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Kevin Clarke (ksclarke)

Kevin Clarke (ksclarke) 

A father, husband, programmer, librarian, and tattoo and sci-fi fan. A vegan, Quaker, Buddhist, and introvert. A 1979 Westfalia owner. And, a perpetual rambler who is rarely at ease.

Occupation: Digital Library Programmer at the UCLA Library (University of California, Los Angeles)

Location: Boone, NC

Followers: 6,456

Following: 928

Views: 1,572,365

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 7

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2016-09-27 13:21:54 (7 comments; 1 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

Most reshares: 3

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2016-09-25 16:32:42 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

Most plusones: 15

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2016-09-17 22:31:16 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 15 +1s; )Open 

Latest 50 posts

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2016-09-27 22:16:52 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

In Today’s Lunch with a “Side Order of Science”:
Today's "Side Order of Science": Can time be multi-dimensional? Neil deGrasse Tyson & Eugene Mirman talk time & time again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvKuEgzElec #SOS

In Today’s Lunch with a “Side Order of Science”:
Today's "Side Order of Science": Can time be multi-dimensional? Neil deGrasse Tyson & Eugene Mirman talk time & time again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvKuEgzElec #SOS___

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2016-09-27 21:42:44 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s; )Open 

Still, major carmakers have resisted recommendations to implement code signing, says Josh Corman, a founder of the Internet-of-things security nonprofit I Am the Cavalry. That’s due in part to their disparate supply chains, dealers, aftermarket tools and mechanics, all of which would be affected if a Detroit giant started requiring the same cryptographic validation of software changes that Apple does. “Tesla’s span of control over its parts and suppliers and dealers may afford a better security response,” says Corman. “Their ability to be nimble is objectively greater.”

Still, major carmakers have resisted recommendations to implement code signing, says Josh Corman, a founder of the Internet-of-things security nonprofit I Am the Cavalry. That’s due in part to their disparate supply chains, dealers, aftermarket tools and mechanics, all of which would be affected if a Detroit giant started requiring the same cryptographic validation of software changes that Apple does. “Tesla’s span of control over its parts and suppliers and dealers may afford a better security response,” says Corman. “Their ability to be nimble is objectively greater.”___

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2016-09-27 21:15:11 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

Stolen from the book of face...

Stolen from the book of face...___

2016-09-27 14:28:16 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

Today in academia...

Today in academia...___

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2016-09-27 13:21:54 (7 comments; 1 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

I don't like roller coasters, but I've heard kidney stones are even worse.

___I don't like roller coasters, but I've heard kidney stones are even worse.

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2016-09-27 12:36:09 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

UBC researchers have discovered how cancer cells become invisible to the body’s immune system, a crucial step that allows tumours to metastasize and spread throughout the body. “The immune system is efficient at identifying and halting the emergence and…

UBC researchers have discovered how cancer cells become invisible to the body’s immune system, a crucial step that allows tumours to metastasize and spread throughout the body. “The immune system is efficient at identifying and halting the emergence and…___

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2016-09-27 12:34:37 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s; )Open 

No hope for Garland then?

No hope for Garland then?___

2016-09-27 11:59:55 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s; )Open 

Check out this line by line look at one of the most popular open source licenses.

Check out this line by line look at one of the most popular open source licenses.___

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2016-09-27 11:52:34 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s; )Open 

#toread

How Bankers Live With Themselves http://trib.al/txPfSbR___#toread

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2016-09-27 11:12:23 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

I guess it turned out as most would have expected.

Debate notes.

Well, here we are. This is really happening: Donald Trump vs. Hillary Clinton. The two least popular presidential candidates we’ve ever had are both running against the only person in the country they could beat.

In case you were wondering whether Lyin’ Donald would temper his behavior for this phase of the campaign, you should know that he invited Gennifer Flowers to attend tonight’s debate. He also preëmptively scolded the moderator not to dare fact-check him, which of course is what everyone else expects the moderator, NBC’s Lester Holt, to do.

They’re saying we could have a hundred million people watching this thing. Welcome, I guess, to the greatest show on Earth—not what a presidential debate is supposed to be.

Hillary Clinton has done this before—a lot. She is an accomplished debater, beyond Bill Clinton, beyond Barack Obama, beyond maybe anyone at this level. She may not be a “natural politician” like both of those men, but she is a natural at this. Her command of policy, her ability to calmly field a question while getting in her talking points, are without parallel. She’s set a high bar for herself, and you can be sure everyone will hold her to it.

Donald Trump, meanwhile, will exceed expectations if he remembers to avoid calling Lester Holt the ‘n-word’. He hasn’t a single clue about policy, and he fields questions by assembling word salad and flat-out lying about basically everything. The media is going to grade him on a curve, which is exactly what the media should not be doing in an interview for the most powerful job on the planet.

Do you doubt it? Do you need some evidence that the two will be judged on different metrics? Well, consider that in all the dozens of presidential-level debates Mrs. Clinton has participated, for all the skill and intelligence she has demonstrated, with all the times she has shown herself to be absolutely great at this, with all the hours of debate footage to choose from, there are two “moments” you’ve seen played over and over, two times the media thinks were great debate moments for Mrs. Clinton that you should (and do) remember:

The first was Rick Lazio weirdly leaving his podium and getting into Mrs. Clinton’s personal space, berating her to take a dumb campaign pledge. The second was Barack Obama telling her, “you’re likable enough, Hillary.”

That’s right: according to the media, Mrs. Clinton’s two great debate moments were having her male opponent do something inappropriate. Not anything she did or said. Not anything literally the best debater you’ve ever seen actually did, but mistakes by the men on stage with her.

That’s what she’s up against. Naturally, everyone is waiting with bated breath to see whether Mr. Trump messes up in the same way. Not whether Mrs. Clinton makes him look like an unprepared fourth-grader, but whether he’ll let her win the debate by his own mistake.

We’ll see. Maybe the media will surprise us by concentrating on what’s important! Right. I guess it could happen.

§

This debate was a disaster for Donald Trump—his worst debate performance thus far. But Mr. Trump has had other disastrous nights before, and they didn’t stop us getting where we are.

Mr. Trump actually started out strong. He had a good hit on Hillary Clinton over trade deals like NAFTA and TPP. Mrs. Clinton has come out against TPP, but Mr. Trump was right that she spoke in favor of it many times before she changed her mind.

He talked about tax differences creating trade imbalance, in ways that would make sense to his constituency. He talked about keeping manufacturing jobs in the country.

Mrs. Clinton baited him at every opportunity, starting early with a mention of Mr. Trump starting out his career with fourteen million dollars from his father. When Mr. Trump is hit in his ego, he can’t help but take the bait—and Mrs. Clinton took full advantage.

Was that why, about halfway through the debate, Mr. Trump ran out of gas? Was he expending all of his energy defending himself? Maybe, maybe not, but whatever it was, he lost control.

He interrupted Mrs. Clinton dozens of times, which didn’t look good. He couldn’t stop fidgeting, as though he’d forgotten to use the bathroom before they started. And his answers began devolving into incoherent word salad.

Oh, yeah—and he was sniffling the entire night. Sniff, sniff, sniff. I’m sure he wasn’t doing lines in the green room, so maybe he was sick? What’s he hiding about his health? Maybe he was on medication? For someone who has spent months planting seeds about Mrs. Clinton’s health, he reversed that narrative tonight.

Mrs. Clinton, for her part, was expecting the interruptions. She ignored him every time he did it. He came off as rude and petulant and she didn’t take his bait by responding in kind.

When the matter of his tax returns came up, Mr. Trump said he would release them as soon as Mrs. Clinton releases the emails she deleted. Ooh, the emails! Go for the jugular! Mrs. Clinton responded by suggesting that perhaps he didn’t want to release this tax returns because he’s not as wealthy as he claims to be. Ooh, snap! Or maybe he doesn’t want us to know he doesn’t pay any income taxes at all? He couldn’t help but interrupt: “That makes me smart.” Perhaps it does, but no one is suggesting that he’s breaking the law by not paying any taxes; it’s just a matter of how it would look. And a lot of people noticed him almost confirming that he pays no taxes.

By this time, Mr. Trump was making faces, sighing, and fidgeting while Mrs. Clinton was talking.

The moderator, Lester Holt, brought up racial tensions and police shootings, and Mr. Trump went into his law-and-order thing. He tried to paint a picture of an America that has descended into a Mad Max hellscape of chaos and violence. “Is this a war-torn country?” “You walk down the street, you get shot.” Unfortunately for him, while violent crime did tick up a little last year, crime overall didn’t, and violent crime is down drastically over the long term. He reiterated his call for stop-and-frisk to be reinstated, though he is wrong that murders went back up after the policy was stopped. It was a good shot at his base, but he was already losing control.

The turning point for Mr. Trump came soon after. He was asked about his pushing of the “birther” theory that President Obama wasn’t born in the USA. He didn’t handle it well. His defense was that he was proud that he got Mr. Obama to produce his birth certificate, but he basically fell apart here trying to defend his fragile ego.

Mrs. Clinton, asked about cyber-security, suggested that Russia may have been responsible for hacking the Democratic National Committee, and this got pretty bizarre. Donald Trump spent something like two full minutes defending Russia against this accusation, suggesting that the hack could have been carried out by a 400-pound guy sitting in his bed, but no, not Russia, not them. Given Mr. Trump’s bizarre man-crush on Vladimir Putin, this was quite telling.

How, moderator Lester Holt asked, would you prevent home-grown terrorist attacks inspired by ISIS? Mr. Trump launched into an attack, accusing Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton of essentially creating ISIS by pulling out of Iraq. If only some troops had been left behind, he insisted, ISIS wouldn’t have existed in the first place.

But the withdrawal from Iraq was set by George W. Bush. The only way President Obama could have left any American troops behind was with agreement from the government of Iraq, and no such invitation was forthcoming. Mr. Trump is flat-out lying that the Obama administration was responsible for the way the US military left Iraq. His pursuit of this line of attack seemed overly enthusiastic and not entirely coherent—he said Mrs. Clinton has been fighting ISIS for her “entire adult life”. What?

Accused of having supported the invasion of Iraq, he descended into chaos. Call Sean Hannity! he kept insisting. I did too oppose it! He spent a lot of time ranting about this, with varying levels of coherence.

His self-control was almost entirely absent by this point. The entire debate was shown in split-screen: both candidates were on-screen all the time, when talking and when not talking. There was no opportunity for a television director to skew appearances with selective editing and camera angles, and Donald Trump did not handle this well. His facial expressions, his fidgeting, his sighing, his unsteadiness, his exhaustion—it was, I can’t emphasize this enough, a total disaster.

His answer about cutting taxes on the rich made no damn sense. You can read the whole thing in the transcript, and find three paragraphs of gibberish that doesn’t address the actual question, and doesn’t make any sense at all even on the topic he seemed to be talking about, which is corporate taxes. He looked both ignorant and incoherent, simultaneously.

If one doesn’t like raising the question of “looks” in what’s supposed to be a substantive debate, consider the candidate’s resumé: he is a television personality, with years of experience looking good on television, and he completely blew it tonight in his own area of expertise.

He has spent months planting seeds about Hillary Clinton’s health. He says she lacks the “stamina” to be president, and he said that on stage tonight—even as he looked like the one lacking in stamina. Between the sniffles and the appearance of total exhaustion after only forty-five minutes, he was the one who looked like health problems might be looming. Meanwhile, Mrs. Clinton handled it like a champ.

But on the topic of national security, of preventing home-grown terrorist attacks, the area he’s been pounding away at, putting himself forth as the only candidate prepared to handle this—he sounded like he didn’t know what the hell he was talking about. His sentences ended on different thoughts than they began with. He gave a bizarre, incomprehensible answer about nuclear weapons and NATO. He would not, he said, “do first strike” with nuclear weapons, but at the same time, he doesn’t want to take anything off the table. He’s all for NATO, but maybe not so much, and maybe we’re not keeping up with other countries.

Then he took the stamina issue out of subtext into the foreground. Despite his own exhaustion and sniffling, he came right out and said that Hillary Clinton lacks the stamina to be president. But wait—the first quote was that “she doesn’t have the look.” The look!

Mrs. Clinton retorted that perhaps he could talk about “stamina” when he travels to 112 countries doing negotiations. Or, for that matter, testifying for eleven hours in front of a Congressional committee.

Then she hit him over his statements about women. “He tried to switch from looks to stamina, but this is a man who has called women pigs, slobs and dogs.” Mr. Trump’s response? Sure, he’s said that kind of thing, but only about Rosie O’Donnell. And, “I think everybody would agree that she deserves it and nobody feels sorry for her.”

Excuse me?

Lester Holt’s closing question was whether both candidates would respect the outcome of the election. This, I’m sure, was in response to Mr. Trump’s suggestions that if he loses the election, it will be because it was rigged.

Mr. Trump’s answer was just bizarre. It was as if he didn’t listen to the question, or didn’t hear it, and launched into a prepared closing statement—and then messed up delivering that statement.

Yes, Mr. Trump called his opponent “Secretary Clinton,” and not “Crooked Hillary.” Yes, he refrained from bringing up Gennifer Flowers or any of her husband’s other irrelevant indiscretions. He interrupted a lot, but he didn’t completely fly off the handle. So, he didn’t lose total control of his faculties. But it didn’t look good for him.

The audience noticed: at one point, Mr. Trump insisted that he has a better temperament than Mrs. Clinton, and the audience laughed out loud.

If it’s true that we had a hundred million viewers, then a whole lot of people got their first full-length impression of Donald Trump tonight, and what they saw was not at all good. You can think of the first general election debate in 2012, when Barack Obama crashed and burned and went on to win the election, and conclude that this wasn’t the end of Mr. Trump’s chances—and it certainly was not the end of his chances. He’s still got a shot at this thing, and tonight isn’t going to change the minds of any die-hard Trump supporters, but Hillary Clinton crushed him tonight and it wasn’t even close.___I guess it turned out as most would have expected.

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2016-09-27 00:04:10 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

This year, +Neil Gaiman​ Stardust is getting the full-cast audio drama treatment.

Directed by Dirk Maggs, the man responsible for both the adaptations of Neverwhere and Good Omens for BBC Radio 4, the drama will air in the UK (and be available online worldwide through the BBC’s website) this December



This year, +Neil Gaiman​ Stardust is getting the full-cast audio drama treatment.

Directed by Dirk Maggs, the man responsible for both the adaptations of Neverwhere and Good Omens for BBC Radio 4, the drama will air in the UK (and be available online worldwide through the BBC’s website) this December

___

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2016-09-26 13:52:13 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-26 13:25:45 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

A human being is part of a whole, called by us the ‘Universe’ —a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts, and feelings, as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.” ~ Albert Einstein, The Einstein Papers

A human being is part of a whole, called by us the ‘Universe’ —a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts, and feelings, as something separated from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.” ~ Albert Einstein, The Einstein Papers___

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2016-09-26 13:24:05 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

#punday  

#punday  ___

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2016-09-26 03:03:47 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-26 02:56:44 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-26 02:50:45 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-26 02:45:27 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

Now, this, this is how you should answer security questions! :-)

Now, this, this is how you should answer security questions! :-)___

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2016-09-26 02:42:44 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

May have to give this book a read.

May have to give this book a read.___

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2016-09-25 16:32:42 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 7 +1s; )Open 

___

2016-09-24 00:20:45 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

Today, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit struck down Ohio’s controversial purge of infrequent voters from its voter rolls. The decision reversed a lower court ruling in a lawsuit brought by public policy organization Demos and the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio on behalf of the Ohio A. Philip Randolph Institute (APRI), the Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless (NEOCH), and Ohio resident Larry Harmon. That lawsuit challenged the state’s practice of cancelling the registrations of Ohio voters who have not voted for a six year period.

On appeal, the Sixth Circuit found that this practice, known as the Supplemental Process, violates the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 (NVRA) by removing voters from the voter registration rolls merely because of their failure to vote. The NVRA, passed in 1993 to increase participation in the electoralproc... more »

Today, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit struck down Ohio’s controversial purge of infrequent voters from its voter rolls. The decision reversed a lower court ruling in a lawsuit brought by public policy organization Demos and the American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio on behalf of the Ohio A. Philip Randolph Institute (APRI), the Northeast Ohio Coalition for the Homeless (NEOCH), and Ohio resident Larry Harmon. That lawsuit challenged the state’s practice of cancelling the registrations of Ohio voters who have not voted for a six year period.

On appeal, the Sixth Circuit found that this practice, known as the Supplemental Process, violates the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 (NVRA) by removing voters from the voter registration rolls merely because of their failure to vote. The NVRA, passed in 1993 to increase participation in the electoral process, requires states to maintain accurate and up-to-date voter rolls. The law allows states to remove a voter’s name from the rolls only if the voter has become ineligible, and it specifically prohibits states from removing voters for not voting. The case now goes back to the district court, which must fashion a remedy for voters impacted by the Supplemental Process. ___

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2016-09-23 16:59:10 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

#northcarolina

The officers looked surprised at first, but then broke into smiles. "Thank you for being out here and being peaceful," the officer said as he embraced Nwadike.

Some of the other protesters yelled at Nwadike, calling him names and demanding to know why he was on "their side."

"We're all human. His uniform doesn't make him a robot. Just like your uniform, your skin color, doesn't make you a criminal."

http://www.businessinsider.com/free-hugs-charlotte-protests-police-2016-9___#northcarolina

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2016-09-23 16:47:56 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

via private share

via private share___

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2016-09-23 13:09:27 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

Clara Jeffrey clearly has no interest in actually preventing Trump’s election. Instead, she would rather make that election more likely, by heaping scorn on those whose support she needs in order to stop Trump. By Democratic logic, this makes her a Trump supporter. By a more serious standard, she is simply a hypocrite.

Clara Jeffrey clearly has no interest in actually preventing Trump’s election. Instead, she would rather make that election more likely, by heaping scorn on those whose support she needs in order to stop Trump. By Democratic logic, this makes her a Trump supporter. By a more serious standard, she is simply a hypocrite.___

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2016-09-23 13:01:41 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-23 12:57:22 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-23 01:09:57 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-23 01:02:58 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-22 16:29:18 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

#toread

#toread___

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2016-09-22 15:53:05 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

Oxytocin has been dubbed the “love hormone” for its role promoting social bonding, altruism and more. Now new research from Duke University suggests the hormone may also support spirituality. In the study, men reported a greater sense of spirituality…

Oxytocin has been dubbed the “love hormone” for its role promoting social bonding, altruism and more. Now new research from Duke University suggests the hormone may also support spirituality. In the study, men reported a greater sense of spirituality…___

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2016-09-22 15:49:49 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

Many Raspberry Pi-like developer boards are available, but most can't run Microsoft's Windows 10 desktop OS. SolidRun can run multiple versions of Windows 10. It has the flexibility to be a PC or a board to use to create cool gadgets.

Many Raspberry Pi-like developer boards are available, but most can't run Microsoft's Windows 10 desktop OS. SolidRun can run multiple versions of Windows 10. It has the flexibility to be a PC or a board to use to create cool gadgets.___

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2016-09-22 15:21:27 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

#northcarolina

#northcarolina___

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2016-09-21 13:12:11 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s; )Open 

Docker Swarm monitoring and logging with ELK


Docker Swarm monitoring and logging with ELK
___

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2016-09-21 04:14:31 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

A Defense Department dictionary helped this poet write in the language of war

A Defense Department dictionary helped this poet write in the language of war___

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2016-09-21 04:08:38 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

And, did you know you can buy an HP printer for less than it costs to replace the ink once? No, I'm not making that up. Read on.


And, did you know you can buy an HP printer for less than it costs to replace the ink once? No, I'm not making that up. Read on.
___

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2016-09-21 03:23:25 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

* drool *

via +Marius Piedallu van Wyk

___* drool *

via +Marius Piedallu van Wyk

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2016-09-21 03:19:50 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

#toread

#toread___

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2016-09-20 18:02:51 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

#toread

#toread___

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2016-09-20 13:03:20 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

via +Cara Evangelista​

via +Cara Evangelista​___

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2016-09-19 13:44:17 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

The last gasp of the ACA’s market-based reforms reveals an uncomfortable truth about our health-care system: we cannot afford to expand or even maintain our current access to care without cost controls, and health-care costs cannot be controlled with competition or markets.

The only cost control that works without undermining access to care is also the kind that Republican and Democratic leadership have foresworn this election: public budgeting and rate-setting through a single-payer system, or regulations that force nonprofit insurers to act like a single-payer.

The last gasp of the ACA’s market-based reforms reveals an uncomfortable truth about our health-care system: we cannot afford to expand or even maintain our current access to care without cost controls, and health-care costs cannot be controlled with competition or markets.

The only cost control that works without undermining access to care is also the kind that Republican and Democratic leadership have foresworn this election: public budgeting and rate-setting through a single-payer system, or regulations that force nonprofit insurers to act like a single-payer.___

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2016-09-19 13:22:26 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-19 13:21:19 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-18 22:50:08 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

More than 6 in 10 registered voters who support Trump say they are following the campaign very closely, and 93 percent say they are absolutely certain to vote. By contrast, 45 percent of Clinton backers are paying close attention to the race, and 80 percent are certain to vote, while one-fifth say they will probably or are less likely to cast a ballot.

Hmm, if only the Democrats had selected someone who inspired enthusiasm in their base.

More than 6 in 10 registered voters who support Trump say they are following the campaign very closely, and 93 percent say they are absolutely certain to vote. By contrast, 45 percent of Clinton backers are paying close attention to the race, and 80 percent are certain to vote, while one-fifth say they will probably or are less likely to cast a ballot.

Hmm, if only the Democrats had selected someone who inspired enthusiasm in their base.___

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2016-09-18 19:34:04 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-17 22:49:14 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-17 22:31:16 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 15 +1s; )Open 

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2016-09-17 15:14:27 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

david letterman's back.... and national geography's got him!

david letterman's back.... and national geography's got him!___

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2016-09-17 12:40:06 (3 comments; 1 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

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