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Mee Ming Wong has been at 7 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Craft Beer Nation0For Episode 164 of our #FridayNightHangout  we are taking a break from a specific style and diving into one of our favorite Craft Breweries: @104060331429659495608  We'll be drinking and discussing some fantastic #craftbeer  from one of the top breweries in the country.  Expect to see some big favorites and hopefully some new ones.  And we're looking forward to discussing the impact Stone has had on the American Craft Beer scene from all aspects.  From their love of Hops to their impact on the updating of many State's outdated beer laws, Stone certainly is a big fish in the industry.  And a favorite of many of us here at Craft Beer Nation. What are your thoughts on *Stone Brewing*?  Let us know. Look to the comments on the event here to see what people are planning to drink on air! *To WATCH*: Respond "Yes" to the Event Invite and you will receive a notification when the Event goes live. That will bring you back to this event and there will be a link to the live feed here. *To JOIN the HOA*: Respond "Yes" to the event, make sure you are following  +Craft Beer Nation, and comment here that you want to participate. If we don't know you want to join, we can't add you to the circle of invitees. *To JOIN the AFTER-PARTY*: Respond "Yes" to the event, make sure you are following +Craft Beer Nation, and comment here that you want to join just the after-party. You will get an notification that the hangout is starting and a link to join us. Just watch and wait for us to go off the air before clicking the Join. You may still get a warning about joining a Hangout on Air, but rest assured that once we hit the button to stop broadcasting, it would take all of Hillary Clinton's emails to get it running again. We are Craft Beer Nation and you can find us at the following locations.  We'd love to hear from you. *Website* http://craftbeernation.org/blog/ *Twitter* https://twitter.com/CBNCommunity *Instagram* https://instagram.com/craftbeer_nation/ *YouTube* https://www.youtube.com/user/CraftBeerNation *Podcast Feedburner* http://feeds.feedburner.com/CraftBeerNation #CraftBeerNation   #CBN   #FNH   #HangoutsOnAir   #HOA   #FNHBeer   #StoneBrewing   #Hops   #CraftBeer  Celebrating Stone Beers - Friday Night Hangout (Ep. 164)2015-06-27 04:00:0013  
Azlin Bloor54,263*LET'S TALK RICE*   this one for those of you on the other side of GMT! Everything you wanted to know about rice & more as we explore all ways with rice!It's Reigning Rice Part 22014-01-18 22:00:0026  
Robert SKREINER1,228,980@110538600381916983600 ► *❶st Contest* Theme: *Natural Water Photos* includes all  Seascape-, Waterfall-, River-, Lake- Photos, etc. by @117000139571713536948 & @110806949181190360839  *Contest Rules:* ● Sign in to the Contest with a short comment! ● *Photos must be your own photos and work!* ● Max *10 Photos* per participating Photographer ● Photos must be uploaded to this *❶st Contest–Page* ● Please add @110538600381916983600 & @105124330145456519952 to your circles,     as well as @117000139571713536948 & @110806949181190360839  ● Post a short own comment to your photo incl. location ● You can also give +1 to your own photo! ● Please be fair and comment also to other photos! ● Please share this ► *❶st Contest* Invitation in your stream! ● Please invite your Google+ Friends and Followers. ● *Don't upload BW-Monochrome Photos!*    There is also a Contest of the Page:   @118354348104191320538  ● Don't delete the automatically shared Contest Photos    in your stream! So you will get more +1 *The best 100 ►TOP Photos on Google+◄* will be shared also at the Page: @110538600381916983600 and in  our Community: *TOP Photos on G+* https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/102730381095199131702 *The 3 ►TOP Photos◄* of the *Winners* will be shared also in the stream of @117000139571713536948 & @110806949181190360839  *All participating Photographers will be incuded in*   *public shared circles of *     @117000139571713536948  & @110806949181190360839  & @110538600381916983600 & @105124330145456519952  *The final decision about the winners is made by an international and independent jury!* ░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░ @102506901448022034742  @114944941956349340056  @109655133541434616383 @107009098215521569646  @112840736235573716407 @115580685364349575355 @114507611997390703788    @102551956772228628364  @112271908611925541359  @102664053835780029639 @105782727431661976037   @104047237564402491584 @105124330145456519952  @101843523903788031573 @105798359393030559274  @117985549028905293535 @103374725189855996747  @112527225704468158520 by @102202857193383470434 +10000 PHOTOGRAPHERS -▶❶st Contest◄ - Natural Water Photos2013-07-23 09:00:001995  
Takahiro Yamamoto3,228,971We'll finish our 366 project in several days! Are you happy about it? Or are you sad? Anyway, who not celebrate the fact that we're completing our missions! You can share two shots this time. *Please remember just two images!* 1) Your best or most favorite shot you took in the fourth quarter of 2012 (October- December). Add #Bestof4Q12Creative366  in the comment section after you post the image! 2) Your best or most favorite shot you took for the project this year. Add #BestofCreative366Project  in the comment section after you post the image! If you think those two tags are too complicated, forget them and just two of your images! But please add your comment in the comment section after you have posted them. *And if you are the one who failed to complete the mission and are thinking you are going to do it again next year, you can add your fav one you took for the project here!* One last thing: I have made this event "public." I might have missed inviting those who are participating this +Creative 366 Project, so if you know anyone who isn't here but is doing his/her project, please invite them! 366プロジェクトもあと数日で終わりです。うれしいですか。それとも、悲しい? どちらにしても、長かったミッションの終わりを皆で祝いましょう! 今回は写真を2枚シェアしてください。 *2枚だけです!* 1.10月~12月にプロジェクト用に撮った写真から、お気に入りの写真かベストの写真を1枚選んで投稿してください。 #Bestof4Q12Creative366  のタグを投稿後にコメント欄に入れてください。 2.プロジェクトのために撮った写真から、今年のベスト(もしくはお気に入り)! の写真を1枚選んで投稿して下さい。  #BestofCreative366Project  をタグとします。 タグが面倒なら、ただ2枚を選んで投稿してくださるだけで結構です。写真のコメント欄に、その写真の思い出などを書き添えていただけるとうれしいです。 そして、このプロジェクトに参加したのに途中で挫折した!来年こそは!という方も、ぜひこのイベントにご参加ください。挫折するまでに撮った写真をシェアしていただければ結構です。もちろん、来年への抱負も添えてくださいね!The Best of Your 3662012-12-30 16:00:0087  
Takahiro Yamamoto3,228,971Where are you and what are you doing on December 12, 2012 (tomorrow), and at 12:12:12 if possible (your lunchtime?). SLRs, compact cameras. phone camera, digital or anolog ... Any cameras are welcome! Let's record the day together! *Invite your friends :)* *Share this link with your friends outside Google+:* http://bit.ly/Shoot121212 明日は12/12/12。どこにいて、何をしていますか? この日に撮った写真をシェアしましょう! 12時12分12秒なら、なお素敵(ランチタイムでしょうか!) カメラは一眼、コンデジ、スマホ、何でもオーケーです。みんなでこの日を記録しましょう。 *お友だちもご招待ください!*Shoot 12/12/122012-12-12 04:00:00487  
Takahiro Yamamoto3,228,971The third quarter is going to be over soon! I'm happy to announce that the event page for the 366ers again. why not share your best or favorite shot you took in the third quarter of 2012 (July 1 - September 30). The date of the event has been set one week after the end of the quarter, so please select one (up to three images) and share it/them here! After you post your photo, please write why you have chosen the image in the comment box. If you have questions about this event page, feel free to leave comment here. One last thing: Please don't share your entire album here. Sometimes it happens when you press a wrong button. Be careful. もうすぐ「クリエイティブ366プロジェクト」も9カ月が過ぎようとしています。今回もやります。2012年第三四半期のベストショット、お気に入りのショットを1枚選んでシェアしてください(最高3枚まで)。シェアしたら、その写真の下のコメント欄に、何でその写真を選んだのか、理由などを書いていただけたらうれしいです。イベントの日時は9月を過ぎて1週間後の月曜日に設定してあります。 最後に、間違って366のアルバム全体をシェアしないでくださいね!Best of Creative 366 Project 3Q122012-10-07 17:00:0082  
Nikola Nikolski44,436These are often the photos that impress, show what you have on your HD... but post not more than three. Have fun and comment!Inelaborate Life in B&W2012-09-20 19:00:0056  

Shared Circles including Mee Ming Wong

Shared Circles are not available on Google+ anymore, but you can find them still here.

The Google+ Collections of Mee Ming Wong

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

4
comments per post
2
reshares per post
28
+1's per post

532
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 30

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2016-02-03 13:16:52 (30 comments; 2 reshares; 24 +1s)Open 

Working Hard to Hardly Working

Robotification, is a word. It means work normally performed by humans are replaced with mechanical or electronic machines. As in, we’re getting robotified out of a job.

For decades, robots have been quietly moving into factories, offices, hospitals, military services and outer space. The progress has been very gradual, but suddenly, robotics is heating up. We are at the inflection point, the turning point on a curve where change picks up speed.

It is predicted that robots will take over 30% of our jobs in the next 10 years. 

Robots are already here, look around, many of the jobs that were once done by humans are now performed by machines. The Automated Teller Machine (ATM) replaced bank tellers; airport self check-in kiosks; grocery store self check-out; factory robotic arms.

Robots and machines are good workers,th... more »

Most reshares: 17

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2016-01-25 12:34:04 (23 comments; 17 reshares; 168 +1s)Open 

Painted Women

Edgar Degas was the street photographer of his time. His works depicted urban life in a raw state. Best known for his paintings of ballet dancers, he also painted women at work, milliners, laundresses and prostitutes.

Prostitution in 19th century Paris was a hot topic; sex in the city of lights. At no other time was there such a fascination and appeal of prostitution in literature and art. 

The new world of industrialization was followed closely by urbanization, creating opportunities and difficulties. Paris was in the midst of a massive social transition and the arts reflected the collapse of traditional ideals to reveal a more compelling reality.
 
The oldest game in town was widely accepted as a sordid but necessary vice. Representations of prostitution fluctuated between fascination and repulsion, of pleasure and of pain.

Somen... more »

Most plusones: 202

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2016-01-15 12:26:44 (9 comments; 15 reshares; 202 +1s)Open 

Shaping the Psyche of the Masses

Propaganda is a purposeful way of spreadin’ the cause, often with a negative connotation of manipulative persuasion.  The use of art in the service of political causes has a long and lasting history. Rulers of ancient empires have used art to glorify their power and victories.

The art movement Socialist Realism emerged during the 1930’s, a time marked by global economic depression, the rise of radical political movements and the optimism after the Mexican and Russian revolutions.

Communism views revolution as a continuous process of not only a transformation of social reality but also a transformation of the consciousness of its people.

Introduced under Joseph Stalin in 1934, Socialist Realism was the official aesthetic of the Soviet Union. It was viewed that the function of art is to educate the population.
Th... more »

Latest 50 posts

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2016-02-08 12:35:04 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

The Pathos of Hard Times
Maynard Dixon and Dorothea Lange were married. He was a painter and she was a photographer. Together they captured the turbulence of a nation during the 1930’s Great Depression. Their images are icons of the pathos of that period. The cause of the Depressio...

The Pathos of Hard Times
Maynard Dixon and Dorothea Lange were married. He was a painter and she was a photographer. Together they captured the turbulence of a nation during the 1930’s Great Depression. Their images are icons of the pathos of that period. The cause of the Depressio...___

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2016-02-08 12:32:27 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 38 +1s)Open 

The Pathos of Hard Times

Maynard Dixon and Dorothea Lange were married. He was a painter and she was a photographer. Together they captured the turbulence of a nation during the 1930’s Great Depression. Their images are icons of the pathos of that period.

The cause of the Depression was a confluence of many events.  

First, the Dust Bowl drought was a natural disaster that came in three waves and lasted up to eight years. The Plains became so dry that topsoil simply blew away with the windstorms. It devastated farmlands. Farmers lost their crops, their homes, their farms, and their life savings. Businesses failed and banks closed. When people could not pay their taxes, local governments went bankrupt.

Then, the Wall Street stock market crashed in October 1929, the world economy was plunged into the Great Depression.

The effects of theDe... more »

The Pathos of Hard Times

Maynard Dixon and Dorothea Lange were married. He was a painter and she was a photographer. Together they captured the turbulence of a nation during the 1930’s Great Depression. Their images are icons of the pathos of that period.

The cause of the Depression was a confluence of many events.  

First, the Dust Bowl drought was a natural disaster that came in three waves and lasted up to eight years. The Plains became so dry that topsoil simply blew away with the windstorms. It devastated farmlands. Farmers lost their crops, their homes, their farms, and their life savings. Businesses failed and banks closed. When people could not pay their taxes, local governments went bankrupt.

Then, the Wall Street stock market crashed in October 1929, the world economy was plunged into the Great Depression.

The effects of the Depression were devastating across the United States. Some 13-15 million people or about 20% of the U.S. population at the time was unemployed. Industrial production dropped 45%, house construction fell 80% and the entire banking system was at the brink of collapse.

Both Maynard Dixon and Dorothea Lange created compelling images of the effects of societal upheaval on the human spirit. Their art captured the spirit and soul of America at a specific moment in history.

Forgotten Man shows a destitute man on a curb, lost in shadow, the viewer is at his level in close proximity. The pathos is intensified with the cropped composition of the passersby. The painting exposes Dixon’s deep sense of humanity.

Dorothea Lange’s photograph of Florence Owen and her children has been an image that defined and symbolized the desolation of that era in history. Dorothea Lange was a studio portrait photographer, it was her husband Maynard Dixon that encouraged her to take her camera from the studio out to the roadside camps to capture the despair and uncertainty of the times.

Now, decades later with the complexities of globalization, climate change and technology, their times and art still resonate and have never been more poignant.

Their compelling images transform the way we see the world.___

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2016-02-07 14:48:03 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

Brookfield Place, Toronto

Brookfield Place development covers an entire city block in Toronto. The Galleria that links two bank towers is an architectural marvel, this atrium of light was designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. The Galleria is defined by 16 intertwining steel arches, which branch out in parabolic shapes that evoke the feeling of a forest canopy. Take a 360-spin look around.

#photosphere  

Brookfield Place, Toronto

Brookfield Place development covers an entire city block in Toronto. The Galleria that links two bank towers is an architectural marvel, this atrium of light was designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. The Galleria is defined by 16 intertwining steel arches, which branch out in parabolic shapes that evoke the feeling of a forest canopy. Take a 360-spin look around.

#photosphere  ___

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2016-02-06 14:11:19 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

Weekend Smile

Weekend Smile___

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2016-02-05 12:53:39 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Evening Sky

Evening Sky___

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2016-02-04 18:18:52 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 

Photosphere of Lake Ontario in the Evening

Photosphere of Lake Ontario in the Evening___

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2016-02-04 12:32:31 (8 comments; 6 reshares; 111 +1s)Open 

Escape to Beyond

American artist Maynard Dixon (1875 – 1946) captured the physical openness of the West in his landscapes. His paintings conveyed the breadth and depth of a vastness that is the American West, an empty openness that many have projected their dreams and hopes upon.

It was that stark emptiness that engulfed Dixon on a deep level.

“The empty desert . . . returns your questionings to you, to your own inner silence which becomes aware – a mystical something that is neither reason nor intelligence nor intuition, a recognition of some nameless truth that may not be denied.”

Painting: Approach to Zion, 1933

Escape to Beyond

American artist Maynard Dixon (1875 – 1946) captured the physical openness of the West in his landscapes. His paintings conveyed the breadth and depth of a vastness that is the American West, an empty openness that many have projected their dreams and hopes upon.

It was that stark emptiness that engulfed Dixon on a deep level.

“The empty desert . . . returns your questionings to you, to your own inner silence which becomes aware – a mystical something that is neither reason nor intelligence nor intuition, a recognition of some nameless truth that may not be denied.”

Painting: Approach to Zion, 1933___

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2016-02-03 13:21:06 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

Working Hard to Hardly Working
Robotification, is a word. It means work normally performed by humans are replaced with mechanical or electronic machines. As in, we’re getting robotified out of a job. For decades, robots have been quietly moving into factories, offices, hospitals, militar...

Working Hard to Hardly Working
Robotification, is a word. It means work normally performed by humans are replaced with mechanical or electronic machines. As in, we’re getting robotified out of a job. For decades, robots have been quietly moving into factories, offices, hospitals, militar...___

posted image

2016-02-03 13:16:52 (30 comments; 2 reshares; 24 +1s)Open 

Working Hard to Hardly Working

Robotification, is a word. It means work normally performed by humans are replaced with mechanical or electronic machines. As in, we’re getting robotified out of a job.

For decades, robots have been quietly moving into factories, offices, hospitals, military services and outer space. The progress has been very gradual, but suddenly, robotics is heating up. We are at the inflection point, the turning point on a curve where change picks up speed.

It is predicted that robots will take over 30% of our jobs in the next 10 years. 

Robots are already here, look around, many of the jobs that were once done by humans are now performed by machines. The Automated Teller Machine (ATM) replaced bank tellers; airport self check-in kiosks; grocery store self check-out; factory robotic arms.

Robots and machines are good workers,th... more »

Working Hard to Hardly Working

Robotification, is a word. It means work normally performed by humans are replaced with mechanical or electronic machines. As in, we’re getting robotified out of a job.

For decades, robots have been quietly moving into factories, offices, hospitals, military services and outer space. The progress has been very gradual, but suddenly, robotics is heating up. We are at the inflection point, the turning point on a curve where change picks up speed.

It is predicted that robots will take over 30% of our jobs in the next 10 years. 

Robots are already here, look around, many of the jobs that were once done by humans are now performed by machines. The Automated Teller Machine (ATM) replaced bank tellers; airport self check-in kiosks; grocery store self check-out; factory robotic arms.

Robots and machines are good workers, they work fast and precise, they don’t make mistakes, they don’t get tired and cost much less than the minimum wage. Repetitive tasks done continuously and tirelessly are the key features of their résumé. They work better, longer, faster and cheaper.

In the past, machines were mechanical muscle; the new robots are mechanical minds built by engineers and programmers. Robotics fall roughly into six categories: manufacturing, military defence, space exploration, medical surgery, research and personal service.

Automation and robots will replace workers from all sectors. The self-driving cars or Autos will replace truck drivers, bus drivers or harvester drivers; accountants and some lawyers will be substituted by software; Watson the doctor bot is predicted to be the best doctor in the world, making evidence-based correlations for medical diagnosis.

With the sweeping changes to a displaced workforce, a society in which machines are doing more and humans less, the question is how are we going to adjust to a world without work. 

Work and money are two entities that drive our economic societies and many see it in a very extrinsic way. A different approach would be to consider their intrinsic qualities.
 
Money is a paradox, it can buy many things but not the things worth having. Money can buy education but not intelligence; medical care but not health; clothes but not style; house but not a home; sex but not love. Money cannot buy purpose, respect or integrity.

Work has an important intrinsic value for many.

Work is the vehicle through which we fit into the world, to develop our identity and sense of belonging.

Working is vital for human beings, it is an instinct to want to be a valued, useful and a contributing member of the tribe. Meaningful work helps develop our well-being, a sense of identity and worth.

For the 15% science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workers, the future looks bright, their skills augment the intelligent machines. For the others there will be less employment.
 
The concern is a polarising, divided society. A demand for high-skill workers and a rise in the service industry of lower-paid work that is hard to automate. 

How we educate has to change, preparing the student for the real world doesn’t apply anymore, upon graduation, in that time it takes to earn a degree, a robot has taken their job. Competing with a robot is not an option, we need to prepare university students to do things robots cannot; to learn to be more human.

For those who can combine critical analytical thinking with creativity, that person will always be needed, anywhere.

People will find their way, human beings always do.___

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2016-02-02 12:07:37 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

Crossing That Bridge

Crossing That Bridge___

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2016-02-01 13:50:10 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 24 +1s)Open 

Happy February!

Happy February!___

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2016-01-31 16:37:48 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

From Germany: Clueso, Gewinner 

The German language is sometimes described as gruff and guttural. In music, the sounds are softened and it gives a strong rhythm to the song, the words are like a percussion instrument. 

Clueso is a singer and rapper whose videos are as captivating as his sound.

Lyrics:
Gewinner

An allem, was man sagt, an allem, was man sagt ist auch was dran
Egal, wer kommt, egal, wer geht, egal, es kommt nicht darauf an
Ich glaube nichts, ich glaub an dich, glaubst du an mich, ich glaub ich auch
Ich frage mich, ich frage dich, doch frag ich nicht: „Fragst du dich auch?“

Ich bin dabei, du bist dabei, wir sind dabei, uns zu verlieren
Ich bin dabei, bist du dabei, sind wir dabei, uns zu verlieren?
Ich bin dabei, du bist dabei, wir sind dabei, uns zu verlieren
Ich bin dabei, bist du dabei, binich d... more »

From Germany: Clueso, Gewinner 

The German language is sometimes described as gruff and guttural. In music, the sounds are softened and it gives a strong rhythm to the song, the words are like a percussion instrument. 

Clueso is a singer and rapper whose videos are as captivating as his sound.

Lyrics:
Gewinner

An allem, was man sagt, an allem, was man sagt ist auch was dran
Egal, wer kommt, egal, wer geht, egal, es kommt nicht darauf an
Ich glaube nichts, ich glaub an dich, glaubst du an mich, ich glaub ich auch
Ich frage mich, ich frage dich, doch frag ich nicht: „Fragst du dich auch?“

Ich bin dabei, du bist dabei, wir sind dabei, uns zu verlieren
Ich bin dabei, bist du dabei, sind wir dabei, uns zu verlieren?
Ich bin dabei, du bist dabei, wir sind dabei, uns zu verlieren
Ich bin dabei, bist du dabei, bin ich dabei, uns zu verlieren?

Leichter als leicht geht es vielleicht, leichter als das, was vielleicht war
Leichter als leicht, es ist nicht weit von hier zu dem, was noch nicht war
Suchst du mich, dann such ich dich, ist die Versuchung groß genug
Ich lass es zu, komm, lass es zu, komm, lass es uns noch einmal tun
Ich geb nicht auf, gehst du mit mir, gehst du mit mir mit auf uns zu?
Fällt dir nichts ein? Komm, leg nicht auf, komm, reg dich auf und komm zur Ruh

English:

In everything what they say, there's something to everything they say,
No matter who comes, no matter who goes, no matter, it doesn't matter
I believe in nothing, I believe in you, do you believe in me, I believe I do too
I ask myself, I ask you, but I don't ask: "Do you ask yourself too?"

I am, you are, we are losing ourselves
Am I, are you, are we losing ourselves?
I am, you are, we are losing ourselves
Am I, are you, are we losing ourselves?

It might be easier than easy, easier than the things that might have been
Easier than easy, it's not far from here to the things that have not yet been
Do you look for me, than I look for you, is the temptation big enough?
I'll allow this, come, allow it, come, let's do it one more time
I don't give up, would you go with me, would you go with me to us?
Does nothing come to your mind? Come, don't hang up, come, fluster and calm down.___

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2016-01-31 15:45:59 (4 comments; 5 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

A lovely animated film on the meeting of probabilities.

A lovely animated film on the meeting of probabilities.___

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2016-01-30 10:49:21 (4 comments; 1 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

January Sunrises

Watching light mark the start of a new day is an exciting and wondrous thing. This video is a compilation of sunrises over Lake Ontario this month of January. There were a few cloudy days and slept in days.

January Sunrises

Watching light mark the start of a new day is an exciting and wondrous thing. This video is a compilation of sunrises over Lake Ontario this month of January. There were a few cloudy days and slept in days.___

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2016-01-29 12:40:10 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 36 +1s)Open 

Dewy Snow in Toronto

Dewy Snow in Toronto___

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2016-01-28 19:16:05 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

From the U.S.: Wilco, I Might
Lean, mean, strum and drums. Great sound.

From the U.S.: Wilco, I Might
Lean, mean, strum and drums. Great sound.___

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2016-01-28 12:56:33 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

Dosing β-Carotene

Dosing β-Carotene___

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2016-01-28 12:54:54 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Carrot Alert

Carrot Alert___

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2016-01-27 12:36:01 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

Kebab Me!

Kebab Me!___

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2016-01-27 12:34:04 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 14 +1s)Open 

Iguana Go My Way?

Iguana Go My Way?___

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2016-01-26 12:38:18 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 28 +1s)Open 

Winter Light

Winter Light___

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2016-01-25 12:34:04 (23 comments; 17 reshares; 168 +1s)Open 

Painted Women

Edgar Degas was the street photographer of his time. His works depicted urban life in a raw state. Best known for his paintings of ballet dancers, he also painted women at work, milliners, laundresses and prostitutes.

Prostitution in 19th century Paris was a hot topic; sex in the city of lights. At no other time was there such a fascination and appeal of prostitution in literature and art. 

The new world of industrialization was followed closely by urbanization, creating opportunities and difficulties. Paris was in the midst of a massive social transition and the arts reflected the collapse of traditional ideals to reveal a more compelling reality.
 
The oldest game in town was widely accepted as a sordid but necessary vice. Representations of prostitution fluctuated between fascination and repulsion, of pleasure and of pain.

Somen... more »

Painted Women

Edgar Degas was the street photographer of his time. His works depicted urban life in a raw state. Best known for his paintings of ballet dancers, he also painted women at work, milliners, laundresses and prostitutes.

Prostitution in 19th century Paris was a hot topic; sex in the city of lights. At no other time was there such a fascination and appeal of prostitution in literature and art. 

The new world of industrialization was followed closely by urbanization, creating opportunities and difficulties. Paris was in the midst of a massive social transition and the arts reflected the collapse of traditional ideals to reveal a more compelling reality.
 
The oldest game in town was widely accepted as a sordid but necessary vice. Representations of prostitution fluctuated between fascination and repulsion, of pleasure and of pain.

Some novelists and artists depicted prostitution as human sexuality freed from conventions of morality and religion. As a celebration of sexual consumerism, especially the courtesans; up-market prostitution at the top of the trade pyramid.

In a more somber light, the arts also depicted another reality of prostitution, the new void in human relationships and the sordid depths of human existence.

Edgar Degas’ painting L’Absinthe, like a snapshot, captures a moment in a café of two figures. In a style often favoured by Degas, they are positioned off center with an expanse of empty foreground. She stares blankly ahead, her arms limp by her sides, a posture devoid of energy or will. The man sits by her, the two are locked in silent, lonely isolation. Sitting on the table is a glass of Absinthe, the 19th century equivalent of lines of cocaine. At the time, absinthe, often referred to as the “green fairy”, was targeted as being responsible for alcoholism and social instability.

For Degas, he was not making a moral statement but rather a depiction of a moment in the wretched lives of modern society. Degas was a realist.___

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2016-01-24 15:05:38 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

From Norway: Ylvis, Old Friends

Multi-talented brothers Vegard and Bård Ylvisåker’s new song Old Friends is equal parts Simon & Garfunkel and Waiting for Godot. From the Theatre of the Absurd, Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot’s two characters represented the distinct entities of our physical and intellectual sides. The song and video is laced with humour, theatre of the absurd and existentialism.

From Norway: Ylvis, Old Friends

Multi-talented brothers Vegard and Bård Ylvisåker’s new song Old Friends is equal parts Simon & Garfunkel and Waiting for Godot. From the Theatre of the Absurd, Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot’s two characters represented the distinct entities of our physical and intellectual sides. The song and video is laced with humour, theatre of the absurd and existentialism.___

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2016-01-23 14:55:51 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

Sunrise over Lake Ontario

Sunrise over Lake Ontario___

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2016-01-22 18:30:59 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

From France: Yann Tiersen, Loin des Villes

Something pretty.

From France: Yann Tiersen, Loin des Villes

Something pretty.___

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2016-01-22 12:21:37 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

Fawny Friday Smile

Fawny Friday Smile___

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2016-01-22 12:19:44 (6 comments; 2 reshares; 28 +1s)Open 

Eyes for YOU

Eyes for YOU___

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2016-01-21 12:28:36 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

Toronto

Toronto___

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2016-01-20 12:28:26 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

Pelican Smile

Pelican Smile___

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2016-01-19 12:30:57 (6 comments; 1 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

Iguana Give You a Smile

Iguana Give You a Smile___

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2016-01-18 12:33:28 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Simplicity
Henry David Thoreau said “The perception of beauty is a moral test.” The brilliance of this simple statement is breathtaking. There is allure to his ideas, words and the way he lived his life. He enraptures by making us question our own lives. When Henry Da...

Simplicity
Henry David Thoreau said “The perception of beauty is a moral test.” The brilliance of this simple statement is breathtaking. There is allure to his ideas, words and the way he lived his life. He enraptures by making us question our own lives. When Henry Da...___

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2016-01-18 12:29:57 (8 comments; 3 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 

Simplicity

Henry David Thoreau said “The perception of beauty is a moral test.” The brilliance of this simple statement is breathtaking.

There is allure to his ideas, words and the way he lived his life. He enraptures by making us question our own lives.

When Henry David Thoreau was 28, he conducted a two-year experiment on himself. He bought a hammer, borrowed an axe, got his hands on some boards and began constructing a cabin in a forest by Walden Pond, in Massachusetts. On July 1845, he declared his independence from the world and began his experiment.

He wanted to experience life with the fewest of things. He wanted to live deliberately, to confront only the essential facts of life, to eliminate all that was not life.

He lived at Walden Pond for two years, two months, and two days. It was a successful experiment, he lived with hispri... more »

Simplicity

Henry David Thoreau said “The perception of beauty is a moral test.” The brilliance of this simple statement is breathtaking.

There is allure to his ideas, words and the way he lived his life. He enraptures by making us question our own lives.

When Henry David Thoreau was 28, he conducted a two-year experiment on himself. He bought a hammer, borrowed an axe, got his hands on some boards and began constructing a cabin in a forest by Walden Pond, in Massachusetts. On July 1845, he declared his independence from the world and began his experiment.

He wanted to experience life with the fewest of things. He wanted to live deliberately, to confront only the essential facts of life, to eliminate all that was not life.

He lived at Walden Pond for two years, two months, and two days. It was a successful experiment, he lived with his priorities and lived the way he wanted to live.

For two years, he lived simply, without the need to support a lifestyle that he did not need or care about. He left with a great story, Walden.  He moved on, it was time to experience other lives. “I left the woods because I had several more lives to live, and could not spare any more time for that one.”

Thoreau’s work is full of criticism for the tendency of man to worship wealth; to want wealth not to satisfy need, but the abstract and obsessive purpose to show that they have won in the game of life.

“The perception of beauty is a moral test.” 

His poetic voice is glowing, with a timeless relevance.

I’m Thankful that my Life doth not Deceive

I’m thankful that my life doth not deceive
Itself with a low loftiness, half height,
And think it soars when still it dip its way
Beneath the clouds on noiseless pinion
Like the crow or owl, but it doth know
The full extent of all its trivialness,
Compared with the splendid heights above.
See how it waits to watch the mail come in
While ’hind its back the sun goes out perchance.
And yet their lumbering cart brings me no word
Not one scrawled leaf such as my neighbors get
To cheer them with the slight events forsooth
Faint ups and downs of their far distant friends—
And now ’tis passed. What next? See the long train
Of teams wreathed in dust, their atmosphere;
Shall I attend until the last is passed?
Else why these ears that hear the leader’s bells
Or eyes that link me in procession?
But hark! the drowsy day has done its task,
Far in yon hazy field where stands a barn,
Unanxious hens improve the sultry hour
And with contented voice now brag their deed—
A new laid egg—Now let the day decline—
They’ll lay another by tomorrow’s sun.___

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2016-01-17 14:22:55 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

J.M.W. Turner: Painting Set Free 
Art Gallery of Ontario

J.M.W. Turner: Painting Set Free 
Art Gallery of Ontario___

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2016-01-16 15:42:20 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

From the U.K.: The Vaccines, Wetsuit

This British band has a beachy surf sound with catchy lyrics, backed up with dancing drum beats and often with videos that say something completely different.

From the U.K.: The Vaccines, Wetsuit

This British band has a beachy surf sound with catchy lyrics, backed up with dancing drum beats and often with videos that say something completely different.___

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2016-01-15 13:52:56 (5 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Shaping the Psyche of the Masses

Propaganda is a purposeful way of spreadin’ the cause, often with a negative connotation of manipulative persuasion.  The use of art in the service of political causes has a... 

Shaping the Psyche of the Masses

Propaganda is a purposeful way of spreadin’ the cause, often with a negative connotation of manipulative persuasion.  The use of art in the service of political causes has a... ___

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2016-01-15 12:26:44 (9 comments; 15 reshares; 202 +1s)Open 

Shaping the Psyche of the Masses

Propaganda is a purposeful way of spreadin’ the cause, often with a negative connotation of manipulative persuasion.  The use of art in the service of political causes has a long and lasting history. Rulers of ancient empires have used art to glorify their power and victories.

The art movement Socialist Realism emerged during the 1930’s, a time marked by global economic depression, the rise of radical political movements and the optimism after the Mexican and Russian revolutions.

Communism views revolution as a continuous process of not only a transformation of social reality but also a transformation of the consciousness of its people.

Introduced under Joseph Stalin in 1934, Socialist Realism was the official aesthetic of the Soviet Union. It was viewed that the function of art is to educate the population.
Th... more »

Shaping the Psyche of the Masses

Propaganda is a purposeful way of spreadin’ the cause, often with a negative connotation of manipulative persuasion.  The use of art in the service of political causes has a long and lasting history. Rulers of ancient empires have used art to glorify their power and victories.

The art movement Socialist Realism emerged during the 1930’s, a time marked by global economic depression, the rise of radical political movements and the optimism after the Mexican and Russian revolutions.

Communism views revolution as a continuous process of not only a transformation of social reality but also a transformation of the consciousness of its people.

Introduced under Joseph Stalin in 1934, Socialist Realism was the official aesthetic of the Soviet Union. It was viewed that the function of art is to educate the population.

The artist’s duty was to interpret and reflect on reality, not ordinary reality but socialist reality as defined by the Communist Party.

The art had to follow four universal principles:
Narodost – people-ness, easily understandable, reflecting their concerns
Klassovost – class-ness, express class concerns
Ideinost – topics relate to concrete issues, ideological content
Partiinost – party-ness, faithful to the Party’s point of view

Socialist Realism created a parallel world from true reality, a world of heroes and heroines that personified political ideals, a world of tireless workers and unyielding optimism.

Before Socialist Realism, art was used to interpret, reflect and change reality. Barge Haulers on the Volga by Ilya Repin (1844 – 1930) is one of the most famous paintings depicting the use of peasants as human beasts of burden. It was Repin’s aim to deliberately criticize the atrocities of society.

Corn by Tatyana Yablonskaya (1917–2005) is a typical example of Socialist Realism and it is no accident that it resembles Repin’s composition. Her painting depicts women workers, filled with joy, without a hint of hardship, glowing with pride and socialist fervour.

Communist regimes have used art to represent social change through a filter of illusion, the dream-like official version of reality is far from the reality of the struggles of ordinary everyday life.

More subtle but equally as manipulative and effective is the use of mass media to shape our modern day psyche, giving us an illusion of choice to pursue our fabricated consumer needs and to view the world through strobe-light distractions.___

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2016-01-14 12:32:42 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 24 +1s)Open 

Sunrise over Lake Ontario

Sunrise over Lake Ontario___

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2016-01-13 12:25:37 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

Containment

Containment___

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2016-01-12 12:28:01 (4 comments; 1 reshares; 31 +1s)Open 

Ice Capped

Ice Capped___

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2016-01-11 12:34:33 (6 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

Thinking and Doing

Robert Frost (1874 – 1963) is one of the most celebrated American poets, he is best known for his poem "The Road Not Taken". Many of Frost’s poems use nature imagery. He uses nature as a metaphor, as a setting to explore human psychological struggles. Human...

Thinking and Doing

Robert Frost (1874 – 1963) is one of the most celebrated American poets, he is best known for his poem "The Road Not Taken". Many of Frost’s poems use nature imagery. He uses nature as a metaphor, as a setting to explore human psychological struggles. Human...___

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2016-01-11 12:31:34 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 36 +1s)Open 

Thinking and Doing

Robert Frost (1874 – 1963) is one of the most celebrated American poets, he is best known for his poem "The Road Not Taken". 

Many of Frost’s poems use nature imagery. He uses nature as a metaphor, as a setting to explore human psychological struggles.

Humans from the beginning of time have searched for the meaning of life and tried to understand how the world works. Nietzsche has said “He who has a why to live for can bear with almost any how.”

Frost’s poem The Most of It, explores man’s search for meaning and fulfillment. There are two characters in the poem. The first is a man, he stands isolated and alone by a lake. He calls out, searching for meaning in another, what returns is his echo. The man hears a sound in the distance, hoping for human contact, it turns out to be a buck. The buck strongly makes his wayacross the l... more »

Thinking and Doing

Robert Frost (1874 – 1963) is one of the most celebrated American poets, he is best known for his poem "The Road Not Taken". 

Many of Frost’s poems use nature imagery. He uses nature as a metaphor, as a setting to explore human psychological struggles.

Humans from the beginning of time have searched for the meaning of life and tried to understand how the world works. Nietzsche has said “He who has a why to live for can bear with almost any how.”

Frost’s poem The Most of It, explores man’s search for meaning and fulfillment. There are two characters in the poem. The first is a man, he stands isolated and alone by a lake. He calls out, searching for meaning in another, what returns is his echo. The man hears a sound in the distance, hoping for human contact, it turns out to be a buck. The buck strongly makes his way across the lake and continues on his own search.

The contrast between the two characters is vivid. The man is paralyzed by his own thoughts to inactivity; his time is spent thinking, calling and hoping. The buck on the other hand is described by dynamic verbs, he doesn’t stop; his journey is a physical one, he continues on his search.

Our modern lives have placed us in a world where we subsist on thoughts and ideas. We are many degrees removed from our physical selves and the physical world. Our instincts and sensibilities to the elements we live in are no longer honed, we have apps for that. But being able to do and be may be exactly what we are searching for.

The Most of It
 
He thought he kept the universe alone;
For all the voice in answer he could wake
Was but the mocking echo of his own
From some tree–hidden cliff across the lake.
Some morning from the boulder–broken beach
He would cry out on life, that what it wants
Is not its own love back in copy speech,
But counter–love, original response.
And nothing ever came of what he cried
Unless it was the embodiment that crashed
In the cliff's talus on the other side,
And then in the far distant water splashed,
But after a time allowed for it to swim,
Instead of proving human when it neared
And someone else additional to him,
As a great buck it powerfully appeared,
Pushing the crumpled water up ahead,
And landed pouring like a waterfall,
And stumbled through the rocks with horny tread,
And forced the underbrush—and that was all. ___

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2016-01-11 00:18:48 (6 comments; 2 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-01-10 14:59:27 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

From Japan: Nujabes, Luv(sic) part 3

Jun Seba’s beautiful music is a very unique mix of rap, hip-hop and jazz. This is part 3 of a six part series. Sadly, in 2010 he died in a car accident, his music lives on.

From Japan: Nujabes, Luv(sic) part 3

Jun Seba’s beautiful music is a very unique mix of rap, hip-hop and jazz. This is part 3 of a six part series. Sadly, in 2010 he died in a car accident, his music lives on.___

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2016-01-10 14:43:20 (3 comments; 1 reshares; 28 +1s)Open 

Breezy Sunset

Breezy Sunset___

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2016-01-09 15:08:52 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

From Finland: French Films, Take You With Me

This Finnish band has a fresh, summer surf sound. A great way to start up the day!

From Finland: French Films, Take You With Me

This Finnish band has a fresh, summer surf sound. A great way to start up the day!___

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2016-01-09 14:39:31 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 

Sunrise Over Lake Ontario

Sunrise Over Lake Ontario___

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2016-01-08 18:49:02 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

From the U.S.: Airborne Toxic Event, Papillon

The song is filled with melancholic lyrics of loneliness and isolation, and the deceptive image of what we want to reveal to the world. The upbeat melody complements the lyrics perfectly to express the sarcasm. Papillon is French for butterfly, a beauty that is transitory and fleeting.

From the U.S.: Airborne Toxic Event, Papillon

The song is filled with melancholic lyrics of loneliness and isolation, and the deceptive image of what we want to reveal to the world. The upbeat melody complements the lyrics perfectly to express the sarcasm. Papillon is French for butterfly, a beauty that is transitory and fleeting.___

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2016-01-08 12:37:17 (5 comments; 1 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 

Sunrise over Lake Ontario

Sunrise over Lake Ontario___

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2016-01-07 16:55:37 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

From the U.S.: Interpol, Next Exit

This is one of my favourite songs from their sharp, elegant melancholy sound.

From the U.S.: Interpol, Next Exit

This is one of my favourite songs from their sharp, elegant melancholy sound.___

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2016-01-07 12:34:41 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Aquamarine Awe

Bridges are things of beauty. They are symbols of human ingenuity to transcend obstacles. Bridges are a functional piece of art and imagination; an engineering and architectural marvel.

The Seven Mile Bridge in the Florida Keys is one of the most photographed images. Completed in 1982, it was the longest continuous concrete segmental bridge in the world. It stands parallel to the old railway bridge which is mostly still there.

The beauty of this bridge is complemented by the glorious openness of the aquamarine water.

Aquamarine Awe

Bridges are things of beauty. They are symbols of human ingenuity to transcend obstacles. Bridges are a functional piece of art and imagination; an engineering and architectural marvel.

The Seven Mile Bridge in the Florida Keys is one of the most photographed images. Completed in 1982, it was the longest continuous concrete segmental bridge in the world. It stands parallel to the old railway bridge which is mostly still there.

The beauty of this bridge is complemented by the glorious openness of the aquamarine water.___

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