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Kee Hinckley

Kee Hinckley 

Fascinated by the boundaries of technology and social behavior.

Occupation: I create things using code, words, and ideas. (TiVo, Inc.)

Location: La Conner, WA

Followers: 11,212

Following: 1,141

Views: 8,522,046

Added to CircleCount.com: 12/25/2011That's the date, where Kee Hinckley has been indexed by CircleCount.com.
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Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

7
comments per post
2
reshares per post
13
+1's per post

480
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 80

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2016-09-23 10:37:02 (80 comments; 5 reshares; 31 +1s; )Open 

❝ Even though, the “Christian concepts typically consisted of the closing line, such as ‘In Jesus’ name. Amen,’ ” the court finds that “these are not really Christian prayers.” The majority simply rejects that notion that multiple references to such Christian concepts might “convey the appearance of an official preference for Christianity.” ❞

Most reshares: 16

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2016-09-25 04:46:10 (19 comments; 16 reshares; 49 +1s; )Open 

Looks about right for a Sandy Neck Thanksgiving with the kids.

h/t girija

Most plusones: 49

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2016-09-25 04:46:10 (19 comments; 16 reshares; 49 +1s; )Open 

Looks about right for a Sandy Neck Thanksgiving with the kids.

h/t girija

Latest 50 posts

2016-09-26 04:57:55 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

Ok, I give. In the new iOS, how in hell do I rate a song? All my playlists are based on star ratings.

Ok, I give. In the new iOS, how in hell do I rate a song? All my playlists are based on star ratings.___

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2016-09-26 04:09:34 (4 comments; 2 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

In the future, fame is measured by how many people turn their back on you.

Oh wait. That's now.

In the future, fame is measured by how many people turn their back on you.

Oh wait. That's now.___

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2016-09-26 03:09:23 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

So close, and yet so far away. (You may have to click through for video)

So close, and yet so far away. (You may have to click through for video)___

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2016-09-26 02:20:54 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 10 +1s; )Open 

Progress! You can see the creative rafters here that I'm goi g to replace. Also, the 12' ridge poll is actually a 10' and a 2' tacked into it.

Tomorrow I'm going to go get a few more supplies.
1. Tougher gloves (ripped these to shreds)
2. A second 12' 2x4 to reinforce the ridge poll and give the rafters more to tie into. I'll get some metal fasteners to link them together.
3. Two more 2x6's to make a full and level storage area in the eves, and to give support to...
4. Four 8' 2x12's for scaffolding, which will make the roof work much easier.

Under the roll roofing I found a hinged trapdoor in the roof. ???

Progress! You can see the creative rafters here that I'm goi g to replace. Also, the 12' ridge poll is actually a 10' and a 2' tacked into it.

Tomorrow I'm going to go get a few more supplies.
1. Tougher gloves (ripped these to shreds)
2. A second 12' 2x4 to reinforce the ridge poll and give the rafters more to tie into. I'll get some metal fasteners to link them together.
3. Two more 2x6's to make a full and level storage area in the eves, and to give support to...
4. Four 8' 2x12's for scaffolding, which will make the roof work much easier.

Under the roll roofing I found a hinged trapdoor in the roof. ???___

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2016-09-25 22:51:07 (13 comments; 0 reshares; 9 +1s; )Open 

Why is she shivering? We have the room at about 80, with a heater on all the time.

Why is she shivering? We have the room at about 80, with a heater on all the time.___

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2016-09-25 21:52:41 (21 comments; 0 reshares; 13 +1s; )Open 

I think I might be over the 150lb rating on the roof rack.

I think I might be over the 150lb rating on the roof rack.___

2016-09-25 17:53:18 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

Why Are Comments Off?

In the words of the great philosopher Popeye, That's all I can stands, I can't stands no more. 

Why Are Comments Off?

In the words of the great philosopher Popeye, That's all I can stands, I can't stands no more. ___

2016-09-25 17:49:43 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 9 +1s; )Open 

in the timeline we all live in, a virtual reality billionaire is paying neo-Nazis to threaten Jewish reporters with cartoon frogs

in the timeline we all live in, a virtual reality billionaire is paying neo-Nazis to threaten Jewish reporters with cartoon frogs___

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2016-09-25 17:22:10 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

Great backgrounder on the history of our understanding of dark matter.

Dark Beginnings

Dark matter is one of the great unsolved mysteries of modern astronomy. We’ve reached the point where we know most matter in the cosmos is made of matter that interacts weakly with light if at all, but drives much of the gravitational interactions between galaxies. While it’s often portrayed as a modern idea added simply to shoehorn observations into the standard model, it actually has a history spanning more than a century, and the theory of dark matter has been refined and improved as we’ve learned more about our Universe.

The origins of dark matter can be traced to the 1600s. Soon after Isaac Newton presented his theory of universal gravity, some astronomers began to speculate about the existence of objects that might emit little or no light, but could still be known by their gravitational tug on bright objects like stars and planets. This idea was strengthened in the 1700s when Pierre Laplace argued that some objects might be massive enough to trap any light they emit (a simplistic idea of a black hole), and by the 1800s Urbain Le Verrier and John Couch Adams used gravitational anomalies in the motion of Uranus to predict the presence of Neptune. By this point astronomers had demonstrated the presence of dark nebulae, seen only by the light they absorb from bright objects behind them. It was clear that there was more in the Universe than could be seen by visible light.

Our modern take on dark matter as a major contributor to galactic mass can be traced to Fritz Zwicky. In 1933 he studied the motion of galaxies within the Coma Cluster. The Coma Cluster is a galactic supercluster containing more than 1,000 galaxies. Since these galaxies are gravitationally bound, the speed of these galaxies can provide a measure of the cluster’s mass. Basically, the more mass the cluster has, the wider the distribution of galactic speeds following a relation known as the virial theorem. A few years earlier Edwin Hubble had estimated that the Coma Cluster contained about 800 galaxies, each containing about a billion stars. Using the virial theorem Zwicky calculated a cluster mass more than 500 times larger than that of Hubble. Zwicky noted that if his measurements held true “dark matter is present in much greater amount than luminous matter.” Over the next couple decades the virial theorem was applied to other galaxy clusters with similar results. Not everyone accepted these results, largely because the virial theorem is a statistical calculation that depends upon certain assumptions. For example, it assumes the clusters are gravitationally bound. Perhaps the galaxies in these clusters are actually flying away from each other, so that the virial theorem simply doesn’t apply. But there was another line of evidence to support dark matter. One that couldn’t be so easily dismissed.

In the early 1900s astronomers began to look at the spectra of galaxies. From this they could determine the speeds of stars as a function of their distance from galactic center, known as a galactic rotation curve. Seen in visible light, most galaxies have a bright center, dimming as you move away from the center. This would imply most of the stars (and thus most of the mass) is located near the center of a galaxy. If that’s the case, one would expect stars far from the center to move much more slowly than stars near the center, just as in our solar system Earth orbits the Sun much more quickly than distant Pluto. When Max Wolf and Vesto Slipher measured the rotation curve of the Andromeda galaxy, they found it was basically flat, meaning that stars moved at the same speed regardless of their distance from galactic center. One solution to this mystery was that Andromeda is surrounded by a halo of dark matter so that its mass is not concentrated in the center. While other galaxies showed similar rotation curves, seeming to support the presence of dark matter, even Fritz Zwicky was skeptical. Gas and dust within a galaxy might exert some kind of drag on fast moving stars, he argued, thus flattening the rotation curves. But by the 1950s radio astronomy had progressed to the point where it could detect monatomic hydrogen through the famous 21 centimeter line. Radio observations of both the Andromeda galaxy and our own Milky Way galaxy showed similarly flat rotation curves. Since hydrogen is by far the most abundant element in the Universe, the results proved that not only stars, but the gas of any dark nebulae were orbiting the galaxies at similar speeds. Either galaxies contained significant dark matter, or our understanding of gravity was very wrong.

As the evidence for dark matter grew, it soon became clear that there was a serious problem. Assuming our gravitational theories were correct, dark matter must be far more plentiful than luminous matter both in galaxies and among galactic clusters. If this dark matter consisted of things like dark nebulae, their presence should be detectable by the light they absorb. If so much dark matter exists, it must not only be non-luminous, it must not absorb light either. It couldn’t simply be regular matter that is cold and dark, but must be something very different. This was such a radial idea that many astronomers questioned the validity of Newtonian gravity. By the 1980s several alternative gravitational models, the most famous of which was Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MoND), proposed by Mordehai Milgrom. While these models did work well for things like dwarf galaxies, they worked horribly with things like galactic clusters. Dark matter models were not without their problems, but they agreed more readily with observations.

In the past couple decades data gathered from gravitational lensing and deep sky surveys have allowed us to further refine our dark matter models. From the large scale distribution of galaxies we know that dark matter must be cold and slow moving, so the countless neutrinos that zip through the cosmos at nearly the speed of light cannot account for dark matter. From gravitational lensing we know the distribution of dark matter within galaxies. By observing the distribution of dark matter within colliding galaxies we know that not only does dark matter not interact with light, it also doesn’t interact strongly with regular matter or itself. While this further verifies the existence of dark matter, it also makes it more difficult to determine just what dark matter is.

The most recent challenge for dark matter has been to determine its composition. The most popular idea is that they are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), but these particles should be detectible by the same experiments used to observe astrophysical neutrinos. So far, no evidence for these particles has been forthcoming. Direct efforts to detect dark matter have only served to eliminate our options for dark matter. After studying dark matter for more than a century, it continues to elude us.

And so the dark history of dark matter continues.
___Great backgrounder on the history of our understanding of dark matter.

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2016-09-25 06:14:32 (14 comments; 6 reshares; 18 +1s; )Open 

___

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2016-09-25 05:44:42 (3 comments; 5 reshares; 22 +1s; )Open 

Article about a small community of Chinese Jews, possibly descendants of Persian merchants.

The New York Times writes about a tiny community of Chinese Jews struggling to preserve their identity despite governmental approval (Judaism is not one of China's five officially sanctioned religions).

Their forebears, possibly merchants from Persia, settled in Kaifeng when it was the vibrant capital of the Northern Song dynasty and built a synagogue here in the 12th century. For hundreds of years, they prospered largely free of persecution, surviving the rise and fall of successive dynasties.

But their numbers dwindled as they intermarried with China’s ethnic Han majority. The synagogue crumbled away. By 1851, when European missionaries acquired a 17th-century Hebrew Torah in Kaifeng and later presented it to the British Museum, few if any residents could read it.

Still, even after decades of Communist rule, some residue of Jewish identity survived in Kaifeng. Parents and grandparents told children of their roots and warned them not to eat pork.

The revival here took off in the 1990s as Jewish tourists, scholars and businesspeople from around the world who were curious about this remote outpost of Judaism began to visit and share their knowledge.

*

The Jewish families I met in Kaifeng seemed determined to preserve their revived identity. Some decorated their homes with traditional candlesticks for Shabbat, grainy black-and-white photos of grandparents, drawings of Kaifeng’s destroyed synagogue, and maps of Israel.

One Friday evening, two couples invited me to join their Shabbat service, for which they had been studying a Torah reading.

“You don’t recognize me as a Jew,” the host said, “but I recognize myself as a Jew, and that’s what is most important.”

He broke bread with his brawny hands, and after ceremoniously drinking homemade wine, his guests shared shots of baijiu, a potent Chinese liquor.

“Judaism,” the host said, “is all about endurance.”

___Article about a small community of Chinese Jews, possibly descendants of Persian merchants.

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2016-09-25 05:24:35 (5 comments; 0 reshares; 12 +1s; )Open 

I'm getting the feeling that one of my kids has been tunneling Netflix to Japan.

I'm getting the feeling that one of my kids has been tunneling Netflix to Japan.___

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2016-09-25 04:46:10 (19 comments; 16 reshares; 49 +1s; )Open 

Looks about right for a Sandy Neck Thanksgiving with the kids.

h/t girija

Looks about right for a Sandy Neck Thanksgiving with the kids.

h/t girija___

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2016-09-25 04:26:11 (0 comments; 5 reshares; 20 +1s; )Open 

The Tulsa Massacre: How racist whites literally destroyed a thriving black town, murdering hundreds of black residents in the process.
This occurred less than a century ago, & in many states, attitudes don't seem to have changed much.
#blacklivesmatter   #racism  

The Tulsa Massacre: How racist whites literally destroyed a thriving black town, murdering hundreds of black residents in the process.
This occurred less than a century ago, & in many states, attitudes don't seem to have changed much.
#blacklivesmatter   #racism  ___

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2016-09-25 03:46:24 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 40 +1s; )Open 

___

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2016-09-24 21:56:02 (7 comments; 0 reshares; 12 +1s; )Open 

I'm thinking maybe i should just replace all the rafters and be done with it. This thing was built from scraps.

I'm thinking maybe i should just replace all the rafters and be done with it. This thing was built from scraps.___

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2016-09-24 20:06:48 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 21 +1s; )Open 

This captures the joys and fears of both parenting and childhood so well. I hope I was this parent. Damp eyes.

awesome sauce___This captures the joys and fears of both parenting and childhood so well. I hope I was this parent. Damp eyes.

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2016-09-24 19:52:35 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s; )Open 

Daddy's Car: a song composed by Artificial Intelligence - in the style of the Beatles - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSHZ_b05W7o #AI #song

Daddy's Car: a song composed by Artificial Intelligence - in the style of the Beatles - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSHZ_b05W7o #AI #song___

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2016-09-24 19:49:48 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 11 +1s; )Open 

"I invite you to join us in boycotting the corporations who continue to disrespect our Grandmother the Earth and all of her Children. Thank you."

Via +Jeremiah Junken​​

"I invite you to join us in boycotting the corporations who continue to disrespect our Grandmother the Earth and all of her Children. Thank you."

Via +Jeremiah Junken​​___

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2016-09-24 07:57:02 (9 comments; 0 reshares; 11 +1s; )Open 

Here we see my father and Aunt Marjorie holding their new chihuahua sister, Lois.

I like Apple's UI for image search better than Google's. Although neither of them have put it in their image picker dialogs yet. So it's still "manually browse 20,000 photos in date order to get the one you want. 😡 However, like Google's, I find the search failures even more interesting for the insight they give into the algorithms.

Here we see my father and Aunt Marjorie holding their new chihuahua sister, Lois.

I like Apple's UI for image search better than Google's. Although neither of them have put it in their image picker dialogs yet. So it's still "manually browse 20,000 photos in date order to get the one you want. 😡 However, like Google's, I find the search failures even more interesting for the insight they give into the algorithms.___

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2016-09-24 07:42:07 (13 comments; 0 reshares; 13 +1s; )Open 

I have this odd light, maybe a Nixie tube. Any thoughts? Found it in my grandfather's stuff when I was a kid. 

I have this odd light, maybe a Nixie tube. Any thoughts? Found it in my grandfather's stuff when I was a kid. ___

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2016-09-24 07:17:38 (11 comments; 0 reshares; 25 +1s; )Open 

+John Wehrle was complaining that I didn't have a "hot and sweaty" collection on G+...

Yes, it's true, I was once a calendar pinup. :)

This is from the calendar, "The Men of Sandy Neck". Poor quality photo, I lost the the original, this is just a printout. I have no idea why I'm sharing it. I think I'll blame that "share two things we don't know about you" meme that's going around.___+John Wehrle was complaining that I didn't have a "hot and sweaty" collection on G+...

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2016-09-24 06:10:00 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 15 +1s; )Open 

If you haven't watched The Great British Bakeoff, it's the antithesis of American competition drama shows. The hosts are lovely. The contestants help each other. It's competitive but wonderful fun, and it all ends with a picnic on the lawn. Glad to see the hosts work hard to keep it that way.

"Here's something you might not know about Mel and Sue: they nearly quit once before. Last year, while promoting her memoir, Sue revealed that she and Mel walked off the set during Bake Off's first season because the producers were trying to coax human-interest drama—and the inevitable tears—out of contestants. 'We felt uncomfortable with it, and we said "We don't think you've got the right presenters,"' Sue told the Telegraph. 'I'm proud that we did that, because what we were saying was "Let's try and do this a different way"—and no one ever cried again. Maybe they cry because their soufflé collapsed, but nobody's crying because someone's going 'Does this mean a lot about your grandmother?"' Bringing up dead relatives at stressful times is a time-honored technique for introducing tension into a television show, but it's no way to treat your family.

"Here's another thing you might not know: When contestants do cry—out of frustration or disappointment, generally—Mel and Sue stand near them and use un-airable language so the embarrassing footage is tainted, and won't make it into the final edit. 'If we see them crying or something,' Sue told the Guardian, 'Mel and I will go over there and put our coats over them, or swear a lot because we know then that the film won't be able to be used.'"___If you haven't watched The Great British Bakeoff, it's the antithesis of American competition drama shows. The hosts are lovely. The contestants help each other. It's competitive but wonderful fun, and it all ends with a picnic on the lawn. Glad to see the hosts work hard to keep it that way.

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2016-09-24 05:53:13 (18 comments; 0 reshares; 24 +1s; )Open 

A Boy and His Dog. With matching chair.

Looking like I felt, having just done an allnighter. It's going to be weird when she's gone, but fostering is right for us right now.

Last May we embarked on two adventures. At home, we were moving from the east coast to the west in a two month voyage with a stopover for Mollie to do a Burmese fellowship in Madison. At work, I was suddenly engaged in the most intense, unanticipated, and company-critical, software project I've ever been involved with.

Both projects are complete and hugely successful! Both are somewhat unbelievable. And now I'm taking a week off. Which feels completely weird. But I've got boxes to unpack. A shed roof to rebuild. A stairway to clear and start rebuilding, and a zillion other projects that have been on hold. Expect hot and sweaty photos.

And then it's back down to... more »

A Boy and His Dog. With matching chair.

Looking like I felt, having just done an allnighter. It's going to be weird when she's gone, but fostering is right for us right now.

Last May we embarked on two adventures. At home, we were moving from the east coast to the west in a two month voyage with a stopover for Mollie to do a Burmese fellowship in Madison. At work, I was suddenly engaged in the most intense, unanticipated, and company-critical, software project I've ever been involved with.

Both projects are complete and hugely successful! Both are somewhat unbelievable. And now I'm taking a week off. Which feels completely weird. But I've got boxes to unpack. A shed roof to rebuild. A stairway to clear and start rebuilding, and a zillion other projects that have been on hold. Expect hot and sweaty photos.

And then it's back down to California to start discussions about how we integrate with the company that bought us. No rest for the wicked!

P.S. My experiment with more collections seems very successful. More engagement in them, and I'm more likely to post some things knowing if people aren't interested they can unsubscribe to that collection. (I saw you! The person who doesn't like my taste in music!) Maybe it's just that I've been over posting, but I think I actually am going to go all the way and start having one for all posts. Adding Science. Tech, and probably a "Me, Myself, and I" for things like this.___

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2016-09-24 04:22:58 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

___

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2016-09-24 04:16:19 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 10 +1s; )Open 

So. I guess the anaconda got some with buns?

So. I guess the anaconda got some with buns?___

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2016-09-24 00:54:53 (3 comments; 1 reshares; 23 +1s; )Open 

One of my all-time favorite Sesame Street tunes. Put Down the Ducky. Awesome guest appearances.

One of my all-time favorite Sesame Street tunes. Put Down the Ducky. Awesome guest appearances.___

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2016-09-24 00:36:13 (3 comments; 1 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

"The copper used to make Ötzi's axe blade did not come from the Alpine region as had previously been supposed, but from ore mined in southern Tuscany. Ötzi was probably not involved in working the metal himself, as the high levels of arsenic and copper found in his hair had, until now, led us to assume. His murder over 5,000 years ago seems to have been brought about due to a personal conflict a few days before his demise, and the man from the ice, despite his normal weight and active life-style, suffered from extensive vascular calcification".

"The copper used to make Ötzi's axe blade did not come from the Alpine region as had previously been supposed, but from ore mined in southern Tuscany. Ötzi was probably not involved in working the metal himself, as the high levels of arsenic and copper found in his hair had, until now, led us to assume. His murder over 5,000 years ago seems to have been brought about due to a personal conflict a few days before his demise, and the man from the ice, despite his normal weight and active life-style, suffered from extensive vascular calcification".___

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2016-09-24 00:18:41 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 45 +1s; )Open 

It made me laugh y'all.

It made me laugh y'all.___

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2016-09-23 17:10:49 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 11 +1s; )Open 

Nice stuff, I like nice stories with happy endings.
😊🐶👍

Nice stuff, I like nice stories with happy endings.
😊🐶👍___

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2016-09-23 13:28:49 (5 comments; 4 reshares; 11 +1s; )Open 

❝ A study of collective bargaining by big-city police unions, published this summer by the reform group Campaign Zero, found that agreements routinely guarantee that officers aren’t interrogated immediately after use-of-force incidents and often insure that disciplinary records are purged after three to five years.

Furthermore, thanks to union contracts, even officers who are fired can frequently get their jobs back. Perhaps the most egregious example was Hector Jimenez, an Oakland police officer who was dismissed in 2009, after killing two unarmed men, but who then successfully appealed and, two years later, was reinstated, with full back pay. The protection that unions have secured has helped create what Samuel Walker, an emeritus professor of criminal justice at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and an expert on police accountability, calls a “culture of impunity.” Citing a recentJustice... more »

Why Are Police Unions Blocking Reform? - The New Yorker
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/09/19/why-are-police-unions-blocking-reform___❝ A study of collective bargaining by big-city police unions, published this summer by the reform group Campaign Zero, found that agreements routinely guarantee that officers aren’t interrogated immediately after use-of-force incidents and often insure that disciplinary records are purged after three to five years.

Furthermore, thanks to union contracts, even officers who are fired can frequently get their jobs back. Perhaps the most egregious example was Hector Jimenez, an Oakland police officer who was dismissed in 2009, after killing two unarmed men, but who then successfully appealed and, two years later, was reinstated, with full back pay. The protection that unions have secured has helped create what Samuel Walker, an emeritus professor of criminal justice at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and an expert on police accountability, calls a “culture of impunity.” Citing a recent Justice Department investigation of Baltimore’s police department, which found a systemic pattern of “serious violations of the U.S. Constitution and federal law,” he told me, “Knowing that it’s hard to be punished for misconduct fosters an attitude where you think you don’t have to answer for your behavior.”

For the past fifty years, police unions have done their best to block policing reforms of all kinds. In the seventies, they opposed officers’ having to wear name tags. More recently, they’ve opposed the use of body cameras and have protested proposals to document racial profiling and to track excessive-force complaints. They have lobbied to keep disciplinary histories sealed. If a doctor commits malpractice, it’s a matter of public record, but, in much of the country, a police officer’s use of excessive force is not. Across the nation, unions have led the battle to limit the power of civilian-review boards, generally by arguing that civilians are in no position to judge the split-second decisions that police officers make. Earlier this year, Newark created a civilian-review board that was acclaimed as a model of oversight. The city’s police union immediately announced that it would sue to shut it down. ❞

2016-09-23 11:55:46 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

Three genetic studies indicate that we are all (outside of Africans) descended from a single out-of-Africa wave--except possibly for Australian aboriginals, who may have a small amount of DNA from an earlier wave as well.

___Three genetic studies indicate that we are all (outside of Africans) descended from a single out-of-Africa wave--except possibly for Australian aboriginals, who may have a small amount of DNA from an earlier wave as well.

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2016-09-23 10:37:02 (80 comments; 5 reshares; 31 +1s; )Open 

❝ Even though, the “Christian concepts typically consisted of the closing line, such as ‘In Jesus’ name. Amen,’ ” the court finds that “these are not really Christian prayers.” The majority simply rejects that notion that multiple references to such Christian concepts might “convey the appearance of an official preference for Christianity.” ❞

❝ Even though, the “Christian concepts typically consisted of the closing line, such as ‘In Jesus’ name. Amen,’ ” the court finds that “these are not really Christian prayers.” The majority simply rejects that notion that multiple references to such Christian concepts might “convey the appearance of an official preference for Christianity.” ❞___

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2016-09-23 07:41:23 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

When mainstream journalists talk to me, they want to know, “What really happened?” Whereas young people are looking back and saying, “Wow, 50 years ago you fed people? Forty-five years ago you created schools that were student-centered and community-based? You had clinics? You had bus-to-prison programs that were free? How did you do that without social media?” I love those conversations, because I feel that young people are convincing themselves that they can do the same thing. After all, the median age of party members was 19 years old.

Our community-survival programs helped people to see how communities could be transformed by seeing it in their own lives, and then they would want to support that which transformed them. That’s exactly what happened. All the community-survival programs were supported by volunteers from the community, not just party members. Their social understandinggrew when... more »

When mainstream journalists talk to me, they want to know, “What really happened?” Whereas young people are looking back and saying, “Wow, 50 years ago you fed people? Forty-five years ago you created schools that were student-centered and community-based? You had clinics? You had bus-to-prison programs that were free? How did you do that without social media?” I love those conversations, because I feel that young people are convincing themselves that they can do the same thing. After all, the median age of party members was 19 years old.

Our community-survival programs helped people to see how communities could be transformed by seeing it in their own lives, and then they would want to support that which transformed them. That’s exactly what happened. All the community-survival programs were supported by volunteers from the community, not just party members. Their social understanding grew when their lives were changed without any strings attached. We did everything we did so that people would feel empowered to make changes in the world they live in, and then go beyond that smaller circle to the larger one and develop a global understanding. I saw this with my own eyes.___

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2016-09-23 07:07:35 (6 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

Okay, I'll play. Three fictional characters that describe me. These all resonated at various times of my life, and are still part of me.

- Elric (I have a print of this signed by Whelan)
- Pyanfar
- Any lost soul in the People stories who thought they were alone and different.

Okay, I'll play. Three fictional characters that describe me. These all resonated at various times of my life, and are still part of me.

- Elric (I have a print of this signed by Whelan)
- Pyanfar
- Any lost soul in the People stories who thought they were alone and different.___

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2016-09-23 06:56:43 (16 comments; 1 reshares; 14 +1s; )Open 

I just stumbled across this site of the worst SF covers ever. I'm horrified.

cc +Pulp Covers 

I just stumbled across this site of the worst SF covers ever. I'm horrified.

cc +Pulp Covers ___

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2016-09-23 06:45:37 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

___

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2016-09-23 06:43:09 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

A reconstruction of the Iceman's voice. I'm dubious. Sounds like an old Mac with a cold.

What Ötzi the Iceman's Voice Sounded Like http://gizmodo.com/what-otzi-the-icemans-voice-sounded-like-1786963868 …___A reconstruction of the Iceman's voice. I'm dubious. Sounds like an old Mac with a cold.

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2016-09-23 05:07:49 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion

An historic occasion.

The document, called the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion, commits its signatories to assist one another when called upon in the battle against oilsands expansion, and to work in partnership to move society towards more sustainable lifestyles. By aligning themselves with other Indigenous nations across Canada and the northern U.S., participants hope to ensure that dangerous projects are not able to "escape" by using alternative routes.

“We have the right and the responsibility to stop these major threats to our lands, our waters and our peoples,” said Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Simon. “For example, from Quebec, we will work with our First Nation allies in B.C. to make sure that the Kinder Morgan pipeline does not pass, and we know they’ll help us do the same against Energy East.”

It comes not only from a legal and cultural responsibility to protect their land, water, air, and climate from harm, said Grand Chief Derek Nepinak of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, but a desire to safeguard a future for all peoples, Indigenous and non-Indigenous as well.

#NoDAPL___Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion

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2016-09-23 04:26:06 (19 comments; 6 reshares; 9 +1s; )Open 

___

2016-09-23 04:07:17 (9 comments; 0 reshares; 10 +1s; )Open 

I may have just created a bunch more collections so you can turn off parts of me (likely) or turn on notifications for parts of me (less likely).

I did a real quick pass of my posts and filed stuff back to August, but I'm sure I missed things. Anyway, if you're tired of puppy posts, or you think my humor is the bee's knees*, click away.

* No, I'm not that old.

#plusonly

I may have just created a bunch more collections so you can turn off parts of me (likely) or turn on notifications for parts of me (less likely).

I did a real quick pass of my posts and filed stuff back to August, but I'm sure I missed things. Anyway, if you're tired of puppy posts, or you think my humor is the bee's knees*, click away.

* No, I'm not that old.

#plusonly___

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2016-09-23 03:40:42 (3 comments; 1 reshares; 25 +1s; )Open 

It's no accident they pretended not to be white people when they did this.

___It's no accident they pretended not to be white people when they did this.

2016-09-23 03:38:04 (10 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

If you want to move a whole bunch of posts to collections, do it now before the Classic G+ interface goes away. There it takes four clicks and no screen reloads. On the new interface it takes six clicks and two screen reloads.

#ns

If you want to move a whole bunch of posts to collections, do it now before the Classic G+ interface goes away. There it takes four clicks and no screen reloads. On the new interface it takes six clicks and two screen reloads.

#ns___

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2016-09-22 22:45:21 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 11 +1s; )Open 

Tongues, piles, and steps!

#ns

Tongues, piles, and steps!

#ns___

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2016-09-22 20:38:50 (3 comments; 8 reshares; 19 +1s; )Open 

"You have no right to my private data about what your boobs probably look like."

#t  

"You have no right to my private data about what your boobs probably look like."

#t  ___

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2016-09-22 20:35:17 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

Not your grandparents' Kenny Rogers. No wait. That's wrong. Yes it is.

But seriously. Great live version of this song.

I guess I should start a #music collection, now that I'm expanding my list.

(although it helps when I actually include the link)

Not your grandparents' Kenny Rogers. No wait. That's wrong. Yes it is.

But seriously. Great live version of this song.

I guess I should start a #music collection, now that I'm expanding my list.

(although it helps when I actually include the link)___

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2016-09-22 19:16:55 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 13 +1s; )Open 

No new news here, but a remarkable summary of what we've learned from the 5,300-year old Otzi mummy.

It was 25 years ago this week when Europe's oldest human mummy was discovered by hikers who were a snowball's throw from the Austrian-Italian border. But the remarkable tale of 'Otzi', a dead man found in the Alps, is still fascinating scientists who continue to learn more about the 5,300-year-old corpse.

http://buff.ly/2cZ8W5Q #Otzi #Europe #Archaeology #History #News___No new news here, but a remarkable summary of what we've learned from the 5,300-year old Otzi mummy.

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2016-09-22 19:13:49 (9 comments; 1 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

❝ Hoffman and collaborators have run evolutionary simulations with different kinds of fitness functions — some of those tuned to reality and some having nothing to do with reality. The non-reality functions almost always win. For Hoffman, the consequences of these studies are profound. As he told me:

"We assume the 'predicates' of perceptions — space, time, physical objects, shapes — are the right ones to describe physical reality. And this theorem says that [such] predicates are [the wrong ones] almost surely."
In other words, evolution couldn't care less if you perceive objective reality. It only wants you to have sex successfully. As a consequence, your apprehension of the world is tuned to whatever allows that to happen. Thus, your perceptions at the root level have nothing to do with some fundamental physics upon which the fundamental nature of objectiveindepen... more »

"For decades, Hoffman, a professor at the University of California, Irvine, has been studying the links between evolution, perception and intelligence (both natural and machine). Based on that body of work, he thinks we've been missing something fundamental when it comes to fundamental reality."

From: http://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2016/09/06/492779594/what-if-evolution-bred-reality-out-of-us___❝ Hoffman and collaborators have run evolutionary simulations with different kinds of fitness functions — some of those tuned to reality and some having nothing to do with reality. The non-reality functions almost always win. For Hoffman, the consequences of these studies are profound. As he told me:

"We assume the 'predicates' of perceptions — space, time, physical objects, shapes — are the right ones to describe physical reality. And this theorem says that [such] predicates are [the wrong ones] almost surely."
In other words, evolution couldn't care less if you perceive objective reality. It only wants you to have sex successfully. As a consequence, your apprehension of the world is tuned to whatever allows that to happen. Thus, your perceptions at the root level have nothing to do with some fundamental physics upon which the fundamental nature of objective independent reality is constructed. ❞

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2016-09-22 19:04:47 (12 comments; 1 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

❝ as Philip Thody describes in Don’t Do It! A Dictionary of the Forbidden, bugger is a term of bigotry and abuse with a long and nasty history: “Rarely used in a literal sense in modern English, and scarcely used at all in the USA, where the term is sodomy… It comes, through the Old French ‘bougre’, from the attitude of the Roman Catholic Church in the Middle Ages to the Greek Orthodox Church, whose members were said to be Bulgarians, infected by the Albigensian heresy, and thus tending to practise unnatural vices. Since the Cathars made a special virtue of chastity, it was a shade unfair. However, since in the Middle Ages sodomy and buggery were linked to heresy as well as to witchcraft, it was perhaps only to be expected.” Bugger is also versatile: ‘Bugger off’ means ‘go away’. ‘I’ll be buggered’ is a general expression of surprise. ‘Bugger me!’ is as well, but it implies agreater degree of astonishment.... more »

I find it interesting that, out of the list of Fry and Laurie's "made-up" swear words, two of the words are definitely considered vulgar by Americans these days.___❝ as Philip Thody describes in Don’t Do It! A Dictionary of the Forbidden, bugger is a term of bigotry and abuse with a long and nasty history: “Rarely used in a literal sense in modern English, and scarcely used at all in the USA, where the term is sodomy… It comes, through the Old French ‘bougre’, from the attitude of the Roman Catholic Church in the Middle Ages to the Greek Orthodox Church, whose members were said to be Bulgarians, infected by the Albigensian heresy, and thus tending to practise unnatural vices. Since the Cathars made a special virtue of chastity, it was a shade unfair. However, since in the Middle Ages sodomy and buggery were linked to heresy as well as to witchcraft, it was perhaps only to be expected.” Bugger is also versatile: ‘Bugger off’ means ‘go away’. ‘I’ll be buggered’ is a general expression of surprise. ‘Bugger me!’ is as well, but it implies a greater degree of astonishment. Similarly, the word sod — used to describe a foolish person, or to tell someone to ‘sod off’ (get lost) — is actually short for sodomite. ❞

Bulgarian?

I never swore before college. I'd say "Jeesum Cripes". Yes, really. Except once, at a time I remember very vividly, when I was crossing a muddy stream and slipped and got stuck and lost my shoe, and I accidentally said "Jeesum Christ" and horrified myself.

Even odder, it had nothing to do with religion. We didn't go to church, and I'd abandoned Sunday School when I felt they were lying to me. It was just that I knew that my parents didn't swear and didn't tolerate swearing.

College did me in though. Although mainly just with "fuck" and "jesus christ". I still wince at other words sometimes.

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2016-09-22 06:44:48 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

Puppies Progress. Remarkably in sync. Largely limited by what mom can produce we suspect.

Puppies Progress. Remarkably in sync. Largely limited by what mom can produce we suspect.___

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