain narrative that ties into the Blue Tribe narrative. Rotherham does the opposite of that. The Jennifer Lawrence nudes, which center around how hackers (read: creepy internet nerds) shared nude pictures of a beloved celebrity on Reddit (read: creepy internet nerds) and 4Chan (read: creepy internet nerds) – and #Gamergate which does the same – are exactly the narrative they want to push, so they become the Stories Of The Century.___

2014-10-25 09:38:16 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

> MacAskill's own pledge is to donate everything he earns above about $35,000 per year, adjusted using standard economic measures for inflation and cost of living, to the organizations that he believes will do the most good. Since his bar is roughly at the UK median income—such that half the population earns more each year, and half the population earns less—he's certainly not condemning himself to a life of hardship, but rather, pre-committing himself to staying roughly in the middle of the national income distribution even as his earnings go up over time.

> That said, his pledge means giving away 60 percent of his expected lifetime earnings.

> When I ask him the inevitable questions about whether this isn't rather a lot to sacrifice for one person, MacAskill shrugs modestly and smiles broadly. "Imagine you're walking down the street and see abui... more »

> MacAskill's own pledge is to donate everything he earns above about $35,000 per year, adjusted using standard economic measures for inflation and cost of living, to the organizations that he believes will do the most good. Since his bar is roughly at the UK median income—such that half the population earns more each year, and half the population earns less—he's certainly not condemning himself to a life of hardship, but rather, pre-committing himself to staying roughly in the middle of the national income distribution even as his earnings go up over time.

> That said, his pledge means giving away 60 percent of his expected lifetime earnings.

> When I ask him the inevitable questions about whether this isn't rather a lot to sacrifice for one person, MacAskill shrugs modestly and smiles broadly. "Imagine you're walking down the street and see a building on fire," he says. "You run in, kick the door down—smoke billowing—you run in and save a young child. That would be a pretty amazing day in your life: That's a day that would stay with you forever. Who wouldn't want to have that experience? But the most effective charities can save a life for $4,000, so many of us are lucky enough that we can save a life every year through our donations. When you're able to achieve so much at such low cost to yourself…why wouldn't you do that? The only reason not to is that you're stuck in the status quo, where giving away so much of your income seems a little bit odd."

> Admittedly, your humble author doesn't have the highest standards for luxury: I'm the kind of person who thinks that Lindt Dark Chocolate is the pinnacle of grandeur (especially when they're three for the price of two). But, to me, MacAskill's life did not seem in any way lacking. Which shouldn't be surprising, since he's a person with normal tastes living in the middle of the income distribution in a wealthy country. By pre-committing himself to living on a certain level of income, however, rather than constantly striving for material rewards just over the horizon, it seems that MacAskill has enabled himself to more deeply appreciate what he has. "One of the good things about the pledge idea," he says, "is that you allot yourself a certain amount of money and you spend it however you want; the rest you give away." [...]

> Walking into an interview with a philosopher, never mind one with a focus on altruism, I think I could be forgiven for expecting a lot more moralism and perhaps some browbeating for my (averagely) slothful, selfish ways. Instead, it was notable how little MacAskill talked about what we ought to do at all, and how completely focused he was on altruism as an opportunity. Despite the fact that he was telling me stories and facts and figures that (let's be honest) he has presumably recited in similar ways on countless previous occasions, MacAskill got visibly excited when talking about the very best charities; he had a genuine, childlike awe for how much one person can do to alleviate suffering in the world.

> It struck me that, through the effective altruism movement, MacAskill seemed to have solved some of the big psychological problems of being a fortunate person in a wealthy country in the modern world. Through the predictability of the pledge, he had overcome the strange malaise of knowing intellectually that you're in the top percentiles of the income distribution out of all the people who currently exist—on average, the bottom 5 percent of the U.S. income distribution has a higher income than the top 5 percent of the Indian income distribution, even after adjusting for the cost of living—and yet spending your days consumed by jealousy because the magical square in your neighbor's pocket is ever-so-slightly newer than the magical square in yours. Through rigorous research into effective charity, MacAskill had discovered ways to use his resources to save lives at surprisingly little cost. And through building a network of people committed to the same ideas, he had found a community and sense of meaning that all too many of us feel we lack. [...]

> As such, more than anything, MacAskill seems like a person who has just discovered some kind of cheat-code for the universe. And to be honest—while it's clearly impossible from a few interactions with someone to really get a measure of their innermost emotional state—one of MacAskill's notable features is that he seems to have attained a quiet, personal satisfaction and a sort of inner peace and confidence that I don't believe would be possible to fake. I came into the interview expecting to feel that, by devoting so few of my resources to altruism, I was doing something morally shaky; I came away just feeling that I might be missing out.___

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2014-10-25 09:29:57 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

> We recently released a page on “top career strategies”, featuring two career strategies for building your long-run potential, and five for immediate impact:

> 1. The experimenter: Finding a career that’s the right fit for you is important, but it’s also difficult to do just by thinking about it. It can therefore be a good strategy to try out a number of different areas in order to learn more about your own interests and skills.

> 2. The self-developer: When you’ve narrowed down which area you want to enter, focus on investing in yourself to build your career capital.

> 3. The effective worker: There are many non-profit and for-profit organisations that have a large impact, which are short of specific types of human capital. If you’re a good fit for a high-impact organization, it’s an option worth considering. By high-impact organisations we meanthose that ar... more »

> We recently released a page on “top career strategies”, featuring two career strategies for building your long-run potential, and five for immediate impact:

> 1. The experimenter: Finding a career that’s the right fit for you is important, but it’s also difficult to do just by thinking about it. It can therefore be a good strategy to try out a number of different areas in order to learn more about your own interests and skills.

> 2. The self-developer: When you’ve narrowed down which area you want to enter, focus on investing in yourself to build your career capital.

> 3. The effective worker: There are many non-profit and for-profit organisations that have a large impact, which are short of specific types of human capital. If you’re a good fit for a high-impact organization, it’s an option worth considering. By high-impact organisations we mean those that are well-run and work on an effective cause.

> 4. The entrepreneur: If you’ve got potential as an entrepreneur, attempt to found new effective non-profit organisations or innovative for-profits that benefit their customers and create positive spill-over effects.

> 5. The philanthropist: Some people have skills that are better suited to earning money than the other strategies. These people can take a higher-earning career and donate the money to effective organisations. We call this strategy ‘earning to give’.

> 6. The researcher: Some people are especially good at and interested in research – attempting to create new knowledge. If this is you, and have you have the opportunity to work in a field that seems particularly important, tractable and neglected, then this could be a way to have a large impact.

> 7. The advocate: If you can take a job that gives you a public platform, good network and credibility, you can use it to promote and unite people behind important ideas.

> The aim of the strategies is to give people ideas for what they could do with their careers over the medium-term.___

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2014-10-25 09:26:21 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

I used this for a while when I still had an iPad, and it was pretty cool.

> One of the best ways to break out of your filter bubble is to read news sources with multiple perspectives on a variety of topics. Random, an app for iPhone and iPad, breaks you out by intentionally guiding you to new topics and interesting articles at sites you may not otherwise read.

> The "filter bubble," or that insular shield of customized, aggregated news that, either automatically or by choice, always tends to give you news catered to your world view, can be hard to break out of, especially if you're trying to learn something new or see an issue from all sides. Random gets the job done by presenting you with a series of topics for you to tap and read more about. Touch one, and you'll get either a selection of more detailed choices, or an article to read. When you're done and... more »

I used this for a while when I still had an iPad, and it was pretty cool.

> One of the best ways to break out of your filter bubble is to read news sources with multiple perspectives on a variety of topics. Random, an app for iPhone and iPad, breaks you out by intentionally guiding you to new topics and interesting articles at sites you may not otherwise read.

> The "filter bubble," or that insular shield of customized, aggregated news that, either automatically or by choice, always tends to give you news catered to your world view, can be hard to break out of, especially if you're trying to learn something new or see an issue from all sides. Random gets the job done by presenting you with a series of topics for you to tap and read more about. Touch one, and you'll get either a selection of more detailed choices, or an article to read. When you're done and go back, you'll get an entirely new set of choices, loosely based on the topic you just read. Tap another one to dive deeper and read a different piece.

> Random isn't a traditional news app. You don't choose your news sources, and it's not a feed reader. You just choose what you're interested in reading about. The app mixes things up a bit with its topic selections too—if you're reading about "climate" and then "environment," you might suddenly get an option to read more about "anthropology," for example, and find yourself led to a new and completely different discussion. The end result is that you wind up reading perspectives and news sources you may otherwise never stumble on, and get a better understanding of issues you're already interested in. The app is free—hit the link below to try it out.___

Buttons

A special service of CircleCount.com is the following button.

The button shows the number of followers you have directly in a small button. You can add this button to your website, like the +1-Button of Google or the Like-Button of Facebook.






You can add this button directly in your website. For more information about the CircleCount Buttons and the description how to add them to another page click here.

Kaj SotalaCircloscope