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Shared Circles including Kee Hinckley

Shared Circles are not available on Google+ anymore, but you can find them still here.

The Google+ Collections of Kee Hinckley

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

3
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2
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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 34

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2016-02-07 07:06:53 (34 comments; 1 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

Most reshares: 12

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2016-02-07 21:06:43 (14 comments; 12 reshares; 19 +1s)Open 

Most plusones: 27

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2016-02-07 23:45:53 (21 comments; 0 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 

What do you think? Should I get this drawing by my daughter Shadi as a tat?

Latest 50 posts

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2016-02-12 06:45:09 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

You can do all the "right" things and still get stopped by security for being black.

You can do all the "right" things and still get stopped by security for being black.___

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2016-02-11 20:55:56 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

❝ As the great Pastor Jean Marrow from Spirit of Peace United Church of Christ in South Dakota said of that state’s targeting of transgender young people, “The same babies we baptize with great hope are the kids we bury because of horrendous discrimination.” ❞

#‎LGBT #‎LGBTQI PFLAG National SOULFORCE - Freedom for LGBT people from religious and political oppression Faithful America Center for American Progress Think Progress HuffPost Politics HuffPost Queer Voices HuffPost Parents 
It’s official: We’re seeing a pattern of extremes emerge in the first legislative session following the national recognition of marriage equality.
The 2016 legislative session is well underway and the most-ever anti-LGBT bills have been introduced in states across the country. Dozens of bills in half the states threaten the livelihood of LGBT people. In many states, vulnerable transgender young people are singled out for discrimination.
The measures range from allowing someone to be turned away in the name of religion because they’re a same-sex couple, to singling out transgender individuals and forcing them to use separate facilities, or else subjecting them to invasive examinations just to use the bathroom.
We’ll give you the good news first. In the past two weeks alone, the voices of LGBT people and our allies have helped to squash harmful measures in Indiana, Washington, Virginia, to name a few. Our collective voice is louder than ever, and, the majority of the country is with us on our right to marry and to live free from discrimination.
The bad news is that there are plenty more scary measures that may continue to advance in the chambers. Just today, a senate committee in South Dakota passed HB 1008, a bill that would single out transgender students and make them use separate restrooms and locker rooms from everyone else. This just days after a South Dakota Senator said of the bill and transgender young people: “I’m sorry if you’re so twisted you don’t know who you are — a lot of people are — and I’m telling you right now, it’s about protecting the kids.”
We need to raise our objections and tell South Dakota that we won’t stand for this anti-transgender rhetoric. We need our leaders to stand up for and protect all kids, which includes LGBT students.

http://tinyurl.com/zq5txdq___❝ As the great Pastor Jean Marrow from Spirit of Peace United Church of Christ in South Dakota said of that state’s targeting of transgender young people, “The same babies we baptize with great hope are the kids we bury because of horrendous discrimination.” ❞

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2016-02-11 20:50:53 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Does Google Hate Old People?

http://lauren.vortex.com/archive/001152.html

No. Google doesn't hate old people. I know Google well enough to be pretty damned sure about that.

Is Google "indifferent" to old people? Does Google simply not appreciate, or somehow devalue, the needs of older users?

Those are much tougher calls.

I've written a lot in the past about accessibility and user interfaces. And today I'm feeling pretty frustrated about these topics. So if some sort of noxious green fluid starts to bubble out from your screen, I apologize in advance.

What is old, anyway? Or we can use the currently more popular term "elderly" if you prefer -- six of one and half a dozen of another, really.

There are a bunch of references to "not wanting to get old" in the lyrics of famous rock stars... more »

Does Google Hate Old People?

http://lauren.vortex.com/archive/001152.html

No. Google doesn't hate old people. I know Google well enough to be pretty damned sure about that.

Is Google "indifferent" to old people? Does Google simply not appreciate, or somehow devalue, the needs of older users?

Those are much tougher calls.

I've written a lot in the past about accessibility and user interfaces. And today I'm feeling pretty frustrated about these topics. So if some sort of noxious green fluid starts to bubble out from your screen, I apologize in advance.

What is old, anyway? Or we can use the currently more popular term "elderly" if you prefer -- six of one and half a dozen of another, really.

There are a bunch of references to "not wanting to get old" in the lyrics of famous rock stars who are now themselves of rather advanced ages. And we hear all the time that "50 is the new 30" or "70 is the new 50" or ... whatever.

The bottom line is that we either age or die.

And the popular view of "elderly" people sitting around staring at the walls -- and so rather easily ignored -- is increasingly a false one. More and more we find active users of computers and Internet services well into their 80s and 90s. In email and social media, many of them are clearly far more intelligent and coherent than large swaths of users a third their age.

That's not to say these older users don't have issues to deal with that younger persons don't. Vision and motor skill problems are common. So is the specter of memory loss (that actually begins by the time we reach age 20, then increases from that point onward for most of us).

Yet an irony is that computers and Internet services can serve as aids in all these areas. I've written in the past of mobile phones being saviors as we age, for example by providing an instantly available form of extended memory.

But we also are forced to acknowledge that most Internet services still only serve older persons' needs seemingly begrudgingly, failing to fully comprehend how changing demographics are pushing an ever larger proportion of their total users into that category -- both here in the U.S. and in many other countries.

So it's painful to see Google dropping the ball in some of these areas (and to be clear, while I have the most experience with the Google aspects of these problems, these are actually industry-wide issues, by no means restricted to Google).

This is difficult to put succinctly. Over time these concerns have intertwined and combined in ways increasingly cumbersome to tease apart with precision. But if you've every tried to provide computer/Internet technical support to an older friend or relative, you'll probably recognize this picture pretty quickly.

I'm no spring chicken myself. But I remotely provide tech support to a number of persons significantly older -- some in their 80s, and more than one well into their 90s.

And while I bitch about poor font contrast and wasted screen real estate, the technical problems of those older users are typically of a far more complex nature.

They have even more trouble with those fonts. They have motor skill issues making the use of common user interfaces difficult or in some cases impossible. Desktop interfaces that seem to be an afterthought of popular "mobile first" interface designs can be especially cumbersome for them. They can forget their passwords and be unable to follow recovery procedures successfully, often creating enormous frustration and even more complications when they try to solve the problems by themselves. The level of technical lingo thrown at them in many such instances -- that services seem to assume everyone just knows -- only frustrates them more. And so on.

But access to the Net is absolutely crucial for so many of these older users. It's not just accessing financial and utility sites that pretty much everyone now depends upon, it's staying active and in touch with friends and relatives and others, especially if they're not physically nearby and their own mobility is limited.

Keeping that connectivity going for these users can involve a number of compromises that we can all agree are not keeping with ideal or "pure" security practices, but are realistic necessities in some cases nonetheless.

So it's often a fact of life that elderly users will use their "trusted support" person as the custodian of their recovery and two-factor addresses, and of their primary login credentials as well.

And to those readers who scream, "No! You must never, ever share your login credentials with anyone!" -- I wish you luck supporting a 93-year-old user across the country without those credentials. Perhaps you're a god with such skills. I'm not.

Because I've written about this kind of stuff so frequently, you may by now be suspecting that a particular incident has fired me off today.

You'd be correct. I've been arguing publicly with a Google program manager and some others on a Chrome bug thread, regarding the lack of persistent connection capability for Chromebooks and Chromeboxes in the otherwise excellent Chrome Remote Desktop system -- a feature that the Windows version of CRD has long possessed.

Painfully, from my perspective the conversation has rapidly degenerated into my arguing against the notion that "it's better to flush some users down the toilet than violate principles of security purity."

I prefer to assume that the arrogance suggested by the "security purity" view is one based on ignorance and lack of experience with users in need, rather than any inherent hatred of the elderly.

In fact, getting back to the title of this posting, I'm sure hatred isn't in play.

But of course whether it's hatred or ignorance -- or something else entirely -- doesn't help these users.

The Chrome OS situation is particularly ironic for me, since these are older users whom I specifically urged to move to Chrome when their Windows systems were failing, while assuring them that Chrome would be a more convenient and stable experience for them.

Unfortunately, these apparently intentional limitations in the Chrome version of CRD -- vis-a-vis the Windows version -- have been a source of unending frustration for these users, as they often struggle to find, enable, and execute the Chrome version manually every time they need help from me, and then are understandably upset that they have to sit there and refresh the connection manually every 10 minutes to keep it going. They keep asking me why I told them to leave Windows and why I can't fix these access problems that are so confusing to them. It's personally embarrassing to me.

Here's arguably the saddest part of all. If I were the average user who didn't have a clue of how Google's internal culture works and of what great people Googlers are, it would be easy to just mumble something like, "What do you expect? All those big companies are the same, they just don't care."

But that isn't the Google I know, and so it's even more frustrating to me to see these unnecessary problems continuing to persist and fester in the Google ecosystem, when I know for a certainty that Google has the capability and resources to do so much better in these areas.

And that's the truth.

-- Lauren --
I have consulted to Google, but I am not currently doing so -- my opinions expressed here are mine alone.
___

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2016-02-11 20:33:37 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

A very nice detailed description of how the gravitational wave detector works.

We have observed gravitational waves!

This morning, the LIGO observatory announced a historic event: for the very first time in history, we have observed a pair of black holes colliding, not by light (which they don't emit), but by the waves in spacetime itself that they form. This is a tremendously big deal, so let me try to explain why.

What's a gravitational wave?

The easiest way to understand General Relativity is to imagine that the universe is a big trampoline. Imagine a star as a bowling ball, sitting in the middle of it, and a spaceship as a small marble that you're shooting along the trampoline. As the marble approaches the bowling ball, it starts to fall along the stretched surface of the trampoline, and curve towards the ball; depending on how close it passes to the ball and how fast, it might fall and hit it. 

If you looked at this from above, you wouldn't see the stretching of the trampoline; it would just look black, and like the marble was "attracted" towards the bowling ball.

This is basically how gravity works: mass (or energy) stretches out space (and time), and as objects just move in what looks like a straight path to them, they curve towards heavy things, because spacetime itself is bent. That's Einstein's theory of Relativity, first published in 1916, and (prior to today) almost every aspect of it had been verified by experiment.

Now imagine that you pick up a bowling ball and drop it, or do something else similarly violent on the trampoline. Not only is the trampoline going to be stretched, but it's going to bounce -- and if you look at it in slow-motion, you'll see ripples flowing along the surface of the trampoline, just like you would if you dropped a bowling ball into a lake. Relativity predicts ripples like that as well, and these are gravitational waves. Until today, they had only been predicted, never seen.

(The real math of relativity is a bit more complicated than that of trampolines, and for example gravitational waves stretch space and time in very distinctive patterns: if you held a T-square up and a gravitational wave hit it head-on,  you would see first one leg compress and the other stretch, then the other way round)

The challenge with seeing gravitational waves is that gravity is very weak (after all, it takes the entire mass of the Earth to hold you down!) and so you need a really large event to emit enough gravity waves to see it. Say, two black holes colliding off-center with each other.

So how do we see them?

We use a trick called laser interferometry, which is basically a fancy T-square. What you do is you take a laser beam, split it in two, and let each beam fly down the length of a large L. At the end of the leg, it hits a mirror and bounces back, and you recombine the two beams.

The trick is this: lasers (unlike other forms of light) form very neat wave patterns, where the light is just a single, perfectly regular, wave. When the two beams recombine, you therefore have two overlapping waves -- and if you've ever watched two ripples collide, you'll notice that when waves overlap, they cancel in spots and reinforce each other in spots. As a result, if the relative length of the legs of the L changes, the amount of cancellation will change -- and so, by monitoring the brightness of the re-merged light, you can see if something changed the length of one leg and not the other.

LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) consists of a pair of these, one in Livingston, Louisiana, and one in Hartford, Washington, three thousand kilometers apart. Each leg of each L is four kilometers long, and they are isolated from ambient ground motion and vibration by a truly impressive set of systems.

If a gravitational wave were to strike LIGO, it would create a very characteristic compression and expansion pattern first in one L, then the other. By comparing the difference between the two, and looking for that very distinctive pattern, you could spot gravity waves.

How sensitive is this? If you change the relative length of the legs of an L by a fraction of the wavelength of the light, you change the brightness of the merged light by a predictable amount. Since measuring the brightness of light is something we're really good at (think high-quality photo-sensors), we can spot very small fractions of a wavelength. In fact, the LIGO detector can currently spot changes of one attometer (10⁻¹⁸ of a meter), or about one-thousandth the size of an atomic nucleus. (Or one hundred-millionth the size of an atom!) It's expected that we'll be able to improve that by a factor of three in the next few years.

With a four-kilometer leg, this means that LIGO can spot changes in length of about one-quarter of a part in 10²¹. That's the resolution you need to spot events like this: despite the tremendous violence of the collision (as I'll explain in a second), it was so far away -- really, on the other end of the universe -- that it only created vibrations of about five parts in 10²¹ on Earth.

So what did LIGO see?

About 1.5 billion light years away, two black holes -- one weighing about 29 times as much as the Sun, the other 36 -- collided with  each other. As they drew closer, their gravity caused them to start to spiral inwards towards each other, so that in the final moments before the collision they started spinning around each other more and more quickly, up to a peak speed of 250 orbits per second. This started to fling gravity waves in all directions with great vigor, and when they finally collided, they formed a single black hole, 62 times the mass of the Sun. The difference -- three solar masses -- was all released in the form of pure energy.

Within those final few milliseconds, the collision was 50 times brighter than the entire rest of the universe combined. All of that energy was emitted in the form of gravitational waves: something to which we were completely blind until today.

Are we sure about that?

High-energy physics has become known for extreme paranoia about the quality of its data. The confidence level required to declare a "discovery" in this field is technically known as 5σ, translating to a confidence level of 99.99994%. That takes into account statistical anomalies and so on, but you should take much more care when dealing with big-deal discoveries; LIGO does all sorts of things for that. For example, their computers are set up to routinely inject false signals into the data, and they don't "open up the box" to reveal whether a signal was real or faked until after the entire team has finished analyzing the data. (This lets you know that your system would detect a real signal, and it has the added benefit that the people doing the data analysis never know if it's the real thing or not when they're doing the analysis -- helping to counter any unconscious tendency to bias the data towards "yes, it's really real!")

There are all sorts of other tricks like that, and generally LIGO is known for the best practices of data analysis basically anywhere. From the analysis, they found a confidence level of 5.1σ -- enough to count as a confirmed discovery of a new physical phenomenon.

(That's equal to a p-value of 3.4*10⁻⁷, for those of you from fields that use those)

So why is this important?

Well, first of all, we just observed a new physical phenomenon for the first time, and confirmed the last major part of Einstein's theory. Which is pretty cool in its own right.

But as of today, LIGO is no longer just a physics experiment: it is now an astronomical observatory. This is the first gravity-wave telescope, and it's going to let us answer questions that we could only dream about before.

Consider that the collision we saw emitted a tremendous amount of energy, brighter than everything else in the sky combined, and yet we were blind to it. How many more such collisions are happening? How does the flow of energy via gravitational wave shape the structure of galaxies, of galactic clusters, of the universe as a whole? How often do black holes collide, and how do they do it? Are there ultramassive black holes which shape the movement of entire galactic clusters, the way that supermassive ones shape the movement of galaxies, but which we can't see using ordinary light at all, because they aren't closely surrounded by stars?

Today's discovery is more than just a milestone in physics: it's the opening act of a much bigger step forward.

What's next?

LIGO is going to keep observing! We may also revisit an old plan (scrapped when the politics broke down) for another observatory called LISA, which instead of using two four-kilometer L's on the Earth, consists of a big triangle of lasers, with their vertices on three satellites orbiting the Sun. The LISA observatory (and yes, this is actually possible with modern technology) would be able to observe motions of roughly the same size as LIGO -- one attometer -- but as a fraction of a leg five million kilometers long. That gives us, shall we say, one hell of a lot better resolution. And because it doesn't have to be shielded from things like the vibrations of passing trucks, in many ways it's actually simpler than LIGO.

(The LISA Pathfinder mission, a test satellite to debug many of these things, was launched on December 3rd)

The next twenty years are likely to lead to a steady stream of discoveries from these observatories: it's the first time we've had a fundamentally new kind of telescope in quite a while. (The last major shift in this was probably Hubble, our first optical telescope in space, above all the problems of the atmosphere)

The one catch is that LIGO and LISA don't produce pretty pictures; you can think of LIGO as a gravity-wave camera that has exactly two pixels. If the wave hits Louisiana first, it came from the south; if it hits Washington first, it came from the north. (This one came from the south, incidentally; it hit Louisiana seven milliseconds before Washington) It's the shift in the pixels over time that lets us see things, but it's not going to look very visually dramatic. We'll have to wait quite some time until we can figure out how to build a gravitational wave telescope that can show us a clear image of the sky in these waves; but even before that, we'll be able to tease out the details of distant events of a scale hard to imagine.

You can read the full paper at http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.061102 , including all of the technical details. Many congratulations to the entire LIGO team: you've really done it. Amazing.

Incidentally, Physical Review Letters normally has a strict four-page max; the fact that they were willing to give this article sixteen pages shows just how big a deal this is.___A very nice detailed description of how the gravitational wave detector works.

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2016-02-11 15:37:27 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

NYTimes: Physicists Detect Gravitational Waves, Proving Einstein Right

NYTimes: Physicists Detect Gravitational Waves, Proving Einstein Right___

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2016-02-11 01:34:53 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

Take The Grand Tour through space. 14 exotic travel posters to download: 

Take The Grand Tour through space. 14 exotic travel posters to download: ___

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2016-02-10 19:39:54 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-02-10 03:32:19 (0 comments; 4 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

___

2016-02-10 03:19:44 (8 comments; 8 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

I don't know if I can accept clause 57.10. (Via Tim Bray.)

h/t +Michael Hannemann

I don't know if I can accept clause 57.10. (Via Tim Bray.)

h/t +Michael Hannemann___

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2016-02-09 20:58:53 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

A Skeptic Infiltrates a Cruise for Conspiracy Theorists http://www.wired.com/2016/02/conspira-sea-cruise-know-truth/ …

A Skeptic Infiltrates a Cruise for Conspiracy Theorists http://www.wired.com/2016/02/conspira-sea-cruise-know-truth/ …___

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2016-02-09 20:53:03 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

❝ large areas of the Antarctic ice sheet sit on rock that's below sea level. Were the ocean to reach these sheets, the ice would break up and float off while melting, a process that could raise sea levels relatively suddenly. Now, researchers have performed a catalog of all of the ice that empties into the ocean in Antarctica, allowing us to identify those that pose the largest threat of rapid sea-level rise. ❞

Total rise if it all melts?

60 meters.

❝ large areas of the Antarctic ice sheet sit on rock that's below sea level. Were the ocean to reach these sheets, the ice would break up and float off while melting, a process that could raise sea levels relatively suddenly. Now, researchers have performed a catalog of all of the ice that empties into the ocean in Antarctica, allowing us to identify those that pose the largest threat of rapid sea-level rise. ❞

Total rise if it all melts?

60 meters.___

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2016-02-09 19:57:35 (1 comments; 5 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

___

2016-02-09 19:36:29 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

I always wondered why people sharing screens with WebEx always asked “Can you see my screen now?”

Now I know. Even the free conference systems I use implement sharing by giving you a thumbnail of what you are going to share, and then showing you what you are sharing.

Not WebEx.

As soon as you share something (by name, not by thumbnail). All context goes away. At the top it says “Sharing Keynote” or whatever, but does it show you what you’re sharing? Nope. Gone.

Great, you’re sharing Keynote? But what window? The front one? Yes. Is it displaying it even though it’s not on my main monitor? Nope, as it turns out. It wouldn’t display until I dragged the window onto my main monitor.

What a crock. I can’t believe a paid product has such a poor interface for it’s core functionality. Give me Join.Me, or BlueJeans, or Zoom, or Appear.in, oranything else.... more »

I always wondered why people sharing screens with WebEx always asked “Can you see my screen now?”

Now I know. Even the free conference systems I use implement sharing by giving you a thumbnail of what you are going to share, and then showing you what you are sharing.

Not WebEx.

As soon as you share something (by name, not by thumbnail). All context goes away. At the top it says “Sharing Keynote” or whatever, but does it show you what you’re sharing? Nope. Gone.

Great, you’re sharing Keynote? But what window? The front one? Yes. Is it displaying it even though it’s not on my main monitor? Nope, as it turns out. It wouldn’t display until I dragged the window onto my main monitor.

What a crock. I can’t believe a paid product has such a poor interface for it’s core functionality. Give me Join.Me, or BlueJeans, or Zoom, or Appear.in, or anything else.___

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2016-02-09 12:59:52 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

The poor were relocated to barracks-style housing west of Ninth Street that lacked any neighborhood appeal and shunned the variety of uses that made cities tick. In case after case, in city after city, these policies of relocation have failed the public good.

What were these civic leaders thinking from the 1950s thru early 1970s? "Urban renewal" never achieved anything remotely close to its lofty goals. Instead it led to vacant lots, lower property values, and lesser living standards.

The poor were relocated to barracks-style housing west of Ninth Street that lacked any neighborhood appeal and shunned the variety of uses that made cities tick. In case after case, in city after city, these policies of relocation have failed the public good.

What were these civic leaders thinking from the 1950s thru early 1970s? "Urban renewal" never achieved anything remotely close to its lofty goals. Instead it led to vacant lots, lower property values, and lesser living standards.___

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2016-02-09 12:40:44 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

A cuddlefish. From Chumbuddy.

A cuddlefish. From Chumbuddy.___

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2016-02-09 04:53:46 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-02-09 02:40:51 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

Suggested Term for Computer-Generated Hilarity: Big Dada. 

Suggested Term for Computer-Generated Hilarity: Big Dada. ___

2016-02-08 22:18:35 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

Great minds think alike. But it’s annoying when it’s your own.

I wanted to see how long my computer had been idle. And I found something that gave a hint on getting a bunch of system stats. So I wrote a shell pipeline to process it.

ioreg -n IOPower -l | grep HIDIdleTime | tail -1 | sed -e 's,.* ,,' -e 's,$, / 1000000000,' | bc

Great. Now I figure I’ll just put it in a script in ~/bin/ and call it idletime. So I vi ~/bin/idletime.

#!/bin/sh

ioreg -c IOHIDSystem | perl -ane 'if(/Idle/) {$idle=(pop @F)/1000000000;print $idle, "\n"; last;}'

Apparently I’ve been down this path before.

Great minds think alike. But it’s annoying when it’s your own.

I wanted to see how long my computer had been idle. And I found something that gave a hint on getting a bunch of system stats. So I wrote a shell pipeline to process it.

ioreg -n IOPower -l | grep HIDIdleTime | tail -1 | sed -e 's,.* ,,' -e 's,$, / 1000000000,' | bc

Great. Now I figure I’ll just put it in a script in ~/bin/ and call it idletime. So I vi ~/bin/idletime.

#!/bin/sh

ioreg -c IOHIDSystem | perl -ane 'if(/Idle/) {$idle=(pop @F)/1000000000;print $idle, "\n"; last;}'

Apparently I’ve been down this path before.___

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2016-02-08 18:23:18 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

This pug tea infuser looks really cute in the cup. Afterwards? Um...

This pug tea infuser looks really cute in the cup. Afterwards? Um...___

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2016-02-08 17:02:34 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

Same old story: overzealous prosecutors and police going after poor people without due process.

Same old story: overzealous prosecutors and police going after poor people without due process.___

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2016-02-08 14:14:43 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

Babies have very different perceptual abilities than adults. Fascinating.

___Babies have very different perceptual abilities than adults. Fascinating.

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2016-02-07 23:57:29 (0 comments; 9 reshares; 14 +1s)Open 

The only Super Bowl ad you need to see.

The only Super Bowl ad you need to see.___

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2016-02-07 23:45:53 (21 comments; 0 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 

What do you think? Should I get this drawing by my daughter Shadi as a tat?

What do you think? Should I get this drawing by my daughter Shadi as a tat?___

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2016-02-07 21:06:43 (14 comments; 12 reshares; 19 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-02-07 20:02:30 (6 comments; 1 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

Modern technology has brought us many benefits, including mosquito traps that cost hundreds of dollars, but sometimes we overlook simple solutions to difficult challenges such as mosquito control. When it comes to controlling pests, research tends to focus on chemicals or concepts that can be patented. Unless someone can make a profit from an idea, the public may never become aware of it.

how to:
Because mosquitoes are attracted to the CO2 we breathe out, I started looking for ideas that used CO2 as the bait for the mosquito trap. I did think of dry ice but it does dissipate fairly quickly.

I found a cached link on Google here. It seems to be active again now. I've rewritten the instructions some and hopefully it will work as well.

Thanks to the students for their hard work on this project. I've used some of their photos for illustration.
Supplies:
... more »

Modern technology has brought us many benefits, including mosquito traps that cost hundreds of dollars, but sometimes we overlook simple solutions to difficult challenges such as mosquito control. When it comes to controlling pests, research tends to focus on chemicals or concepts that can be patented. Unless someone can make a profit from an idea, the public may never become aware of it.

how to:
Because mosquitoes are attracted to the CO2 we breathe out, I started looking for ideas that used CO2 as the bait for the mosquito trap. I did think of dry ice but it does dissipate fairly quickly.

I found a cached link on Google here. It seems to be active again now. I've rewritten the instructions some and hopefully it will work as well.

Thanks to the students for their hard work on this project. I've used some of their photos for illustration.
Supplies:

1 2 liter soda bottle
a sharp knife
black paper
tape
candy thermometer

Take a 2 liter soda bottle. Cut off the top right below where it starts to narrow for the top, invert and place inside the lower half.

Make a simple sugar syrup.
Ingredients:

1 cup sugar
1 cup water
2 cups cool water
1 tsp. active dry yeast

Directions:

Bring 1 cup of the water to a boil.

Dissolve the sugar into the boiling water.

Once the sugar is dissolved completely, remove the pan from the heat. Stir in 2 cups cool water, stir well.

Check the temperature of the syrup to make sure it is no hotter than 90 degrees F, if hotter, let cool to 90 degrees F, add 1 tsp. active dry yeast, no need to mix. Put syrup in the bottom part of the bottle, using the cut off neck piece, leave in place.

Be sure to seal the two parts of the bottle with the tape. The fermenting yeast will release carbon dioxide. Put black paper around the bottle since mosquitoes like dark places and carbon dioxide. This mosquito trap will then start working.

TIPS: Put the trap in a dark and humid place for 2 weeks, you'll see the effect. You'll have to replace the sugar water + yeast solution every 2 weeks. 

Please Follow:- +Creative Ideas___

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2016-02-07 18:16:28 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

James Doohan and Majel Barrett...in Bonanza.

___James Doohan and Majel Barrett...in Bonanza.

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2016-02-07 16:05:20 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

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2016-02-07 15:23:05 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

Rubio is a conservative, but fortunately the Three Laws of Robotics will keep him from harming us all. -- @SrWHOfficial

I only tuned in for about 20 minutes of the debate, but I caught the fourth time he gave that speech.

All I can think is that someone told him "To beat Cruz and Trump, you need to appeal to the conspiracy theorists," and he got carried away. It was just weird. He was asked a question. He said first he wanted to respond to someone. And his response had nothing to do with what they had said. When the moderator pointed that out, his excuse was, "Well, he mentioned Obama."

Maybe it's a post-hypnotic suggestion? Anytime someone says the word "Obama", he automatically gives his speech?

Rubio is a conservative, but fortunately the Three Laws of Robotics will keep him from harming us all. -- @SrWHOfficial

I only tuned in for about 20 minutes of the debate, but I caught the fourth time he gave that speech.

All I can think is that someone told him "To beat Cruz and Trump, you need to appeal to the conspiracy theorists," and he got carried away. It was just weird. He was asked a question. He said first he wanted to respond to someone. And his response had nothing to do with what they had said. When the moderator pointed that out, his excuse was, "Well, he mentioned Obama."

Maybe it's a post-hypnotic suggestion? Anytime someone says the word "Obama", he automatically gives his speech?___

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2016-02-07 14:37:12 (5 comments; 2 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

Internet speed...

Internet speed...___

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2016-02-07 07:25:31 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Fascinating reading....

Fascinating reading....___

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2016-02-07 07:06:53 (34 comments; 1 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

Defunding Planned Parenthood increases unwanted births. Not from lack of abortions, but lack of birth control like IUDs and hormonal injections. In other words, working birth control, not condoms and stuff that simply doesn't work reliably.

___Defunding Planned Parenthood increases unwanted births. Not from lack of abortions, but lack of birth control like IUDs and hormonal injections. In other words, working birth control, not condoms and stuff that simply doesn't work reliably.

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2016-02-07 04:52:21 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

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2016-02-07 03:34:39 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

It's still #caturday , right?

It's still #caturday , right?___

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2016-02-07 03:31:47 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

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2016-02-07 03:09:15 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

Vice does an indepth look at what led the CIA to spy on a senate investigation.

From the timeline, my guess is that someone misconfigured the search engine. It was supposed to have two access groups with one shared directory. But the CIA added a third group with their own documents. And their documents ended up in the search. That kind of after-the-spec-is-done tweaking often results in security issues, and this time it did as well. The CIA's analysis was available to the Senate team. And when the CIA's public response bore no relationship at all to their own internal review, they got caught with their pants down.

___Vice does an indepth look at what led the CIA to spy on a senate investigation.

From the timeline, my guess is that someone misconfigured the search engine. It was supposed to have two access groups with one shared directory. But the CIA added a third group with their own documents. And their documents ended up in the search. That kind of after-the-spec-is-done tweaking often results in security issues, and this time it did as well. The CIA's analysis was available to the Senate team. And when the CIA's public response bore no relationship at all to their own internal review, they got caught with their pants down.

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2016-02-07 00:34:28 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s)Open 

It's not climbing, it's vertical dance.

h/t +bonnie denis 

It's not climbing, it's vertical dance.

h/t +bonnie denis ___

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2016-02-06 23:55:42 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

Via https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/695974936767307776

Via https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/695974936767307776___

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2016-02-06 23:27:56 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

Warn your friends and neighbors.
The Superb Owl comes this Sunday, and none of us are safe.

Warn your friends and neighbors.
The Superb Owl comes this Sunday, and none of us are safe.___

2016-02-06 23:27:08 (19 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

I'm investigating moving my email over to my (legacy) free Google Apps account. But I originally set it up with a secondary domain, not my usual email address. But I figure there must be a way to move it to a new domain.

Yes. You can do it it using the Google APIs. But not the web console.

Okay, so someone must have written this.

Of course they did. So I download a command line tool (Python) called GAM. Walk through an extremely long (but easy to follow) set of instructions on setting up my Google API account and giving it all the right API permissions. Get the whole thing installed. Run it. Run the command to change my primary domain...

Nope. You can only change to a validated secondary domain. My other domain is an alias, not a secondary domain. I can't make it a secondary domain because that's not an option on the legacy free accounts.

I... more »

I'm investigating moving my email over to my (legacy) free Google Apps account. But I originally set it up with a secondary domain, not my usual email address. But I figure there must be a way to move it to a new domain.

Yes. You can do it it using the Google APIs. But not the web console.

Okay, so someone must have written this.

Of course they did. So I download a command line tool (Python) called GAM. Walk through an extremely long (but easy to follow) set of instructions on setting up my Google API account and giving it all the right API permissions. Get the whole thing installed. Run it. Run the command to change my primary domain...

Nope. You can only change to a validated secondary domain. My other domain is an alias, not a secondary domain. I can't make it a secondary domain because that's not an option on the legacy free accounts.

I think I have a solution. I can get a 30 day free trial for the business version, and I have the option of going back to the free version anytime in the 30 days (but not after). So if I turn on the trial, then I can add a secondary domain, swap the primary with it, and then go back to the free version.

That ought to work, right?

But I only get one chance to do it.

The things I'll do to avoid paying $40/month (5 * 8 folks on my family email server).

Of course, once I do all that, I still have the email alias problem. I use a custom email address for every site I sign up for. I used to use "+", but too many sites claimed it was an illegal character. So I switched to "-" and programmed my mail server to translate it as a "+". Here I'll need to use aliases for that, but Google only allows 30 aliases per account.

OTOH, I don't see any limits on the number of groups. So I could create a group for each one, and put only myself in the group. Is there really no limit to the number of groups? Anyone?

Or of course I could go update 20 years of websites with new email addresses. Ugh.

#ns___

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2016-02-06 20:18:59 (0 comments; 5 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

This is the most comprehensive article I've seen on Zika, Guillain-Barré, and microcephaly I've seen so far.

This is the most comprehensive article I've seen on Zika, Guillain-Barré, and microcephaly I've seen so far.___

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2016-02-06 19:53:34 (4 comments; 2 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

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2016-02-06 18:14:29 (6 comments; 1 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

There's probably a joke here about bareback monkeys, or monkey on your back, or monkey see monkey do. But frankly, I can't even see the monkey anymore.

#t

There's probably a joke here about bareback monkeys, or monkey on your back, or monkey see monkey do. But frankly, I can't even see the monkey anymore.

#t___

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2016-02-06 17:05:56 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

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2016-02-06 15:59:05 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

❝ Ruth Gruber was the youngest PhD graduate in the world, earning her degree at the age of 20 with a doctoral thesis on Virginia Woolf (the first academic work on the author), when she trudged out into the Arctic and became the first journalist to interview prisoners at a Soviet Gulag in 1935. Born in 1911 in Brooklyn to Russian Jewish immigrants, she was a long way from home, but it was just the beginning of an international journey that would take her from remote corners of pre-statehood Alaska to the harrowing postwar internment camps of Europe. Now 104 years old, she’s had one of the most intrepid photography careers of the 20th century, and that legacy is being celebrated in Ruth Gruber, Photojournalist at Brooklyn College Library. ❞

___❝ Ruth Gruber was the youngest PhD graduate in the world, earning her degree at the age of 20 with a doctoral thesis on Virginia Woolf (the first academic work on the author), when she trudged out into the Arctic and became the first journalist to interview prisoners at a Soviet Gulag in 1935. Born in 1911 in Brooklyn to Russian Jewish immigrants, she was a long way from home, but it was just the beginning of an international journey that would take her from remote corners of pre-statehood Alaska to the harrowing postwar internment camps of Europe. Now 104 years old, she’s had one of the most intrepid photography careers of the 20th century, and that legacy is being celebrated in Ruth Gruber, Photojournalist at Brooklyn College Library. ❞

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2016-02-06 15:45:46 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

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2016-02-06 15:33:32 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

You can (until DMCA takedown) watch a SFW version of an XXX version of Batman. And it's not bad. Which probably says more about the original Batman than about porn movies, but whatever. :)

#t

This is... quite amazing, actually. Rule 34 means, of course, that this porn exists. But the really funny thing is that even after excising the naughty bits, it looks like a decent episode in its own right. This might be the first time I've seen a porn show with an actual plot... Now I kind of want to find the originals.

And oh yeah, there's legal and copyright questions over everything. I bet this made some law clerk's day to run across for a change.___You can (until DMCA takedown) watch a SFW version of an XXX version of Batman. And it's not bad. Which probably says more about the original Batman than about porn movies, but whatever. :)

#t

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2016-02-06 15:21:02 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

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2016-02-06 15:08:50 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

❝ Argosy began in 1882 as a magazine for children and ceased publication ninety-six years later as soft-core porn for men, but for ten years in between it was the home of a true-crime column by Erle Stanley Gardner, the man who gave the world Perry Mason. In eighty-two novels, six films, and nearly three hundred television episodes, Mason, a criminal-defense lawyer, took on seemingly guilty clients and proved their innocence. In the magazine, Gardner, who had practiced law before turning to writing, attempted to do something similar—except that there his “clients” were real people, already convicted and behind bars. All of them met the same criteria: they were impoverished, they insisted that they were blameless, they were serving life sentences for serious crimes, and they had exhausted their legal options. Gardner called his column “The Court of Last Resort.” ❞

❝ Argosy began in 1882 as a magazine for children and ceased publication ninety-six years later as soft-core porn for men, but for ten years in between it was the home of a true-crime column by Erle Stanley Gardner, the man who gave the world Perry Mason. In eighty-two novels, six films, and nearly three hundred television episodes, Mason, a criminal-defense lawyer, took on seemingly guilty clients and proved their innocence. In the magazine, Gardner, who had practiced law before turning to writing, attempted to do something similar—except that there his “clients” were real people, already convicted and behind bars. All of them met the same criteria: they were impoverished, they insisted that they were blameless, they were serving life sentences for serious crimes, and they had exhausted their legal options. Gardner called his column “The Court of Last Resort.” ❞___

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2016-02-06 05:21:06 (0 comments; 4 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

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