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Kee Hinckley

Kee Hinckley 

Fascinated by the boundaries of technology and social behavior.

Occupation: I create things using code, words, and ideas. (TiVo, Inc.)

Location: La Conner, WA

Followers: 11,192

Following: 1,133

Views: 7,139,110

Added to CircleCount.com: 12/25/2011That's the date, where Kee Hinckley has been indexed by CircleCount.com.
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Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

3
comments per post
1
reshares per post
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726
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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 52

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2016-05-21 17:30:37 (52 comments; 5 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

"No seriously, why are we still working?

[...] the economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by now, people in technologically advanced societies wouldn't need to work much at all.

In Australia, by the new millennium, many full time employees were working more than their grandparents had.

What happened? Did technology fail to deliver the gains Keynes expected?

On the contrary. Technological advancement outstripped even the giddy imaginations of futurists from a century ago. We can grow food, dig up minerals, make fridges and bridges, move things and ourselves around the planet and share knowledge and information much faster with a fraction of the workforce it once took."

Most reshares: 7

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2016-05-25 16:08:34 (5 comments; 7 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

Cautela y poderío 

Most plusones: 39

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2016-05-19 17:24:42 (7 comments; 0 reshares; 39 +1s)Open 

She's graduating!

#ns

Latest 50 posts

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2016-05-26 12:15:43 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s)Open 

Lovely tribute to Bill Watterson.

Lovely tribute to Bill Watterson.___

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2016-05-26 12:03:40 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

#ThrowBackThursday  

#ThrowBackThursday  ___

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2016-05-26 11:57:28 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s)Open 

Amnesty International has published its policy on sex work: it calls on governments to take several critical steps to protect the human rights of sex workers, including: decriminalize consensual sex work, ensure that sex workers are protected from harm, exploitation and coercion; include sex workers in the development of laws that affect their lives and safety; and end discrimination and provide access to education and employment options for all.

Amnesty International’s policy is the culmination of extensive worldwide consultations, a considered review of substantive evidence and international human rights standards and first-hand research, carried out over more than two years.

It recommends the decriminalization of consensual sex work, including those laws that prohibit associated activities — such as bans on buying, solicitation and general organization of sexwork.... more »

Amnesty International has published its policy on sex work: it calls on governments to take several critical steps to protect the human rights of sex workers, including: decriminalize consensual sex work, ensure that sex workers are protected from harm, exploitation and coercion; include sex workers in the development of laws that affect their lives and safety; and end discrimination and provide access to education and employment options for all.

Amnesty International’s policy is the culmination of extensive worldwide consultations, a considered review of substantive evidence and international human rights standards and first-hand research, carried out over more than two years.

It recommends the decriminalization of consensual sex work, including those laws that prohibit associated activities — such as bans on buying, solicitation and general organization of sex work. This is based on evidence that these laws often make sex workers less safe and provide impunity for abusers, with sex workers often too scared of being penalized to report crime to the police. Laws on sex work should focus on protecting people from exploitation and abuse, rather than trying to ban all sex work and penalize sex workers.

Extensive research, including four geographically specific reports, shows that sex workers are often subject to horrific human rights abuses. This is in part due to criminalization, which further endangers and marginalizes sex workers and impedes their ability to seek legal and social services as well as protection from violence.

Amnesty International’s research shows that sex workers often get no, or very little, protection from abuse, or legal redress, even in countries where the act of selling sex itself is legal.

The research makes a strong case against the "Nordic model," or the criminalization of buying sexual services, as it's been implemented in Norway and Sweden, and as many "end-demand" campaigns are hoping to modify the systems all over Europe, including countries that previously had less abusive legal frameworks for sex workers.

This is an important step for sex workers, as well as for health and the rights of gay and transgender individuals, who most often face the brunt of initiatives to combat prostitution.___

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2016-05-26 05:04:25 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

Sandy Neck Lighthouse at night.

Sandy Neck Lighthouse at night.___

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2016-05-26 04:45:35 (0 comments; 4 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-05-26 03:51:52 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

Even amongst the more liberal-leaning circles of journalism white supremacy reins, well, supreme.

Even amongst the more liberal-leaning circles of journalism white supremacy reins, well, supreme.___

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2016-05-26 01:19:44 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

The original Star Wars trailer from 1977. The movie you know, but you wouldn't guess it from this rarely seen trailer. Look, listen, and be amazed.

The original Star Wars trailer from 1977. The movie you know, but you wouldn't guess it from this rarely seen trailer. Look, listen, and be amazed.___

2016-05-26 01:16:51 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s)Open 

Why Free Speech Is Even More Important Than Privacy

http://lauren.vortex.com/2016/05/why-free-speech-is-even-more-important-than-privacy

Supporters of the EU’s horrific “Right To Be Forgotten” (RTBF) generally make the implicit (and sometimes explicit) argument that privacy must take precedence over free speech.

As a privacy advocate for many years (I created my ongoing PRIVACY Forum in 1992) you might expect that I’d have at least some sympathy for that position.

Such an assumption would be incorrect. At least in the context of censorship in general — and of RTBF in particular — I disagree strongly with such assertions.

It’s not because privacy is unimportant. In fact, I feel that free speech is more important than privacy precisely because privacy itself is so important!

It’s all a matter of what you know, what youdon’t know, and... more »

Why Free Speech Is Even More Important Than Privacy

http://lauren.vortex.com/2016/05/why-free-speech-is-even-more-important-than-privacy

Supporters of the EU’s horrific “Right To Be Forgotten” (RTBF) generally make the implicit (and sometimes explicit) argument that privacy must take precedence over free speech.

As a privacy advocate for many years (I created my ongoing PRIVACY Forum in 1992) you might expect that I’d have at least some sympathy for that position.

Such an assumption would be incorrect. At least in the context of censorship in general — and of RTBF in particular — I disagree strongly with such assertions.

It’s not because privacy is unimportant. In fact, I feel that free speech is more important than privacy precisely because privacy itself is so important!

It’s all a matter of what you know, what you don’t know, and what you don’t know that you don’t know.

Basically, there are two categories of censorship.

The first consists largely of materials that you know exist, but that you are forbidden by (usually government) edict from accessing. Such items may in practice be difficult to obtain, or simple to obtain, but in either case may carry significant legal penalties if you actually obtain them (or in some cases, even try to obtain them). An obvious example of this category is sexually-explicit materials of various sorts around the world.

Ironically, while this category could encompass everything from classic erotic literature to the most depraved pornography involving children, overall it is the lesser insidious form of censorship, since at least you know that it exists.

The even more evil type of censorship — the sort that is fundamental to the “Right To be Forgotten” concept and an essential element of George Orwell’s “Nineteen Eighty-Four” — is the effort to hide actual information in a manner that would prevent you from even knowing that it exists in the first place.

Whether it’s a war with “Eastasia” or a personal past that someone would prefer that you not know about, the goal is for you not to realize, to not even suspect, that some negative information is out there that you might consider to be relevant and important.

Combine this with the escalating RTBF demands of France and other countries for global censorship powers over Google’s and other firms’ search results, and it becomes clear why privacy itself can be decimated under RTBF and similar forms of censorship.

Because if individual governments — some of whom already impose draconian information controls domestically — gain global censorship powers, we can’t possibly assume that we even know what’s really going on in respect to negative impacts on our privacy!

In other words, RTBF and similar forms of censorship can act to hide from us the very existence of entities, facts and efforts that could be directly damaging to our privacy in a myriad number of ways. And if we don’t know that these even exist, how can we possibly make informed evaluations of our privacy and the privacy of our loved ones?

To make matters worse, much of this applies not only to privacy issues, but to an array of crucial security issues as well.

Attempting to maintain privacy and security in a regime of global censorship designed to hide facts from the public — irrespective of the occasionally laudable motives for such actions in some specific cases — is like trying to build a skyscraper on a foundation of quicksand.

You don’t need to be an architect, a computer scientist — or a privacy expert– to recognize the insanity of such an approach.

–Lauren–
I have consulted to Google, but I am not currently doing so — my opinions expressed here are mine alone.___

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2016-05-25 16:33:24 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

"Who else would have thought of such a wonderful idea‽"

Created in 1948 as the first animated series designed specifically for television, the crude animation was offset by some great writing (not surprising with Jay Ward involved). Tested in 1948, the first real episode sequences aired here in L.A. on 1 Aug 1949 (on KNBH, now KNBC-TV). The opening narration of this clip -- "Crusade 1 Episode 1" -- includes probably the single most brilliant two sentences to ever begin any film or program.___"Who else would have thought of such a wonderful idea‽"

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2016-05-25 16:08:34 (5 comments; 7 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

Cautela y poderío 

Cautela y poderío ___

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2016-05-25 07:01:25 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Oklahoma’s Insane Rush to Execute https://theintercept.com/2016/05/24/oklahomas-insane-rush-to-execute/ -via Flynx

Oklahoma’s Insane Rush to Execute https://theintercept.com/2016/05/24/oklahomas-insane-rush-to-execute/ -via Flynx___

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2016-05-25 06:42:43 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

The solution to the problems we face "represents the greatest development and investment opportunity we have ever seen in creating the low-carbon world. But it must be a 21st-century world focused on genuine sustainability and quality of life, not on rebooting the unsustainable 20th-century free-market version which has got us in to the current mess. We hear much rhetoric about "transition", "innovation", "jobs and growth" but no clarity on "transition to what?", "innovation to what end?" and "what sort of jobs and growth?". At present, policies of both the left and right are committed to delivering the latter world, not the former."

#sustainability   #lowcarbonfuture   #climatechange  

The solution to the problems we face "represents the greatest development and investment opportunity we have ever seen in creating the low-carbon world. But it must be a 21st-century world focused on genuine sustainability and quality of life, not on rebooting the unsustainable 20th-century free-market version which has got us in to the current mess. We hear much rhetoric about "transition", "innovation", "jobs and growth" but no clarity on "transition to what?", "innovation to what end?" and "what sort of jobs and growth?". At present, policies of both the left and right are committed to delivering the latter world, not the former."

#sustainability   #lowcarbonfuture   #climatechange  ___

2016-05-25 02:43:05 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 

Next time you start a joke with, "If a woman/your wife…" try changing it to "partner". Bet it's just as funny. And if it's not, it's probably not a joke you should be telling.

And no, I'm not really interested in amusing counter-examples in the comments. I'm sure there are some, but I'm too tired of garbage right now to hear them.

Next time you start a joke with, "If a woman/your wife…" try changing it to "partner". Bet it's just as funny. And if it's not, it's probably not a joke you should be telling.

And no, I'm not really interested in amusing counter-examples in the comments. I'm sure there are some, but I'm too tired of garbage right now to hear them.___

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2016-05-25 01:49:17 (3 comments; 1 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

Israel renews law that bans Palestinians from living with their Israeli spouses http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/controversial-citizenship-law-that-bans-palestinians-married-to-israelis-from-living-in-israel-10327385.html -via Flynx

Israel renews law that bans Palestinians from living with their Israeli spouses http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/controversial-citizenship-law-that-bans-palestinians-married-to-israelis-from-living-in-israel-10327385.html -via Flynx___

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2016-05-24 23:39:03 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

I've never done this to my kids. Although they've never forgiven me for reading them The Monkey's Paw on Halloween.

Dad creates the most haunting horror photos with his daughters as the stars http://www.lostateminor.com/2016/05/23/dad-creates-the-most-haunting-horror-photos-with-his-daughters-as-the-stars/ …___I've never done this to my kids. Although they've never forgiven me for reading them The Monkey's Paw on Halloween.

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2016-05-24 23:15:11 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

An innovative new archaeological study has revealed in detail for the first time how individual towns, villages and hamlets across swathes of medieval England were decimated by the Black Death.

An innovative new archaeological study has revealed in detail for the first time how individual towns, villages and hamlets across swathes of medieval England were decimated by the Black Death.___

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2016-05-24 22:54:23 (2 comments; 3 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

Love in the time of climate change: Grizzlies and polar bears are now mating - The Washington Post

Love in the time of climate change: Grizzlies and polar bears are now mating - The Washington Post___

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2016-05-24 22:39:19 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 37 +1s)Open 

LOLOLOL

LOLOLOL___

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2016-05-24 21:21:55 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Votive bowls. Jewish, Zoroastrian and other magicians. Stolen artifacts. Forgeries. Talmudic history. It's all here.

10% are ❝ ancient forgeries. These latter are filled with scribbles that mimic cursive writing but are not, in fact, in any language at all; perhaps they were made by illiterate scribes preying on equally illiterate clients. ❞

A remarkable story about votive bowls and what they can tell us about life in Mesopotamia 1500 years ago. But who owns them? ___Votive bowls. Jewish, Zoroastrian and other magicians. Stolen artifacts. Forgeries. Talmudic history. It's all here.

10% are ❝ ancient forgeries. These latter are filled with scribbles that mimic cursive writing but are not, in fact, in any language at all; perhaps they were made by illiterate scribes preying on equally illiterate clients. ❞

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2016-05-24 20:41:31 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

+Mellie B drew my attention to a really important video people need to see. It's not easy to watch. It starts light hearted, haha some tweets are mean, haha...but very quickly you see how gross some of the tweets women in sports get can be. And the guys reading them start to blush, apologize, and feel precisely as horrible as anyone ought to feel.

And while I'll tell you there's a trigger warning insofar as some of these tweets sent to these sports reporters who happen to be female are exactly the rapey, violent, ugly shit you expect, they're actually not that bad compared to the seriously creative rapey ultra-shit that people like Anita Sarkeesian gets. I mean how pathetic is our culture when I can watch this video made of awkward and think, "I've seen worse"?

We're becoming inured to this garbage because we're constantly told that it's... more »

+Mellie B drew my attention to a really important video people need to see. It's not easy to watch. It starts light hearted, haha some tweets are mean, haha...but very quickly you see how gross some of the tweets women in sports get can be. And the guys reading them start to blush, apologize, and feel precisely as horrible as anyone ought to feel.

And while I'll tell you there's a trigger warning insofar as some of these tweets sent to these sports reporters who happen to be female are exactly the rapey, violent, ugly shit you expect, they're actually not that bad compared to the seriously creative rapey ultra-shit that people like Anita Sarkeesian gets. I mean how pathetic is our culture when I can watch this video made of awkward and think, "I've seen worse"?

We're becoming inured to this garbage because we're constantly told that it's not a big deal, but threats of sexual violence are a big deal. We're told that that's the price of being online, but NO, that should not be an acceptable price. We're told to suck it up and deal, to put on our big girl pants and cope, because our culture blames victims for not taking it well instead of blaming the shitty little fuckweasels who post this crap.

We tolerate this nonsense. We laugh it off and say it's just words. But it's not "just words" and we shouldn't be giving it a pass. If some guy walked around saying things like this to people in person on this scale, he'd be arrested, probably lose his job, and end up socially outcast. But online we reward it with all of the wrong kinds of attention instead.

Start standing up against it, and stop doing it.

And share the video.

https://youtu.be/9tU-D-m2JY8___

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2016-05-24 20:29:35 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Clinton vs. Trump. Guess which group watches lots of shows with strong female protagonists?

#tivoemp  

Clinton vs. Trump. Guess which group watches lots of shows with strong female protagonists?

#tivoemp  ___

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2016-05-24 13:25:26 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

Here: have a rant on an epic scale about what's wrong with American politics.

A rant by a Lecturer in Politics with a doctorate in the subject.

Also, epic.

Here: have a rant on an epic scale about what's wrong with American politics.

A rant by a Lecturer in Politics with a doctorate in the subject.

Also, epic.___

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2016-05-24 00:46:57 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

Techies without clue. You don't block postal addresses using string compare.

Morons.___Techies without clue. You don't block postal addresses using string compare.

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2016-05-23 06:06:47 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

Why is the TSA so terrible?

Because the TSA, like any organization, responds to the incentives and disincentives it's given.

The most prominent disincentive that drives it is:

0. "Someone with something gets on board a plane and kills a bunch of people." That's a great disincentive, something the TSA (or anyone else) wants to avoid ... but it's also an incredibly rare event. Astonishingly rare. Statistically insignificantly rare.

It's like saying "We are hopping up and down on one foot to keep a meteor from killing someone in our town." "How do you know it works?" "Because it hasn't happened yet." There's very little evidence I know of that the TSA's checks at security lines have actually prevented a major terror plot.

What are the other incentives / disincentives the TSA has?... more »

Why is the TSA so terrible?

Because the TSA, like any organization, responds to the incentives and disincentives it's given.

The most prominent disincentive that drives it is:

0. "Someone with something gets on board a plane and kills a bunch of people." That's a great disincentive, something the TSA (or anyone else) wants to avoid ... but it's also an incredibly rare event. Astonishingly rare. Statistically insignificantly rare.

It's like saying "We are hopping up and down on one foot to keep a meteor from killing someone in our town." "How do you know it works?" "Because it hasn't happened yet." There's very little evidence I know of that the TSA's checks at security lines have actually prevented a major terror plot.

What are the other incentives / disincentives the TSA has?

1. "Bad audits of auditors sneaking stuff past the security line, leading to horrible publicity and congressional hearings." This is a much more realistic and frequent disincentive, and one the TSA has done very poorly at avoiding. Result? The TSA cracks down on anything that might represent a threat or an out-of-usual occurrence or false negative ... and lines for security extend out the door.

2. "Be an important agency." That's the incentive for any government body, regardless of its primary mission. This incentive is reached by having higher head count and higher budget. That has nothing to do with the actual purpose, but it will lead to behaviors designed to increase those two metrics, such as ... well, slowing down security lines and claiming that's because you don't have enough headcount.

Some folk (like Phoenix International) are considering the alternative of getting rid of the TSA and using private contractors. That gets rid of the No. 2 above, but does nothing to reduce No. 0, or No. 1.

Indeed, it arguably increases No. 1 because a contractor can be more easily replaced than a government agency, so a private contractor will be more incented to avoid bad publicity (or else incented to corrupt the political system that awards contracts to ignore performance).

It also adds another incentive:

3. "Maximize profits." Which means lower pay for agents, less training for agents, more corruption in the bidding process, arguably lighter checking to reduce workload (balancing No. 1). On the other hand, if the contract is awarded as a cost-plus one -- "we'll take whatever your costs are and add a markup percentage" -- then No. 3 increases costs, too.

Clearly we don't want people wandering onto a plane with automatic weapons slung over their shoulders. But the bottom line is that airplane hijacking as a terror effort is, statistically, a (tragic) anomaly, and intense security line checks (mandated by law, not by the agency / contractor implementing them) are only marginally more logical and useful than hopping on one foot to appease the meteor gods.

But the scandal of investment to date at airports to build a huge security line infrastructure, and the incentives / disincentives of the organizations tasked to keep airline terror from ever happening again, are such that I don't expect to see any improvement in how security affects travelers for many, many years to come.

[h/t +Yonatan Zunger]
___

2016-05-23 03:51:01 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

Word of the day: cosplatriot.

h/t +Chris Kantarjiev 

Word of the day: cosplatriot.

h/t +Chris Kantarjiev ___

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2016-05-23 03:47:52 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

If Uno was Anime

h/t to my daughter +shadi fotouhi 

If Uno was Anime

h/t to my daughter +shadi fotouhi ___

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2016-05-23 03:24:06 (1 comments; 6 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

Stay out of rabbit holes. 

Stay out of rabbit holes. ___

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2016-05-23 03:03:57 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-05-22 13:16:57 (4 comments; 1 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

From a 1968 IBM ad: the typical programmer of the day. Their new PL/1 language answers the age-old question: "Can a young girl with no previous programming experience find happiness handling both commercial and scientific applications, without resorting to assembly language?"

(And yes, this woman did in fact look like the very typical programmer of the day. Check out pictures of Margaret Hamilton (head of software for the Apollo program) or Katherine Johnson (who computed the trajectories) if you don't believe me. And note that the typical programmers of the day were not all white, either!)

Via @pwnallthethings and @jackyalcine on Twitter.

From a 1968 IBM ad: the typical programmer of the day. Their new PL/1 language answers the age-old question: "Can a young girl with no previous programming experience find happiness handling both commercial and scientific applications, without resorting to assembly language?"

(And yes, this woman did in fact look like the very typical programmer of the day. Check out pictures of Margaret Hamilton (head of software for the Apollo program) or Katherine Johnson (who computed the trajectories) if you don't believe me. And note that the typical programmers of the day were not all white, either!)

Via @pwnallthethings and @jackyalcine on Twitter.___

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2016-05-22 03:31:15 (9 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-05-22 03:04:17 (5 comments; 2 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Photography and the oldest profession.

#t

"There’s some invisible thread that has kept photographers enamored with the oldest profession for so many centuries," the article notes. "Whether pure fascination, an obsession with defiance, camaraderie, compassion, or corrupt curiosity, we may never be certain."

I would have thought it would be simple. Women's bodies being so thoroughly policed throughout history, the only ones who would be willing to be a model, given the profession's scandalous reputation, would have to be women who'd airway forfeited "respectability."

But anyway, this article names some names of people who photographed sex workers, and it helps explain, for those interested, what it takes to photograph them as human beings, rather than props. 

Content warning: This link contains images that are not safe for work.___Photography and the oldest profession.

#t

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2016-05-22 00:17:20 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

More data about the expense of poverty.

" When Orhun and Palazzolo compared households with similar consumption rates shopping at comparable stores — and controlling for two-ply TP — they found that the poor were less likely than wealthier households to buy bigger packages, or to time their purchases to take advantage of sales. By failing to do so, they paid about 5.9 percent more per sheet of toilet paper — a little less than what they saved by buying cheaper brands in the first place (8.8 percent).

Perhaps this sounds like a subtle discovery about minor household goods. But it supports a larger point about poverty: It's expensive to be poor. Or, to state the same from another angle: Having more money gives people the luxury of paying less for things. "

More data about the expense of poverty.

" When Orhun and Palazzolo compared households with similar consumption rates shopping at comparable stores — and controlling for two-ply TP — they found that the poor were less likely than wealthier households to buy bigger packages, or to time their purchases to take advantage of sales. By failing to do so, they paid about 5.9 percent more per sheet of toilet paper — a little less than what they saved by buying cheaper brands in the first place (8.8 percent).

Perhaps this sounds like a subtle discovery about minor household goods. But it supports a larger point about poverty: It's expensive to be poor. Or, to state the same from another angle: Having more money gives people the luxury of paying less for things. "___

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2016-05-21 18:05:46 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

“Who knew there’d come a time when people didn’t want to bury their children?” -- Ruth Cocker Burks http://www.out.com/positive-voices/2016/5/19/meet-woman-who-cared-hundreds-abandoned-gay-men-dying-aids …

“Who knew there’d come a time when people didn’t want to bury their children?” -- Ruth Cocker Burks http://www.out.com/positive-voices/2016/5/19/meet-woman-who-cared-hundreds-abandoned-gay-men-dying-aids …___

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2016-05-21 17:57:51 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s)Open 

Smart blockchains with contracts triggered by the Internet of Things. What could possibly go wrong?

Don't get me wrong. Nice article. Cool concepts. Well explained. Now if only someone made secure things.

___Smart blockchains with contracts triggered by the Internet of Things. What could possibly go wrong?

Don't get me wrong. Nice article. Cool concepts. Well explained. Now if only someone made secure things.

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2016-05-21 17:35:26 (9 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

One week to the move. Coming together. Hauling the Saroca down from Maine.

One week to the move. Coming together. Hauling the Saroca down from Maine.___

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2016-05-21 17:30:37 (52 comments; 5 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

"No seriously, why are we still working?

[...] the economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by now, people in technologically advanced societies wouldn't need to work much at all.

In Australia, by the new millennium, many full time employees were working more than their grandparents had.

What happened? Did technology fail to deliver the gains Keynes expected?

On the contrary. Technological advancement outstripped even the giddy imaginations of futurists from a century ago. We can grow food, dig up minerals, make fridges and bridges, move things and ourselves around the planet and share knowledge and information much faster with a fraction of the workforce it once took."

"No seriously, why are we still working?

[...] the economist John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by now, people in technologically advanced societies wouldn't need to work much at all.

In Australia, by the new millennium, many full time employees were working more than their grandparents had.

What happened? Did technology fail to deliver the gains Keynes expected?

On the contrary. Technological advancement outstripped even the giddy imaginations of futurists from a century ago. We can grow food, dig up minerals, make fridges and bridges, move things and ourselves around the planet and share knowledge and information much faster with a fraction of the workforce it once took."___

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2016-05-21 12:43:35 (4 comments; 1 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

An interesting article about how products give the illusion of freedom while in fact limiting your choices.

Some of this is inherent in UX in general--you can only present so many things. But the interesting question is, "why are these things being presented to me, and what's not there?"

The Dopamine Meme: How (and why) tech and online experiences are addictive -- and how to fight this and make them less so

I've written on the dopamine meme previously -- the idea that online experiences are made intentionally addictive. Google are as guilty of this as anyone else, and much my frustration with G+ centers on its own hugely user-disrespectful patterns, particularly those which actively impede intentional use.

Constant nags, HOT colours (red headers and nag screens or buttons, the reversion of "new posts" to a grey is a recent exception), lack of intentional positive and negative filters (content type, animations, video, audio, domains, keywords or topics). A search capacity which should lead to mass deaths of sheer embarassment at the company.

I could continue, but this isn't (just) about Google or G+.


The patterns described here are pretty significant. Several lead me to swear off the source. I've gone out of my way to avoid retailers who pull these stunts. I've consciously avoided numerous online services simply for their annoyances. Google's putting a Notifications widget on every page of its site drove me not to engage more but to 1) switch to other search provider(s) and 2) access Google without authenticating.

Craptastic shit-in-my-face adverts on YouTube have lead to a multi-day boycot.

These anti-patterns are short-term positive, but in the long term discredit brands. E.g., WashPo's embarassingly blatant clickbait heads (post a WashPo story, draw an abuse report). On Reddit and Hacker News, ad-blocker-blockers and paywalls increasingly lead to domain bans.

Among the reasons I push for strong reputation management aggregation systems is to specifically punish this behavior. Craptacular YouTube channel? Ban that mofo. Crap Website? /etc/hosts block.

And failure to provide strong tools for fighting this shit on user platforms? Among my chief gripes against Android -- the OS I increasingly hate to use, but there's little else on that form-factor.


The author's got a project based on similar principles. Worth looking at.___An interesting article about how products give the illusion of freedom while in fact limiting your choices.

Some of this is inherent in UX in general--you can only present so many things. But the interesting question is, "why are these things being presented to me, and what's not there?"

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2016-05-21 06:55:25 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

This is a short, concise, and extremely clear talk on decriminalization of sex work. It's about the different legal approaches different countries use, and why many of them are a bad idea. It's about why people want to criminalize or eliminate sex work, and what the consequences of that actually are. And ultimately, it's about the most important question in such a situation: what are the laws that the people affected actually want?

You would think this would be the question about most kinds of laws, but the laws around sex work tend to be constructed rather spectacularly without the input of any of the parties affected – with a few key counterexamples, such as New Zealand's 2003 legal reform.

I'm not normally in the habit of sharing TED talks – the tend towards the self-congratulatory and/or asinine. But this one is worth a watch or a read.

This is a short, concise, and extremely clear talk on decriminalization of sex work. It's about the different legal approaches different countries use, and why many of them are a bad idea. It's about why people want to criminalize or eliminate sex work, and what the consequences of that actually are. And ultimately, it's about the most important question in such a situation: what are the laws that the people affected actually want?

You would think this would be the question about most kinds of laws, but the laws around sex work tend to be constructed rather spectacularly without the input of any of the parties affected – with a few key counterexamples, such as New Zealand's 2003 legal reform.

I'm not normally in the habit of sharing TED talks – the tend towards the self-congratulatory and/or asinine. But this one is worth a watch or a read.___

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2016-05-21 06:30:52 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

Hidden Figures is a movie coming out early next year about three black women who worked on the Apollo project – an engineer, a trajectory computer, and one of the computation team leaders. This is entirely based on real people; Katherine Johnson, played by Taraji P. Henson, who led trajectory computations for the lunar flights, received the Medal of Freedom last year.

This is a great subject for a movie: it's a story not nearly enough people know about, about really interesting people with complex conflicts in their lives who were also working on one of the great accomplishments of the twentieth century.

So why is it that this review decided it had to start out like this:

"Taraji P. Henson hates math, and Octavia Spencer has a paralyzing fear of calculus, but that didn’t stop either actress..."

(We know math is mean and scary, especially forwome... more »

Hidden Figures is a movie coming out early next year about three black women who worked on the Apollo project – an engineer, a trajectory computer, and one of the computation team leaders. This is entirely based on real people; Katherine Johnson, played by Taraji P. Henson, who led trajectory computations for the lunar flights, received the Medal of Freedom last year.

This is a great subject for a movie: it's a story not nearly enough people know about, about really interesting people with complex conflicts in their lives who were also working on one of the great accomplishments of the twentieth century.

So why is it that this review decided it had to start out like this:

"Taraji P. Henson hates math, and Octavia Spencer has a paralyzing fear of calculus, but that didn’t stop either actress..."

(We know math is mean and scary, especially for women, but they overcame their fear so that they could play in this movie!)

Or let us know that

"The role of Ms. Johnson is a meaty one, as well as a departure, for Ms. Henson, who... collected a Golden Globe for her portrayal of Cookie, the brazen, razor-tongued matriarch on Fox’s nighttime soap “Empire.”"

Glad to know that meaty roles are somehow a departure for Henson. I'm also glad to have been told that Cookie is "brazen" and "razor-tongued;" thank you for letting me know which stereotype I should be expecting. (Incidentally, I've seen Empire; Cookie is a very meaty character indeed, and for my money the most interesting and complex character in a great show.)

And of course, even though everyone involved with the film is emphasizing the broad importance of the story – the story, among other things, of the tremendous number of women who held key roles on the project – the article spends plenty of time telling us that it's a black movie, which will satisfy black audience's calls for more diversity in Hollywood.

Essentially, this review managed to speak well of a movie while simultaneously suggesting that its leads are kind of stupid, not really very experienced actors, and are there primarily for purposes of "diversity." So you, as the (presumably imagined) white reader of this, should feel proud that you know about it but not feel under any undue pressure to watch it, because it's not really for you. You see, films with black people in them are only for black audiences; films with white people in them are the ones which are for everybody, because they're more universal.

I strongly suggest that you ignore everything this asinine review says and go see the movie. First, it's an excellent story, and one that could make for great film. Second, Taraji P. Henson alone is a good reason to see a movie: if you haven't seen her act before, you should, and if you have, well, you know. And third, this is a whole part of our history – whether "us" in this case is Americans, geeks, engineers, women, black people, people who care at all about space, or any combination thereof – which is really fascinating to learn about and which you've probably never gotten to hear before.___

2016-05-21 04:52:03 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

France’s Guillotining of Global Free Speech Continues

http://lauren.vortex.com/2016/05/frances-guillotining-of-global-free-speech-continues

The war between France and Google -- with France demanding that Google act as a global censor, and Google appealing France's edicts -- shows no signs of abating, and the casualty list could easily end up including most of this planet's residents.

As soon as the horrific "Right To Be Forgotten" (RTBF) concept was initially announced by the EU, many observers (including myself) suspected that the "end game" would always be global censorship, despite efforts by Google and others to reach agreements that could limit EU censorship to the EU itself.

This is the heart of the matter. France -- and shortly we can be sure a parade of such free speech loathing countries like Russia, China, and manyo... more »

France’s Guillotining of Global Free Speech Continues

http://lauren.vortex.com/2016/05/frances-guillotining-of-global-free-speech-continues

The war between France and Google -- with France demanding that Google act as a global censor, and Google appealing France's edicts -- shows no signs of abating, and the casualty list could easily end up including most of this planet's residents.

As soon as the horrific "Right To Be Forgotten" (RTBF) concept was initially announced by the EU, many observers (including myself) suspected that the "end game" would always be global censorship, despite efforts by Google and others to reach agreements that could limit EU censorship to the EU itself.

This is the heart of the matter. France -- and shortly we can be sure a parade of such free speech loathing countries like Russia, China, and many others -- is demanding that Google remove search results for third-party materials on a global basis from all Google indexes around the world.

What this means is that even though I'm sitting right here in Los Angeles, if I dare to write a completely accurate and USA-legal post that the French government finds objectionable, France is demanding the right to force Google (and ultimately, other search engines and indexes) to remove key references to my posting from Google and other search results. For everyone. Everywhere. Around the world. Because of ... France.

It's nonsensical on its face but incredibly dangerous. It's a dream of every dictator and legions of bureaucrats down through history, brought to a shiny 21st century technological reality.

You don't have to be a computer scientist to realize that if every country in the world has a veto power over global search results, the lightspeed race to the lowest common denominator of sickly search results pablum would make Einstein's head spin.

Proponents of these censorship regimes play the usual sorts of duplicitous word games of censorship czars throughout history. They claim it's for the good of all, and that it's not "really" censorship since "only" search results are involved.

Well here's something you can take to the bank. Let's leave aside for the moment the absolute truth that -- given the enormous scale of the Web -- hiding search results is effectively largely the same as hiding most source content itself as far as most people are concerned. But even if we ignore this fact, the truth of the matter is that it won't be long before these same governments are also demanding the direct censorship of source material websites as well as search results.

However small the "forbidden information" leakage past the censorship of search results themselves, government censors will never be satisfied. They never are. In the history of civilization, they've never been satisfied.

A grand irony of course is that the very rise of Internet technology has been the potential enabler of centrally-mandated censorship to a degree never imagined even twenty years ago. For those of us who've spent our professional lives working to build these systems to foster the open spread of information, seeing our technologies turned into the tools of tyrants is disheartening to say the least.

It is however encouraging that firms like Google are continuing to fight the good fight against governments' censorship regimes. Frankly, it will take firms on the scale of Google -- along with support by masses of ordinary folks like us -- to have any chance at all of keeping France and other governments around the world from turning the Internet into their own personal information control fiefdoms.

Lauren
I have consulted to Google, but I am not currently doing so -- my opinions expressed here are mine alone.
___

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2016-05-20 20:22:53 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s)Open 

Lazyweb Request - I need a tablet for running Zoom/Skype/Webex, along with a tripod.

It wants to meet their OS requirements.
https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/201179966-System-Requirements-for-iOS-and-Android

It's going to sit at the main office and be virtual me. I'll ask people to take it to meetings when I'm supposed to be there, so I can be there remotely. So it needs to be easy to launch those apps, and it needs a tripod such that it can be put at the end of the table and people can see me, and I can see people. So good rear camera is a plus.

I'm an iOS person, but in this case I don't really care. It just needs to have good specs, and if I can call it and it auto-answers, that's even better. If I can remote control it it update things, that would be awesome (something I can't do to iOS). Other features don't matter. This is... more »

Lazyweb Request - I need a tablet for running Zoom/Skype/Webex, along with a tripod.

It wants to meet their OS requirements.
https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/201179966-System-Requirements-for-iOS-and-Android

It's going to sit at the main office and be virtual me. I'll ask people to take it to meetings when I'm supposed to be there, so I can be there remotely. So it needs to be easy to launch those apps, and it needs a tripod such that it can be put at the end of the table and people can see me, and I can see people. So good rear camera is a plus.

I'm an iOS person, but in this case I don't really care. It just needs to have good specs, and if I can call it and it auto-answers, that's even better. If I can remote control it it update things, that would be awesome (something I can't do to iOS). Other features don't matter. This is only for remote video conferencing.___

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2016-05-20 18:38:11 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

Delete.
http://maximumble.thebookofbiff.com/2016/05/20/1336-delete/

Delete.
http://maximumble.thebookofbiff.com/2016/05/20/1336-delete/___

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2016-05-20 18:31:58 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-05-20 13:43:06 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

Historians call the Bear River Massacre of 1863 on the Shoshone the deadliest reported attack on Native Americans by the U.S. military.

In 2013, the Idaho State Historical Society began efforts to map and protect what may remain of that killing-ground. And although the site is still not found, it is at least getting the attention it deserves.

Historians call the Bear River Massacre of 1863 on the Shoshone the deadliest reported attack on Native Americans by the U.S. military.

In 2013, the Idaho State Historical Society began efforts to map and protect what may remain of that killing-ground. And although the site is still not found, it is at least getting the attention it deserves.___

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2016-05-20 04:54:28 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

Something I did not know: at the Statue of Liberty's feet are broken chains, and in the original design of the statue, she did not hold a book in her left hand, but rather the chains she had shattered.

Edouard de Laboulaye and Frédéric Batholdi, the two men behind the statue, were fervent abolitionists, and the initial impetus for the statue was the ratification of the 13th Amendment.

The final design of the statue, in which the chains are visible only from a helicopter, was the result of strong objections from the project's American backers, upon whom de Laboulaye and Batholdi were relying to fund the pedestal and the site; they wanted no mentions of slavery. In 1885-6, the United States was fully in the throes of "reconciliation," the process of the official forgetting of pre-War history, the rehabilitation of the political image of the South, and thef... more »

Something I did not know: at the Statue of Liberty's feet are broken chains, and in the original design of the statue, she did not hold a book in her left hand, but rather the chains she had shattered.

Edouard de Laboulaye and Frédéric Batholdi, the two men behind the statue, were fervent abolitionists, and the initial impetus for the statue was the ratification of the 13th Amendment.

The final design of the statue, in which the chains are visible only from a helicopter, was the result of strong objections from the project's American backers, upon whom de Laboulaye and Batholdi were relying to fund the pedestal and the site; they wanted no mentions of slavery. In 1885-6, the United States was fully in the throes of "reconciliation," the process of the official forgetting of pre-War history, the rehabilitation of the political image of the South, and the formalization of the "New Slavery" system in both North and South which was to prove so immensely profitable. Such a public decree of slavery as an evil, and the antithesis of liberty, would have been an entirely unwanted political problem to those who wanted the country to "just get over it."

The chains remained virtually unknown until recently, with even the National Park Service not mentioning their existence in its publications. Ordinary tourists never saw them; thanks to the steep angle of the plinth, they're completely invisible from the ground. It was only in 2011 that (for reasons not fully clear) this changed, and the USNPS now discusses this history at length on its site.

Via +Ralf Haring and +Peter da Silva.___

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2016-05-19 17:24:42 (7 comments; 0 reshares; 39 +1s)Open 

She's graduating!

#ns

She's graduating!

#ns___

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2016-05-19 15:21:26 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-05-19 13:23:34 (8 comments; 2 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

Call me, maybe?

___Call me, maybe?

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