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Stephen Ingraham

Stephen Ingraham 

Christian, birder, photographer, blogger...

Occupation: Retired. Senior Brand Advocate for Birding and Wildlife Observation: Carl Zeiss Sports Optics (Photographer (nature & landscape), Blogger)

Location: Kennebunk ME

Followers: 56,050

Following: 3,620

Views: 94,526,267

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Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

4
comments per post
6
reshares per post
113
+1's per post

593
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 25

posted image

2016-05-15 14:55:24 (25 comments; 10 reshares; 275 +1s)Open 

Farmington Falls, in Farmington Maine. In-camera HDR, Sony RX10 iii. Program shift for show shutter. Processed in Lightroom.

Most reshares: 39

posted image

2016-05-11 10:42:49 (17 comments; 39 reshares; 460 +1s)Open 

Scarlet!
Not great light but a great bird. This Scarlet Tanager was down low right over the boardwalk at Magee Marsh during the Biggest Week in American Birding. I, and about 20 other photographers who happened to be right there at the right moment, had a chance at some good shots, and an experience we will remember.

Nikon P900 at 2000mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 320 @ f6.5. Processed in Lightroom.



Most plusones: 460

posted image

2016-05-11 10:42:49 (17 comments; 39 reshares; 460 +1s)Open 

Scarlet!
Not great light but a great bird. This Scarlet Tanager was down low right over the boardwalk at Magee Marsh during the Biggest Week in American Birding. I, and about 20 other photographers who happened to be right there at the right moment, had a chance at some good shots, and an experience we will remember.

Nikon P900 at 2000mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 320 @ f6.5. Processed in Lightroom.



Latest 50 posts

posted image

2016-05-25 12:37:06 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

Looking up the Little River as clouds come in. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processes in Lightroom. 

Looking up the Little River as clouds come in. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processes in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-05-25 12:26:06 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

Grooming
Birds spend a lot of time on maintaining their feathers: grooming, preening, oiling, rearranging, etc. Not surprising. When they are not hunting, feeding, breeding, or feeding young…they are probably grooming. This Tricolored Heron at St. Augustine Alligator Farm’s wild bird rookery is busy on the underside of his wing. A long neck comes in handy that way.

Nikon P900 at 1000mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 400 @ f5.6. Processed in Lightroom.



Grooming
Birds spend a lot of time on maintaining their feathers: grooming, preening, oiling, rearranging, etc. Not surprising. When they are not hunting, feeding, breeding, or feeding young…they are probably grooming. This Tricolored Heron at St. Augustine Alligator Farm’s wild bird rookery is busy on the underside of his wing. A long neck comes in handy that way.

Nikon P900 at 1000mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 400 @ f5.6. Processed in Lightroom.

___

2016-05-24 22:11:01 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

May 24

Dark day, raining off and on, busy
all morning with a ZEISS project,
drowsy this afternoon from a long
night of fighting with my CPAP
mask and machine...still waiting, in
fact, to see the supposed therapeutic
benefit of this unnatural contraption...
I can not report it has, as others
claim, made a new man of me...
not yet away, and my morning BP
is still running high. Give it time,
I am sure the doctor will say, but
I wish someone could tell me if
it is working right, or the way it
is supposed to anyway. That is the
trouble with medicine these days,
it takes more faith than prayer,
more faith than faith, for which,
so Jesus said, a bit the size of a
tiny mustard seed will suffice
to move mountains...and I can
honestly say I have no reason to
doubt him and much reason... more »

May 24

Dark day, raining off and on, busy
all morning with a ZEISS project,
drowsy this afternoon from a long
night of fighting with my CPAP
mask and machine...still waiting, in
fact, to see the supposed therapeutic
benefit of this unnatural contraption...
I can not report it has, as others
claim, made a new man of me...
not yet away, and my morning BP
is still running high. Give it time,
I am sure the doctor will say, but
I wish someone could tell me if
it is working right, or the way it
is supposed to anyway. That is the
trouble with medicine these days,
it takes more faith than prayer,
more faith than faith, for which,
so Jesus said, a bit the size of a
tiny mustard seed will suffice
to move mountains...and I can
honestly say I have no reason to
doubt him and much reason to
believe...which is, unfortunately,
not the case in any case with the
medical profession in general
and CPAP in particular. Another
night tonight...and another day
tomorrow. I can only hope for better...
unless of course I resort to prayer
with is the better part of hope.___

posted image

2016-05-24 12:53:34 (8 comments; 11 reshares; 215 +1s)Open 

Goosfair Bay and the Little River under the apple tree. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

Goosfair Bay and the Little River under the apple tree. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-05-24 12:42:59 (5 comments; 7 reshares; 83 +1s)Open 

Blackburnian Warbler x 4
Back to Ohio and Magee Marsh today for this 4 shot collage of Blackburnian Warbler...certainly one of my favorite warblers. Like a live spark. :)

Nikon P900 at 1600mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 280 @ f6.3. Processed in Lightroom and assembled in Coolage.

Blackburnian Warbler x 4
Back to Ohio and Magee Marsh today for this 4 shot collage of Blackburnian Warbler...certainly one of my favorite warblers. Like a live spark. :)

Nikon P900 at 1600mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 280 @ f6.3. Processed in Lightroom and assembled in Coolage.___

2016-05-23 22:05:03 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

May 23

I sat on a bench and ate my apple
under a tree busy with Catbird song
watching the waves roll up the
Little River between Goose Rocks
and Timber Point, under a sky so
deep and blue, relieved by banked
puffs of cumulus clouds, under a cap
of high thin cirrus, as though some
one dragged a dry white brush across
the top of the sky...the air so clear
I could count the shingles on the
houses along Goosefair Bay right
across the river, most of a half
a mile away. A few Eider floated
in the surging water in front of
me, unperturbed by the turbulence,
used to rougher seas by far, and
once or twice a Yellow Warbler
buzzed by, or stopped unseen to sing,
sweet sweet sweet, as I reduced
that apple to a core and tossed it
under a bush. It will provide
for certain, a rare experience... more »

May 23

I sat on a bench and ate my apple
under a tree busy with Catbird song
watching the waves roll up the
Little River between Goose Rocks
and Timber Point, under a sky so
deep and blue, relieved by banked
puffs of cumulus clouds, under a cap
of high thin cirrus, as though some
one dragged a dry white brush across
the top of the sky...the air so clear
I could count the shingles on the
houses along Goosefair Bay right
across the river, most of a half
a mile away. A few Eider floated
in the surging water in front of
me, unperturbed by the turbulence,
used to rougher seas by far, and
once or twice a Yellow Warbler
buzzed by, or stopped unseen to sing,
sweet sweet sweet, as I reduced
that apple to a core and tossed it
under a bush. It will provide
for certain, a rare experience for
some chipmunk or maybe give one
of the Catbirds something to sing about.___

posted image

2016-05-23 13:44:08 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

It is not too late. Still a few spots open. A Point and Shoot Nature Photography adventure in Honduras. Excellent rates. P&S friendly instruction by Steve Ingraham. Great photo ops!

It is not too late. Still a few spots open. A Point and Shoot Nature Photography adventure in Honduras. Excellent rates. P&S friendly instruction by Steve Ingraham. Great photo ops!___

posted image

2016-05-23 12:44:27 (3 comments; 11 reshares; 274 +1s)Open 

Deep in the dell above Day Brook Pond. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10M3. Processed in Lightroom.

Deep in the dell above Day Brook Pond. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10M3. Processed in Lightroom.___

posted image

2016-05-23 12:37:28 (8 comments; 7 reshares; 73 +1s)Open 

Northern Water Snake
This is neither Florida or Ohio. 🙂 With spring finally in the ascendancy here in Southern Maine, the Water Snakes (Northern) have come out to sun along the shore of Day Brook Pond on the Kennebunk Plains Wildlife Management Area. This young fellow, only half the size to the biggest I have seen in the pond, was making use of the fallen birch over the water. This is a common posture…they raise their head even when stretched out, and certainly when swimming, probably for better vision.

Sony RX10M3. 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/320th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed and cropped slightly in Lightroom.



Northern Water Snake
This is neither Florida or Ohio. 🙂 With spring finally in the ascendancy here in Southern Maine, the Water Snakes (Northern) have come out to sun along the shore of Day Brook Pond on the Kennebunk Plains Wildlife Management Area. This young fellow, only half the size to the biggest I have seen in the pond, was making use of the fallen birch over the water. This is a common posture…they raise their head even when stretched out, and certainly when swimming, probably for better vision.

Sony RX10M3. 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/320th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed and cropped slightly in Lightroom.

___

posted image

2016-05-22 16:15:34 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

May 22

Who knew an oaks first leaves
would be so like a flower...
a feathery, graceful fall of pastel
pink, straight out of the imagination
of a painter (or a poet), totally
out of character with the leather
leaved tree it will be come summer.

It is as though the oaks first
thought (as ours so often are)
was something quite different.

And who is to say
first thoughts
are not the best of us?

I certainly will never now see
an oak the same.

And I surely will forgive you
(thank you even)
if you do the same for me.

May 22

Who knew an oaks first leaves
would be so like a flower...
a feathery, graceful fall of pastel
pink, straight out of the imagination
of a painter (or a poet), totally
out of character with the leather
leaved tree it will be come summer.

It is as though the oaks first
thought (as ours so often are)
was something quite different.

And who is to say
first thoughts
are not the best of us?

I certainly will never now see
an oak the same.

And I surely will forgive you
(thank you even)
if you do the same for me.___

posted image

2016-05-22 11:52:47 (4 comments; 4 reshares; 213 +1s)Open 

Morning sun in the forest at Rachel Carson NWR. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii, Processed in Lightroom. I love the detail and the textures!

Morning sun in the forest at Rachel Carson NWR. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii, Processed in Lightroom. I love the detail and the textures!___

posted image

2016-05-22 11:45:15 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 42 +1s)Open 

Lady Slipper time. Happy Sunday!

“If your eye is generous, your whole being is full of light!” Jesus

I have been watching the patches of Pink Lady Slipper at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge and along the Kennebunk Bridle Trail in Wells and Kennebunk for weeks now. There is one patch off a deck at the back at Rachel Carson, overlooking Branch Brook, where the sun comes in all day. Lady Slipper orchids bloom there at least a few days, sometimes a week, before they bloom anywhere else in our area. Yesterday the first blossoms opened fully. I can go back through my archives on my WideEyedInWonder site and find images of this plant going back at least 7 or 8 years, maybe more. I don’t mean this plant as in Lady Slipper, I mean this plant as in this Lady Slipper. It always produces at least two blossoms, sometimes as many as 6. There is a delicacy, a rare beauty in these strangebloom... more »

Lady Slipper time. Happy Sunday!

“If your eye is generous, your whole being is full of light!” Jesus

I have been watching the patches of Pink Lady Slipper at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge and along the Kennebunk Bridle Trail in Wells and Kennebunk for weeks now. There is one patch off a deck at the back at Rachel Carson, overlooking Branch Brook, where the sun comes in all day. Lady Slipper orchids bloom there at least a few days, sometimes a week, before they bloom anywhere else in our area. Yesterday the first blossoms opened fully. I can go back through my archives on my WideEyedInWonder site and find images of this plant going back at least 7 or 8 years, maybe more. I don’t mean this plant as in Lady Slipper, I mean this plant as in this Lady Slipper. It always produces at least two blossoms, sometimes as many as 6. There is a delicacy, a rare beauty in these strange blooms, and I do my best to catch it year by year.

My yearly Lady Slipper vigil is part of what keeps me aware of the constant renewal of the beauty of creation…the cycle of change…no two years the same…but each year with its beauty…that is God’s creative love at work, day by day. It is not that Genesis has it wrong when it says that after God created the heavens and the earth God rested…it is that we have the wrong idea of rest. Rest, in the divine sense has to be creative, radiant…an ongoing action producing peace…an continual outflowing and outworking of love. Rest is not a pause in the dance, or a silence in the music…it is the moment of perfect balance within the motion of the dance…it is the moment when the notes of the music echo in the room…echo in our hearts and minds…and fulfill their beauty. That is a little, a very little, like the rest of God.

When I see the Lady Slippers bloom, in the quiet beauty, I sense the active rest of God, and the notes of God’s love echo and swell in my life to fill it. This is reason enough to love the Lady Slipper, reason enough to watch for its coming, and to celebrate its bloom year by year. Happy Sunday!___

2016-05-21 12:45:17 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

May 21

Coming back from a photoprowl
yesterday, turning into the driveway,
it struck me: I have lived in this small
neighborhood at the edge of town for
more than 20 years. Of all who live here,
some 100 souls or more, I know only the
people in the three abutting yards. (I once
knew those who lived at one of the corners
of the yard. They moved away a few years
ago and I have not met the couple who
bought the house. I never met, in 20 years,
the folks at the other corner of the yard.)

In 20 years.

And yet, on Facebook and Google+, I have,
conservatively, a few hundred people who,
not only follow me, but would call me a friend.
They know what flowers are in bloom in my yard,
where I am traveling next and where I am just back
from (most of them came on the trip with me.)
They... more »

May 21

Coming back from a photoprowl
yesterday, turning into the driveway,
it struck me: I have lived in this small
neighborhood at the edge of town for
more than 20 years. Of all who live here,
some 100 souls or more, I know only the
people in the three abutting yards. (I once
knew those who lived at one of the corners
of the yard. They moved away a few years
ago and I have not met the couple who
bought the house. I never met, in 20 years,
the folks at the other corner of the yard.)

In 20 years.

And yet, on Facebook and Google+, I have,
conservatively, a few hundred people who,
not only follow me, but would call me a friend.
They know what flowers are in bloom in my yard,
where I am traveling next and where I am just back
from (most of them came on the trip with me.)
They know my daily photoprowls, and what
kind of landscape moves me. Many share my
passion for birds and birding. They know my
health issues, and have watched me take up
Qi Gong. Some share my Sunday worship posts
and, I am certain, the sense of awe inspired by
a creating God. At least 50 of those I know
considerably more about than any but one
of my immediate neighbors...and with all
of those there is a genuine feeling of life shared...
at least the beginnings of neighborly love.

Does it say something about me, something
about this modern world, that I find that strange,
but not especially disturbing?___

posted image

2016-05-21 12:04:33 (13 comments; 13 reshares; 314 +1s)Open 

Looking the other way from Cape Porpoise, north into Goosefair Bay. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.

Looking the other way from Cape Porpoise, north into Goosefair Bay. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.___

posted image

2016-05-21 11:52:25 (3 comments; 4 reshares; 108 +1s)Open 

Back again to Florida for today’s pic. This is an immature Red-shouldered Hawk at Washington Oaks Gardens State Park south of St Augustine Florida. I saw a similar hawk last year when I visited, so I was kind of looking for this hawk when it appeared in the huge Live Oaks above the water features in the shaded part of the garden. It appeared as though on cue, and my students (it was a Point and Shoot Nature Photography field trip at the Florida Birding and Photo Fest) were duly impressed 🙂

Nikon P900 at 1200mm equivalent field of view (pulled back for context). 1/160 @ ISO 400 @ f6.3. Processed in Lightroom.


Back again to Florida for today’s pic. This is an immature Red-shouldered Hawk at Washington Oaks Gardens State Park south of St Augustine Florida. I saw a similar hawk last year when I visited, so I was kind of looking for this hawk when it appeared in the huge Live Oaks above the water features in the shaded part of the garden. It appeared as though on cue, and my students (it was a Point and Shoot Nature Photography field trip at the Florida Birding and Photo Fest) were duly impressed 🙂

Nikon P900 at 1200mm equivalent field of view (pulled back for context). 1/160 @ ISO 400 @ f6.3. Processed in Lightroom.
___

posted image

2016-05-20 21:00:24 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

May 20

Maple leaves are red, first and last,
early and late, spring and fall,
before the green vigor of summer
obscures the more subtle chemistry
of cold...making sugar, extending
the season at both ends, extracting
every erg of energy from the light
that has been given. Smart.

We should all be so adaptable,
don't you think, so well adapted,
if we are to live, to survive and
thrive, in this temperate zone.

May 20

Maple leaves are red, first and last,
early and late, spring and fall,
before the green vigor of summer
obscures the more subtle chemistry
of cold...making sugar, extending
the season at both ends, extracting
every erg of energy from the light
that has been given. Smart.

We should all be so adaptable,
don't you think, so well adapted,
if we are to live, to survive and
thrive, in this temperate zone.___

posted image

2016-05-20 14:33:38 (5 comments; 6 reshares; 163 +1s)Open 

Cape Porpoise Maine. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.

Cape Porpoise Maine. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.___

posted image

2016-05-20 14:17:42 (11 comments; 31 reshares; 296 +1s)Open 

Another Oriole in Apple
Back to Ohio today for this Baltimore Oriole in Apple blossoms. An action shot.

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processes and cropped for scale in Lightroom.

#birds #birding #birdphoto

Another Oriole in Apple
Back to Ohio today for this Baltimore Oriole in Apple blossoms. An action shot.

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processes and cropped for scale in Lightroom.

#birds #birding #birdphoto___

2016-05-19 19:52:41 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

May 19

I kept telling myself all morning
to go get the bug spray out of my
suitcase where I saw it last, but,
wouldn't you know, I got all the way
to Emmon's Preserve without it.

There were fewer blackflies than
I feared, but those big striped
mosquitoes you only see in spring
were everywhere, hatched from
winter hardy larvae, or maybe even,
(though I may just have imagined it)
tropical migrants on their way north
to Canada to live on moose and
carabou, and only stopping here a day
or two to top up their tanks on us.

I want to say big as a Bumble Bee,
but that would clearly be such
an outrageous exaggeration.

Safer to say: a fine fingered fellow
could thread them on a hook for
trout bait (though it would take a
delicate hook as well as hand.)
... more »

May 19

I kept telling myself all morning
to go get the bug spray out of my
suitcase where I saw it last, but,
wouldn't you know, I got all the way
to Emmon's Preserve without it.

There were fewer blackflies than
I feared, but those big striped
mosquitoes you only see in spring
were everywhere, hatched from
winter hardy larvae, or maybe even,
(though I may just have imagined it)
tropical migrants on their way north
to Canada to live on moose and
carabou, and only stopping here a day
or two to top up their tanks on us.

I want to say big as a Bumble Bee,
but that would clearly be such
an outrageous exaggeration.

Safer to say: a fine fingered fellow
could thread them on a hook for
trout bait (though it would take a
delicate hook as well as hand.)

More like minnow bait to be honest,
on a tiny rod the weight of oat straw
with spider silk on a pearl button reel.

Can you see it?
I'd call that ultra-light tackle.

I have to ask though, considering, (and
putting aside the question of bug spray)
where are dragonflies when you need them?___

posted image

2016-05-19 12:27:19 (13 comments; 16 reshares; 296 +1s)Open 

A sweep panorama Sony RX10iii. I love the framing of the birch trees but the path behind them is not quite wide enough for a 24mm shot that gets both in the frame. used a ZEISS 12mm on my Sony NEX 5t once that did the job. Yesterday I resorted to a normal width (portrait orientation) sweep panorama. Processed in Lightroom.

A sweep panorama Sony RX10iii. I love the framing of the birch trees but the path behind them is not quite wide enough for a 24mm shot that gets both in the frame. used a ZEISS 12mm on my Sony NEX 5t once that did the job. Yesterday I resorted to a normal width (portrait orientation) sweep panorama. Processed in Lightroom.___

posted image

2016-05-19 12:19:36 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 105 +1s)Open 

Passing the twig: courtship
In late April and early May each year I have two events. The Florida Birding and Photo Fest and the Biggest Week in American Birding at Magee Marsh and Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge in Ohio. Essentially I go direct from one to the other and have about 15 days of excellent bird photography…mostly nesting waders in Florida, and migrating warblers and songbirds in Ohio. I also come back from the two trips with well over 1000 images…keepers that is…I probably take close to 4000 frames. I share a few images from the events, while I am there, but clearly I have a lot more that I have not shared. All of which is to explain why, after several weeks, we are back to a Florida image for today’s post, though I have been back in Maine for several days now. 🙂

These two Roseate Spoonbills at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm wild bird rookery spent most of aday attemp... more »

Passing the twig: courtship
In late April and early May each year I have two events. The Florida Birding and Photo Fest and the Biggest Week in American Birding at Magee Marsh and Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge in Ohio. Essentially I go direct from one to the other and have about 15 days of excellent bird photography…mostly nesting waders in Florida, and migrating warblers and songbirds in Ohio. I also come back from the two trips with well over 1000 images…keepers that is…I probably take close to 4000 frames. I share a few images from the events, while I am there, but clearly I have a lot more that I have not shared. All of which is to explain why, after several weeks, we are back to a Florida image for today’s post, though I have been back in Maine for several days now. 🙂

These two Roseate Spoonbills at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm wild bird rookery spent most of a day attempting to build a nest in this low Mangrove…an odd place to begin with. They abandoned the attempt overnight, but while they were active, I had a chance to observe courtship and nest building activity up close. Here the male is passing a bit of viney twig to the female.

Nikon P900 at 400mm equivalent field of view (I told you they were close). 1/125th @ ISO 125 @ f5. Processed and cropped slightly for composition in Lightroom.

___

2016-05-18 17:21:35 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

May 18

We have had a few warm days
recently, yesterday among them,
and suddenly it is spring. Wood
Anomone, Johnny Jump-ups, and
Fringed Polygala (purple Gay-
wings) are with us in abundance,
making a brave show everywhere
on the forest floor. Wild strawberry
and Low-bush Blueberry are both
in blossom. Common Yellow-
throats sing from every thicket
and tangle, and the Gray Catbird
and the Veery are back, turning
leaf litter, and (in the case of the
Catbird) singing other folks' songs.
The emphatic whistles of Rufous-
sided Towhee echo across the pond
and through the woods. Oh yes,
that is a female Ruby-throated
Hummingbird among the flowers
of the High-bush Blueberry. And
though there are no Grass Pink
Orchids in the bog yet, as I
stand beneath the blossoms of ... more »

May 18

We have had a few warm days
recently, yesterday among them,
and suddenly it is spring. Wood
Anomone, Johnny Jump-ups, and
Fringed Polygala (purple Gay-
wings) are with us in abundance,
making a brave show everywhere
on the forest floor. Wild strawberry
and Low-bush Blueberry are both
in blossom. Common Yellow-
throats sing from every thicket
and tangle, and the Gray Catbird
and the Veery are back, turning
leaf litter, and (in the case of the
Catbird) singing other folks' songs.
The emphatic whistles of Rufous-
sided Towhee echo across the pond
and through the woods. Oh yes,
that is a female Ruby-throated
Hummingbird among the flowers
of the High-bush Blueberry. And
though there are no Grass Pink
Orchids in the bog yet, as I
stand beneath the blossoms of
Apple and Dogwood where they
reach to meet across the path,
the whole world seems to shout,
"Oh, yea of little faith! What
made you ever doubt the coming
of this tardy spring in Maine?___

posted image

2016-05-18 12:19:24 (21 comments; 11 reshares; 258 +1s)Open 

Looking south from East Point in Biddeford Pool Maine. In-camera HDR, Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.

Looking south from East Point in Biddeford Pool Maine. In-camera HDR, Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.___

posted image

2016-05-18 12:10:42 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 38 +1s)Open 

Blackburnian Warbler
Blackburnian Warblers are small, fast, restless, and beautiful. There is nothing more striking than a Blackburnian among fresh spring foliage. At Magee Marsh in Ohio during the Biggest Week in American Birding, you often see them close, but they are hard to catch, as they are in constant motion and feed among the leaves. I have very few photos of them in which the bird is not at least partially obscured by leaves. 🙂

Sony RX10 iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed and cropped slightly for scale in Lightroom.



Blackburnian Warbler
Blackburnian Warblers are small, fast, restless, and beautiful. There is nothing more striking than a Blackburnian among fresh spring foliage. At Magee Marsh in Ohio during the Biggest Week in American Birding, you often see them close, but they are hard to catch, as they are in constant motion and feed among the leaves. I have very few photos of them in which the bird is not at least partially obscured by leaves. 🙂

Sony RX10 iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed and cropped slightly for scale in Lightroom.

___

2016-05-17 20:47:02 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s)Open 

May 16

I was out in the field testing cameras
when against all hope and expectation
I found the perfect subject...a Kingbird
teed up and content to sit on a beavered
off sapling stump. I was busy with my
craft, juggling two cameras, equalizing
settings when something that had
obviously crawled up the inside of my
pants and into my boxer shorts bit me
right on the scrotum. Hurt like blazes.
I grabbed at my crotch and came close
to dropping both cameras and a few
choice expletives. I did neither. I toughed
it out through 4 or 5 more bites to get
my Kingbird shots with both cameras
before bolting for the nearest gully,
dropping my pants and drawers and
digging out a good sized black ant
who clearly had nothing better to do
on a sunny May afternoon than to attack
the nearest big warm blooded... more »

May 16

I was out in the field testing cameras
when against all hope and expectation
I found the perfect subject...a Kingbird
teed up and content to sit on a beavered
off sapling stump. I was busy with my
craft, juggling two cameras, equalizing
settings when something that had
obviously crawled up the inside of my
pants and into my boxer shorts bit me
right on the scrotum. Hurt like blazes.
I grabbed at my crotch and came close
to dropping both cameras and a few
choice expletives. I did neither. I toughed
it out through 4 or 5 more bites to get
my Kingbird shots with both cameras
before bolting for the nearest gully,
dropping my pants and drawers and
digging out a good sized black ant
who clearly had nothing better to do
on a sunny May afternoon than to attack
the nearest big warm blooded thing. Me.

I am not claiming any special fortitude,
or unusual strength of character here.

Any wildlife photographer worth his (or her)
salt would have done the same to get those
comparative Kingbird shots, but I do have to
say, considering the delicate location, I am very
glad my assailant did not turn out to be a tick.___

posted image

2016-05-17 14:45:03 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

When teaching my Point and Shoot Nature Photography workshops I spend a few hours on the basic set-up of a camera for wildlife shots, running through the menus on several different cameras, depending on what the participants have. I have had many requests…

When teaching my Point and Shoot Nature Photography workshops I spend a few hours on the basic set-up of a camera for wildlife shots, running through the menus on several different cameras, depending on what the participants have. I have had many requests…___

posted image

2016-05-17 12:15:19 (11 comments; 9 reshares; 220 +1s)Open 

Looking up Saco Bay from East Point. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10 MkIII. Processed in Lightroom.

Looking up Saco Bay from East Point. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10 MkIII. Processed in Lightroom.___

2016-05-17 12:04:12 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

A new community for those who use (and love) the Sony RX100, RX1, and RX10 series of cameras. 

A new community for those who use (and love) the Sony RX100, RX1, and RX10 series of cameras. ___

posted image

2016-05-17 11:44:42 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 48 +1s)Open 

Northern Parula
The Sony RX10 Mk III might not have the reach or the magical focus of my Nikon P900 (600mm vs 2000mm), but it takes beautiful pictures. Beautiful. There is a quality about the Sony pics that is impossible to attribute to any one cause…but they are more than usually attractive to the eye. A depth. A dimension. A balance of tone and color…a working with the light…that is just a bit extra-ordinary.

This shot of a Northern Parula feeding on flowers is a perfect example. I cropped it slightly for scale, but the sharp bird and the vivid colors in the soft foreground and background arrests and rests my eye. I could look at this image a long time!

Sony RX10 Mk III at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ ISO 400 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.



Northern Parula
The Sony RX10 Mk III might not have the reach or the magical focus of my Nikon P900 (600mm vs 2000mm), but it takes beautiful pictures. Beautiful. There is a quality about the Sony pics that is impossible to attribute to any one cause…but they are more than usually attractive to the eye. A depth. A dimension. A balance of tone and color…a working with the light…that is just a bit extra-ordinary.

This shot of a Northern Parula feeding on flowers is a perfect example. I cropped it slightly for scale, but the sharp bird and the vivid colors in the soft foreground and background arrests and rests my eye. I could look at this image a long time!

Sony RX10 Mk III at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ ISO 400 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.

___

posted image

2016-05-16 10:58:04 (3 comments; 5 reshares; 183 +1s)Open 

Behind the Sportsman's Bird Center at Magee Marsh. Great Ohio clouds. In-camera HDR, Sony RX10 iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

Behind the Sportsman's Bird Center at Magee Marsh. Great Ohio clouds. In-camera HDR, Sony RX10 iii. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-05-16 10:43:28 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

Curiosity thy name is Black-throated Green
When the warblers are close at Magee Marsh…they are really close. This Black-throated Green warbler appeared to take a great interest in the photographers facing it across 6 feet or so. I was shooting with my new Sony RX10 iii, otherwise I would not have been able to focus on it. The look says it all!

Sony RX10 iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ ISO 250 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.



Curiosity thy name is Black-throated Green
When the warblers are close at Magee Marsh…they are really close. This Black-throated Green warbler appeared to take a great interest in the photographers facing it across 6 feet or so. I was shooting with my new Sony RX10 iii, otherwise I would not have been able to focus on it. The look says it all!

Sony RX10 iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ ISO 250 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.

___

posted image

2016-05-16 10:43:13 (3 comments; 3 reshares; 39 +1s)Open 

Curiosity thy name is Black-throated Green
When the warblers are close at Magee Marsh…they are really close. This Black-throated Green warbler appeared to take a great interest in the photographers facing it across 6 feet or so. I was shooting with my new Sony RX10 iii, otherwise I would not have been able to focus on it. The look says it all!

Sony RX10 iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ ISO 250 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.



Curiosity thy name is Black-throated Green
When the warblers are close at Magee Marsh…they are really close. This Black-throated Green warbler appeared to take a great interest in the photographers facing it across 6 feet or so. I was shooting with my new Sony RX10 iii, otherwise I would not have been able to focus on it. The look says it all!

Sony RX10 iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ ISO 250 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.

___

posted image

2016-05-16 10:41:47 (8 comments; 11 reshares; 185 +1s)Open 

Cape May Warbler in evening light. Happy Sunday
Somehow I did not get this posted yesterday. ?? Anyway.

“If your eye is generous, your whole being is full of light.” Jesus

Last Wednesday was one of those wonderful days at Magee Marsh, when the late afternoon/early evening light illuminated trees just dripping with warblers…and many feeding at eye-level. It was the first really epic day at Magee Marsh since the Biggest Week in American Birding started on the Friday before. This Cape May warbler is showing its colors, and its attitude, in the golden evening glow.

I ran a Cape May Warbler in last Sunday’s The Generous Eye post…but I had to work for that one. On Wednesday it was just easy! A friend calls the warblers on a good day at Magee Marsh “confiding”, and they are…all around you…busy with there own lives, but approachable…sometimes evencurious as to what ... more »

Cape May Warbler in evening light. Happy Sunday
Somehow I did not get this posted yesterday. ?? Anyway.

“If your eye is generous, your whole being is full of light.” Jesus

Last Wednesday was one of those wonderful days at Magee Marsh, when the late afternoon/early evening light illuminated trees just dripping with warblers…and many feeding at eye-level. It was the first really epic day at Magee Marsh since the Biggest Week in American Birding started on the Friday before. This Cape May warbler is showing its colors, and its attitude, in the golden evening glow.

I ran a Cape May Warbler in last Sunday’s The Generous Eye post…but I had to work for that one. On Wednesday it was just easy! A friend calls the warblers on a good day at Magee Marsh “confiding”, and they are…all around you…busy with there own lives, but approachable…sometimes even curious as to what we humans are up to in their forest. On a day like that it is simply joy to photograph them…joy even to stand and watch them. You get such a sense of life…of vigor…of color and movement in harmony. It is a deeply moving experience. I always come back from Magee in the spring filled with a sense of wonder that propels me into the Maine spring, just beginning compared to Ohio.

And, out there on the boardwalk you sense too, the generosity of the birders and photographers around you. Everyone is caught up in the experience…and everyone is willing and eager to share it (with few enough exceptions to ignore). It is just a good feeling. A blessing to be there and be part of this grand happening.

May you discover a similar blessing today, wherever you are, and whatever you are doing. Happy Sunday!___

2016-05-15 19:54:50 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s)Open 

May 15

I have been gone from Maine for
the better part of 3 weeks...Florida,
and then Ohio, for nesting waders
and migrant warblers...and I swear
Maine spring has not advanced a
single day all the time I was away.

The Canada May and Foam Flowers
are just bare leaves, Blue-bead Lily
is barely in bud, I found 3 lonely
Trillium in bloom where the cover
is most thin, and the Lady Slipper,
which might have bloomed on
Mother's Day, looks to be a good
two weeks away. I mean, come on
Maine, what's up with all this delay?

I don't mean to be hyper-critical, but
honestly already Maine, lets be spring!

May 15

I have been gone from Maine for
the better part of 3 weeks...Florida,
and then Ohio, for nesting waders
and migrant warblers...and I swear
Maine spring has not advanced a
single day all the time I was away.

The Canada May and Foam Flowers
are just bare leaves, Blue-bead Lily
is barely in bud, I found 3 lonely
Trillium in bloom where the cover
is most thin, and the Lady Slipper,
which might have bloomed on
Mother's Day, looks to be a good
two weeks away. I mean, come on
Maine, what's up with all this delay?

I don't mean to be hyper-critical, but
honestly already Maine, lets be spring!___

posted image

2016-05-15 14:55:24 (25 comments; 10 reshares; 275 +1s)Open 

Farmington Falls, in Farmington Maine. In-camera HDR, Sony RX10 iii. Program shift for show shutter. Processed in Lightroom.

Farmington Falls, in Farmington Maine. In-camera HDR, Sony RX10 iii. Program shift for show shutter. Processed in Lightroom.___

2016-05-15 00:00:21 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

May 14

The class of 2016 came marching
down High Street to bagpipes and
snare, my daughter Erin among them,
all but impossible to spot in the river
of black robes and mortarboards...two
sisters, me and mom, assorted friends,
standing by the roped off walkway
through the converted parking lot
to glimpse her as she passed. Then
we sat in the hot sun of the first really
warm day of May, waiting as they
waded through the necessary speeches
and remarks, for Erin's turn...her name
called, BA Cum Laud, to walk across
the stage and on into the rest of her life.

Then a reception, some apartment packing,
a long walk to a local waterfall, and an
early dinner at the Greenwood Room.

And so, with understated ceremony, typically
Maine and typically Ingraham, we help
Erin to mark and... more »

May 14

The class of 2016 came marching
down High Street to bagpipes and
snare, my daughter Erin among them,
all but impossible to spot in the river
of black robes and mortarboards...two
sisters, me and mom, assorted friends,
standing by the roped off walkway
through the converted parking lot
to glimpse her as she passed. Then
we sat in the hot sun of the first really
warm day of May, waiting as they
waded through the necessary speeches
and remarks, for Erin's turn...her name
called, BA Cum Laud, to walk across
the stage and on into the rest of her life.

Then a reception, some apartment packing,
a long walk to a local waterfall, and an
early dinner at the Greenwood Room.

And so, with understated ceremony, typically
Maine and typically Ingraham, we help
Erin to mark and celebrate her achievement.___

posted image

2016-05-14 10:53:54 (9 comments; 5 reshares; 250 +1s)Open 

Lake Erie by cloudlight :) Sony RX10 iii in-camera HDR. Processed in Lightroom.

Lake Erie by cloudlight :) Sony RX10 iii in-camera HDR. Processed in Lightroom.___

posted image

2016-05-14 10:45:40 (4 comments; 12 reshares; 224 +1s)Open 

Waxwing in Apple Blossoms
I have watched this tree bloom at Magee Marsh for years, during the Biggest Week in American Birding, and I always hoped to catch an interesting bird in it. This year I caught several. This is a Cedar Waxwing, and the bird was busy eating the petals of the flowers…a behavior I have never seen before, and something I did not know any bird did.

Sony RX10 iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/800th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed and cropped for scale in Lightroom.

Waxwing in Apple Blossoms
I have watched this tree bloom at Magee Marsh for years, during the Biggest Week in American Birding, and I always hoped to catch an interesting bird in it. This year I caught several. This is a Cedar Waxwing, and the bird was busy eating the petals of the flowers…a behavior I have never seen before, and something I did not know any bird did.

Sony RX10 iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/800th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed and cropped for scale in Lightroom.___

2016-05-13 13:24:41 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

May 13

Driving east into the sun to Black
Swamp Bird Observatory and
Magee Marsh for the last time
this trip, visor down and still
squinting into the glare, wondering
if I can get out for a last turn
around the boardwalk for one
more helping from the warbler
smorgasbord, and wondering
too what exotic dish might be
on the menu today. Whatever.
I know I will go home to Maine
tonight satisfied, completely
satiated with the birds, the sights
and sounds, of Magee in spring.



May 13

Driving east into the sun to Black
Swamp Bird Observatory and
Magee Marsh for the last time
this trip, visor down and still
squinting into the glare, wondering
if I can get out for a last turn
around the boardwalk for one
more helping from the warbler
smorgasbord, and wondering
too what exotic dish might be
on the menu today. Whatever.
I know I will go home to Maine
tonight satisfied, completely
satiated with the birds, the sights
and sounds, of Magee in spring.

___

posted image

2016-05-13 10:27:56 (10 comments; 9 reshares; 220 +1s)Open 

Off the back-side of the boardwalk at Magee Marsh in Ohio, looking out over Ottawa NWR. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10 iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

Off the back-side of the boardwalk at Magee Marsh in Ohio, looking out over Ottawa NWR. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10 iii. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-05-13 10:19:51 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 33 +1s)Open 

Chestnut-sided Warbler
The warblers are coming through in greater numbers, and greater numbers of species, at Magee Marsh and the the Biggest Week in American Birding the past two days. Today is my last day here and I am hoping to get out for one last turn around the boardwalk. This Chestnut-sided Warbler is singing his spring song.

Sony RX10 iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ ISO 250 @ f4. Processed and cropped for scale in Lightroom. I did not buy the Sony RX10 iii for birds, but this and other shots from the past few days have shown what it can do!



Chestnut-sided Warbler
The warblers are coming through in greater numbers, and greater numbers of species, at Magee Marsh and the the Biggest Week in American Birding the past two days. Today is my last day here and I am hoping to get out for one last turn around the boardwalk. This Chestnut-sided Warbler is singing his spring song.

Sony RX10 iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ ISO 250 @ f4. Processed and cropped for scale in Lightroom. I did not buy the Sony RX10 iii for birds, but this and other shots from the past few days have shown what it can do!

___

2016-05-12 20:08:13 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

May 12

So my day at the ZEISS Booth is
all but over. Question. Do I rush
out to the boardwalk for a few
more Warblers (maybe even an
actual Kirtland's, confirmed today)
or do I go back to the hotel and
put my feet up? I know what my
feet are voting. And besides we
lost the good photographic light
an hour ago...no evening glow
today. Ah, the vote from my back
is now in. Hotel it is, and if I don't ask,
I will never know what I am missing.

I do not plan to ask. 

May 12

So my day at the ZEISS Booth is
all but over. Question. Do I rush
out to the boardwalk for a few
more Warblers (maybe even an
actual Kirtland's, confirmed today)
or do I go back to the hotel and
put my feet up? I know what my
feet are voting. And besides we
lost the good photographic light
an hour ago...no evening glow
today. Ah, the vote from my back
is now in. Hotel it is, and if I don't ask,
I will never know what I am missing.

I do not plan to ask. ___

posted image

2016-05-12 11:27:39 (13 comments; 4 reshares; 218 +1s)Open 

Magee Marsh woods...one of the dryer spots. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10 iii, Processed in Lightroom. 

Magee Marsh woods...one of the dryer spots. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10 iii, Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-05-12 11:15:08 (1 comments; 5 reshares; 80 +1s)Open 

Black-throated Green Warbler
It was one of those days at Magee Marsh that make believers out of birders, and birders out of casual citizens who just happen by. Lots of warblers, lots of species, and feeding down low where you could see them. This Black-throated Green posed nicely just a few feet away.

Nikon P900 at 1200mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 100 @ f6.3. Processed and cropped slightly for scale in Lightroom.

Black-throated Green Warbler
It was one of those days at Magee Marsh that make believers out of birders, and birders out of casual citizens who just happen by. Lots of warblers, lots of species, and feeding down low where you could see them. This Black-throated Green posed nicely just a few feet away.

Nikon P900 at 1200mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 100 @ f6.3. Processed and cropped slightly for scale in Lightroom.___

2016-05-12 09:46:16 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

May 11

A great wave of warblers flowed
into Magee Marsh overnight, and
suddenly birds are everywhere,
a smorgasbord of species, in such
abundance...and feeding down
to eye-level and below, where they
are easy targets for the camera...
Chestnut-sided and Bay-breasted
feeding within feet of your face...
Blackburnian, impossibly bright,
right overhead...Ovenbirds under
the boardwalk...Black-throated
Greens so close you could touch
them (if you were fast enough
to arrest their constant motion)...
I had a Scarlet Tanager fly between
my arm and body as I held the
camera up! It is one of those
days that creates and sustains
the legend of Magee Marsh, that
fuels the allure of the place during
spring migration, that draws the
crowds year after year to line
the boardwalk so solid... more »

May 11

A great wave of warblers flowed
into Magee Marsh overnight, and
suddenly birds are everywhere,
a smorgasbord of species, in such
abundance...and feeding down
to eye-level and below, where they
are easy targets for the camera...
Chestnut-sided and Bay-breasted
feeding within feet of your face...
Blackburnian, impossibly bright,
right overhead...Ovenbirds under
the boardwalk...Black-throated
Greens so close you could touch
them (if you were fast enough
to arrest their constant motion)...
I had a Scarlet Tanager fly between
my arm and body as I held the
camera up! It is one of those
days that creates and sustains
the legend of Magee Marsh, that
fuels the allure of the place during
spring migration, that draws the
crowds year after year to line
the boardwalk so solid that it
takes real determination to worm
your way through...and makes
it totally worth the effort. There
was even a report of a Kirtlands
Warbler (very rare and endangered).
All day long the far end of the
overflow parking hosted a crowd
of several hundred birders and
photographers (though wiser
minds, reviewing the photos,
decided it was actually a female
Magnolia...and still, at 7 PM
there were a dozen or more
photographers there trying for
a pic). It is magic, it is addictive...
one such day and you are hooked
forever on Magee Marsh, and you
will be back...always hoping for
the true Magee Marsh experience!___

posted image

2016-05-11 10:49:40 (4 comments; 8 reshares; 245 +1s)Open 

Another moody Maine landscape. Rachel Carson NWR. In-camera HDR. Sony HX90V. Processed in Lightroom. 

Another moody Maine landscape. Rachel Carson NWR. In-camera HDR. Sony HX90V. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-05-11 10:42:49 (17 comments; 39 reshares; 460 +1s)Open 

Scarlet!
Not great light but a great bird. This Scarlet Tanager was down low right over the boardwalk at Magee Marsh during the Biggest Week in American Birding. I, and about 20 other photographers who happened to be right there at the right moment, had a chance at some good shots, and an experience we will remember.

Nikon P900 at 2000mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 320 @ f6.5. Processed in Lightroom.



Scarlet!
Not great light but a great bird. This Scarlet Tanager was down low right over the boardwalk at Magee Marsh during the Biggest Week in American Birding. I, and about 20 other photographers who happened to be right there at the right moment, had a chance at some good shots, and an experience we will remember.

Nikon P900 at 2000mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 320 @ f6.5. Processed in Lightroom.

___

2016-05-10 23:38:44 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

May 10

Getting a new camera is always
like getting new eyes...a way of
rediscovering the world, of subtly
re-imagining existence (right here,
in the ongoing midst and sometime
mess of it)...a renewal of vision...

I doubt painters feel the same way
when they get a new brush...but
maybe they just might when they
first try watercolor, or tempera,
or oil, or finger painting, or any
new medium of expression with
its inevitable new way of seeing.

Suddenly you want to go back
and re-see a lot of what you have
already seen, and this is good.

It keeps the world fresh, and the
heart and mind wonderfully alive.

May 10

Getting a new camera is always
like getting new eyes...a way of
rediscovering the world, of subtly
re-imagining existence (right here,
in the ongoing midst and sometime
mess of it)...a renewal of vision...

I doubt painters feel the same way
when they get a new brush...but
maybe they just might when they
first try watercolor, or tempera,
or oil, or finger painting, or any
new medium of expression with
its inevitable new way of seeing.

Suddenly you want to go back
and re-see a lot of what you have
already seen, and this is good.

It keeps the world fresh, and the
heart and mind wonderfully alive.___

posted image

2016-05-10 11:28:51 (8 comments; 9 reshares; 191 +1s)Open 

Here in Ohio I am concentrating on warblers and other song birds, so we will dip back to my few days in Maine last week. The bend in Branch Brook on a moody day. In-camera HDR, Sony HX90V. Processes in Lightroom. 

Here in Ohio I am concentrating on warblers and other song birds, so we will dip back to my few days in Maine last week. The bend in Branch Brook on a moody day. In-camera HDR, Sony HX90V. Processes in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-05-10 11:19:13 (5 comments; 8 reshares; 154 +1s)Open 

He's not heavy, he's my brother...
These two Great Horned Owl chicks were out on the branch for the first time yesterday. We have been seeing them, along the boardwalk at Magee Marsh among the warblers, deep down in the crevice below this perch. At one time both owls were up on the branch, and then one of them apparently decided to go back into the crevice…but it looks like maybe his brother stood on him before he could get all the way down. Looks like. And it makes a good story. He’s not heavy, he’s my brother.

Nikon P900 at 1500mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 200 @ f6.3. Processed in Lightroom.

And I suppose using that line from the song really, really dates me! :)

He's not heavy, he's my brother...
These two Great Horned Owl chicks were out on the branch for the first time yesterday. We have been seeing them, along the boardwalk at Magee Marsh among the warblers, deep down in the crevice below this perch. At one time both owls were up on the branch, and then one of them apparently decided to go back into the crevice…but it looks like maybe his brother stood on him before he could get all the way down. Looks like. And it makes a good story. He’s not heavy, he’s my brother.

Nikon P900 at 1500mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 200 @ f6.3. Processed in Lightroom.

And I suppose using that line from the song really, really dates me! :)___

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