Login now

Not your profile? Login and get free access to your reports and analysis.

Tags

Sign in

No tag added here yet.
You can login on CircleCount to add some tags here.

Are you missing a tag in the list of available tags? You can suggest new tags here.

Login now

Do you want to see a more detailed chart? Check your settings and define your favorite chart type.

Or click here to get the detailed chart only once.

Kaj Sotala has been shared in 24 public circles

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Brian Mcquillan13,393New Public CircleThis is a public circle of people that would like to be circulated in order to discover new people with similar interest and to gain more followers, if you would like to be included please follow these steps.1. Follow/Add our page(this is needed in order for us to add you to the circle).2. Share the circle publicly.3. (Optional) if you would like to be include in a more specialized circle click on this link #sharedcircleoftheday #fullcircleshare  #addmetoyourcircles #awesomeness  #awesomepeople #awesomecircle  #awesome   #awesomesauce #awesomeness #awesomepeople2014-11-11 08:27:25464131433
Angie Rocio50To be added to my Circle you have to do these simple steps:1 - Include me in your circles 2 - Plus, Comment and Reshare this post° in PUBLIC 2014-06-17 17:20:394483210
Angie Rocio40This is a super Circle and in it I put together a group of really interesting and active people on Google Plus to add in your circles.I'm talking about the top   Google + users that share unique and original contents.Follow   this advice and grow your G+ community with people that share amazing content that will surprise you:boost   visibility on Google+ - Share the circle!If you want to be added to the next Circle you have to do these simple steps:1 - Include me in your circles 3 - Share the circle (Publicly) 4 - Add +1 to the post 5 - Follow  your dreams and smile to life.More you share More you get! :)Thanks!2014-06-15 08:09:44448119
Dina Tika0Here is a group of Active Engagers, Circle Sharers, Awesome Plus Oners, and Cool People on Google Plus!   Circle Sharing is an awesome way to increase your followers and active engagers on your profile. Some of my favorite people that I've met here on Google + through Circle Sharing.    Want to be in the next Circle of Awesomeness? Follow the Steps Below!  ☛ Add the circle ☛ Share in the Public ☛ Plus 1 the Post. ☛ Comment. 2014-06-10 05:53:52479001
Krzysztof Skomra4,828New circle 201404031. Plus this post2. Leave a comment (introduce yourself, if you’d like)3. Add this circle to your circles4. Add yourself to the circle5. Share this circle publicly to your stream1. Dodaj Plus dla postu 2. Zostaw komentarz (przedstaw ślad po sobie, jeśli chcesz) 3. Dodaj ten krąg do swoich kręgów 4. Dodaj się do kręgu 5. Poleć ten krąg publicznie do strumienia #techlover   #photographers   #bloggers   #circle   #circleshare   #circlesharing  #circles   #share   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircles   #sharemycircles  #sharemycircle   #iwillfollow   #followback   #followers#cardphoto   #circle #circles #publiccircle #circleshare #circlesharing #sharedcircles #sharedcircle #morefollowers #sharingcircles #circleshare#sharedpubliccircles #sharedpublicircles #sharedcircle #AddCircle #FindCircles #AwesomeCircle #addcircle #addpeople #circlemeup 2014-04-03 21:55:02501349
Aleksander Adamczyk0New circle 201404031. Dodaj Plus dla postu 2. Zostaw komentarz (przedstaw ślad po sobie, jeśli chcesz) 3. Dodaj ten krąg do swoich kręgów 4. Dodaj się do kręgu 5. Poleć ten krąg publicznie do strumienia EN.1. Plus this post2. Leave a comment (introduce yourself, if you’d like)3. Add this circle to your circles4. Add yourself to the circle5. Share this circle publicly to your stream#techlover   #photographers   #bloggers   #circle   #circleshare   #circlesharing  #circles   #share   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircles   #sharemycircles  #sharemycircle   #iwillfollow   #followback   #followers#cardphoto   #circle #circles #publiccircle #circleshare #circlesharing#sharedcircles #sharedcircle #morefollowers #sharingcircles #circleshare#sharedpubliccircles #sharedpublicircles #sharedcircle #AddCircle #FindCircles#AwesomeCircle #addcircle #addpeople #circlemeup #circlesdiscovery  2014-04-03 21:29:32501014
Timo Kiviluoma9,935A full circle of MEN from FINLAND! Crazy but true. We Finns are artistic, witty and bit shy - you need to add this circle and fin us! #circleshare   #circles   #finland   #men   #sharedcircles  2014-04-03 13:07:45132014
Timo Kiviluoma6,945MEN FROM FINLAND. A very dedicated circle of men, all from Finland. Strange, isn't it? Anyway, add these witty and generous gentlemen and find the true character of Finland. .-) #finland   #men   #circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #sharedcircle   #sharedcircleoftheday  +Circles 2014-01-08 14:25:32131165
Timo Kiviluoma5,304KOKONAINEN PIIRILLINEN SUOMALAISIA MIEHIÄGoogleplussaa sanotaan aavekaupungiksi. Tottahan tuuli humisee tyhjässä saluunassa, jos et ole lisännyt piireihisi sinua kiinnostavia ihmisiä.Tässä piirissä on noin 130 suomalaista miestä. Fiksua, taiteellista ja hauskojakin ovat. Osa postaa suomeksi, osa englanniksi. Sinuna antaisin heille mahdollisuuden. :-)ELI HYVÄ IHMINEN LISÄÄ TÄMÄ PIIRI ITSELLESI! (ja jaa eteenpäin...) #piirit   #sharedcircles   #suomipiiri   #suomi  2013-10-30 18:06:22131115
Max Huijgen41,136Europe calling: the old giant wakes up and calls on its peeps! A new circle of Europeans as I promised long ago to connect the people who responded and share them. See for the first shared circle this post https://plus.google.com/112352920206354603958/posts/PDUi13o9dB1The original post was shared 225 times. You can find it here:https://plus.google.com/112352920206354603958/posts/CdhmHGbYjgiPart 2 is still open and can be found here:https://plus.google.com/112352920206354603958/posts/NDAhG4fP2a7If you didn´t do so already, post there and as long as I have spots free, I will circle you as I want to see my streams come alive during European hours.There was a shared feeling that it would be great to get some attention from G+ for Europe with official hangouts from the community managers during European times, feature roll-outs from Google no longer restricted to the US, having some central point to share European circles and last but not least the desire to have hangouts without having to burn the midnight oil. To help solve this and get Europeans together on the same page I created +Europeans on G+  It already has multiple managers out of the community and that initiative recently span off +European Photo  but feel to offer a bit of your time for this community project. Circle the page if you didn´t already do so. We need more peeps from all over Europe to participate and enjoy G+I hope these posts can do the rounds through Europe and gets us firmly on the G+ map. So even if you´re not European yourself, but sympathize with the initiatives to form a community here, help spread the word and share it.And don´t forget: we all love the other continents and most of us have circles which encompass the whole world. So it´s not against others, but pro us :)2013-03-15 15:05:14291532076
Andrey Mashnich51,420Круг людей с активной жизненной позицией в Гугле+Circle of people, with active life position in Google+#ForFriends #photo #EarthMyMother   #circleshare #sharedcircles #sharedcircle #sharedpubliccircles #circlesharing #publiccircle2013-01-23 10:40:00479311537
J. M. Weber812I don't always share circles, but when I do I put some thought into creating them.This is a circle with some of the most interesting people I have in my circles. There are a few rules I follow when selecting:- Only people (no pages or communities)- No NSFW content, not overly political- You can expect these people to engage / be active on G+- Not more than 30 people. Sorry if you're not in it, maybe you will be next time.My goal is to share a circle than can be added without second thoughts. In my experience, adding a circle with up to a few hundred profiles will likely mess up your circles so bad it's rarely worth adding them.I hope this circle will be of use to some of you. Recommendations are always welcome.2012-12-15 01:36:3730403
Jaana Nyström431,855Finnish active people and Pages circle:Suomalaisia postaavia piiri Marraskuu 2012UUTTA:  Piiriläisten päivittäisiä postauksia!http://publiccircles.appspot.com/dailycircle/jaana_nystr_m-finnisch_circle/2012-11-22* * *Kävin läpi omia piirejäni sekä useita eri sivustoja:http://www.circlecount.com/fi/http://www.googleplussuomi.com/mybestfriends/?googleid=101780786123023132934http://www.googleplussuomi.com/Lisäsin sellaiset jotka ovat postanneet julkisesti, varsinkin kahden viime viikon aikana.Postauskieli vaihtelee suomesta englantiin.Tallentakaa koko piiri uutena ja napsikaa sitten pois porukkaa joiden sisältö ei teitä kiinnosta. Tai valikoikaa! :-)Hauskoja hetkiä näiden aktiivisten Plussaajien parissa:  Vinkatkaa lisää profiileja kommenteissa, väsähdin parin tunnin setvimisen jälkeen.Saa jakaa, mielellään kiitos.Katsele piiriläisiä Circlecount.com:issa:http://www.circlecount.com/fi/sharedcircle/?id=z120f1eoezn1t5lms22celljpvm0wvzfs #Piiri   #Suomi   #Gplussa  2012-11-23 07:52:26111451737
John Ward4,989This is a circle I have set up for people who enjoy Science Fiction or Fantasy. If you'd like to be added to the circle, please let me know in the comments. Also, make sure you guys add the circle as well; so you can see other people's recommendations on the subject. Feel free to re-share this post. #circlesharesunday  2012-06-24 22:05:395014938
Max Huijgen24,852Europe calling: the old giant wakes up and calls on its peeps! Part IIAccording to the latest figures 426.9 million Europeans now use the InternetThere is a is feeling that it would be great to get some attention from G+ for Europe with official hangouts from the community managers during European times, feature roll-outs from Google no longer restricted to the US, and last but not least the desire to have hangouts and interaction without having to burn the midnight oil. To help solve this and get Europeans together on the same page I created +Europeans on G+  It already has four managers out of the community but feel to offer a bit of your time if you want to contribute. Circle the page if you didn´t already do so. I also organized a "I will circle you" project. If people commented that they came from Europe I would circle them instead of the other way. The intention was to share this circle back to the community and the first circle of 500 went out. You can find them here https://plus.google.com/112352920206354603958/posts/PDUi13o9dB1Now as promised it´s time for round 2: 300 people and a few European pages. Some very well known, some relatively unknown, but all certified active posters from Europe who will spice up your streams during European hours.Check them out and please share the circle as the intention is to get much more Europeans united!if you were left out while you signed up: my excuses as it´s a tedious job to manage all these circles. I checked all but I am only human :)2012-06-01 14:51:14301843557
Kevin Medeiros3,101Yeah yeah, this is a huge circle to share. These guys and girls are a bunch of geeks. Geeks of what type you might ask? Well, of all sorts..you'll just have to find out. I've gone through and weeded out some of the inactive users myself in order to stay under the 500 person limit. These guys make up a big portion of my stream and never fail to keep me informed about awesome shit.You may also be asking why I didn't sort them out into sub-geek categories? The answer to that is because I'm not your damn secretary :-)Just check'em out :)2012-05-26 19:20:2947711714
Peter Edenist1,213Final share of this circle for #scififans for some time. This has been one of the oldest circles I have curated and I wouldn't remove one person from here !Plus 1 if you want in! #projectslowboat #scifi #scifisunday #scifichat #sciencefiction #scienceeveryday #scienceisawesome2012-04-22 14:47:445007414
Mike Clancy3,739I promised to reshare this sci-fi fans circle if I got a lot of new subscribers and I did ... over 100! As before, if you are not already listed in in this circle, but would like to be, please just +1 this post. If you are already in the circle and would like it to grow, please just share. That is all..2012-04-06 13:37:293196322
Mike Clancy3,675Ok, here's the new and improved sci-fi interests circle. Non-posters have been removed. As before, if you are not already listed in in this circle, but would like to be, please just +1 this post. If you are already in the circle and would like it to grow, please just share. That is all.2012-04-05 13:39:1521813834
Mike Clancy3,583My sci-fi fan circle ... +1 if you want to be added, share if you already are.2012-04-04 17:18:421343113
Kevin Medeiros2,549This is my circle of geeks. Definitely an active circle that share geeky shit that "others" may not understand, but you do, right?Circle them if you want instant fun. Seriously..I weed out the lame ones all the time..be prepared for the onslaught of awesome when you add this circle!2012-03-23 21:02:4544913918
Mike Clancy2,938Final edition of my sci-fi circle for now ... +1 and share if you want to be added to future releases2012-03-20 02:15:081335212
Mike Clancy1,885My select group of true Sci-Fi fans. If you think you should be added to it, just +12012-03-05 00:31:231514217
Jaana Nyström35,188#suomi #piiri #Finncircle Lauantain iloksi:Enemmän suomalaisia virtaan!Tämä piiri sisältää niin vanhoja kettuja kuin uusia tulokkaitakin.Kerään koko ajan lisää kotimaista settiä, käykäähän kommentoimassa postauksia niin tiedän lisätä uusia.Te joilla ei vielä ole profiili hyvässä hapessa, lukaiskaa tämä:http://googleplussa.blogspot.com/2012/01/google-kayton-aloitus-profiilivinkit.html2012-03-03 12:32:55186216

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

1
comments per post
2
reshares per post
6
+1's per post

934
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 11

2015-02-28 18:31:58 (11 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Saw a Gremlins commercial while visiting a friend, on the way home started to ponder the evolutionary purpose of the whole "reproduce when wet" thing. Maybe mogwais originally evolved somewhere really dry, and had to make use of the opportunity to reproduce the moment there was water available? 

Then there's the "cocooning and turning into a new subspecies if they get food after midnight" thing - the most obvious analogy would be to butterflies, but gremlins being the natural next phase of the mogwai life cycle feels a little weird considering that reproduction's already possible in the first phase.

Maybe a better analogy would be those fish - I forget which - that may develop drastically different forms based on the temperature of the water they grow up in. In that case, different environmental conditions trigger different developmental programs. In the... more »

Most reshares: 46

posted image

2015-03-15 12:33:00 (1 comments, 46 reshares, 36 +1s)Open 

> A lot of what travelled on the Grand Trunk was called the Overhead. It was instructions to towers, reports, messages about messages, even chatter between operators, although this was strictly forbidden these days. It was all in code. It was very rare you got Plain in the Overhead. But now . . . 'There it goes again,' she said. 'It must be wrong. It's got no origin code and no address. It's Overhead, but it's in Plain.' On the other side of the tower, sitting in a seat facing the opposite direction because he was operating the up-line, was Roger, who was seventeen and already working for his tower-master certificate. His hand didn't stop moving as he said: 

> 'What did it say?'

> 'There was GNU, and I know that's a code, and then just a name. It was John Dearheart. Was it a—'

> 'You sent it on?' saidGr... more »

Most plusones: 36

posted image

2015-03-15 12:33:00 (1 comments, 46 reshares, 36 +1s)Open 

> A lot of what travelled on the Grand Trunk was called the Overhead. It was instructions to towers, reports, messages about messages, even chatter between operators, although this was strictly forbidden these days. It was all in code. It was very rare you got Plain in the Overhead. But now . . . 'There it goes again,' she said. 'It must be wrong. It's got no origin code and no address. It's Overhead, but it's in Plain.' On the other side of the tower, sitting in a seat facing the opposite direction because he was operating the up-line, was Roger, who was seventeen and already working for his tower-master certificate. His hand didn't stop moving as he said: 

> 'What did it say?'

> 'There was GNU, and I know that's a code, and then just a name. It was John Dearheart. Was it a—'

> 'You sent it on?' saidGr... more »

Latest 50 posts

2015-03-27 14:43:19 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Okay, let's see if I can do this. I want to finally get my thesis done, or at least in a close-enough-to-done shape, before May when I start a new internship which will be taking up my time. Therefore no social media use before I hit that goal: in particular, no public posts, +1's, or comments. I'll put in an exception on event invitations and such, as well as for making posts that are somehow useful for my thesis (like "hey, I need playtesters"). I may or may not respond to private messages, but if you want to reach me, I recommend sending an e-mail instead.

Okay, let's see if I can do this. I want to finally get my thesis done, or at least in a close-enough-to-done shape, before May when I start a new internship which will be taking up my time. Therefore no social media use before I hit that goal: in particular, no public posts, +1's, or comments. I'll put in an exception on event invitations and such, as well as for making posts that are somehow useful for my thesis (like "hey, I need playtesters"). I may or may not respond to private messages, but if you want to reach me, I recommend sending an e-mail instead.___

posted image

2015-03-25 15:40:30 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

This looks like an interesting concept.

> An Office Nomad is a person, who has a new host organisation every month. The Office Nomad always arrives on the first and leaves on the last day of the month. Office Nomad continues working on his/her own tasks or business, but acts as a member of the work community.

> There is no business relationship between the Office Nomad and the host company. This means no expenses, no invoices, no direct business. However, there are endless opportunities for both parties to learn and explore new ways of working.

This looks like an interesting concept.

> An Office Nomad is a person, who has a new host organisation every month. The Office Nomad always arrives on the first and leaves on the last day of the month. Office Nomad continues working on his/her own tasks or business, but acts as a member of the work community.

> There is no business relationship between the Office Nomad and the host company. This means no expenses, no invoices, no direct business. However, there are endless opportunities for both parties to learn and explore new ways of working.___

2015-03-25 14:33:23 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Tuure Parkkinen: Hypothetical election promise by a future political party: "We will destroy 40,000 more unnecessary jobs"

Tuure Parkkinen: Hypothetical election promise by a future political party: "We will destroy 40,000 more unnecessary jobs"___

2015-03-25 14:31:29 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Javier Reyes speaking at Utopia 2048 seminar: We are not profit-maximizers: we are social maximizers, we seek social relationships and meaning. Yet our economy is built around maximizing profit, shifting our perspective and causing our thoughts to focus on that.

My thoughts on the above:

First the caveats and disagreements with the claim.

I do think that in general, "making profit" correlates reasonably well with "creating value for people", for people pay for what they find to be valuable. Similarly, I do also think that free markets are one of the best ways to aggregate information about what people want, that prices are a powerful signal of things that there's an insufficient supply of, and that aiming to make profit by seizing upon a market opportunity often ends up making lots of people better off.

I also think that the often-repeated... more »

Javier Reyes speaking at Utopia 2048 seminar: We are not profit-maximizers: we are social maximizers, we seek social relationships and meaning. Yet our economy is built around maximizing profit, shifting our perspective and causing our thoughts to focus on that.

My thoughts on the above:

First the caveats and disagreements with the claim.

I do think that in general, "making profit" correlates reasonably well with "creating value for people", for people pay for what they find to be valuable. Similarly, I do also think that free markets are one of the best ways to aggregate information about what people want, that prices are a powerful signal of things that there's an insufficient supply of, and that aiming to make profit by seizing upon a market opportunity often ends up making lots of people better off.

I also think that the often-repeated criticism of classical economics assuming that people are pure profit maximizers reflects a misunderstanding of economics, in that even classical economics viewed people as seeking to satisfy a large number of needs, with money just being the most effective way of collaborating with other people to get your needs met.

Those things said, I think the claim also made valuable points. The speaker had a nice example of four friends who decide to build a house for someone else. After doing it once, they decide that hey, now they could make a living of this, and go register themselves as a corporation.

Now their whole social dynamic changes. Maybe someone loans the new corporation money and becomes a majority shareholder; maybe someone else becomes the chief executive. Possibly their incorporation is a net benefit for them and the world overall, but regardless, when they meet next Sunday to play Xbox games together, their whole relationships with each other are very likely affected by the legal fiction of them now forming a corporate entity.

More generally there's the whole question of how market norms are different than social norms, and how these interact: there was a chapter in Freakanomics about a daycare that instituted a fine for parents who came to get their children late and kept the workers there overtime. The end result was that more parents ended up being late, because their mental frame had changed into one of market norms: they felt that paying the fine was how they bought themselves the right to be late, whereas earlier they had been on time out of a sense of duty and as a social norm.

And while I do think that profit-maximizing correlates reasonably well with value-creation, there is always Goodhart's law: "When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure." Probably all of us can think of countless of examples that produce lots of profit while not being particularly socially beneficial, or outright harmful for people's well-being. The way our society is structured, people have to focus their energies on making sure that they manage to make a living and get money from somewhere. When money becomes what enables you to live, if you're lucky and privileged you may look for the things that earn you a living and contribute value to others: but if you're less lucky and privileged, you're forced to just look for anything that turns a profit, and an increasing part of your attention and focus will be centered on that, as opposed to the other things that would provide you with value.

I'm not saying that having a market economy would be a bad thing, on net: nor do I have any particular suggestions (other than a basic income made possible by increasing automatization). But thinking in monetary terms does alter people's mindset, and whenever the basic thing that our society incentivizes is only roughly correlated with well-being, that's always a good thing to be aware of.

s an interesting alternative incentive structure, look at how people interact online. A lot of creativity is driven not for the desire for monetary profit, but for the desire for attention and respect. Post something online and hope that other people will like it and appreciate it in return.

Could you run a whole economy this way? No, at least not with our current technology level. Does it work for everything? Ditto. Is it an interesting alternative incentive structure that's arguably more close to "social maximization" than "profit maximization"? Yes. Is that a good thing? Maybe.___

2015-03-25 06:18:51 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Why can you never trust an atom?

Because they make up everything.

(via Princess Awesome)

Why can you never trust an atom?

Because they make up everything.

(via Princess Awesome)___

posted image

2015-03-24 15:39:37 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Turns in the online card game Hearthstone are usually limited to 90 seconds, so of course this guy had to set up a situation where his turn takes 40 hours to resolve. Repeating the same simple animation for the whole time. And livestream the whole thing on Twitch, responding to comments from the chat.

Why? Because he could.

Turns in the online card game Hearthstone are usually limited to 90 seconds, so of course this guy had to set up a situation where his turn takes 40 hours to resolve. Repeating the same simple animation for the whole time. And livestream the whole thing on Twitch, responding to comments from the chat.

Why? Because he could.___

posted image

2015-03-24 14:49:11 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Skylines modders: building creative traffic solutions since 2015.

Skylines modders: building creative traffic solutions since 2015.___

2015-03-24 09:24:23 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Idea: a service that's kind of a cross of OKCupid and Chatroulette, geared towards those moments when you're feeling lonely and just want to have someone to talk with right now. Hit the "I want to talk" button, and the service connects you to some other person who's also feeling like talking and that you have things in common with, and suggests an initial discussion topic chosen at random from the interests that you happen to share. Can use your public Facebook, Last.fm, Goodreads, etc. information as a data source, as well as allowing you to specify specific criteria ("only match to people with at least 50 karma on the Philosophy Stack Exchange").

Idea: a service that's kind of a cross of OKCupid and Chatroulette, geared towards those moments when you're feeling lonely and just want to have someone to talk with right now. Hit the "I want to talk" button, and the service connects you to some other person who's also feeling like talking and that you have things in common with, and suggests an initial discussion topic chosen at random from the interests that you happen to share. Can use your public Facebook, Last.fm, Goodreads, etc. information as a data source, as well as allowing you to specify specific criteria ("only match to people with at least 50 karma on the Philosophy Stack Exchange").___

2015-03-23 16:55:40 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

> The takeaway here is that being– a Nice Guy ™ is not a guy thing—it’s a people thing. Specifically, Nice Guy ™ is what happens when you get someone who is not sure how this whole “relationships” thing works exactly, who is petrified of rejection, and who doesn’t fully understand that people of the other primary gender are actually people and not some kind of complicated relationship-granting automation.

> I think for a lot of people it’s a normal developmental stage on the path of figuring out how relationships work, and there’s nothing wrong with that (you get amnesty about any relationship mistakes you make before the age of 18). The problem is when some people of any gender get stuck there.

> The takeaway here is that being– a Nice Guy ™ is not a guy thing—it’s a people thing. Specifically, Nice Guy ™ is what happens when you get someone who is not sure how this whole “relationships” thing works exactly, who is petrified of rejection, and who doesn’t fully understand that people of the other primary gender are actually people and not some kind of complicated relationship-granting automation.

> I think for a lot of people it’s a normal developmental stage on the path of figuring out how relationships work, and there’s nothing wrong with that (you get amnesty about any relationship mistakes you make before the age of 18). The problem is when some people of any gender get stuck there.___

posted image

2015-03-23 16:42:51 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

> But the long history of Harlequin does a lot to explain why "no no no OK actually yes" became such a popular trope. It's very easy to forget how hard women had to fight over the course of the twentieth century to feel they had a right to sexual pleasure. And so, while romance is often treated as a static genre, I prefer to think of it as a sprawling, decades-long intergenerational discussion (sometimes polite, sometimes a bare-knuckle brawl) among women about what constitutes love, how one finds a partner that's worth putting up with the occasional tantrums and dirty socks. Scenes that disturb the modern reader nevertheless paved the way for the more sex-positive genre we enjoy today. [...]

> This dovetails nicely with romance novelist Sarah MacLean's feminist theory of romance as a broader genre. "If you look at it as heroine as hero, hero as society, at its... more »

> But the long history of Harlequin does a lot to explain why "no no no OK actually yes" became such a popular trope. It's very easy to forget how hard women had to fight over the course of the twentieth century to feel they had a right to sexual pleasure. And so, while romance is often treated as a static genre, I prefer to think of it as a sprawling, decades-long intergenerational discussion (sometimes polite, sometimes a bare-knuckle brawl) among women about what constitutes love, how one finds a partner that's worth putting up with the occasional tantrums and dirty socks. Scenes that disturb the modern reader nevertheless paved the way for the more sex-positive genre we enjoy today. [...]

> This dovetails nicely with romance novelist Sarah MacLean's feminist theory of romance as a broader genre. "If you look at it as heroine as hero, hero as society, at its core it's the story of the feminist movement," she told me. Which provides another way to read the novels of the 70s and 80s as products of their time: "You're in the heroine's head, even though it's third person, and the hero is closed off to her. She has to break him open, like he's a world she can't be a part of," said MacLean. "The heroines come at the hero in a distinctly 'female' way. They unlock the 'female' part of him," and "when she's doing that, she's imbuing the hero with femininity. Right? She's saying, it's OK for you to love. It's OK for you to care. it's OK for you to cry."

> Starting around 1983, Harlequins suddenly look a lot more modern. Heroines have careers and ambitions and personalities. They're older, and even the young women no longer seem quite so wet-behind-the-ears, so helpless. Maybe the hero's still ultimately forgiven for being a dick, but the text is likely more self-aware about the fact that he's being a dick. While you'll still find Alphamen roaming free in the romance aisle generally and the Harlequin display specifically, outright brutishness increasingly had to be curbed or explained more convincingly or capped off with a really good grovel—or all three. You get the sense that bad behavior is deployed in the service of eventual emotional catharsis, rather than excused. [...]

> Harlequin's array of offerings multiplied at a dizzying rate in the late 80s and into the 90s. Lines divided and subdivided. Within various lines like SuperRomance and Silhouette Intimate Moments, they began carving out thematic series, denoting what was inside with stickers like "Count on a Cop" or "Hope Springs." Many heroes were downright sensitive; single dads and dudes willing to co-parent fatherless kids or surprise babies are common.___

posted image

2015-03-23 12:55:09 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

> exulansis
> n. the tendency to give up trying to talk about an experience because people are unable to relate to it—whether through envy or pity or simple foreignness—which allows it to drift away from the rest of your life story, until the memory itself feels out of place, almost mythical, wandering restlessly in the fog, no longer even looking for a place to land.

> exulansis
> n. the tendency to give up trying to talk about an experience because people are unable to relate to it—whether through envy or pity or simple foreignness—which allows it to drift away from the rest of your life story, until the memory itself feels out of place, almost mythical, wandering restlessly in the fog, no longer even looking for a place to land.___

2015-03-23 11:17:21 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Writing was first invented about 5500 years ago, so all the written records that we have of earlier times are from since that. The beginning of that time is often referred to as "ancient history", or "the beginning of history", and probably seems incomprehensibly far away for most people.

Homo sapiens first appeared around 200,000 years ago. That means that we have written records of only about 3 percent of the time that humans have existed.

Think about that for a while.

Writing was first invented about 5500 years ago, so all the written records that we have of earlier times are from since that. The beginning of that time is often referred to as "ancient history", or "the beginning of history", and probably seems incomprehensibly far away for most people.

Homo sapiens first appeared around 200,000 years ago. That means that we have written records of only about 3 percent of the time that humans have existed.

Think about that for a while.___

posted image

2015-03-23 10:55:03 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Whoa, trees can live a long time - this site claims that the world's oldest tree is over 5000 years old, meaning that it has been in existence starting roughly from the time that the stone age ended.

Whoa, trees can live a long time - this site claims that the world's oldest tree is over 5000 years old, meaning that it has been in existence starting roughly from the time that the stone age ended.___

posted image

2015-03-20 15:35:19 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"Somehow, over the last 24 hours, I have become the world’s leading expert on toilet paper orientation."

"Somehow, over the last 24 hours, I have become the world’s leading expert on toilet paper orientation."___

2015-03-20 10:16:35 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

[+Mikhail Novikov on creating the kinds of planets you see in science fiction, all city and nothing else]

11:57 < freiksenet> if you have quadrillions of people living in your galactic empire
11:57 < freiksenet> it might be not different from city planning nowadays
11:57 < freiksenet> "yeah, let's make that planet residential'
11:57 < freiksenet> "and this has some good climate, we can make it a luxury district"
11:58 < freiksenet> "how is the star lane situation there? we need a space gate to handle a trillion passengers jumping to factory hub every day, can we do it"?

[+Mikhail Novikov on creating the kinds of planets you see in science fiction, all city and nothing else]

11:57 < freiksenet> if you have quadrillions of people living in your galactic empire
11:57 < freiksenet> it might be not different from city planning nowadays
11:57 < freiksenet> "yeah, let's make that planet residential'
11:57 < freiksenet> "and this has some good climate, we can make it a luxury district"
11:58 < freiksenet> "how is the star lane situation there? we need a space gate to handle a trillion passengers jumping to factory hub every day, can we do it"?___

posted image

2015-03-19 19:36:36 (2 comments, 11 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

I knew on a conscious level that, if you dropped a ball and a feather in a vacuum with no air resistance, the two would fall at a same rate. But I couldn't imagine it in my head: my inner simulator insisted on visualizing it as if there was air in the room. Until I saw the video, that is.

I knew on a conscious level that, if you dropped a ball and a feather in a vacuum with no air resistance, the two would fall at a same rate. But I couldn't imagine it in my head: my inner simulator insisted on visualizing it as if there was air in the room. Until I saw the video, that is.___

2015-03-19 19:04:35 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

This... is actually a pretty good answer to the Problem of Evil. (Note that this formulation assumes that God is a classical utilitarian, but utilitarianism is not strictly necessary for the argument.)

This... is actually a pretty good answer to the Problem of Evil. (Note that this formulation assumes that God is a classical utilitarian, but utilitarianism is not strictly necessary for the argument.)___

posted image

2015-03-19 18:32:20 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

> ...intentional injuries are responsible for 2.8% of all deaths. Of these suicide is responsible for 1.53% of total death rate, violence 0.98% and war 0.3%. Yes, all wars killed about the same number of people as were killed by meningitis, and slightly more than the people who died of syphilis. In terms of absolute numbers we might be much better off improving antibiotic treatments and suicide hotlines than trying to stop the wars. And terrorism is so small that it doesn’t really show up: even the highest estimates put the median fatalities per year in the low thousands. [...]

> In fact, when looking at the value of better lives, it looks like an enhancement in life quality might be worth much more than fixing a lot of the deaths discussed above: make everybody’s life 1% better, and it corresponds to more quality adjusted life years than is lost to death every year! So improving ourwel... more »

Making the world a better place: autonomous cars and happiness pills might matter more than even stopping wars. http://aleph.se/andart2/ethics/consequentialist-world-improvement/ ___> ...intentional injuries are responsible for 2.8% of all deaths. Of these suicide is responsible for 1.53% of total death rate, violence 0.98% and war 0.3%. Yes, all wars killed about the same number of people as were killed by meningitis, and slightly more than the people who died of syphilis. In terms of absolute numbers we might be much better off improving antibiotic treatments and suicide hotlines than trying to stop the wars. And terrorism is so small that it doesn’t really show up: even the highest estimates put the median fatalities per year in the low thousands. [...]

> In fact, when looking at the value of better lives, it looks like an enhancement in life quality might be worth much more than fixing a lot of the deaths discussed above: make everybody’s life 1% better, and it corresponds to more quality adjusted life years than is lost to death every year! So improving our wellbeing might actually matter far, far more than many diseases. 

posted image

2015-03-19 17:19:01 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

> ...some days I think the reason we’ve been successfully married for fifteen years is that we thank each other for the dumbest goddamned things.  I mean, I’m thanking her for being allowed to bring her wine, she’s thanking me for doing the minimal amount of effort.

> I thank her for not stepping on my punchline when I’m telling a story.  She thanks me for not leaving toothpaste in the sink.  I thank her for not taking it personally when I scream at a broken computer.  She thanks me for watching reruns of Say Yes To The Dress with her, even though I don’t mind it all that much.

> Our days are suffused with gratitude.

> And yet it is a genuine gratitude.  She’s put together my weekly regimen of pills for years now, coordinating the various prescriptions and putting them all into a single M-T-W-T-F-S-S pillbox for me.  And every time I see her doit, I hug her and... more »

> ...some days I think the reason we’ve been successfully married for fifteen years is that we thank each other for the dumbest goddamned things.  I mean, I’m thanking her for being allowed to bring her wine, she’s thanking me for doing the minimal amount of effort.

> I thank her for not stepping on my punchline when I’m telling a story.  She thanks me for not leaving toothpaste in the sink.  I thank her for not taking it personally when I scream at a broken computer.  She thanks me for watching reruns of Say Yes To The Dress with her, even though I don’t mind it all that much.

> Our days are suffused with gratitude.

> And yet it is a genuine gratitude.  She’s put together my weekly regimen of pills for years now, coordinating the various prescriptions and putting them all into a single M-T-W-T-F-S-S pillbox for me.  And every time I see her do it, I hug her and thank her, because we don’t let “routine” clog our thanks.  It’s still special that she does it, even if it’s the hundredth week in a row.___

posted image

2015-03-18 06:55:35 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Patrolling African wilderness with night-vision drones that move on routes calculated by AI and 3D printing spare parts for them on-the-spot. We are living in the future.

Patrolling African wilderness with night-vision drones that move on routes calculated by AI and 3D printing spare parts for them on-the-spot. We are living in the future.___

posted image

2015-03-18 06:48:06 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

+John Danaher, summarizing de Wispelaere and Weinstock's critique of the idea of mandatory parenting licenses:

> Surely there are better ways of supplying the necessary education. For example, why not simply include parenting classes and tests as part of the mandatory school curriculum? That way everybody would still require some basic knowledge and skills of parenting and you’d avoid all the negatives associated with a licensing regime. This would come with its own set of problems, but they would be no more significant than the problems associated with all other forms of standardised education, and they might do some (comparative) good.

Yes. Why don't we already have this in school?

Should prospective parents have to apply for licences? An Ethical Debate
Should prospective parents have to apply for parental licences? The argument seems obvious. Having children is a serious business. Negligent or irresponsible parents risk causing long-term harms to their offspring, harms that often have spillover effects on...___+John Danaher, summarizing de Wispelaere and Weinstock's critique of the idea of mandatory parenting licenses:

> Surely there are better ways of supplying the necessary education. For example, why not simply include parenting classes and tests as part of the mandatory school curriculum? That way everybody would still require some basic knowledge and skills of parenting and you’d avoid all the negatives associated with a licensing regime. This would come with its own set of problems, but they would be no more significant than the problems associated with all other forms of standardised education, and they might do some (comparative) good.

Yes. Why don't we already have this in school?

posted image

2015-03-16 10:22:41 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

> The researchers note that the most striking difference between the top three pianists and the rest, was how they handled mistakes. It’s not that the top pianists made fewer mistakes in the beginning and simply had an easier time learning the passage.

> The top pianists made mistakes too, but they managed to correct their errors in such a way that helped them avoid making the same mistakes over and over, leading to a higher proportion of correct trials overall.

> The researchers note that the most striking difference between the top three pianists and the rest, was how they handled mistakes. It’s not that the top pianists made fewer mistakes in the beginning and simply had an easier time learning the passage.

> The top pianists made mistakes too, but they managed to correct their errors in such a way that helped them avoid making the same mistakes over and over, leading to a higher proportion of correct trials overall.___

2015-03-15 19:22:28 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

> You hold in your hands a compilation of two years of daily blog posts. In retrospect, I look back on that project and see a number of things I did completely wrong. I'm fine with that. Looking back and not seeing a huge number of things I did wrong would mean that neither my writing nor my understanding had improved since 2009. Oops is the sound we make when we improve our beliefs and strategies; so to look back at a time and not see anything you did wrong means that you haven't learned anything or changed your mind since then.

-- Eliezer Yudkowsky​, Rationality: From AI to Zombies (preface)

> You hold in your hands a compilation of two years of daily blog posts. In retrospect, I look back on that project and see a number of things I did completely wrong. I'm fine with that. Looking back and not seeing a huge number of things I did wrong would mean that neither my writing nor my understanding had improved since 2009. Oops is the sound we make when we improve our beliefs and strategies; so to look back at a time and not see anything you did wrong means that you haven't learned anything or changed your mind since then.

-- Eliezer Yudkowsky​, Rationality: From AI to Zombies (preface)___

posted image

2015-03-15 12:33:00 (1 comments, 46 reshares, 36 +1s)Open 

> A lot of what travelled on the Grand Trunk was called the Overhead. It was instructions to towers, reports, messages about messages, even chatter between operators, although this was strictly forbidden these days. It was all in code. It was very rare you got Plain in the Overhead. But now . . . 'There it goes again,' she said. 'It must be wrong. It's got no origin code and no address. It's Overhead, but it's in Plain.' On the other side of the tower, sitting in a seat facing the opposite direction because he was operating the up-line, was Roger, who was seventeen and already working for his tower-master certificate. His hand didn't stop moving as he said: 

> 'What did it say?'

> 'There was GNU, and I know that's a code, and then just a name. It was John Dearheart. Was it a—'

> 'You sent it on?' saidGr... more »

> A lot of what travelled on the Grand Trunk was called the Overhead. It was instructions to towers, reports, messages about messages, even chatter between operators, although this was strictly forbidden these days. It was all in code. It was very rare you got Plain in the Overhead. But now . . . 'There it goes again,' she said. 'It must be wrong. It's got no origin code and no address. It's Overhead, but it's in Plain.' On the other side of the tower, sitting in a seat facing the opposite direction because he was operating the up-line, was Roger, who was seventeen and already working for his tower-master certificate. His hand didn't stop moving as he said: 

> 'What did it say?'

> 'There was GNU, and I know that's a code, and then just a name. It was John Dearheart. Was it a—'

> 'You sent it on?' said Grandad. Grandad had been hunched in the corner, repairing a shutter box in this cramped shed halfway up the tower. Grandad was the tower-master and had been everywhere and knew everything. Everyone called him Grandad. He was twenty-six. He was always doing something in the tower when she was working the line, even though there was always a boy in the other chair. She didn't work out why until later. 'Yes, because it was a G code,' said Princess. 'Then you did right. Don't worry about it.'

> 'Yes, but I've sent that name before. Several times. Upline and downline. Just a name, no message or anything!' She had a sense that something was wrong, but she went on: 'I know a U at the end means it has to be turned round at the end of the line, and an N means Not Logged.' This was showing off, but she'd spent hours reading the cypher book. 'So it's just a name, going up and down all the time! Where's the sense in that?' Something was really wrong. Roger was still working his line, but he was staring ahead with a thunderous expression. Then Grandad said: 'Very clever, Princess. You're dead right.'

> 'Hah!' said Roger. 'I'm sorry if I did something wrong,' said the girl meekly. 'I just thought it was strange. Who's John Dearheart?'

> 'He . . . fell off a tower,' said Grandad. 'Hah!' said Roger, working his shutters as if he suddenly hated them. 'He's dead?' said Princess. 'Well, some people say—' Roger began. 'Roger!' snapped Grandad. It sounded like a warning. [...]

> It was Grandad who spoke next, after a long pause broken only by the squeaking of the new shutter bars. When he did speak, it was as if something was on his mind. 'We keep that name moving in the Overhead,' he said, and it seemed to Princess that the wind in the shutter arrays above her blew more forlornly, and the everlasting clicking of the shutters grew more urgent. 'He'd never have wanted to go home. He was a real linesman. His name is in the code, in the wind in the rigging and the shutters. Haven't you ever heard the saying “A man's not dead while his name is still spoken”?'

-- Terry Pratchett, Going Postal

( http://www.gnuterrypratchett.com/ )___

2015-03-13 08:54:22 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Summer job interview in 1½ hours, and my brain's attention is completely focused... on redesigning and optimizing the bus network in my Skylines city.

Summer job interview in 1½ hours, and my brain's attention is completely focused... on redesigning and optimizing the bus network in my Skylines city.___

2015-03-12 18:47:52 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"Let's follow one more fire engine! Wait, that one didn't go to a big enough fire, let's follow a fire engine that goes to a really big fire!" Passing the time waiting for my Skylines city to generate more taxes & entertaining a six-year-old: two birds with one stone.

"Let's follow one more fire engine! Wait, that one didn't go to a big enough fire, let's follow a fire engine that goes to a really big fire!" Passing the time waiting for my Skylines city to generate more taxes & entertaining a six-year-old: two birds with one stone.___

posted image

2015-03-07 19:33:03 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

> Faith in democracy flares up in moments of triumph, such as the overthrow of unpopular regimes in Cairo or Kiev, only to sputter out once again. Outside the West, democracy often advances only to collapse. And within the West, democracy has too often become associated with debt and dysfunction at home and overreach abroad. Democracy has always had its critics, but now old doubts are being treated with renewed respect as the weaknesses of democracy in its Western strongholds, and the fragility of its influence elsewhere, have become increasingly apparent. Why has democracy lost its forward momentum? 

> The two main reasons are the financial crisis of 2007-08 and the rise of China. The damage the crisis did was psychological as well as financial. It revealed fundamental weaknesses in the West’s political systems, undermining the self-confidence that had been one of their great assets.Go... more »

> Faith in democracy flares up in moments of triumph, such as the overthrow of unpopular regimes in Cairo or Kiev, only to sputter out once again. Outside the West, democracy often advances only to collapse. And within the West, democracy has too often become associated with debt and dysfunction at home and overreach abroad. Democracy has always had its critics, but now old doubts are being treated with renewed respect as the weaknesses of democracy in its Western strongholds, and the fragility of its influence elsewhere, have become increasingly apparent. Why has democracy lost its forward momentum? 

> The two main reasons are the financial crisis of 2007-08 and the rise of China. The damage the crisis did was psychological as well as financial. It revealed fundamental weaknesses in the West’s political systems, undermining the self-confidence that had been one of their great assets. Governments had steadily extended entitlements over decades, allowing dangerous levels of debt to develop, and politicians came to believe that they had abolished boom-bust cycles and tamed risk. Many people became disillusioned with the workings of their political systems—particularly when governments bailed out bankers with taxpayers’ money and then stood by impotently as financiers continued to pay themselves huge bonuses. The crisis turned the Washington consensus into a term of reproach across the emerging world.

> Meanwhile, the Chinese Communist Party has broken the democratic world’s monopoly on economic progress. Larry Summers, of Harvard University, observes that when America was growing fastest, it doubled living standards roughly every 30 years. China has been doubling living standards roughly every decade for the past 30 years. The Chinese elite argue that their model—tight control by the Communist Party, coupled with a relentless effort to recruit talented people into its upper ranks—is more efficient than democracy and less susceptible to gridlock. The political leadership changes every decade or so, and there is a constant supply of fresh talent as party cadres are promoted based on their ability to hit targets.

> China’s critics rightly condemn the government for controlling public opinion in all sorts of ways, from imprisoning dissidents to censoring internet discussions. Yet the regime’s obsession with control paradoxically means it pays close attention to public opinion. At the same time China’s leaders have been able to tackle some of the big problems of state-building that can take decades to deal with in a democracy. In just two years China has extended pension coverage to an extra 240m rural dwellers, for example—far more than the total number of people covered by America’s public-pension system.

> Many Chinese are prepared to put up with their system if it delivers growth. The 2013 Pew Survey of Global Attitudes showed that 85% of Chinese were “very satisfied” with their country’s direction, compared with 31% of Americans. Some Chinese intellectuals have become positively boastful. Zhang Weiwei of Fudan University argues that democracy is destroying the West, and particularly America, because it institutionalises gridlock, trivialises decision-making and throws up second-rate presidents like George Bush junior. Yu Keping of Beijing University argues that democracy makes simple things “overly complicated and frivolous” and allows “certain sweet-talking politicians to mislead the people”. Wang Jisi, also of Beijing University, has observed that “many developing countries that have introduced Western values and political systems are experiencing disorder and chaos” and that China offers an alternative model. Countries from Africa (Rwanda) to the Middle East (Dubai) to South-East Asia (Vietnam) are taking this advice seriously.___

2015-03-06 13:33:14 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Whenever I see a popular science headline of type "scientists have discovered the cause of X", I mentally translate this as "one group of scientists has, after careful p-value fishing to make the results reach significance, published a new study once again supporting their pet theory which they've published on since the early nineties, but which still doesn't explain the contradicting results gotten by the dozen other groups with different pet theories".

I bet that at least some of you think that I'm kidding.

Whenever I see a popular science headline of type "scientists have discovered the cause of X", I mentally translate this as "one group of scientists has, after careful p-value fishing to make the results reach significance, published a new study once again supporting their pet theory which they've published on since the early nineties, but which still doesn't explain the contradicting results gotten by the dozen other groups with different pet theories".

I bet that at least some of you think that I'm kidding.___

posted image

2015-03-06 08:45:39 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

> Mearls said that, even though the growth of D&D had been steady, something else had changed. In the prior five or ten years (remember, this was two years ago), there had been an explosion of people in geeky hobbies. More people than ever before were playing video games and MMOs, reading comics, watching comic and sci-fi and fantasy movies, watching anime, playing card games, playing board games, doing cosplay, attending conventions, and all that other crap that we gamers do aside from playing games. It was suddenly cool to be a geek. There were huge numbers of new geeks in the world. And every one of those new geeks was a potential D&D player.

> But D&D wasn’t nabbing them. Somehow, D&D’s growth remained as steady as ever. [...]

> ...the primary means by which new players enter the D&D hobby is through an existing player who drags them to a game andtea... more »

> Mearls said that, even though the growth of D&D had been steady, something else had changed. In the prior five or ten years (remember, this was two years ago), there had been an explosion of people in geeky hobbies. More people than ever before were playing video games and MMOs, reading comics, watching comic and sci-fi and fantasy movies, watching anime, playing card games, playing board games, doing cosplay, attending conventions, and all that other crap that we gamers do aside from playing games. It was suddenly cool to be a geek. There were huge numbers of new geeks in the world. And every one of those new geeks was a potential D&D player.

> But D&D wasn’t nabbing them. Somehow, D&D’s growth remained as steady as ever. [...]

> ...the primary means by which new players enter the D&D hobby is through an existing player who drags them to a game and teaches them the ropes. That existing player is the “older cousin.” [...]

> Now, not everyone in gaming is an “older cousin.” An “older cousin” is someone who is willing to teach the game to a newbie and make that gaming experience a good one. It is someone who has an open seat or is willing to run an extra game just to bring new people in. It is usually going to end up being a DM. Even though players can bring other players TO the game, it is almost always going to fall to the DM to be the teacher and mentor and to provide a positive gaming experience.

> The point is, not every gamer is willing and able to be a successful “older cousin.” The “older cousins” are a fraction of the gaming community. So, if you have a 1,000 gamers in a given region, say 10 of them are actually reliable older cousins (1%). I don’t have any actual numbers, I’m just trying to give an example. [...]

> As long as the older cousins (the toll booths) are the primary means of converting people into players, you can only convert players at whatever steady rate the size of the current community can absorb. [...] The older cousin model limits the speed at which the community can grow.___

posted image

2015-03-06 07:46:59 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

> We spend money on a lot of things that don't provide us with that much happiness, but a small number of purchases produce amazing returns for our happiness (think your favorite shirt, an incredible pillow, a perfect gift for a friend, or maybe even the dopamine-releasing iPhone, despite the offsetting high cost). The curve for our time investments is probably even more pronounced. Sometimes we spend hours making little progress on problems that won't even be that helpful if solved, and other times we spend 30 seconds writing an email that turns out to be hugely valuable in our personal or business lives.

> The important thing to remember is that there are outsized returns for a small number of our "investments", and it's worth a great deal of our time and energy figuring out how we can be more likely to make these investments. For my mom this may mean asking other... more »

> We spend money on a lot of things that don't provide us with that much happiness, but a small number of purchases produce amazing returns for our happiness (think your favorite shirt, an incredible pillow, a perfect gift for a friend, or maybe even the dopamine-releasing iPhone, despite the offsetting high cost). The curve for our time investments is probably even more pronounced. Sometimes we spend hours making little progress on problems that won't even be that helpful if solved, and other times we spend 30 seconds writing an email that turns out to be hugely valuable in our personal or business lives.

> The important thing to remember is that there are outsized returns for a small number of our "investments", and it's worth a great deal of our time and energy figuring out how we can be more likely to make these investments. For my mom this may mean asking other dermatologist what high impact changes they have recently made in their practices.

> Almost always, these outliers have an element of unpredictability; you can never know for sure which early stage startup will be worth a billion dollars, which email will be worth a huge multiple of the time it took to write, or what new improvement will make a medical practice drastically more efficient.

> However, we can reduce this unpredictability by removing focus from the types of investments that almost never have outsized payoffs, and by adding focus to the types that often do. By trying to be acutely aware of what activities have a high likelihood of ending up on the far left of our personal power law curves, we can give ourselves a much better chance to see great returns.___

posted image

2015-03-06 06:27:50 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

> I’m always fascinated by the number of people who proudly build columns, tweets, blog posts or Facebook posts around the same core statement: “I don’t understand how anyone could (oppose legal abortion/support a carbon tax/sympathize with the Palestinians over the Israelis/want to privatize Social Security/insert your pet issue here)." It’s such an interesting statement, because it has three layers of meaning.

> The first layer is the literal meaning of the words: I lack the knowledge and understanding to figure this out. But the second, intended meaning is the opposite: I am such a superior moral being that I cannot even imagine the cognitive errors or moral turpitude that could lead someone to such obviously wrong conclusions. And yet, the third, true meaning is actually more like the first: I lack the empathy, moral imagination or analytical skills to attempt even a basicunderst... more »

> I’m always fascinated by the number of people who proudly build columns, tweets, blog posts or Facebook posts around the same core statement: “I don’t understand how anyone could (oppose legal abortion/support a carbon tax/sympathize with the Palestinians over the Israelis/want to privatize Social Security/insert your pet issue here)." It’s such an interesting statement, because it has three layers of meaning.

> The first layer is the literal meaning of the words: I lack the knowledge and understanding to figure this out. But the second, intended meaning is the opposite: I am such a superior moral being that I cannot even imagine the cognitive errors or moral turpitude that could lead someone to such obviously wrong conclusions. And yet, the third, true meaning is actually more like the first: I lack the empathy, moral imagination or analytical skills to attempt even a basic understanding of the people who disagree with me.

> In short, “I’m stupid.” Something that few people would ever post so starkly on their Facebook feeds.___

posted image

2015-03-05 09:29:26 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

!!! Finland's biggest newspaper has started running SMBC in their comics section. Didn't expect to see this.

!!! Finland's biggest newspaper has started running SMBC in their comics section. Didn't expect to see this.___

posted image

2015-03-04 20:54:35 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

> Whether it was on Reddit, Hinterland's own forums or on Steam's message boards, only a half to one percent of the people who have bought the game have taken the time to share their thoughts.

> Making matters worse he said, they're not a representative sampling of players.

> Instead of listening to the people on the forums who yell the loudest, van Lierop stressed that developers should be gathering data on exactly how people play their game. As an example, he said that his team determined early on that The Long Dark attracted two different kinds of players; those who connected with their game as a poetic, emotional experience, and those that were looking for the most hardcore survival simulation they could find. Those two sets of players, he said, could have lead the game into dramatically different directions. To determine who they should listen to, they ran a... more »

A great article from Hinterland Studio about why listening to the loudest voices in the community is not always best for the project. I'm one of the players who was positively tickled pink with the Pilgrim mode, and I'm generally not at all active in communities like this. Listening to your community or even crowdsourcing doesn't and shouldn't mean total creative democracy.

""What we ended up realizing was when we would pull data about 60 percent of our players actually chose that middle setting, which was pretty awesome. Almost 25 percent picked the pilgrim, and it was only 12 percent that played the stalker mode."

It was this minority of players, this 12 percent of users who were the ones participating in the forums the most. It was the people looking for the hardcore experience who were most unhappy with the game, and they came into the forums to express their displeasure. But by catering to their needs alone, Hinterlands ran the risk of alienating the silent majority of their customers."___> Whether it was on Reddit, Hinterland's own forums or on Steam's message boards, only a half to one percent of the people who have bought the game have taken the time to share their thoughts.

> Making matters worse he said, they're not a representative sampling of players.

> Instead of listening to the people on the forums who yell the loudest, van Lierop stressed that developers should be gathering data on exactly how people play their game. As an example, he said that his team determined early on that The Long Dark attracted two different kinds of players; those who connected with their game as a poetic, emotional experience, and those that were looking for the most hardcore survival simulation they could find. Those two sets of players, he said, could have lead the game into dramatically different directions. To determine who they should listen to, they ran a test.

> "We created what we called experience modes," van Lierop said, "called pilgrim, voyager, and stalker. Pilgrim is for people who really like wander through the world and soak it up. … Voyager was kind of balanced between exploration and survival. It was, sort of, the way that we envisioned the game to be played from the beginning. Stalker was made to be really challenging, for people who were looking for that experience.

> "What we ended up realizing was when we would pull data about 60 percent of our players actually chose that middle setting, which was pretty awesome. Almost 25 percent picked the pilgrim, and it was only 12 percent that played the stalker mode."

> It was this minority of players, this 12 percent of users who were the ones participating in the forums the most. It was the people looking for the hardcore experience who were most unhappy with the game, and they came into the forums to express their displeasure. But by catering to their needs alone, Hinterlands ran the risk of alienating the silent majority of their customers.

2015-03-03 12:42:41 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

My current feeling: at least to a first and second and third approximation, everything that we do can ultimately be reduced to how "yummy" or "icky" that thing, and the things related to it, feel. (Or to use more technical vocabulary, whether they're associated with positive or negative affect.) Much of the feel of different things is determined according to the principles originally uncovered by the Behaviorist school of psychology, but there are also plenty of mental associations and processes through which the yumminess or or ickiness of different things may influence one another. Specific sources of yumminess which we seek out consistently enough become entrenched habits.

Some claims of varying radicality associated with this, all of which I endorse to varying extent:

* Intellectual planning of what to do next is only useful to the extent that you manage to... more »

My current feeling: at least to a first and second and third approximation, everything that we do can ultimately be reduced to how "yummy" or "icky" that thing, and the things related to it, feel. (Or to use more technical vocabulary, whether they're associated with positive or negative affect.) Much of the feel of different things is determined according to the principles originally uncovered by the Behaviorist school of psychology, but there are also plenty of mental associations and processes through which the yumminess or or ickiness of different things may influence one another. Specific sources of yumminess which we seek out consistently enough become entrenched habits.

Some claims of varying radicality associated with this, all of which I endorse to varying extent:

* Intellectual planning of what to do next is only useful to the extent that you manage to marshal positive affect in a way that motivates you to act upon the plan (such as by having positive affect about the actions themselves, their end result, some specific procedure of carrying them out, an identity that involves taking those actions etc.)
* The thoughts that you think are just as strongly determined by this as the physical actions that you take; there's a part of your mind will try to dwell on thoughts that feel nice and to push out the thoughts that feel bad, though there are also other parts of your mind that keep bringing up the uncomfortable thoughts.
* Any question along the lines of "how could I have been so stupid" or "why did I make that obvious mistake" has a simple answer: because the action which you now regret happened to feel more yummy, or at least less icky, than the alternative. If you didn't happen to stop and think, part of the reason is likely that you didn't have an entrenched habit of stopping to analyze the situation.
* The extent to which you happen to endorse some particular set of ethics (whether a formal academic one like utilitarianism or deontology, or some kind of folk morality) depends more on the kind of affect you happen to have around different moral principles than any logical considerations.
* To the extent that your ethics is affected by logical considerations, it depends on which kinds of logical principles (consistency, simplicity, etc.) you happen to feel the most affect for.
* Similarly, the extent to which you are rational, kind, agreeable, etc. depends mostly on what kinds of habits and affect you have around different kinds of thought patterns and actions.
* Learning to consciously work on your affect and that of others is one of the most valuable things in life that you can learn. Though of course, how you end up using that skill will always be driven by your existing patterns of affect.___

2015-02-28 18:31:58 (11 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Saw a Gremlins commercial while visiting a friend, on the way home started to ponder the evolutionary purpose of the whole "reproduce when wet" thing. Maybe mogwais originally evolved somewhere really dry, and had to make use of the opportunity to reproduce the moment there was water available? 

Then there's the "cocooning and turning into a new subspecies if they get food after midnight" thing - the most obvious analogy would be to butterflies, but gremlins being the natural next phase of the mogwai life cycle feels a little weird considering that reproduction's already possible in the first phase.

Maybe a better analogy would be those fish - I forget which - that may develop drastically different forms based on the temperature of the water they grow up in. In that case, different environmental conditions trigger different developmental programs. In the... more »

Saw a Gremlins commercial while visiting a friend, on the way home started to ponder the evolutionary purpose of the whole "reproduce when wet" thing. Maybe mogwais originally evolved somewhere really dry, and had to make use of the opportunity to reproduce the moment there was water available? 

Then there's the "cocooning and turning into a new subspecies if they get food after midnight" thing - the most obvious analogy would be to butterflies, but gremlins being the natural next phase of the mogwai life cycle feels a little weird considering that reproduction's already possible in the first phase.

Maybe a better analogy would be those fish - I forget which - that may develop drastically different forms based on the temperature of the water they grow up in. In that case, different environmental conditions trigger different developmental programs. In the case of mogwais, presumably the availability of food after midnight reliably signaled an abundance, or at least non-starvation: do we have information on mogwai foraging behavior? Possibly they usually eat any food they find on the spot, and only bring it to the nest to be eaten after midnight if there's enough to make them full while still in the field? They would then turn into gremlins if there seemed to be enough food around for them to survive despite the increased metabolic cost from the extra aggression.

I don't think we have enough information to determine whether the gremlin form exists mainly for the sake of fighting natural enemies, other mogwais, or both. Their hostility towards Gizmo (even before the metamorphosis to gremlin form) would seem to suggest that members of the species would naturally tend to fight each other, though.

Given that there were both male and female gremlins, probably getting wet isn't the only way the species reproduces, and it usually happens by more ordinary means - it's just when there's extra water available that there's no time for finding a mate.___

posted image

2015-02-28 15:17:35 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

> The new character, named Alesha, Who Smiles at Death, is part of Magic: The Gathering's latest expansion, Fate Reforged. While her card doesn't mention her gender, a story published on Wizards of the Coast's website reveals that she was born anatomically male, weaving her background into the tale of combat.

> Alesha's clan tradition allows its members to pick their own name after earning glory in battle, with members usually picking names that reflect battle feats. "She had been so different—only sixteen, a boy in everyone's eyes but her own, about to choose and declare her name before the khan and all the Mardu."

> When it comes time for Alesha to choose her name after killing her first dragon, she goes in a different direction and takes the opportunity to come out to her battle comrades. "And the whole gathered horde shouted&... more »

> The new character, named Alesha, Who Smiles at Death, is part of Magic: The Gathering's latest expansion, Fate Reforged. While her card doesn't mention her gender, a story published on Wizards of the Coast's website reveals that she was born anatomically male, weaving her background into the tale of combat.

> Alesha's clan tradition allows its members to pick their own name after earning glory in battle, with members usually picking names that reflect battle feats. "She had been so different—only sixteen, a boy in everyone's eyes but her own, about to choose and declare her name before the khan and all the Mardu."

> When it comes time for Alesha to choose her name after killing her first dragon, she goes in a different direction and takes the opportunity to come out to her battle comrades. "And the whole gathered horde shouted 'Alesha!' in reply. The warriors of the Mardu shouted her name. In that moment, if anyone had told her that in three years' time she would be khan, she just might have dared to believe it."

> Alesha does eventually go on to become kahn, leading the horde of humans, goblins, and orcs into battle.___

posted image

2015-02-27 19:58:10 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

<3

<3___

posted image

2015-02-27 19:38:36 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

I'm not usually very moved by the death of celebrities, but now the world feels a little emptier.

I'm not usually very moved by the death of celebrities, but now the world feels a little emptier.___

2015-02-27 19:31:06 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

A conversation I had today (slightly paraphrased):

"Hey Kaj, can you [do favor X]? It's okay if you can't, Tell Culture."
"Okay, Tell Culture. I have a mild to moderate preference towards saying no, because [inconvenience Y]; however if you have more than a mild to moderate preference towards avoiding the inconvenience resulting from me saying no, then I'm cool with [doing favor X]."
"Well I have a pretty strong preference towards respecting your preferences, so I'll ask if someone else could do it for me and ask you again if nobody else says yes."
"Okay, sounds good. :) "

A conversation I had today (slightly paraphrased):

"Hey Kaj, can you [do favor X]? It's okay if you can't, Tell Culture."
"Okay, Tell Culture. I have a mild to moderate preference towards saying no, because [inconvenience Y]; however if you have more than a mild to moderate preference towards avoiding the inconvenience resulting from me saying no, then I'm cool with [doing favor X]."
"Well I have a pretty strong preference towards respecting your preferences, so I'll ask if someone else could do it for me and ask you again if nobody else says yes."
"Okay, sounds good. :) "___

2015-02-27 10:02:27 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Earlier, a friend suggested that I was bad at something I had thought I was good at, and naturally I initially got defensive and tried to come up with counterexamples. After a while, I accepted that they were probably right, but still my mind would keep indignantly coming up with counterexamples later on.

Finally I figured out that "am I good or bad at this" was asking the wrong question. Even if I could identify some aspects of the skill where I was good, the relevant question was "have I found an aspect of the skill where I have clear room for improvement?".

Once I concluded that the answer was "yes", it became irrelevant whether or not I was already good or bad at it. The most important thing is that I've now identified a way to level up and unlock cool new abilities, and that isn't affected by what other abilities I've happened to unlock... more »

Earlier, a friend suggested that I was bad at something I had thought I was good at, and naturally I initially got defensive and tried to come up with counterexamples. After a while, I accepted that they were probably right, but still my mind would keep indignantly coming up with counterexamples later on.

Finally I figured out that "am I good or bad at this" was asking the wrong question. Even if I could identify some aspects of the skill where I was good, the relevant question was "have I found an aspect of the skill where I have clear room for improvement?".

Once I concluded that the answer was "yes", it became irrelevant whether or not I was already good or bad at it. The most important thing is that I've now identified a way to level up and unlock cool new abilities, and that isn't affected by what other abilities I've happened to unlock before.___

posted image

2015-02-26 19:59:35 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

> I was reminded of this last week when I appeared on Glenn Beck's show along with cryptography pioneer Whitfield Diffie. Diffie said:

> > You can't have privacy without security, and I think we have glaring failures in computer security in problems that we've been working on for 40 years. You really should not live in fear of opening an attachment to a message. It ought to be confined; your computer ought to be able to handle it. And the fact that we have persisted for decades without solving these problems is partly because they're very difficult, but partly because there are lots of people who want you to be secure against everyone but them. And that includes all of the major computer manufacturers who, roughly speaking, want to manage your computer for you. The trouble is, I'm not sure of any practical alternative.

> That neatly explains Google. Eric... more »

> I was reminded of this last week when I appeared on Glenn Beck's show along with cryptography pioneer Whitfield Diffie. Diffie said:

> > You can't have privacy without security, and I think we have glaring failures in computer security in problems that we've been working on for 40 years. You really should not live in fear of opening an attachment to a message. It ought to be confined; your computer ought to be able to handle it. And the fact that we have persisted for decades without solving these problems is partly because they're very difficult, but partly because there are lots of people who want you to be secure against everyone but them. And that includes all of the major computer manufacturers who, roughly speaking, want to manage your computer for you. The trouble is, I'm not sure of any practical alternative.

> That neatly explains Google. Eric Schmidt does want your data to be secure. He wants Google to be the safest place for your data ­ as long as you don't mind the fact that Google has access to your data. Facebook wants the same thing: to protect your data from everyone except Facebook. Hardware companies are no different. Last week, we learned that Lenovo computers shipped with a piece of adware called Superfish that broke users' security to spy on them for advertising purposes.

> Governments are no different. The FBI wants people to have strong encryption, but it wants backdoor access so it can get at your data. UK Prime Minister David Cameron wants you to have good security, just as long as it's not so strong as to keep the UK government out. And, of course, the NSA spends a lot of money ensuring that there's no security it can't break.

> Corporations want access to your data for profit; governments want it security purposes, be they benevolent or malevolent. But Diffie makes an even stronger point: we give lots of companies access to our data because it makes our lives easier.___

posted image

2015-02-26 19:57:04 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

> Still, in those early days [of online shaming campaigns] the collective fury felt righteous, powerful and effective. It felt as if hierarchies were being dismantled, as if justice were being democratized. As time passed, though, I watched these shame campaigns multiply, to the point that they targeted not just powerful institutions and public figures but really anyone perceived to have done something offensive. I also began to marvel at the disconnect between the severity of the crime and the gleeful savagery of the punishment. It almost felt as if shamings were now happening for their own sake, as if they were following a script.

> Eventually I started to wonder about the recipients of our shamings, the real humans who were the virtual targets of these campaigns. So for the past two years, I’ve been interviewing individuals like Justine Sacco: everyday people pilloried brutally, mosto... more »

> Still, in those early days [of online shaming campaigns] the collective fury felt righteous, powerful and effective. It felt as if hierarchies were being dismantled, as if justice were being democratized. As time passed, though, I watched these shame campaigns multiply, to the point that they targeted not just powerful institutions and public figures but really anyone perceived to have done something offensive. I also began to marvel at the disconnect between the severity of the crime and the gleeful savagery of the punishment. It almost felt as if shamings were now happening for their own sake, as if they were following a script.

> Eventually I started to wonder about the recipients of our shamings, the real humans who were the virtual targets of these campaigns. So for the past two years, I’ve been interviewing individuals like Justine Sacco: everyday people pilloried brutally, most often for posting some poorly considered joke on social media. Whenever possible, I have met them in person, to truly grasp the emotional toll at the other end of our screens. The people I met were mostly unemployed, fired for their transgressions, and they seemed broken somehow — deeply confused and traumatized.___

2015-02-26 09:44:14 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

> A lot of dating advice, particularly of the performance variety, tries to promise the ability to have sex with any girl you want, regardless of... well, pretty much anything. You could be a fat slob living in your mother’s basement, and with the right two or three lines you too can date a lingerie model (as if there’s a lingerie model hanging out on every street corner.) 

> This is a fairy tale. And not only is it a fairy tale, it’s a fairy tale you don’t actually want to live. 

> Rejection exists for a reason — it’s a means to keep people who are not good for each other apart. 

> Men don’t seem to understand that if a woman rejects him because he’s short, or because she doesn’t like his hair, or because she finds him boring, then he wasn’t going to enjoy being around her anyway. 

> Ask yourself: Why would you want to beintimate with someone w... more »

> A lot of dating advice, particularly of the performance variety, tries to promise the ability to have sex with any girl you want, regardless of... well, pretty much anything. You could be a fat slob living in your mother’s basement, and with the right two or three lines you too can date a lingerie model (as if there’s a lingerie model hanging out on every street corner.) 

> This is a fairy tale. And not only is it a fairy tale, it’s a fairy tale you don’t actually want to live. 

> Rejection exists for a reason — it’s a means to keep people who are not good for each other apart. 

> Men don’t seem to understand that if a woman rejects him because he’s short, or because she doesn’t like his hair, or because she finds him boring, then he wasn’t going to enjoy being around her anyway. 

> Ask yourself: Why would you want to be intimate with someone who doesn't appreciate you? Why would you EVER settle for such a person? Because she's hot? Come on, have a little more self-respect. 

> Again, it’s men who are unconfident and have poor self-esteem who are willing to completely alter their personalities in order to seduce ANY woman. The first step to being more attractive is to see rejection as a means to eliminate women who won't make you happy from your life. It's a blessing, not a curse.

-- Manson, Mark (2011-07-26). Models: Attract Women Through Honesty (Kindle Locations 1296-1307). Kindle Edition. ___

posted image

2015-02-17 12:21:08 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

> But if you’ve ever tried to buy those little girls clothes that are pink and have dinosaurs, or are sparkly and have pirates, or even just a dress with a robot on it, then you know it’s pretty much impossible. Princess Awesome wants to change that. 

> We believe that if a girl likes purple and also likes trucks, she should be able to wear a purple truck dress. And if a girl likes princesses and also aliens, then an alien princess skirt is for her.

> We also believe that if a girl would prefer to skip the "princess" and stick with the "awesome," she deserves some dress options that feature a range of colors and topics.

> We are Princess Awesome because butterflies are awesome and so are airplanes. Because monsters are awesome and so are twirly skirts. Because girls are awesome and girls decide what it means to be girly.

> But if you’ve ever tried to buy those little girls clothes that are pink and have dinosaurs, or are sparkly and have pirates, or even just a dress with a robot on it, then you know it’s pretty much impossible. Princess Awesome wants to change that. 

> We believe that if a girl likes purple and also likes trucks, she should be able to wear a purple truck dress. And if a girl likes princesses and also aliens, then an alien princess skirt is for her.

> We also believe that if a girl would prefer to skip the "princess" and stick with the "awesome," she deserves some dress options that feature a range of colors and topics.

> We are Princess Awesome because butterflies are awesome and so are airplanes. Because monsters are awesome and so are twirly skirts. Because girls are awesome and girls decide what it means to be girly.___

posted image

2015-02-16 22:56:41 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Stuart Armstrong invented the term "A lump of cadmium" for a level of precaution woefully inadequate to the risk at hand. Based on the "safety precautions" in the German nuclear program in WWII. http://aleph.se/andart2/risk/a-lump-of-cadmium/

Stuart Armstrong invented the term "A lump of cadmium" for a level of precaution woefully inadequate to the risk at hand. Based on the "safety precautions" in the German nuclear program in WWII. http://aleph.se/andart2/risk/a-lump-of-cadmium/___

2015-02-16 22:53:28 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

An older guy came to my table while I was waiting for my friends at the bar. He seemed down on his luck, a former prison warden, now on pension. I tried to ask him what his job had been like, he said it had been easy but wasn't very talkative about it. He did show me his left hand: he'd lost his little finger in a saw accident when he was 18. He had a hand-made ring of gold and silver he'd gotten from work, but I didn't see a wedding ring; he mentioned being alone and asked whether I had a girl yet. He asked whether I was a student, and where I lived; I told him that I was studying computer science, and he said that he didn't understand a thing about computers.

He had the decency to chat me with for a nice while before asking for money, and to sit around after a while after that. He said he was ashamed to ask for it, and I could believe him. I gave him the five euros that... more »

An older guy came to my table while I was waiting for my friends at the bar. He seemed down on his luck, a former prison warden, now on pension. I tried to ask him what his job had been like, he said it had been easy but wasn't very talkative about it. He did show me his left hand: he'd lost his little finger in a saw accident when he was 18. He had a hand-made ring of gold and silver he'd gotten from work, but I didn't see a wedding ring; he mentioned being alone and asked whether I had a girl yet. He asked whether I was a student, and where I lived; I told him that I was studying computer science, and he said that he didn't understand a thing about computers.

He had the decency to chat me with for a nice while before asking for money, and to sit around after a while after that. He said he was ashamed to ask for it, and I could believe him. I gave him the five euros that happened to be in my wallet, and he promised that he'd buy me a beer if I were here on Friday, when he'd be paid his pension. He left to see what he could get from the store with that, and the two euros he'd had before. We wished each other well, and I meant what I said.___

2015-02-15 18:11:38 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Why were the Snowden leaks such a shock for the security community? An impressive commitment to secrecy and techniques for deniability and misdirection. (I particularly like the exfiltration technique using passive collection.)

Why were the Snowden leaks such a shock for the security community? An impressive commitment to secrecy and techniques for deniability and misdirection. (I particularly like the exfiltration technique using passive collection.)___

2015-02-15 18:11:13 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

> If you read a chemistry textbook, it makes sense to ask after each sentence: “Is this true?”.  If the answer is “no”, “no”, “no”, for a sufficient number of sentences, you should probably abandon that book and look for a better one.  Chemistry textbooks are supposed to be made out of statements you can trust -- statements you can add to your file of “trusted explicit claims”, in such a fashion as to make you better at chemistry.  When a book fails at this property, its main value is lost.

> Not so, IMO, for soft skills. [...] most “soft skills” books are not trying to add explicit statements to your store of “trusted explicit/verbal statements”. [...]

> As I read “Bonds that Make Us Free”, I read many explicit statements I disagreed with (such as statements about a Christian God).  I took these in as poetry: I tried to imagine the worldthe author saw himself in, and to s... more »

> If you read a chemistry textbook, it makes sense to ask after each sentence: “Is this true?”.  If the answer is “no”, “no”, “no”, for a sufficient number of sentences, you should probably abandon that book and look for a better one.  Chemistry textbooks are supposed to be made out of statements you can trust -- statements you can add to your file of “trusted explicit claims”, in such a fashion as to make you better at chemistry.  When a book fails at this property, its main value is lost.

> Not so, IMO, for soft skills. [...] most “soft skills” books are not trying to add explicit statements to your store of “trusted explicit/verbal statements”. [...]

> As I read “Bonds that Make Us Free”, I read many explicit statements I disagreed with (such as statements about a Christian God).  I took these in as poetry: I tried to imagine the world the author saw himself in, and to see myself in the same world, so as to have more access to the way he was parsing human phenomena.  

> The book also contained many stories, all of which “rang true” in my inner simulator (they matched the world as I anticipated it), but which formed new patterns when placed next to each other.  I felt my intuitions update as I read -- I felt the stories take patterns I had previously half-seen, and pull them into full conscious awareness.

> I left the book with a changed perception of how rationalization patterns affect close relationships, and with an increased ability to separate from my rationalizations and see the people close to me.  I left also with some new freedom from social shame.  These changes did not come about via trusting or deferring to the author; they came via trying on his perspective, and finding that pieces of the pattern he was pointing to “clicked”.___

posted image

2015-02-15 18:08:19 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

> Partial answers [to why some people can be very good at some kinds of math while being very bad at other kinds of math] come from the literature on so-called “Twice Exceptional” (2e) children. The label is used broadly, to refer to children who are intellectually gifted and also have some sort of disability.

> The central finding of the IQ literature is that people who are good at one cognitive task tend to be good at any another cognitive task. For example, people who have better reaction time tend to also be better at arithmetic, better at solving logic puzzles, better able to give coherent explanations of real world concepts, and better able to recall a string of numbers that are read to them. When I was a small child, my teachers noticed that I was an exception to the rule: I had a very easy time learning some things and also found it very difficult to learn others. They referredme ... more »

> Partial answers [to why some people can be very good at some kinds of math while being very bad at other kinds of math] come from the literature on so-called “Twice Exceptional” (2e) children. The label is used broadly, to refer to children who are intellectually gifted and also have some sort of disability.

> The central finding of the IQ literature is that people who are good at one cognitive task tend to be good at any another cognitive task. For example, people who have better reaction time tend to also be better at arithmetic, better at solving logic puzzles, better able to give coherent explanations of real world concepts, and better able to recall a string of numbers that are read to them. When I was a small child, my teachers noticed that I was an exception to the rule: I had a very easy time learning some things and also found it very difficult to learn others. They referred me to a school psychologist, who found that I had exceptionally high reasoning abilities, but only average short term memory and processing speed: a 3 standard deviation difference.

> There’s a sense in which my situation is actually not so unusual. The finding that people who are good at one cognitive task tend to be good at another is based on the study of people of average intelligence. It becomes less and less true as you look at people of progressively higher intelligence. Twice exceptional children are not very rare amongst intellectually gifted children.  Linda Silverman writes

> > Gifted children may have hidden learning disabilities. Approximately one-sixth of the gifted children who come to the Center for testing have some type of learning disability—often undetected before the assessment—such as central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), difficulties with visual processing, sensory processing disorder, spatial disorientation, dyslexia, and attention deficits. Giftedness masks disabilities and disabilities depress IQ scores. Higher abstract reasoning enables children to compensate to some extent for these weaknesses, making them harder to detect.___

posted image

2015-02-15 18:02:39 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Well, this does makes sense, it just wouldn't have occurred to me to anticipate it: 

> In 2011, instead of praying a special devotion, I wrote code that would help me pray better in the future. Noticing that the experience had been positive I donated the code to the company I work for so they could build it into a product and make it available to other people. Now more than 10k users pray the rosary daily using Electronic Rosary for iOS.

Well, this does makes sense, it just wouldn't have occurred to me to anticipate it: 

> In 2011, instead of praying a special devotion, I wrote code that would help me pray better in the future. Noticing that the experience had been positive I donated the code to the company I work for so they could build it into a product and make it available to other people. Now more than 10k users pray the rosary daily using Electronic Rosary for iOS.___

Buttons

A special service of CircleCount.com is the following button.

The button shows the number of followers you have directly in a small button. You can add this button to your website, like the +1-Button of Google or the Like-Button of Facebook.






You can add this button directly in your website. For more information about the CircleCount Buttons and the description how to add them to another page click here.

Kaj SotalaCircloscope