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Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

42
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13
reshares per post
418
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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 159

2016-06-03 21:28:50 (159 comments; 30 reshares; 639 +1s; )Open 

It used to be that the only thing that made Donald Trump look good was comparing him with the other Republican candidates. Because even a whiny five-year old megalomaniac looks positively stellar when compared to a religious nut who loves the death penalty.

Now, those other Republican candidates are gone. That should make for a saner baseline, no?

No.

These days, it's the anti-Trump protesters that make "the Donald" look good in comparison.

Christ, people. You're doing it wrong.

Most reshares: 233

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2016-05-19 18:59:59 (131 comments; 233 reshares; 1,529 +1s; )Open 

Hey, either Macs don't count much on the desktop, or we may have to finally lay the "year of the Linux desktop" joke to rest.

Most plusones: 1995

2016-09-17 18:56:56 (144 comments; 199 reshares; 1,995 +1s; )Open 

Today is the 25th anniversary of the Linux-0.01 release, I do believe.

Normally the anniversary is counted from the announcement email (August 25), because that was the actual public statement of intent. The 0.01 code drop happened a couple of weeks later, and wasn't publicly announced.

Latest 50 posts

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2017-01-20 05:31:49 (80 comments; 31 reshares; 635 +1s; )Open 

I've posted model builds here before.

This time I decided to try something different. One of the laser cut metal models - "Fascinations Metal Earth".

They make a big deal about how there is no glue or solder needed to build them.

And it's true. What keeps these things together is the tears of frustration when you try to fit the invisibly small tabs into the invisibly small holes.

The thing looked much bigger in pictures. It is tiny. 

I've posted model builds here before.

This time I decided to try something different. One of the laser cut metal models - "Fascinations Metal Earth".

They make a big deal about how there is no glue or solder needed to build them.

And it's true. What keeps these things together is the tears of frustration when you try to fit the invisibly small tabs into the invisibly small holes.

The thing looked much bigger in pictures. It is tiny. ___

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2017-01-16 17:54:23 (11 comments; 3 reshares; 94 +1s; )Open 

It's almost a year since I made a post here on G+ asking for peoples comments about gas compressibility calculations in scuba diving.

The resulting more accurate breathing gas compressibility calculations are one (very small) part of the new +Subsurface 4.6 release.

It has already successfully confused several people who learnt to do their SAC rate calculations using the ideal gas law.

Realistically, all the other changes listed in the announcement are much more important, but I had nothing to do with them, so they don't count.

The Subsurface developer team is happy to announce that release 4.6 of the Subsurface dive log program has been released.
You will find many improvements to the user experience (including a fix for spurious errors saving to cloud storage, improvements to the Facebook integration, many improvements to the dive planner and a really cool new heatmap for visualization of tissue loading during a dive). Subsurface can now download data directly from a number of new dive computers (thanks to Jef and the rest of the libdivecomputer developers) and also import several new data formats.
And of course there are a whole lot of bugfixes.
Look at the full announcement below, which also includes links to the binaries for Windows, Mac, and Linux.___It's almost a year since I made a post here on G+ asking for peoples comments about gas compressibility calculations in scuba diving.

The resulting more accurate breathing gas compressibility calculations are one (very small) part of the new +Subsurface 4.6 release.

It has already successfully confused several people who learnt to do their SAC rate calculations using the ideal gas law.

Realistically, all the other changes listed in the announcement are much more important, but I had nothing to do with them, so they don't count.

2017-01-15 19:37:18 (23 comments; 15 reshares; 202 +1s; )Open 

Google WiFi update.

So I talked about my Google WiFi experience a couple of weeks ago, here's some more updates from having a bit more experience with it.

Notably, I got my fourth unit, and what remains the real bright spot with Google WiFi is the easy setup. Adding the unit to the network was truly trivial, and when I then plugged it into ethernet at my office, things "Just Worked(tm)".

That's what I like to see.

That experience also just reinforced my opinion that these mesh systems really should be able to mesh both wirelessly and over ethernet - the wireless mesh is great for the trivial cases and for easy setup, and the wired mesh is what makes it so good to expand on the system and get to places that would otherwise be unreachable or cause unnecessary extra wireless hops.

So I continue to be a fan. I don't think I ever want... more »

Google WiFi update.

So I talked about my Google WiFi experience a couple of weeks ago, here's some more updates from having a bit more experience with it.

Notably, I got my fourth unit, and what remains the real bright spot with Google WiFi is the easy setup. Adding the unit to the network was truly trivial, and when I then plugged it into ethernet at my office, things "Just Worked(tm)".

That's what I like to see.

That experience also just reinforced my opinion that these mesh systems really should be able to mesh both wirelessly and over ethernet - the wireless mesh is great for the trivial cases and for easy setup, and the wired mesh is what makes it so good to expand on the system and get to places that would otherwise be unreachable or cause unnecessary extra wireless hops.

So I continue to be a fan. I don't think I ever want to deal with a traditional wireless router again (but I'll make a separate post about using the Ubiquiti system in more challenging environments).

Small details that have cropped up in the meanwhile:

DHCP Reseverations:

As with every system before, I did end up having to make dhcp address reservations for the printers after all. Without doing that, discoverability is just too flaky. I'm sure the whole PnP experience works for some people without it, and maybe it's the particular printers I have, but giving the printers a static IP address just helps with all those situations where they otherwise don't seem to be discoverable.

This isn't specific to Google WiFi, and the App makes it fairly easy to do. But it would be more natural to do it when looking at the device in the network overview screen, rather than having to go into "Settings" and "Advanced networking".

What I'm left missing (and nobody else seems to do that either) is to add a new DNS entry for the device when I do this. The dhcp names are good as they go, and the DNS client on the router does the right thing with them, but having a printer named something like "HP874661" is not exactly a human-friendly name.

In fact, the IP address is easier to remember than the odd dhcp name. So I'd like to be able to add a "office-printer" DNS alias when I assign the IP to the device (or even without assigning an IP to it - some things are fine to leave as dynamic addresses, but you might still want to have a local name to reach them).

And on that note:

Like a number of other fancier routers, Google WiFi does traffic tracking, and let's you name your devices so that it's easier to see exactly which device does what (so you can have "Linus' Pixel Phone" instead of some ambiguous "Andoid-2" device). This isn't the DNS alias I'm asking for, but it makes it much easier to read the statistics. Good.

And what I found interesting was how much more useful this was when you just carry your phone around with an App, rather than having a web interface on your computer. I've used routers with per-device network statistics etc before, and I've named the major devices before, but Google WiFi made it really easy to just walk around and see "ok, that name refers to this piece of equipment" and give them all more useful human-legible names.

As a result, I ended up naming everything, including things like my Rachio sprinkler controller etc. Things that I've never bothered with before, because it was just not very convenient. Walking around with a phone I could just go to the kids and say "ok, show me your phone settings screen so that can tell which IP is your phone".

So the "configure everything on your phone with the App" clearly has some secondary convenience advantages. I'd have liked to be able to filter devices (by IP address and by which unit they were connected to), but even without that, the app just made some things much simpler.

However, I do note that not having a traditional web interface at all then makes the "what the hell was the printer called again" problem much worse. If I'm at the kids computer, configuring the printer setup, and I don't have my phone with me, I can't just look it up on the router config web page on the same device that I'm trying to configure the printer on.

So you win some, you lose some.

But that issue made me really want those DNS aliases, because it's so hard remembering what IP address you picked for the printer, or what the crazy dhcp name for the printer was. Let me just call it "office-printer" or something. ___

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2017-01-11 19:13:32 (35 comments; 6 reshares; 341 +1s; )Open 

I take back everything I said about the nasty weather.

It got a bit colder and actually snowed. We got almost a foot overnight, and now outdoor activities are on. It's actually pleasant outside.

Of course, in our family, outdoor activities are apparently limited to not even bothering to clear the hot tub cover. 

I take back everything I said about the nasty weather.

It got a bit colder and actually snowed. We got almost a foot overnight, and now outdoor activities are on. It's actually pleasant outside.

Of course, in our family, outdoor activities are apparently limited to not even bothering to clear the hot tub cover. ___

2017-01-09 02:16:45 (58 comments; 11 reshares; 353 +1s; )Open 

So a winter storm warning is in effect here, with freezing rain and just generally miserable. Everybody is staying inside, because outside is basically trying to kill you by having cars sliding around like greased pumpkins.

But somebody always thinks there is a silver lining.

The mobile weather information from http://weather.com happily tells you:

Air quality: good
Ideal air quality for outdoor activities

No, http://weather.com. Freezing weather with ambiguous snow/rain/ice falling from the sky, and the ground covered with ice is definitely not "Ideal air quality for outdoor activities".

The particulate counts don't really come into the picture at all, in fact.

So a winter storm warning is in effect here, with freezing rain and just generally miserable. Everybody is staying inside, because outside is basically trying to kill you by having cars sliding around like greased pumpkins.

But somebody always thinks there is a silver lining.

The mobile weather information from http://weather.com happily tells you:

Air quality: good
Ideal air quality for outdoor activities

No, http://weather.com. Freezing weather with ambiguous snow/rain/ice falling from the sky, and the ground covered with ice is definitely not "Ideal air quality for outdoor activities".

The particulate counts don't really come into the picture at all, in fact.___

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2017-01-01 20:35:20 (42 comments; 13 reshares; 885 +1s; )Open 

___

posted image

2016-12-27 19:56:24 (19 comments; 8 reshares; 125 +1s; )Open 

Resharing the +Subsurface announcement, because it's been some time since the last larger release.

The Subsurface developer team is proud to announce our first beta version of Subsurface 4.6.
This version adds support for multiple new dive computers, the beginnings of multi-user support, and introduces new visualization of tissue loading on deco dives (the heat map, as seen in the picture below the dive profile). Plenty of bugs have been squashed along with improvements on dive planning and import/export functionality.
Head over to our website for the full announcement.___Resharing the +Subsurface announcement, because it's been some time since the last larger release.

2016-12-25 21:04:33 (50 comments; 24 reshares; 413 +1s; )Open 

Quick comments on Google WiFi..

I asked here some time ago about peoples favorite solution to good WiFi coverage when you have a rambling house. A single AP has never worked well for me, particularly with my office out away from the rest of the house above the garage (but the rest of the house is fairly spread out too).

For a while I've been running a Ubiquiti UniFi setup. It worked fairly well, and after working quite a bit on placement, I could cover the whole house with just two access points (but that really was after carefully placing them in the ceiling at just the right points).

But I've wanted to try the new mesh setups, and last week I finally decided to give Google WiFi a try. So here's a few comments about it, with the caveat that I really only have about a weeks worth of experience with it so far.

First off: setup really is as easy as they... more »

Quick comments on Google WiFi..

I asked here some time ago about peoples favorite solution to good WiFi coverage when you have a rambling house. A single AP has never worked well for me, particularly with my office out away from the rest of the house above the garage (but the rest of the house is fairly spread out too).

For a while I've been running a Ubiquiti UniFi setup. It worked fairly well, and after working quite a bit on placement, I could cover the whole house with just two access points (but that really was after carefully placing them in the ceiling at just the right points).

But I've wanted to try the new mesh setups, and last week I finally decided to give Google WiFi a try. So here's a few comments about it, with the caveat that I really only have about a weeks worth of experience with it so far.

First off: setup really is as easy as they say it is. I've set up a lot of NAT routers and access points over the years, and Google Wifi simplifies things a lot by getting rid of all the unnecessary stuff. Particularly considering that it's a multi-AP setup, it really was that trivial. Just walk around with your phone while you're setting them up.

Of course, part of that simplicity comes from just having a lot of (sane) defaults and not a lot of complex management. With a traditional router setup, I would likely have tried to emulate my old network setup, including manually setting up DHCP addresses for the printers, because I've several times had issues with printers not really getting discovered properly otherwise.

With Google Wifi, it picked a subnet that wasn't what I used before, and while you can set DHCP assignment manually, it just wouldn't have been the same network anyway. So I didn't. But while it was different from what I've done before, I don't think it was necessarily wrong.

The other thing I liked is that the power supply seems to be a standard USB C power supply. I can't wait for special power supplies to just die, die, die.

That said, network routers are just about the only thing where one particular kind of special power delivery makes sense: PoE. Having two cables to plug into that thing is an annoyance after you've gotten used to PoE. That's particularly true if you want to place it in odd places (ie ceiling mounts or just other random hard-to-reach spots).

Yes, yes, you can argue that you only need the two cables for the master access point that is directly connected to your modem, and that you aren't going to have PoE coming from the modem anyway, and you'll have a nest of wires in that closet anyway.

The other APs only want power, and then USB C is much better than PoE.

That argument isn't incorrect, but it's not the full story either. The argument for Google WiFi is that the "pucks" are good-looking enough that you can just have them out. But that's complete BS if you then have to connect them right next to the modem, and have a rats nest of wires running around.

Which gets me back to my old UniFi setup: I had two AP's that were carefully placed in the ceiling, with just a single PoE wire going to each. Neither of them was in the closet where the cable modem and the NAT router and ethernet switch was, so the end result was that all the ugly stuff was hidden away, and the ones that had to be placed in the open really were very non-obtrusive.

Google Wifi doesn't really allow for that. Since you basically have to use the master AP as your NAT switch to get the easy setup and the full experience, that master AP has three wires going into it - the incoming internet, the power cable, and the outgoing ethernet to the wired part of the network.

End result: you get the three-device pack, but one of the devices is going to have to be hidden away, if only because of wiring. The "it's so good looking that you can keep it in the open" is BS when it comes to the master AP.

The others? Yes, you can place them freely, and they are fine. However, I don't know anybody who has their house wired for USB C. So you're going to have to place them near a power outlet, not in the ceiling, and it's not going to be as optimal as if you actually did a custom install.

So your pack of three has effectively shrunk to two AP's that you can place fairly around your house, and you won't be able to place them as optimally as you would a custom setup.

End result of all this: with three Google WiFi AP's I actually have worse coverage in the house than I had with just two optimally placed UniFi AP's.

This may sound like Google WiFi is a bad thing. But realistically, it really means that it's just different. My Ubiquiti setup actually took a long time to get to that optimal layout - I started with three UniFi AP's too, because optimal placement just isn't easy. There was tweaking going on, and a fair amount of running cable in attics and crawlspaces.

But with PoE and ceiling mounts, optimal placement is possible.

Google WiFi simply doesn't seem to aim for "optimal". It aims for "simple".

So which should you get? These days you can get the UniFi AP AC Lite for $80, or a 5-pack of them for not much more than the three-pack of the Google WiFi pucks. So they are actually cheaper than Google WiFi.

The UniFi setup doesn't include a NAT router (so you'd have to get that separately - but realistically that's going to be the existing wireless router that you just turn off wireless on), but it's PoE and designed to be pretty good-looking with a ceiling mount.

And the thing is, those UniFi access points absolutely have to be ceiling- or wall-mounted to look good, and they do need that ethernet cable. No wireless mesh, no trivial setup, no "buy it, connect it to your modem, and have a working good network in fifteen minutes or less". It's going to take a fair amount of effort to get a good UniFi network. You'll probably have to run cable in the walls, know how to crimp ethernet, and know how to set it up with a fairly complex controller on your main computer.

The Google WiFi points don't need any ethernet at all. They'll just work. No effort. No expertise needed.

So I'm going to continue testing Google WiFi. I have a fourth AP on order that I'll connect with ethernet in my office so that I'll have good coverage everywhere. That way I'll also test the "some of the mesh is wireless, some of it is wired". Let's see how it works. I think the convenience is probably worth it.___

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2016-12-22 20:42:37 (75 comments; 13 reshares; 679 +1s; )Open 

As a software engineer, I'm convinced that electrical tape is a required structural element in any hardware hacking.

... along with random kitchen plastic ware.

This is the replacement power supply for the tiny milk fridge that goes with my coffee maker. So it's an essential piece of hardware to keep me sufficiently caffeinated to function well.

It turns out that the manufacturers power supply is unbelievable crap (I've gone through two of them), and it's hard to find 9V / 20W supplies.

"It's not stupid if it works"

Edit: by popular demand I fixed the typo, added some hot glue, and made holes in the box. Not adding a fan, because that's overkill.

As a software engineer, I'm convinced that electrical tape is a required structural element in any hardware hacking.

... along with random kitchen plastic ware.

This is the replacement power supply for the tiny milk fridge that goes with my coffee maker. So it's an essential piece of hardware to keep me sufficiently caffeinated to function well.

It turns out that the manufacturers power supply is unbelievable crap (I've gone through two of them), and it's hard to find 9V / 20W supplies.

"It's not stupid if it works"

Edit: by popular demand I fixed the typo, added some hot glue, and made holes in the box. Not adding a fan, because that's overkill.___

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2016-12-11 19:27:13 (125 comments; 9 reshares; 441 +1s; )Open 

I took a welding class a couple of weeks ago. Not because I foresee ever needing to weld anything, but because learning new things is always interesting.

Yesterday was "add casters to the legs of the welding table we are building" day.

This is not my weld. But it is too funny not to share. The perpetrator of this weld shall remain anonymous to protect the guilty.

I took a welding class a couple of weeks ago. Not because I foresee ever needing to weld anything, but because learning new things is always interesting.

Yesterday was "add casters to the legs of the welding table we are building" day.

This is not my weld. But it is too funny not to share. The perpetrator of this weld shall remain anonymous to protect the guilty.___

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2016-11-29 21:55:20 (98 comments; 48 reshares; 1,464 +1s; )Open 

I'm special. Hear me roar.

I'm special. Hear me roar.___

2016-11-21 22:39:55 (64 comments; 7 reshares; 290 +1s; )Open 

So I've been a fairly happy "Project Fi" user for a while now, and a few weeks ago they started doing group plans too, so I thought I'd move a daughter or two over.

Setup was easy, but the level of just pure incompetence when actually mailing out the SIM-cards is scary.

I ordered a new SIM card on the 12th. On the 13th, they tell me it has shipped (good, good), using Fedex Smartpost. The tracking told me yesterday that the card should arrive today. Eh, ok, 8 days to get from California to Oregon, not great, but whatever - it's probably some "extra cheap saver" rate or whatever.

Today the tracking says "U.S. Postal Service will be delivering this shipment", and the scheduled delivery has moved to Wednesday.

Ten days? For a SIM-card?

Guys, if Amazon can ship just about anything in two days, you should be able to... more »

So I've been a fairly happy "Project Fi" user for a while now, and a few weeks ago they started doing group plans too, so I thought I'd move a daughter or two over.

Setup was easy, but the level of just pure incompetence when actually mailing out the SIM-cards is scary.

I ordered a new SIM card on the 12th. On the 13th, they tell me it has shipped (good, good), using Fedex Smartpost. The tracking told me yesterday that the card should arrive today. Eh, ok, 8 days to get from California to Oregon, not great, but whatever - it's probably some "extra cheap saver" rate or whatever.

Today the tracking says "U.S. Postal Service will be delivering this shipment", and the scheduled delivery has moved to Wednesday.

Ten days? For a SIM-card?

Guys, if Amazon can ship just about anything in two days, you should be able to do better.

And quite frankly, if "Fedex Smartpost" just means ":we'll use USPS for the last mile delivery, and we'll waste a week before we even get to that point", why are you bothering with those jokers? Just plain USPS would have been 47¢ and gotten the job done in a third of the time.

Can somebody explain to me what the "Smart" part in "Fedex Smartpost" is supposed to mean? Because I'm not getting it. It makes both Fedex and Google look like they just don't care.

Before I had realized the level of incompetence here, I had ordered another SIM card last week for another daughter, because she was going to be back from college for Thanksgiving, so switching her over while she was home was "convenient".

Yeah, I'll give you one guess when that SIM card is supposed to arrive...___

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2016-11-18 21:21:21 (62 comments; 3 reshares; 519 +1s; )Open 

"Build your own deck" they said. "Weekend project - it will be fun", they said. "Think of all the money you'll save".

Yeah, almost three weeks later, and it's finally done. Well, except for the fascia boards. And I still haven't screwed down the three boards in front of the hot tub door that need to be removable. But mostly "done". In between kernel builds and all the rain.

And no, I didn't pour the concrete myself. There are limits to my stupidity. I had the piers done before the kernel summit, and started building when I got back.

I think Tove was worried it wouldn't be done before all the kids are back for Thanksgiving.

"Build your own deck" they said. "Weekend project - it will be fun", they said. "Think of all the money you'll save".

Yeah, almost three weeks later, and it's finally done. Well, except for the fascia boards. And I still haven't screwed down the three boards in front of the hot tub door that need to be removable. But mostly "done". In between kernel builds and all the rain.

And no, I didn't pour the concrete myself. There are limits to my stupidity. I had the piers done before the kernel summit, and started building when I got back.

I think Tove was worried it wouldn't be done before all the kids are back for Thanksgiving.___

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2016-11-11 17:39:26 (27 comments; 10 reshares; 175 +1s; )Open 

Just yesterday I was thinking "What we really need is a wetter winter here in Oregon".

So imagine how happy I am to read that La Niña is coming.

Just yesterday I was thinking "What we really need is a wetter winter here in Oregon".

So imagine how happy I am to read that La Niña is coming.___

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2016-10-25 18:17:51 (76 comments; 16 reshares; 272 +1s; )Open 

We don't like to talk about it, but there's a dark secret to living in Oregon: it rains a lot during winter.

And fall.

And spring.

I know. This probably took you by surprise. "Rain in Oregon? Who knew?" you say.

"But", I also hear you say, "as a computer geek, why should you care? It's not like you do any outdoors activities anyway."

And you'd be quite right.

However, the rain has an insidious side effect: it is also very green, and there are lots of trees around. And in the fall (when it rains - keep up with me for a moment, I'm trying to make a point) those trees also tend to shed all their leaves all at once.

And they invariably shed them right in your gutters. The damn bastards seem to actively aim for them. Trees, man.

Anyway, being a geek, and avoiding that great... more »

We don't like to talk about it, but there's a dark secret to living in Oregon: it rains a lot during winter.

And fall.

And spring.

I know. This probably took you by surprise. "Rain in Oregon? Who knew?" you say.

"But", I also hear you say, "as a computer geek, why should you care? It's not like you do any outdoors activities anyway."

And you'd be quite right.

However, the rain has an insidious side effect: it is also very green, and there are lots of trees around. And in the fall (when it rains - keep up with me for a moment, I'm trying to make a point) those trees also tend to shed all their leaves all at once.

And they invariably shed them right in your gutters. The damn bastards seem to actively aim for them. Trees, man.

Anyway, being a geek, and avoiding that great outdoors that pisses water and leaves all over you, you usually don't really notice until it's much too late. Namely when the gutters are overflowing with crap.

At which point you have to go up on the roof and blow that stuff away. With a weak-ass electric rechargeable blower, because if you are anything like me, you're just not manly enough for one of those big back-mounted gas-powered ones.

It's an exercise in futility, I tell you. It's easy enough if you do it while the leaves are all dry an they blow away if you just look at them sternly. But that's usually not when you really need to do it.

I think I have found the solution.

Hear me roar.
___

2016-10-25 04:29:52 (0 comments; 22 reshares; 542 +1s; )Open 

Like +Jonathan Corbet I have voted - Oregon too does vote-by-mail, and I can put this whole sorry voting season behind me.

I might have written in "Giant Meteor 2016" on my ballot, since that was the only part of the whole election season that wasn't too depressing. But Giant Meteor doesn't care who votes for it, it either happens or does not.

May the best woman win.

Like +Jonathan Corbet I have voted - Oregon too does vote-by-mail, and I can put this whole sorry voting season behind me.

I might have written in "Giant Meteor 2016" on my ballot, since that was the only part of the whole election season that wasn't too depressing. But Giant Meteor doesn't care who votes for it, it either happens or does not.

May the best woman win.___

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2016-10-22 17:17:38 (138 comments; 45 reshares; 480 +1s; )Open 

I wonder why I see reporting like this only from NPR.

There's a lot of "crazy Duterte" stories from most of the media outlets, but this one is the only one I've seen that tried to explain the "why".

I wish more news tried to talk about the "why" rather than - or at least in addition to - the "what". Of course, even just the "what" is preferable to the opinion garbage from a lot of news outlets.

(Honesty in advertising: I'm not claiming to really know anything about the Philippines, but I found it interesting just how much this story stood out from all the other stories I've seen. Good job, NPR)

I wonder why I see reporting like this only from NPR.

There's a lot of "crazy Duterte" stories from most of the media outlets, but this one is the only one I've seen that tried to explain the "why".

I wish more news tried to talk about the "why" rather than - or at least in addition to - the "what". Of course, even just the "what" is preferable to the opinion garbage from a lot of news outlets.

(Honesty in advertising: I'm not claiming to really know anything about the Philippines, but I found it interesting just how much this story stood out from all the other stories I've seen. Good job, NPR)___

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2016-10-14 04:16:36 (156 comments; 121 reshares; 874 +1s; )Open 

Christ. What the hell is wrong with people who still believe in this craptrap?

Homeopathy is a scam, and people who believe in it are either uneducated or morons. Or both.

People, stop being gullible morons.

EDIT: guys, why are you talking about FDA, traditional medicine, or home remedies? That has nothing to do with Homeopathy.

"Homeopathy" means that some scumbag is actively trying to fool you into selling you proven snake-oil. It's not "placebo". It's a scam. A company that sells you homeopathic medicines is purely out to scam you. End of story.

Eat the shit all you want (or drink it, or slather it on your skin or whatever) to show the world what a moron you are, but don't put it on or in your baby, for chrissake!

Christ. What the hell is wrong with people who still believe in this craptrap?

Homeopathy is a scam, and people who believe in it are either uneducated or morons. Or both.

People, stop being gullible morons.

EDIT: guys, why are you talking about FDA, traditional medicine, or home remedies? That has nothing to do with Homeopathy.

"Homeopathy" means that some scumbag is actively trying to fool you into selling you proven snake-oil. It's not "placebo". It's a scam. A company that sells you homeopathic medicines is purely out to scam you. End of story.

Eat the shit all you want (or drink it, or slather it on your skin or whatever) to show the world what a moron you are, but don't put it on or in your baby, for chrissake!___

2016-10-10 20:34:21 (87 comments; 14 reshares; 697 +1s; )Open 

Hey guys - if you decide to make a fake internet identity and call yourself "Linus Torvalds" (yes, I know, really cool name), please don't use my email address as you do so.

That just means that I end up getting your stupid Jenkins reports when you do something stupid and your project no longer builds or passes your company tests. Or I get your chat records from your Brazilian telco discussions, or whatever.

Yes, yes, you may think it's a funny homage. Maybe it's not so much "identity theft" as just trying to give credit. But just don't do it, ok?

Hey guys - if you decide to make a fake internet identity and call yourself "Linus Torvalds" (yes, I know, really cool name), please don't use my email address as you do so.

That just means that I end up getting your stupid Jenkins reports when you do something stupid and your project no longer builds or passes your company tests. Or I get your chat records from your Brazilian telco discussions, or whatever.

Yes, yes, you may think it's a funny homage. Maybe it's not so much "identity theft" as just trying to give credit. But just don't do it, ok?___

2016-10-08 05:12:04 (51 comments; 35 reshares; 658 +1s; )Open 

Numerology.

Today we're half-way between Linux 4.0 and 5.0.

Why? It turns out that we've had a git object count pattern in the kernel, with the major version transitions happening fairly exactly at every two million objects in the git object database.

Put another way: v3.0 was released when the kernel git object database grew to two million objects, and v4.0 was released when we crossed over the 4M mark. So naturally, if you're into numerology, that unequivocally proves v5.0 will be when we reach 6M objects.

And today my git object database crossed over the 5M object mark.

Ergo, we are half-way to 5.0.

QED.

Numerology.

Today we're half-way between Linux 4.0 and 5.0.

Why? It turns out that we've had a git object count pattern in the kernel, with the major version transitions happening fairly exactly at every two million objects in the git object database.

Put another way: v3.0 was released when the kernel git object database grew to two million objects, and v4.0 was released when we crossed over the 4M mark. So naturally, if you're into numerology, that unequivocally proves v5.0 will be when we reach 6M objects.

And today my git object database crossed over the 5M object mark.

Ergo, we are half-way to 5.0.

QED.___

2016-10-07 23:15:33 (50 comments; 19 reshares; 312 +1s; )Open 

This is a possibly stupid question, and maybe it's just me that has ever wanted to do this, but I often end up having some terminal that is busy doing something (typically compiling the kernel, but it might be something else).

And I often end up wondering how long it's been churning away.

Yes, yes, I know about (and occasionally use) "ps kstart_time -ef". But it strikes me that it would be nicer to see in the terminal itself somehow. And while I can use PROMPT_COMMAND and do something like

PROMPT_COMMAND='printf "\033]0;$(date '+%X')\007"'

to show when the prompt was last printed in the terminal header, that isn't actually the same thing. It comes fairly close - it shows when the prompt was generated (so when the previous job finished), but not when I actually started a new job.

I'm guessing... more »

This is a possibly stupid question, and maybe it's just me that has ever wanted to do this, but I often end up having some terminal that is busy doing something (typically compiling the kernel, but it might be something else).

And I often end up wondering how long it's been churning away.

Yes, yes, I know about (and occasionally use) "ps kstart_time -ef". But it strikes me that it would be nicer to see in the terminal itself somehow. And while I can use PROMPT_COMMAND and do something like

PROMPT_COMMAND='printf "\033]0;$(date '+%X')\007"'

to show when the prompt was last printed in the terminal header, that isn't actually the same thing. It comes fairly close - it shows when the prompt was generated (so when the previous job finished), but not when I actually started a new job.

I'm guessing somebody else has wanted something like this in the past, and there's a way to make bash execute something before it starts each interactive command, instead of doing it when it prints the prompt. But my google-fu failed me.

Help me. <bats eyelashes>

EDIT: so Sajith in the comments points out that bash 4.4 (released three weeks ago) has the exact thing I was asking for. Life is good when people anticipate your issues.___

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2016-10-07 17:15:52 (29 comments; 84 reshares; 518 +1s; )Open 

___

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2016-10-06 17:34:25 (50 comments; 32 reshares; 919 +1s; )Open 

Occasionally at conferences, I get the question about kernel developers getting older. And some people will happily point out how we're getting fatter too.

But then you see pictures like this, and it makes you think that we may be like good wines - getting better with age.

At least +Dirk Hohndel doesn't do the pornstashe thing any more. And the best my wife could say about me was "nice shoes".

I'm reminded how lucky we are that these kinds of pictures are hard to find. The current generation of awkward young people are going to be really screwed, with all their pictures being saved forever.

Occasionally at conferences, I get the question about kernel developers getting older. And some people will happily point out how we're getting fatter too.

But then you see pictures like this, and it makes you think that we may be like good wines - getting better with age.

At least +Dirk Hohndel doesn't do the pornstashe thing any more. And the best my wife could say about me was "nice shoes".

I'm reminded how lucky we are that these kinds of pictures are hard to find. The current generation of awkward young people are going to be really screwed, with all their pictures being saved forever.___

2016-09-17 18:56:56 (144 comments; 199 reshares; 1,995 +1s; )Open 

Today is the 25th anniversary of the Linux-0.01 release, I do believe.

Normally the anniversary is counted from the announcement email (August 25), because that was the actual public statement of intent. The 0.01 code drop happened a couple of weeks later, and wasn't publicly announced.

Today is the 25th anniversary of the Linux-0.01 release, I do believe.

Normally the anniversary is counted from the announcement email (August 25), because that was the actual public statement of intent. The 0.01 code drop happened a couple of weeks later, and wasn't publicly announced.___

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2016-09-15 20:22:17 (12 comments; 10 reshares; 179 +1s; )Open 

It's interesting how people can recreate the dinosaur skin details etc.

At the same time, my inner five-year-old is severely disappointed in just what that silly thing looks like. If you don't want to see the whole thing, just go to 6:19. This is not the majestic creature I remember growing up thinking dinosaurs were.

It's interesting how people can recreate the dinosaur skin details etc.

At the same time, my inner five-year-old is severely disappointed in just what that silly thing looks like. If you don't want to see the whole thing, just go to 6:19. This is not the majestic creature I remember growing up thinking dinosaurs were.___

2016-09-10 23:13:55 (104 comments; 32 reshares; 566 +1s; )Open 

So four weeks ago I posted asking for input on a new laptop. As evidenced by my scaling factor rant, I now have one, and it's in the process of getting set up.

Before I mention which laptop I got, let me just re-iterate the things I personally care about, and what I don't particularly care about. Because my choice of laptop is obviously tied very much to that, and often what I care about may not be relevant to much anybody else.

First off: I don't use my laptop as a desktop replacement, and I only travel for a small handful of events each year. So for me, the laptop is a fairly specialized thing that doesn't get daily (or even weekly) use, so the main criteria are not some kind of "average daily use", but very much "travel use".

Which is why I end up caring a lot about it being fairly small and light, because I may end up carrying... more »

So four weeks ago I posted asking for input on a new laptop. As evidenced by my scaling factor rant, I now have one, and it's in the process of getting set up.

Before I mention which laptop I got, let me just re-iterate the things I personally care about, and what I don't particularly care about. Because my choice of laptop is obviously tied very much to that, and often what I care about may not be relevant to much anybody else.

First off: I don't use my laptop as a desktop replacement, and I only travel for a small handful of events each year. So for me, the laptop is a fairly specialized thing that doesn't get daily (or even weekly) use, so the main criteria are not some kind of "average daily use", but very much "travel use".

Which is why I end up caring a lot about it being fairly small and light, because I may end up carrying it around all day at a conference. I also want it to have a good screen, because by now I'm just used to it at my main desktop, and I want my text to be legible but small.

What I don't tend to care about is touch-screens, because my fingers are big and clumsy compared to the text I'm looking at (I also can't handle the smudges: maybe I just have particularly oily fingers, but I really don't want to touch that screen).

I also don't care deeply about some "all day battery life", because quite frankly, I can't recall the last time I didn't have access to power. I might not want to bother to plug it in for some quick check, but it's just not a big overwhelming issue. By the time battery life is in "more than a couple of hours", I just don't care very much any more.

So I see laptop reviews that say "do the HD screen instead of the QHD+ one, because you can't see the pixels anyway, and it is better for battery life", and I just go "who is this crazy joker?". That's not who I am.

And no, it's not just a phase.

I do want a reasonably powerful CPU, because when I'm traveling I still build the kernel a lot. I don't do my normal full "make allmodconfig" build between each pull request like I do at home, but I'd like to do it more often than I did with my previous laptop, which is actually (along with the screen) the main reason I wanted to upgrade.

So: good screen, but fairly small and light is primary. With as much CPU power that is reasonable within those primary concerns.

End result: I now have a Dell XPS13. In fact, I've set up two of them in the last month, one for Daniela that went off to college, and the second one now for myself.

The first one was the standard XPS13 that I opened up and replaced the wireless in. It wasn't too painful, but it was a bit annoying to have to do it. The Broadcom wireless really wasn't an option - you can google for it and see even the Windows users complaining about it. But I had a time limit for Daniela going off to school, and I could get a standard XPS13 and a new intel 8260 wireless module right away. And it also acted as my "let's test this out and see" machine.

The one I have now is the "Developer Edition" version that didn't need any surgery to just work.

Anyway, the good news is that there really were a lot of fairly reasonable machines out there now, and the XPS13 was by no means the only possible choice. My thin-and-light kind of requirements used to mean that I had to compromise a lot just a few years ago, but that's no longer the case.

Right now the XPS13 stands out due to the thin bezel, which really does maximize the screen size for the size of machine. That was really what made me pick it for Daniela in the first place. It just ends up hitting my two primary goals very well: small and portable, but with the biggest screen you can cram into that size.

But the Lenovo X1 Carbon got lots of votes, and it looks good too (and a matte screen really is better). The Samsung 9 Spin looked very classy, and if it wasn't for the bezel it might have been my first choice.

Daniela actually liked the HP spectre 13 x360, which I found interesting just because it comes in two versions: butt-ugly and good looking. It was interesting just how much the color choice matters. I thought the all-silver one was the ugliest thing around, while the exact same laptop in brown-with-gold-accents is actually fairly good-looking (and that was what Daniela liked about it too). But I guess that''s very personal.

The Lenovo Yoga 900 still looks like a good choice, and that's what I sent off my older daughter to college with last year. There's apparently a 910 coming out with thinner bezels, so the XPS13 isn't going to be the only kid on the block.

Anyway, there we go. So far the XPS13 looks like a very solid machine, as long as you get the intel wireless module to go with it (and it looks like the next generation should come with good wireless by default).

I haven't used the new laptop enough to really give a review yet, but I'll comment here if anything comes up.___

2016-09-10 22:16:50 (135 comments; 46 reshares; 738 +1s; )Open 

Setting up my new laptop. Am once again reminded that the crazy UI people continue to think that "DPI" is something meaningful. No it is not. The number of pixels matters. Not the DPI.

The new laptop has the same resolution as my desktop, but apparently because the laptop screen is smaller, gnome seems to decide on its own that I need an automatic scaling factor of 2, which blows up all the stupid things (window decorations, icons etc) to a ridiculous degree.

And obviously none of this is documented anywhere, nor are there any sane settings to edit it. Because "settings confuse people". So instead, you have to do this:

gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.interface scaling-factor 1

because unlike having some UI in the gnome settings center, that confuses nobody.

What the hell is wrong with UI people? What insane person thought... more »

Setting up my new laptop. Am once again reminded that the crazy UI people continue to think that "DPI" is something meaningful. No it is not. The number of pixels matters. Not the DPI.

The new laptop has the same resolution as my desktop, but apparently because the laptop screen is smaller, gnome seems to decide on its own that I need an automatic scaling factor of 2, which blows up all the stupid things (window decorations, icons etc) to a ridiculous degree.

And obviously none of this is documented anywhere, nor are there any sane settings to edit it. Because "settings confuse people". So instead, you have to do this:

gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.interface scaling-factor 1

because unlike having some UI in the gnome settings center, that confuses nobody.

What the hell is wrong with UI people? What insane person thought that it's a good idea to say "oh, you have a 13.3" QHD+ display, let's make it act completely different from your 28" QHD+ desktop display and waste all that precious screen real estate with stupid window borders and big fonts in your title bars?"

And especially if you have some heuristic tunable that makes random UI decisions for people, give me a simple setting in the control center that says "no, I really know better than you do".

But no.

Writing a G+ rant just to remind myself for next time this insanity happens.___

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2016-09-07 17:43:34 (62 comments; 28 reshares; 703 +1s; )Open 

Why didn't they have costumes like this when I was a kid?

Why didn't they have costumes like this when I was a kid?___

2016-08-15 20:00:13 (26 comments; 12 reshares; 258 +1s; )Open 

Over the last few months, I've emailed a number people complaining about how their smtp setup was buggy, and as a result their emails lacked the DKIM signatures that the originating domain required them to have.

Gmail seems to have started actually checking DKIM signing (when DMARC records indicated it was required) earlier this year, and since almost nobody else seems to even bother checking it, there were a number of people who just didn't have the configuration right for DKIM signing. They generally didn't even realize that their email was marked as spam for some of us as a result.

It still happens (I sent out another email about bad smtp server configuration yesterday), but what used to be a fairly common problem is actually getting much better.

But as the lack of DKIM signing has became less common, what I noticed happening is that occasionally... more »

Over the last few months, I've emailed a number people complaining about how their smtp setup was buggy, and as a result their emails lacked the DKIM signatures that the originating domain required them to have.

Gmail seems to have started actually checking DKIM signing (when DMARC records indicated it was required) earlier this year, and since almost nobody else seems to even bother checking it, there were a number of people who just didn't have the configuration right for DKIM signing. They generally didn't even realize that their email was marked as spam for some of us as a result.

It still happens (I sent out another email about bad smtp server configuration yesterday), but what used to be a fairly common problem is actually getting much better.

But as the lack of DKIM signing has became less common, what I noticed happening is that occasionally (very very occasionally), I'd get an email that was properly signed by DKIM, but then failed the hash verification. There was no obvious pattern to it.

I finally figured out the pattern a few days ago: the kernel mailing list would rewrite quoted-printable emails by removing the QP and turning it into 8BIT. As a result, the DKIM body hash would no longer verify.

Since mailers generally only use quoted-printable when they have 8-bit content, and DKIM signing is fairly unusual to begin with, most emails by far would never trigger the problem. So only when you had the combination of a source host that required DKIM and an email that contained non-US-ASCII characters (usually due to a name, since we seldom have that in patches or discussion on lkml) would it get marked as spam.

David just applied a patch of mine to zmailer that hopefully fixes it for good (by disabling the QP rewriting if a DKIM signature was present).

Fingers crossed - I had no sane way to actually test the patch, so it might not actually work. The problem was unusual enough that it usually only triggered every few days.

If you send kernel mailing list emails from a broadcom.com, microsoft.com or seagate.com address (those are the main ones I've noticed have mandatory DKIM signing), you could try adding 8-bit characters in there just to test.

If you have nothing else, just add this to your signature:

"The majestik møøse is one of the mäni interesting furry animals in Sweden"

and let's see if all your emails get marked as spam or the untested patch actually works.___

2016-08-12 20:50:36 (144 comments; 11 reshares; 269 +1s; )Open 

Finally thinking of replacing my old Sony Vaio Pro 11. It has worked fine for almost three years, but there are better laptops out there now..

Since I build kernels on this thing, it needs to be a real Core i5 or i7, but my target weight is still around 1kg/2lbs. And I want a real keyboard, not some kind of silly convertible tablet.

I'm ok with 8GB/256GB of RAM/SSD. I've lived with 4GB when on the road for several years, I don't want to do that any more, but I also don't need huge amounts of RAM. I compile the kernel, I don't run big VM's or other odd things.

I've looked at the Asus UX305UA, and it looks almost perfect, except the QHD+ panel seems to be impossible to actually buy. And while a backlit keyboard isn't an absolute must, it is very much in the "good to have" category (unlike, say, a touchscreen, which is a complete waste... more »

Finally thinking of replacing my old Sony Vaio Pro 11. It has worked fine for almost three years, but there are better laptops out there now..

Since I build kernels on this thing, it needs to be a real Core i5 or i7, but my target weight is still around 1kg/2lbs. And I want a real keyboard, not some kind of silly convertible tablet.

I'm ok with 8GB/256GB of RAM/SSD. I've lived with 4GB when on the road for several years, I don't want to do that any more, but I also don't need huge amounts of RAM. I compile the kernel, I don't run big VM's or other odd things.

I've looked at the Asus UX305UA, and it looks almost perfect, except the QHD+ panel seems to be impossible to actually buy. And while a backlit keyboard isn't an absolute must, it is very much in the "good to have" category (unlike, say, a touchscreen, which is a complete waste of money for me).

The XPS13 always comes up, but Dell continues to destroy that laptop with the stupid "Dell Wireless", which is just a nasty OEM Broadcom solution. Yes, I'm aware of the developer edition, and yes, I'm aware that I can just fix it by switching out the wireless card myself.

But the developer edition doesn't actually have - or it is very well hidden - the "add to cart" on Dell.com (which negates the whole "look, Dell is a good guy, buy it!" argument) , and the "but you can switch it out" argument still doesn't fix the fact that I feel bad about buying crap. Sue me.

Dell, please get rid of the crappy "DW" wireless entirely. Or at least allow me to pick a good replacement at build time. Because as-is, your laptop choices look just nasty.

The Lenovo Yoga 900 still looks fairly good, but there are definitely quality assurance concerns when looking at all the reviews.

Suggestions? But please, keep the weight issue and the CPU requirements in mind - they aren't negotiable. If it's even a hair over 3lbs or has a Core-m CPU in it, just shut up about it and don't look like a fool. Ok?

Update: if you search for "xps13" and "linux" on dell.com, you get the old Developer Edition one. Which they don't sell any more. Changing the search terms to "ubuntu" instead of "linux" gets you the new one that they sell.

And on the xps13 page, the developer edition doesn't show up at all, because it's apparently a whole different SKU. Lovely. Anyway, I did finally find where Dell actually sells it, but for a while I thought they had stopped it entirely.___

2016-08-04 14:55:05 (12 comments; 1 reshares; 146 +1s; )Open 

Nature or nurture?

In a recent scientific experiment I uncovered data that may indicate that the dreaded "blurry fish butt syndrome" may have a genetic component.

I gave Daniela my GoPro for a recent dive, and she showed all the symptoms.

Hmm. More research needed.

Nature or nurture?

In a recent scientific experiment I uncovered data that may indicate that the dreaded "blurry fish butt syndrome" may have a genetic component.

I gave Daniela my GoPro for a recent dive, and she showed all the symptoms.

Hmm. More research needed.___

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2016-08-01 19:36:54 (30 comments; 5 reshares; 367 +1s; )Open 

All the locals were singularly unimpressed and looking at the silly tourists that were taking pictures of the iguana.

Or whatever it is.

All the locals were singularly unimpressed and looking at the silly tourists that were taking pictures of the iguana.

Or whatever it is.___

2016-07-31 00:35:29 (44 comments; 18 reshares; 462 +1s; )Open 

The Dream of the 90's is alive in Portland University.

Ahh, the joys of sending your kid off to college. In particular, the unbridled joy of college tuition offices.

You'd think it was enough that they want to have lots of money. No, they want to make it inconvenient too.

I just had to install Adobe acrobat reader because somebody is still using the absolutely insane Adobe-only crazy "secure" pdf (hah - If you make me install Adobe plugins, I really don't think you should talk about security).

And it's not like they don't know it's problematic. They have a big FAQ about how you have to do magic things on just about any OS and browser combination to be able to read that insane format. So they are clearly getting a lot of questions about it.

But instead of just fixing the broken format to be a modern standard pdf,... more »

The Dream of the 90's is alive in Portland University.

Ahh, the joys of sending your kid off to college. In particular, the unbridled joy of college tuition offices.

You'd think it was enough that they want to have lots of money. No, they want to make it inconvenient too.

I just had to install Adobe acrobat reader because somebody is still using the absolutely insane Adobe-only crazy "secure" pdf (hah - If you make me install Adobe plugins, I really don't think you should talk about security).

And it's not like they don't know it's problematic. They have a big FAQ about how you have to do magic things on just about any OS and browser combination to be able to read that insane format. So they are clearly getting a lot of questions about it.

But instead of just fixing the broken format to be a modern standard pdf, let's just inconvenience the people who pay for it all, shall we?

After having used acroread to turn the illegible pdf mess into postscript, and then used ps2pdf to turn it back into actually legible pdf again, the file also shrinks from 879kB to 121kB.

Christ.___

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2016-07-26 04:56:23 (22 comments; 10 reshares; 224 +1s; )Open 

I even found a few of the creatures Dirk took photos of.

As I said on the trip - it's not that I don't have a camera with me under-water. I have both a camera and somebody to press the button for me.

A few favorite pictures from our recent dive trip to Palau. 7 days on the Ocean Hunter I. 31 dives. More than 33 hours under water...
An amazing trip.___I even found a few of the creatures Dirk took photos of.

As I said on the trip - it's not that I don't have a camera with me under-water. I have both a camera and somebody to press the button for me.

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2016-07-07 20:58:45 (25 comments; 11 reshares; 468 +1s; )Open 

Visiting Patricia in San Francisco, and shamelessly raiding the github store.

I'm not going to be one of those cold tourists. 

Visiting Patricia in San Francisco, and shamelessly raiding the github store.

I'm not going to be one of those cold tourists. ___

2016-06-03 21:28:50 (159 comments; 30 reshares; 639 +1s; )Open 

It used to be that the only thing that made Donald Trump look good was comparing him with the other Republican candidates. Because even a whiny five-year old megalomaniac looks positively stellar when compared to a religious nut who loves the death penalty.

Now, those other Republican candidates are gone. That should make for a saner baseline, no?

No.

These days, it's the anti-Trump protesters that make "the Donald" look good in comparison.

Christ, people. You're doing it wrong.

It used to be that the only thing that made Donald Trump look good was comparing him with the other Republican candidates. Because even a whiny five-year old megalomaniac looks positively stellar when compared to a religious nut who loves the death penalty.

Now, those other Republican candidates are gone. That should make for a saner baseline, no?

No.

These days, it's the anti-Trump protesters that make "the Donald" look good in comparison.

Christ, people. You're doing it wrong.___

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2016-05-19 18:59:59 (131 comments; 233 reshares; 1,529 +1s; )Open 

Hey, either Macs don't count much on the desktop, or we may have to finally lay the "year of the Linux desktop" joke to rest.

Hey, either Macs don't count much on the desktop, or we may have to finally lay the "year of the Linux desktop" joke to rest.___

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2016-05-18 06:44:06 (27 comments; 2 reshares; 215 +1s; )Open 

The Who were in town...

The Who were in town...___

2016-05-17 19:11:12 (28 comments; 39 reshares; 435 +1s; )Open 

The new parallel lookup and readdir code from Al Viro just landed in -git.

This is a big deal: we've always serialized accesses to the same directory using the directory inode mutex, and while cached lookups (or lookups in different directories) scaled fine, that per-directory serialization could keep you from getting good performance on some loads.

I remember looking at some nasty samba load that +Andrew Tridgell had, where the serialized readdir caused tons of problems. That was over a decade ago. And it should finally be fixed now, although I suspect samba has lots of workarounds to just avoid the issue.

The new parallel lookup and readdir code from Al Viro just landed in -git.

This is a big deal: we've always serialized accesses to the same directory using the directory inode mutex, and while cached lookups (or lookups in different directories) scaled fine, that per-directory serialization could keep you from getting good performance on some loads.

I remember looking at some nasty samba load that +Andrew Tridgell had, where the serialized readdir caused tons of problems. That was over a decade ago. And it should finally be fixed now, although I suspect samba has lots of workarounds to just avoid the issue.___

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2016-05-16 18:24:57 (85 comments; 8 reshares; 333 +1s; )Open 

The neighbors had a small tree fall overnight (I think it's a golden chain, but my arboreal knowledge is non-existent).

Neither of us having anything as manly as a real chainsaw, I ended up helping him cut off the branches with my circular saw and a couple of long extension cords instead.

The neighbors had a small tree fall overnight (I think it's a golden chain, but my arboreal knowledge is non-existent).

Neither of us having anything as manly as a real chainsaw, I ended up helping him cut off the branches with my circular saw and a couple of long extension cords instead.___

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2016-05-06 04:14:34 (76 comments; 44 reshares; 399 +1s; )Open 

There's a fascinating (and pretty depressing) story over at LA Times about OxyContin.

The article itself is depressing, with he fixation on the dosing schedule apparently being so important from a marketing standpoint. Interesting.

The fact that the top comment (at least right now) then blames the addicted people makes it more depressing still, and wasn't nearly as surprising ;(

There's a fascinating (and pretty depressing) story over at LA Times about OxyContin.

The article itself is depressing, with he fixation on the dosing schedule apparently being so important from a marketing standpoint. Interesting.

The fact that the top comment (at least right now) then blames the addicted people makes it more depressing still, and wasn't nearly as surprising ;(___

2016-05-04 21:46:05 (37 comments; 10 reshares; 291 +1s; )Open 

I've lived with my cheap UHD Dell TN panel that I got for black Friday a year and a half ago. It was really cheap and really not very good, but I wanted the resolution and I felt it would last me until the good IPS panels came down in price.

Today is that day.

I had delayed and kind of hoped that I would have an OLED monitor by now (since I look at text all day, infinite contrast really would be nice), but I suspect that will be another year and a half wait for that next step.

But UHD IPS panels are pretty reasonable these days, and boy what a difference it makes. Much better color, and the electronics inside have improved too. No longer do I need to turn off dpms just because the old Dell panel would take ages to wake up and often not wake up reliably at all.

It's an LG 27" IPS panel in case anybody cares. It got delivered just an hour ago, but so... more »

I've lived with my cheap UHD Dell TN panel that I got for black Friday a year and a half ago. It was really cheap and really not very good, but I wanted the resolution and I felt it would last me until the good IPS panels came down in price.

Today is that day.

I had delayed and kind of hoped that I would have an OLED monitor by now (since I look at text all day, infinite contrast really would be nice), but I suspect that will be another year and a half wait for that next step.

But UHD IPS panels are pretty reasonable these days, and boy what a difference it makes. Much better color, and the electronics inside have improved too. No longer do I need to turn off dpms just because the old Dell panel would take ages to wake up and often not wake up reliably at all.

It's an LG 27" IPS panel in case anybody cares. It got delivered just an hour ago, but so far so great.___

2016-05-03 20:20:26 (57 comments; 19 reshares; 481 +1s; )Open 

Some days are more productive than others.

I just spent 15 minutes researching heavy duty dog poop bags on Amazon. And I was seriously considering just ordering multiple different brands to compare when I finally came to my senses.

Some days are more productive than others.

I just spent 15 minutes researching heavy duty dog poop bags on Amazon. And I was seriously considering just ordering multiple different brands to compare when I finally came to my senses.___

2016-04-25 19:48:37 (58 comments; 3 reshares; 409 +1s; )Open 

I got my 23andme report back.

I was kind of hoping for something interesting, but I guess this is one of those "it's better when it's boring" things. No interesting genetic disorders.

But now I know that I have blue eyes and very low chance of unibrow. Whew. All those mirrors weren't lying to me all those years, and it's not my wife sneakily plucking my brow while I'm asleep.

I'm also apparently 99.7% European, and likely to drink more coffee than average. Yeah, that didn't come as a big shock either.

I got my 23andme report back.

I was kind of hoping for something interesting, but I guess this is one of those "it's better when it's boring" things. No interesting genetic disorders.

But now I know that I have blue eyes and very low chance of unibrow. Whew. All those mirrors weren't lying to me all those years, and it's not my wife sneakily plucking my brow while I'm asleep.

I'm also apparently 99.7% European, and likely to drink more coffee than average. Yeah, that didn't come as a big shock either.___

2016-04-09 16:20:52 (32 comments; 20 reshares; 469 +1s; )Open 

I'm enjoying the Youtube mixup of the SpaceX CRS-8 first stage landing with Lonely Island's "I'm on a boat" song. Congrats to everybody involved.

I'm not very hip, so the only other time I've heard that song is when somebody in my poker group is mangling it (horribly). I think it works better for Elon Musk, but maybe that is because I'm not losing money.

I'm enjoying the Youtube mixup of the SpaceX CRS-8 first stage landing with Lonely Island's "I'm on a boat" song. Congrats to everybody involved.

I'm not very hip, so the only other time I've heard that song is when somebody in my poker group is mangling it (horribly). I think it works better for Elon Musk, but maybe that is because I'm not losing money.___

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2016-03-19 23:20:05 (70 comments; 67 reshares; 530 +1s; )Open 

So I wonder what the excuse is from the apologists that think we don't need ECC in the consumer space this time around?

If you are selling CPUs, and you "differentiate" your products around ECC, you should be ashamed of yourself.  It's not acceptable.

Yeah, I've complained about lack of ECC for over a decade now (you know who you are). There's always some f*cking excuse for why some SKU or other doesn't really "need" it.

Stop it with the excuses already. 

So I wonder what the excuse is from the apologists that think we don't need ECC in the consumer space this time around?

If you are selling CPUs, and you "differentiate" your products around ECC, you should be ashamed of yourself.  It's not acceptable.

Yeah, I've complained about lack of ECC for over a decade now (you know who you are). There's always some f*cking excuse for why some SKU or other doesn't really "need" it.

Stop it with the excuses already. ___

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2016-03-02 22:59:27 (37 comments; 17 reshares; 122 +1s; )Open 

Hey, I have a new math problem for G+ people.  This worked really well back a few years ago when I did the "figure out number of bytes from a bitmask efficiently", so let's see if somebody on G+ has the background to do a good job on a totally different math problem for a totally different open-source project.

This time, it's about gas compressibility in scuba diving, obviously for the +Subsurface project.

The issue is that scuba cylinders end up having a (small) gas compressibility factor difference from the ideal gas law, and it's noticeable enough that some people care.

For example, one of the most common cylinders, the AL80, fits 80 cubic feet of an ideal gas, but only about 77.4 cubic feet of actual air, because air at 3000 psi (the fill pressure of an AL80) has a "compressibility Z factor" of about 1.03.

And it turns outt... more »

Hey, I have a new math problem for G+ people.  This worked really well back a few years ago when I did the "figure out number of bytes from a bitmask efficiently", so let's see if somebody on G+ has the background to do a good job on a totally different math problem for a totally different open-source project.

This time, it's about gas compressibility in scuba diving, obviously for the +Subsurface project.

The issue is that scuba cylinders end up having a (small) gas compressibility factor difference from the ideal gas law, and it's noticeable enough that some people care.

For example, one of the most common cylinders, the AL80, fits 80 cubic feet of an ideal gas, but only about 77.4 cubic feet of actual air, because air at 3000 psi (the fill pressure of an AL80) has a "compressibility Z factor" of about 1.03.

And it turns out that there are many ways to get those compressibility factors, but they all have some problems.

 (a) ignore them. That's actually quite reasonable, but at higher pressures - but still relevant to scuba - the 3% error ends up being more like 10%.

 (b) use a table lookup. That's what we did for a while, and it works fine, for air. Take the air compressibility table at 300K from Wikipedia, do linear interpolation between points for pressure, and you get quite good results. But only for air.

 (c) use actual functions used by physicists. This is the next step we did, because one of the people involved is an actual physicist. The idea is that you can get the compressibility right for other gases too. Sadly, the common functions actually do pretty badly for the usual scuba gases and pressure ranges, probably because these are not ranges that most physicists care about.

 (d) use a least-square polynomial fit of the Wikipedia values. This gets you much prettier code, and good approximations, but gets us back to "just air", but at least in a prettier form than my disgusting table lookup.

 (e) something else.

My current idea for (e) is to do the same least-square fitting for the three relevant gases (Oxygen, Nitrogen and Helium) using the table at 

   http://www.baue.org/library/zfactor_table.php

and then just doing a linear interpolation of the compressibility of the different gases based on the actual gas mix.

Anyway, I realize this is pretty esoteric, but maybe there is somebody around on G+ that can tell whether that linear mix is a good idea or just horrible. 

Don't tell me about van der Waals equations or Redlich-Kwong. Our resident physicist already tried those. In the range we care about (temperature at about 20°C, pressure in the 1-350 bar range), they aren't actually sufficiently close to the experimental values to work..___

2016-02-29 17:32:43 (35 comments; 5 reshares; 214 +1s; )Open 

Went to the Bay Area for Daniela's gym meet over the weekend, and watched the local evening news on Saturday.

I'm convinced the discussion in the newsroom before their weather segment went something like this:

 "Should we kick some puppies onstage tonight?"

 "No, we did that last weekend. How do you feel about pentagrams and human sacrifice?"

 "Wait, I know - there are people from Portland in town. How about we make the whole weather segment be about how we're finally getting some much-needed rain? Let's look extra happy about it!"

 "Mwhahahahhhahh! Perfect!"

... and then they went on to do exactly that.

Bastards.

Went to the Bay Area for Daniela's gym meet over the weekend, and watched the local evening news on Saturday.

I'm convinced the discussion in the newsroom before their weather segment went something like this:

 "Should we kick some puppies onstage tonight?"

 "No, we did that last weekend. How do you feel about pentagrams and human sacrifice?"

 "Wait, I know - there are people from Portland in town. How about we make the whole weather segment be about how we're finally getting some much-needed rain? Let's look extra happy about it!"

 "Mwhahahahhhahh! Perfect!"

... and then they went on to do exactly that.

Bastards.___

2016-02-26 20:14:11 (58 comments; 20 reshares; 361 +1s; )Open 

Is "walking like a penguin" a good or bad thing?

The Trump quotes keep on coming in the 2016 Republican presidential primaries. Most of them are pretty clearly derogatory ("stupid" or "like a little baby"), but the most recent one where Romney apparently walks like a penguin struck me as pretty ambiguous.

But maybe it's just me that likes penguins. 

Or maybe Trump is a penguin fan too, and trying to cozy up to Romney.  He's done odder things. 

I'm enjoying the Republican discussions more than I would have ever expected.

Is "walking like a penguin" a good or bad thing?

The Trump quotes keep on coming in the 2016 Republican presidential primaries. Most of them are pretty clearly derogatory ("stupid" or "like a little baby"), but the most recent one where Romney apparently walks like a penguin struck me as pretty ambiguous.

But maybe it's just me that likes penguins. 

Or maybe Trump is a penguin fan too, and trying to cozy up to Romney.  He's done odder things. 

I'm enjoying the Republican discussions more than I would have ever expected.___

2016-02-10 23:34:59 (73 comments; 9 reshares; 298 +1s; )Open 

I'm looking at the Google Play Music family plan, because I'd like to make sure the kids end up listening to their music legally. 

However, that thing must be the absolutely worst documented thing ever. Either that, or it's the most mis-designed thing ever. So before I take that plunge, can somebody who uses it clarify which of the two it is, by answering this simple question for me:

Q: Can I actually sign up for the family plan (what $14.99/mo), without having to then worry about any mistaken purchases by the kids.

Don't get me wrong - it's no that I don't trust my kids (or my wife, heh) to behave. But every time I look at the FAQ for that thing, I end up struck by the fact that the whole "family payment plan" seems to be tragically misdesigned, and is a "family can randomly use the credit card information you put in" plan.more »

I'm looking at the Google Play Music family plan, because I'd like to make sure the kids end up listening to their music legally. 

However, that thing must be the absolutely worst documented thing ever. Either that, or it's the most mis-designed thing ever. So before I take that plunge, can somebody who uses it clarify which of the two it is, by answering this simple question for me:

Q: Can I actually sign up for the family plan (what $14.99/mo), without having to then worry about any mistaken purchases by the kids.

Don't get me wrong - it's no that I don't trust my kids (or my wife, heh) to behave. But every time I look at the FAQ for that thing, I end up struck by the fact that the whole "family payment plan" seems to be tragically misdesigned, and is a "family can randomly use the credit card information you put in" plan.

Yes, in-app purchases are restricted, but that seems to be the only thing. 

Maybe it's just the support pages that are garbage.  I can hardly complain about that, considering how much great documentation I write myself.

So please tell me it's just the docs that are crazy.

Because I can't imagine that anybody would be so stupid as to actually design a system the way it's documented.

I take that back. I can imagine that, which is why I'm not signing up without clarification..___

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