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Stephen Ingraham

Stephen Ingraham Verified in Google 

Christian, birder, photographer, blogger...

Occupation: Retired. Senior Brand Advocate for Birding and Wildlife Observation: Carl Zeiss Sports Optics (Photographer (nature & landscape), Blogger)

Location: Kennebunk ME

Followers: 57,010

Following: 3,610

Views: 117,450,865

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Stephen Ingraham has been at 1 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Landscape Photography Community10,866*Landscape Photography Community:  One of a Kind* *General Rules* 1) You must be a member of the Landscape Photography Community (LPC)!!  Please circle the @106632923256517196664 page. 2) Only ONE photograph per member is allowed.  If you submit more than one photo, all of your photos will be removed. 3) Your photo MUST be ORIGINAL.  Do NOT share someone else's photo.  If you post the work of someone else, you will be banned from the community. *4) You MUST have complete EXIF data for your photo.  Within the event, select your photo and view it large.  Look for the "photo details" on the right.  It should be complete with the date the photo was taken, camera and lens information, ISO, speed, f stop etc.  Photos that don't have complete EXIF data will be removed.* 5) This must be a photograph suitable for the Landscape Photography Community.  6) There is NO VOTING for this contest!  Several of our senior moderators have volunteered to judge this contest.  They are experienced judges of photography events and their decision is final. 7) Photos must be posted no later than Monday, July 6, 2015, 3 pm CDT.  Those posted after that time will be removed. 8) Winners will be announced on Wednesday, July 8, 2015. 9) Moderators of the LPC may participate but they cannot win the contest. 10) Technical Requirements: Enable "sharing" on your photo.  If it receives honors, we want to be able to share it!!  Enable "comments" on your photo.  We want to say how great it is!!  Enable "plus ones" so everyone can give it a big plus!!LPC Contest #43: One of a Kind2015-06-29 22:00:00465  

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 63

posted image

2016-09-16 01:18:31 (63 comments; 20 reshares; 371 +1s; )Open 

Three Rondawels/Blyde Canyon Overlook, South Africa. Justly famous. On the Panorama Route north of Johannesburg. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

Most reshares: 20

posted image

2016-09-16 01:18:31 (63 comments; 20 reshares; 371 +1s; )Open 

Three Rondawels/Blyde Canyon Overlook, South Africa. Justly famous. On the Panorama Route north of Johannesburg. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

Most plusones: 371

posted image

2016-09-16 01:18:31 (63 comments; 20 reshares; 371 +1s; )Open 

Three Rondawels/Blyde Canyon Overlook, South Africa. Justly famous. On the Panorama Route north of Johannesburg. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

Latest 50 posts

posted image

2016-09-30 11:37:57 (5 comments; 2 reshares; 91 +1s; )Open 

A touch of fall color in the marsh. Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, Wells Maine. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.

A touch of fall color in the marsh. Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, Wells Maine. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.___

posted image

2016-09-30 11:29:14 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 17 +1s; )Open 

Agitated Elephant
One of the things that impressed me about the Ranger/Drivers of Viva Safaris was how respectful they were of the animals they showed us. This young male Elephant at Kruger National Park was clearly bothered about something, and spent 15 minutes deciding if it was us, before bolting across the road in front of us in a mock charge. All that time our driver sat with one foot on the accelerator and a hand on the gear-shift, ready to move at need, but definitely giving the Elephant every opportunity to make up its mind. Even a young bull like this could easily flip a Game Viewer full of tourists, so I was happy when he decided that a brief show of force was all that was needed, and went on his way off into the bush.

Sony RX10iii at 150mm equivalent field of view. 1/320th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.

Agitated Elephant
One of the things that impressed me about the Ranger/Drivers of Viva Safaris was how respectful they were of the animals they showed us. This young male Elephant at Kruger National Park was clearly bothered about something, and spent 15 minutes deciding if it was us, before bolting across the road in front of us in a mock charge. All that time our driver sat with one foot on the accelerator and a hand on the gear-shift, ready to move at need, but definitely giving the Elephant every opportunity to make up its mind. Even a young bull like this could easily flip a Game Viewer full of tourists, so I was happy when he decided that a brief show of force was all that was needed, and went on his way off into the bush.

Sony RX10iii at 150mm equivalent field of view. 1/320th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.___

2016-09-29 22:57:12 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s; )Open 

September 29
I am trying to get my mind into
Cuba mode. I ordered the bird
books, and I have done a trial
packing...clothing for 14 days
in a carry-on, plus my CPAP
and my cameras in a backpack...
and I am trying to slow my
mind, to temper my expectations
of efficiency and shift my focus
to the faces, to the hearts, of the
people around me...to tune in to
bright color and brassy sound and
slow scented breezes across the
landscape, so it will not come as
a shock when I get off the plane in
Havana and work my way through
customs, white uniforms, moving in
rhythm to the ceiling fans circling
slowly overhead...

September 29
I am trying to get my mind into
Cuba mode. I ordered the bird
books, and I have done a trial
packing...clothing for 14 days
in a carry-on, plus my CPAP
and my cameras in a backpack...
and I am trying to slow my
mind, to temper my expectations
of efficiency and shift my focus
to the faces, to the hearts, of the
people around me...to tune in to
bright color and brassy sound and
slow scented breezes across the
landscape, so it will not come as
a shock when I get off the plane in
Havana and work my way through
customs, white uniforms, moving in
rhythm to the ceiling fans circling
slowly overhead...___

posted image

2016-09-29 11:42:42 (9 comments; 4 reshares; 165 +1s; )Open 

The panorama version of Branch Brook at Rachel Carson NWR in early fall. Sweep Panorama Mode, Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.

The panorama version of Branch Brook at Rachel Carson NWR in early fall. Sweep Panorama Mode, Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.___

posted image

2016-09-29 11:18:52 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 20 +1s; )Open 

Male and Female Giraffes
This shot shows off one of the “tells” that helps us humans to separate male and female Giraffes in the field. The female in the foreground has tufts of hair on the tops of the bony protrusions on her head. They are not “horns” as such, since they are still completely covered by skin. The male, in contrast, has no tufts. His protrusions end in a smooth point…sometimes spreading to form a bit of a ball. Aside from the id aspect, I just like the graphic impact of this image…which is all, actually, I was looking at at the moment I took it. 🙂

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.



Male and Female Giraffes
This shot shows off one of the “tells” that helps us humans to separate male and female Giraffes in the field. The female in the foreground has tufts of hair on the tops of the bony protrusions on her head. They are not “horns” as such, since they are still completely covered by skin. The male, in contrast, has no tufts. His protrusions end in a smooth point…sometimes spreading to form a bit of a ball. Aside from the id aspect, I just like the graphic impact of this image…which is all, actually, I was looking at at the moment I took it. 🙂

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.

___

2016-09-29 00:33:15 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

September 28
Knocked out an article on
my trip to Tranquilo Bay in
Bocas del Toro, Panama today...
sank back into the images and
memories of a month ago...
almost as good as a vacation,

so why do I feel so tired, as
though I had lifted mental
weights all day...maybe I
am re-experiencing the jet
lag right along with the pics?

September 28
Knocked out an article on
my trip to Tranquilo Bay in
Bocas del Toro, Panama today...
sank back into the images and
memories of a month ago...
almost as good as a vacation,

so why do I feel so tired, as
though I had lifted mental
weights all day...maybe I
am re-experiencing the jet
lag right along with the pics?___

posted image

2016-09-28 11:58:11 (14 comments; 6 reshares; 174 +1s; )Open 

Fall color is coming, sure as the change of seasons. This is along Branch Brook at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Wells Maine. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processes in Lightroom. 

Fall color is coming, sure as the change of seasons. This is along Branch Brook at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Wells Maine. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processes in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-09-28 11:47:29 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 23 +1s; )Open 

Blue Wildebeest
The Blue Wildebeest is, of course, the iconic African Migration animal, the one you see thundering off a stream bank in a mass of horns and hooves by the hundred as they move across the African bush in season…but most of the year this is how you see them, at least during the day. During the day the herds are dispersed in small groups as the grazing allows, generally in the company of similar small groups of Zebras. Zebra have a “you watch my back and I’ll watch yours” arrangement with Wildebeest. Come sundown, the Wildebeests (and the Zebras) reform in larger herds. One of our game viewers, on a day I was not in Kruger National Park, was stuck for 2 hours as herd of Wildebeest crossed the only road out of the park. The largest herd I saw, at sunset in Kruger, was maybe 200, and they crossed while we were parked at the gift shop/camp ground 7k inside the gates, stocking upon wate... more »

Blue Wildebeest
The Blue Wildebeest is, of course, the iconic African Migration animal, the one you see thundering off a stream bank in a mass of horns and hooves by the hundred as they move across the African bush in season…but most of the year this is how you see them, at least during the day. During the day the herds are dispersed in small groups as the grazing allows, generally in the company of similar small groups of Zebras. Zebra have a “you watch my back and I’ll watch yours” arrangement with Wildebeest. Come sundown, the Wildebeests (and the Zebras) reform in larger herds. One of our game viewers, on a day I was not in Kruger National Park, was stuck for 2 hours as herd of Wildebeest crossed the only road out of the park. The largest herd I saw, at sunset in Kruger, was maybe 200, and they crossed while we were parked at the gift shop/camp ground 7k inside the gates, stocking up on water for the drive home.

Sony RX10iii at 214mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.

___

posted image

2016-09-27 14:42:42 (10 comments; 2 reshares; 138 +1s; )Open 

The blown heads of seeded grass, backlit by the sun. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.

The blown heads of seeded grass, backlit by the sun. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.___

2016-09-27 14:38:55 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

September 27
Upon reflection, I can't help but fear
that this election cycle is giving
ammunition to anyone who has
ever mocked our great experiment
in government by and for the
people, to those who see us
as impossibly naive and doomed
to eventual dissolution into
populists ciaos or hardening
into a dictatorship of the
proletariat. And it is not like
me to be political at all. It is just
that I hate to think it has come
to this...that there are that many
people who need someone to blame...
that many who do not know that
overall we beat the odds every day,
that the USA is still the shining
on the hill, the proof positive of
hope and faith that the common
decency and intelligence of our
fellows, that good will, and the
grace of God, can and will prevail.

Democracy... more »

September 27
Upon reflection, I can't help but fear
that this election cycle is giving
ammunition to anyone who has
ever mocked our great experiment
in government by and for the
people, to those who see us
as impossibly naive and doomed
to eventual dissolution into
populists ciaos or hardening
into a dictatorship of the
proletariat. And it is not like
me to be political at all. It is just
that I hate to think it has come
to this...that there are that many
people who need someone to blame...
that many who do not know that
overall we beat the odds every day,
that the USA is still the shining
on the hill, the proof positive of
hope and faith that the common
decency and intelligence of our
fellows, that good will, and the
grace of God, can and will prevail.

Democracy works.
We proved it 8 years ago, and
we prove it every day.

And I do not appreciate the likes
of Trump and Clinton giving me
any reason to doubt it.___

posted image

2016-09-27 14:07:31 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 44 +1s; )Open 

Tandem Zebras
I had a lot of fun photographing the Zebras in Kruger National Park and the surrounding Game Reserves. They are easy. They just stand most of the time, most of the time in pairs, and the patterns their patterns make when they collide are always interesting…from a purely graphic point of view. This pair (and I use the term not in its familial sense but just as a numerical designation) show the erect manes of healthy Zebras, despite the drought in Kruger. According to our guides, the patterns on Zebras are as unique as fingerprints…and you can see the subtle variations in this image.

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/640th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.



Tandem Zebras
I had a lot of fun photographing the Zebras in Kruger National Park and the surrounding Game Reserves. They are easy. They just stand most of the time, most of the time in pairs, and the patterns their patterns make when they collide are always interesting…from a purely graphic point of view. This pair (and I use the term not in its familial sense but just as a numerical designation) show the erect manes of healthy Zebras, despite the drought in Kruger. According to our guides, the patterns on Zebras are as unique as fingerprints…and you can see the subtle variations in this image.

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/640th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.

___

2016-09-27 13:04:14 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

September 26
Watching the Presidential Debate
on my tablet in the livingroom
with headphones (so Carol can
sleep) only deepens the mystery
of how we got here, to this point,
with such an implausible choice.

Bluster and bully on one side, with
an interestingly detached (and
intentionally dark) sense of reality,
and crafty politician in a pants suit
on the other, only too obviously
promoting a politically correcct
reality...but I am being unkind
and that is the last thing I, or any-
one, needs this year (or any other).

It is the voice of frustration talking.
(and there is already too much
of that in this election...)

September 26
Watching the Presidential Debate
on my tablet in the livingroom
with headphones (so Carol can
sleep) only deepens the mystery
of how we got here, to this point,
with such an implausible choice.

Bluster and bully on one side, with
an interestingly detached (and
intentionally dark) sense of reality,
and crafty politician in a pants suit
on the other, only too obviously
promoting a politically correcct
reality...but I am being unkind
and that is the last thing I, or any-
one, needs this year (or any other).

It is the voice of frustration talking.
(and there is already too much
of that in this election...)___

posted image

2016-09-26 13:00:44 (14 comments; 5 reshares; 244 +1s; )Open 

Sunset along the Olifant River, Balule Game Reserve, South Africa. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.

Sunset along the Olifant River, Balule Game Reserve, South Africa. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.___

posted image

2016-09-26 10:46:02 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 20 +1s; )Open 

Magpie Shrike
At the end of a long dry winter in South Africa, one of the most present birds of the bush wherever you go, is the Magpie Shrike. Most locals, including our guides, still call it by its old name, the Long-tailed Shrike. And, indeed, the first thing you are likely to notice is the exceptionally long tail. I saw hundreds of them before pulling up alongside this one in the game viewer at Balule Game Reserve for a portrait. They are conspicuous, not only for their tail, but because they tend to perch in the tops of small to medium height brush and trees, where they can keep a sharp eye out for insects on the ground around them. Like most birds with long tails they use the tail for quick side-ways maneuvers and abrupt turns in flight, when pouncing on prey.

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ f4 @ ISO 100. Processed in Lightroom.



Magpie Shrike
At the end of a long dry winter in South Africa, one of the most present birds of the bush wherever you go, is the Magpie Shrike. Most locals, including our guides, still call it by its old name, the Long-tailed Shrike. And, indeed, the first thing you are likely to notice is the exceptionally long tail. I saw hundreds of them before pulling up alongside this one in the game viewer at Balule Game Reserve for a portrait. They are conspicuous, not only for their tail, but because they tend to perch in the tops of small to medium height brush and trees, where they can keep a sharp eye out for insects on the ground around them. Like most birds with long tails they use the tail for quick side-ways maneuvers and abrupt turns in flight, when pouncing on prey.

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/250th @ f4 @ ISO 100. Processed in Lightroom.

___

2016-09-25 20:09:01 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

September 25
Our back yard is moss, mostly,
underneath, and when I mowed
it yesterday, I found, unmistakable,
moose tracks pressed into the soft
cushion of green...

I imagine the moose, standing
there in the night, antlers spread
wide, short-sighted eyes focused
on nothing, munching the sparse
sweet grass, half asleep, dreaming
moose dreams, while I am inside,
behind the window, 20 feet away,
breathing in the rhythm of my
CPAP machine, dreams suppressed...

otherwise, surely there would be
moose tracks pressed into the moss
of my mind as well as the yard.

September 25
Our back yard is moss, mostly,
underneath, and when I mowed
it yesterday, I found, unmistakable,
moose tracks pressed into the soft
cushion of green...

I imagine the moose, standing
there in the night, antlers spread
wide, short-sighted eyes focused
on nothing, munching the sparse
sweet grass, half asleep, dreaming
moose dreams, while I am inside,
behind the window, 20 feet away,
breathing in the rhythm of my
CPAP machine, dreams suppressed...

otherwise, surely there would be
moose tracks pressed into the moss
of my mind as well as the yard.___

posted image

2016-09-25 17:55:54 (12 comments; 3 reshares; 198 +1s; )Open 

I think this is feverfew, growing wild on the Kennebunk Plains. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

I think this is feverfew, growing wild on the Kennebunk Plains. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-09-25 12:25:51 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 36 +1s; )Open 

___

2016-09-24 20:26:12 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

September 24
There are a few trees, maples, along
the shore of Day Brook Pond, that
feel the touch of fall first, turning,
showing red well ahead of the
season. Maybe deep springs under
water well up cold, adding a chill
to the air not felt elsewhere, or
maybe it is genetic, something
in the trees themselves, that
responds to the change in the
angle of the sun early. Whatever.
I am always happy to see the first
red of the season, there along the
cool shore of Day Brook Pond.

http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-24.html

September 24
There are a few trees, maples, along
the shore of Day Brook Pond, that
feel the touch of fall first, turning,
showing red well ahead of the
season. Maybe deep springs under
water well up cold, adding a chill
to the air not felt elsewhere, or
maybe it is genetic, something
in the trees themselves, that
responds to the change in the
angle of the sun early. Whatever.
I am always happy to see the first
red of the season, there along the
cool shore of Day Brook Pond.

http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-24.html___

posted image

2016-09-24 18:58:39 (21 comments; 10 reshares; 297 +1s; )Open 

I am definitely back from Panama and South Africa. The first touch of fall along the shores of Day Brook Pond on the Kennebunk Plains Wildlife Management Area in W. Kennebunk Maine. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

I am definitely back from Panama and South Africa. The first touch of fall along the shores of Day Brook Pond on the Kennebunk Plains Wildlife Management Area in W. Kennebunk Maine. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-09-24 11:33:50 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 37 +1s; )Open 

Morning at Marc's
My last full, non-travel, morning in South Africa I was at Marc’s Treehouse Lodge, operated by Viva Safaris. It is on a private Game Reserve west of the Orpen Gate at Kruger National Park. I decided to forego the scheduled activity and just spend the morning wandering around the grounds of the Lodge with my camera to see what I could see. I was very thankful to the staff at Marc’s for letting me do that. I stayed fairly close to the cabins and tents at the Lodge, as Marc’s is an unfenced camp and there is always the chance of the wandering Cape Buffalo or even Leopard on the grounds. I was looking mostly for smaller birds, as that is what I was missing from my African experience and all the game drives in high vehicles. As I mentioned in previous posts, South Africa and Kruger in particular, are well into a major drought, and it is the end of a long dry winter there,so bi... more »

Morning at Marc's
My last full, non-travel, morning in South Africa I was at Marc’s Treehouse Lodge, operated by Viva Safaris. It is on a private Game Reserve west of the Orpen Gate at Kruger National Park. I decided to forego the scheduled activity and just spend the morning wandering around the grounds of the Lodge with my camera to see what I could see. I was very thankful to the staff at Marc’s for letting me do that. I stayed fairly close to the cabins and tents at the Lodge, as Marc’s is an unfenced camp and there is always the chance of the wandering Cape Buffalo or even Leopard on the grounds. I was looking mostly for smaller birds, as that is what I was missing from my African experience and all the game drives in high vehicles. As I mentioned in previous posts, South Africa and Kruger in particular, are well into a major drought, and it is the end of a long dry winter there, so birds were scarce, even in the trees along the river below the camp. I did see Pied Kingfisher and Little Bee-eater, both amazing birds, and that would have made my morning, but it was really the Sunbirds I wanted closer looks at. I was able to photograph the White-bellied Sunbird in the collage above several times that morning, and glimpsed at least two others during my walk…Scarlet-breasted and one of the yellow ones. (I got a record shot of the Scarlet-breasted the next morning before boarding the van for Johannesburg.) I love the Sunbirds…colored like a hummingbird and filling much the same niche…but with size, flight, and song of a finch. The Southern Black Tit was working the trees just at the edge of the sandy bed of the river, and the Yellow-breasted Apalis was in the vegetation around the pool just below the lodge where the giraffes come to drink. The Citrus Swallowtail was basking by the same pool. I was happy to ID this as the Citrus Swallowtail of Southern Africa and not the much more common, and closely related, Lemon Swallowtail, which is a problem butterfly in North Africa…invasive as far east as China and some of the South Pacific Islands, and as far west as Central America. I also photograhed a Red-capped Robin-chat, but was not able to get a really sharp image in the dense thicket it preferred. All in all, a very worthwhile morning.

All shots with the Sony RX10iii, at 600mm equivalent field of view. Program Mode. Processed in Lightroom and assembled in Coolage.

___

2016-09-24 01:06:22 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

September 23
When I went to South Africa
I was not a rooibos drinker...
far from it...I did not like
rooibos. But mornings on
the thatched veranda at
Tremisana Lodge, with
monkeys watching from
the branches and warthogs
and Yellow-billed Hornbills
at the pool under the scarce
trees, there was only rooibos
if I did not want caffeine with
breakfast, and I didn't, so
I drank it South African style,
with milk, and it was so good
I ordered two boxes from
Amazon when I got home...
the real stuff, just what you
would buy for the table in
South Africa. And I brewed
a cup this evening, as soon
as it came, with a splash of
coconut milk, and it was good

even without the monkeys.

http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-23.html

September 23
When I went to South Africa
I was not a rooibos drinker...
far from it...I did not like
rooibos. But mornings on
the thatched veranda at
Tremisana Lodge, with
monkeys watching from
the branches and warthogs
and Yellow-billed Hornbills
at the pool under the scarce
trees, there was only rooibos
if I did not want caffeine with
breakfast, and I didn't, so
I drank it South African style,
with milk, and it was so good
I ordered two boxes from
Amazon when I got home...
the real stuff, just what you
would buy for the table in
South Africa. And I brewed
a cup this evening, as soon
as it came, with a splash of
coconut milk, and it was good

even without the monkeys.

http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-23.html___

posted image

2016-09-23 12:32:10 (15 comments; 6 reshares; 208 +1s; )Open 

___

posted image

2016-09-23 11:59:58 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 24 +1s; )Open 

World Rhinoceros Day
Yesterday, September 22, was World Rhinoceros Day, and I missed it 🙁 So, here, a day late, are my two best shots of Rhinoceros in the wild, taken at Kruger National Park last week. Both are White Rhino. It turns out that “white” is a mistake, an accident based on the fact that the Dutch name was “wide-lipped” which sounded a bit like “white”, and the name for the other South African Rhino was “hooked lipped” which sounded a bit like “black”. So this is, in reality, the Wide-lipped Rhinoceros, so named because its wide lips are adapted for eating grasses at ground level. The Black, or Hook-lipped, Rhinoceros has narrow lips adapted for plucking leaves from standing trees and brush. Grazer vs. Browser. But it is too late for that. They are forever Black and White. Besides these two “wild” Rhinos, I saw lots of Rhinos at Tshukudu Game Reserve, wherethey specialize in Rhino (... more »

World Rhinoceros Day
Yesterday, September 22, was World Rhinoceros Day, and I missed it 🙁 So, here, a day late, are my two best shots of Rhinoceros in the wild, taken at Kruger National Park last week. Both are White Rhino. It turns out that “white” is a mistake, an accident based on the fact that the Dutch name was “wide-lipped” which sounded a bit like “white”, and the name for the other South African Rhino was “hooked lipped” which sounded a bit like “black”. So this is, in reality, the Wide-lipped Rhinoceros, so named because its wide lips are adapted for eating grasses at ground level. The Black, or Hook-lipped, Rhinoceros has narrow lips adapted for plucking leaves from standing trees and brush. Grazer vs. Browser. But it is too late for that. They are forever Black and White. Besides these two “wild” Rhinos, I saw lots of Rhinos at Tshukudu Game Reserve, where they specialize in Rhino (Tshakudu means Rhinoceros in the local language). Unfortunately, due to heavy poaching, all the Rhinos at Tshakudu have to be dehorned for their own protection. Poaching is huge problem. Kruger National Park has enough Rhino horn in stock to flood the market for 20 years to come, but each year proposals to release it for sale, and so drive down the prices to levels where poaching will not be so attractive, are defeated. The logic is that they do not want to “expand” the existing market to the point where poaching is the only way to meet the demand after their stocks run out. Others argue that Rhino horn could be “farmed” in a way that would meet the demand and save most wild Rhinos. I am glad it is not a decision I have to make…but it is one that needs making. I can certainly see the logic of putting the poachers out of business. There are signs along the road to Kruger in South Africa, posed on the property of private game reserves, that say “Poachers will be Poached!” and the people at Tshakudu will tell you about running gun battles between their rangers and poachers as recently as the past few months. It is a serious problem, and, when added to habitat loss, is keeping the Rhino at the edge of disaster.

Sony RX10iii at 1200mm equivalent field of view (2x Clear Image Zoom). Neither Rhino was nearly as close as they look in the images. Program. ISO 100 and ISO 1000. Processed in Lightroom.

___

2016-09-23 00:52:36 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s; )Open 

September 22
I finished captioning 851 images
from South Africa this evening...
not my favorite task. I sit with
my reference books: birds, mammals,
etc. and try to id as many of the
creatures in my pics as possible,
and I put the general location for
each...info not already in the exif
file, so those who navigate my
galleries will know...but mostly
so I can remember myself...so I
will know, a year from now, ten
years from now (lord willing) what
I photographed and where...and so,
(again lord willing), should I ever
see these critters again I might
know their names...I might
recognize them. You'd be surprised
how much it helps...or maybe
you wouldn't...but it helps me.

If only it were as much fun as
taking the photos in the first place.

September 22
I finished captioning 851 images
from South Africa this evening...
not my favorite task. I sit with
my reference books: birds, mammals,
etc. and try to id as many of the
creatures in my pics as possible,
and I put the general location for
each...info not already in the exif
file, so those who navigate my
galleries will know...but mostly
so I can remember myself...so I
will know, a year from now, ten
years from now (lord willing) what
I photographed and where...and so,
(again lord willing), should I ever
see these critters again I might
know their names...I might
recognize them. You'd be surprised
how much it helps...or maybe
you wouldn't...but it helps me.

If only it were as much fun as
taking the photos in the first place.___

posted image

2016-09-22 11:44:19 (22 comments; 8 reshares; 189 +1s; )Open 

Three Rondawels on the Panorama Route, South Africa...the panorama version. Sweep Panorama Mode, Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

Three Rondawels on the Panorama Route, South Africa...the panorama version. Sweep Panorama Mode, Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-09-22 11:20:10 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 29 +1s; )Open 

Crocodile, Hippo, and three Terripins
The few remaining watering holes at Kruger National Park in South Africa make for strange associations: in this case a Crocodile, a Hippopotamus, and three Hinged Terripins. None of these animals are much threat to the others. The Crocodile might be tempted by a Hippo calf, but it would be very unlikely to get by the fiercely protective mother, and no Croc messes with a full grown Hippo. I suppose the Croc might also try for the Terripins but I am sure their heavy shell is a deterrent. The Croc is sunning itself, using the membranes in its mouth to regulate its body temperature. The Hippo is resting in hopes (probably misplaced during this drought) of finding grass to feed on during the cool hours of the night. Hippo hide is very sensitive to the sun and they have to keep pretty much submerged all day. The Terripins appear to be both sunning and resting,... more »

Crocodile, Hippo, and three Terripins
The few remaining watering holes at Kruger National Park in South Africa make for strange associations: in this case a Crocodile, a Hippopotamus, and three Hinged Terripins. None of these animals are much threat to the others. The Crocodile might be tempted by a Hippo calf, but it would be very unlikely to get by the fiercely protective mother, and no Croc messes with a full grown Hippo. I suppose the Croc might also try for the Terripins but I am sure their heavy shell is a deterrent. The Croc is sunning itself, using the membranes in its mouth to regulate its body temperature. The Hippo is resting in hopes (probably misplaced during this drought) of finding grass to feed on during the cool hours of the night. Hippo hide is very sensitive to the sun and they have to keep pretty much submerged all day. The Terripins appear to be both sunning and resting, taking advantage of the elevation and relative safety of the Hippo’s broad back.

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. 1/800th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed and cropped to about 1200mm apparent field of view in Lightroom.

___

2016-09-22 10:24:37 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

September 21
What is it with Hawk Mountain?
Twice I have been supposed to
do workshops there on a Saturday,
and twice now, they were canceled.
The first time I actually got to
Philadelphia before finding out
the workshop was canceled while
I was in the air...maybe over NYC.
I am beginning to think the whole
Hawk Mountain thing is a myth,
or a promised land thing that I am
(probably for good and sufficient
reason) not yet worthy to enter.

September 21
What is it with Hawk Mountain?
Twice I have been supposed to
do workshops there on a Saturday,
and twice now, they were canceled.
The first time I actually got to
Philadelphia before finding out
the workshop was canceled while
I was in the air...maybe over NYC.
I am beginning to think the whole
Hawk Mountain thing is a myth,
or a promised land thing that I am
(probably for good and sufficient
reason) not yet worthy to enter.___

posted image

2016-09-21 12:15:22 (15 comments; 7 reshares; 223 +1s; )Open 

A branch of the Klaserie River at Marc's Treehouse Lodge, South Africa. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

A branch of the Klaserie River at Marc's Treehouse Lodge, South Africa. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-09-21 12:08:16 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 59 +1s; )Open 

Thirst. Elephant
You can not visit Kruger National Park in South Africa right now without quickly realizing that Kruger is in trouble. 2 years of intense drought has brought water levels in the dams and natural watering holes to record lows. Many once reliable sources of water have dried up entirely. Large sections of Kruger look more like desert than savannah or scrub woodland. And the park is overpopulated with large herbivores…elephants and hippos in particular. The elephants are surviving so far by pushing over trees to get at the edible bark of the roots. In some sections of Kruger there are very few standing trees left, which, of course, further alters the environment: reduces shade, accelerates desertification, and reduces habitat for birds, reptiles, and mammals that depend on the trees. The hippos, who rely only on standing grasses, are simply dying. 30 died the week I was there. Thed... more »

Thirst. Elephant
You can not visit Kruger National Park in South Africa right now without quickly realizing that Kruger is in trouble. 2 years of intense drought has brought water levels in the dams and natural watering holes to record lows. Many once reliable sources of water have dried up entirely. Large sections of Kruger look more like desert than savannah or scrub woodland. And the park is overpopulated with large herbivores…elephants and hippos in particular. The elephants are surviving so far by pushing over trees to get at the edible bark of the roots. In some sections of Kruger there are very few standing trees left, which, of course, further alters the environment: reduces shade, accelerates desertification, and reduces habitat for birds, reptiles, and mammals that depend on the trees. The hippos, who rely only on standing grasses, are simply dying. 30 died the week I was there. The day I left, the park took the unprecedented step of culling 300 hippos and distributing the meat to surrounding villages. Sad as that is, having been there I know that the choice for those hippos was between a quick death and slow lingering death by starvation. And unless the rains come this South African summer, beginning this month and next, the elephants will begin to die too. Elephants need 200-600 pounds of fodder per day to survive…and up to 50 gallons of water. The park does still operate several bore holes with windmills and tanks and pools, and we saw big male elephants standing on the buttresses of the water tanks, tanks as tall as a two story house, and putting their trunks up over the tank walls to drink. The debate is on as to whether in the long run it is a kindness (or ecologically sound practice) to provide supplemental water to a population of elephants that is already considerably over what the land will bear. There are no good solutions, and even if the rains come this season, the park will take generations to recover.

Because water is scarce, the wildlife is concentrated. Herds of elephants come to the dams, off and on all day, to drink and cover their hides in mud. This is a large female, drinking her bathtub full of water for the day.

Sony RX10iii at 247mm equivalent field of view. 1/800th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.

The long range forecast models for South Africa are producing mixed results. Some models predict lower than normal precipitation this summer, some predict higher than normal…some predict a dry spring and a wet fall, and some the reverse. If you are a praying person, and the animals of Kruger matter to you, you might spare a prayer for a wet summer for South Africa…this year and for several years to come.

___

2016-09-20 14:05:06 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

September 20
Watching folks come off a late flight
at LaGuardia: confused, bemused, intent,
dazed, serene, panicked, resolute or resigned,
each one's circumstance, each one's story
of the moment, written plain, unguarded,
in face and posture, and I see myself, various
times and various places, airports past
and airports present, in every one of them.

September 20
Watching folks come off a late flight
at LaGuardia: confused, bemused, intent,
dazed, serene, panicked, resolute or resigned,
each one's circumstance, each one's story
of the moment, written plain, unguarded,
in face and posture, and I see myself, various
times and various places, airports past
and airports present, in every one of them.___

posted image

2016-09-20 12:17:34 (19 comments; 11 reshares; 250 +1s; )Open 

African sunset from the game viewer. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

African sunset from the game viewer. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-09-20 12:02:24 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 23 +1s; )Open 

Lion cub...
We found a medium sized pride of lions basking in the shade near a waterhole in Kruger National Park in South Africa. There were a dozen of what looked like adult females (a few of those might have been young males), and cubs of at least 4 different ages. This was the smallest, seen here having a rub along its mother’s flank as it moved to find a new spot among it’s larger cousins.

Sony RX10iii at 1200mm equivalent field of view (2x Clear Image Zoom). 1/320th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed and cropped from the top for effect in Lightroom.



Lion cub...
We found a medium sized pride of lions basking in the shade near a waterhole in Kruger National Park in South Africa. There were a dozen of what looked like adult females (a few of those might have been young males), and cubs of at least 4 different ages. This was the smallest, seen here having a rub along its mother’s flank as it moved to find a new spot among it’s larger cousins.

Sony RX10iii at 1200mm equivalent field of view (2x Clear Image Zoom). 1/320th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed and cropped from the top for effect in Lightroom.

___

2016-09-19 19:14:46 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

September 19

Sitting at the airport in Columbus
waiting for a flight out of here at 4...
been here since check-out time
at he hotel, oh, hours ago already...
did a spicy tuna melt on whole grain
bagel for lunch, and now I am nodding
off and on, catching myself sleeping,
and waking myself to check the time
on my phone, incredulous at how much
is still left before boarding. I know,
once I hit that air seat I will be asleep
before we leave the ground. I am trying
to remember...were there no morning
flights or did I really think this afternoon
flight was a good idea? Did I think I was
going to do something in Columbus
in the morning? I doubt it. Must have
booked the earliest available seat after
10 am...but this is cruel and unusual
punishment for sleeping in...

... more »

September 19

Sitting at the airport in Columbus
waiting for a flight out of here at 4...
been here since check-out time
at he hotel, oh, hours ago already...
did a spicy tuna melt on whole grain
bagel for lunch, and now I am nodding
off and on, catching myself sleeping,
and waking myself to check the time
on my phone, incredulous at how much
is still left before boarding. I know,
once I hit that air seat I will be asleep
before we leave the ground. I am trying
to remember...were there no morning
flights or did I really think this afternoon
flight was a good idea? Did I think I was
going to do something in Columbus
in the morning? I doubt it. Must have
booked the earliest available seat after
10 am...but this is cruel and unusual
punishment for sleeping in...

http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-19.html___

posted image

2016-09-19 11:38:12 (10 comments; 12 reshares; 193 +1s; )Open 

Landscape with elephants. Kruger National Park, South Africa. Kruger is in the grip of 2 year drought and watering holes are at a premium. Elephants gather to bathe and drink. Heat haze obscures the horizon. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

Landscape with elephants. Kruger National Park, South Africa. Kruger is in the grip of 2 year drought and watering holes are at a premium. Elephants gather to bathe and drink. Heat haze obscures the horizon. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-09-19 10:33:34 (2 comments; 4 reshares; 48 +1s; )Open 

Zebra classic...
This is a classic Zebra pose from Kruger National Park in South Africa. Though it might look like a tender moment, the Zebras are actually resting. The posture allows each to relax, while still keeping watch in both directions for potential danger.

Sony RX10iii at 500mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.

Zebra classic...
This is a classic Zebra pose from Kruger National Park in South Africa. Though it might look like a tender moment, the Zebras are actually resting. The posture allows each to relax, while still keeping watch in both directions for potential danger.

Sony RX10iii at 500mm equivalent field of view. 1/500th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom.___

2016-09-19 10:09:21 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s; )Open 

September 18
I am tempted (though not asked)
to attempt to put my oar in, to
effect the course of things, to have
my say one more time...it is the
habit of a lifetime, and I really
ought to know better by now. It
is not even my job anymore, I
remind myself. The best thing about
retirement, I often tell folks, is that
if it is broken (or even circling the
drain) it is not my job to fix it.

But honestly, where in a full life
do you actually stow an oar?

September 18
I am tempted (though not asked)
to attempt to put my oar in, to
effect the course of things, to have
my say one more time...it is the
habit of a lifetime, and I really
ought to know better by now. It
is not even my job anymore, I
remind myself. The best thing about
retirement, I often tell folks, is that
if it is broken (or even circling the
drain) it is not my job to fix it.

But honestly, where in a full life
do you actually stow an oar?___

posted image

2016-09-18 12:47:49 (17 comments; 5 reshares; 270 +1s; )Open 

The southern-most wild Baobab tree in Africa (according to the sign). Kruger National Park, South Africa. Note the Game Viewer (Toyota Land Cruiser) tracks in the foreground to judge the size of this huge tree. Sony RX10iii in-camera HDR. Processed in Lightroom. 

The southern-most wild Baobab tree in Africa (according to the sign). Kruger National Park, South Africa. Note the Game Viewer (Toyota Land Cruiser) tracks in the foreground to judge the size of this huge tree. Sony RX10iii in-camera HDR. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-09-18 10:36:43 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 32 +1s; )Open 

Hippo in the sunset. Happy Sunday!
“If your eye is generous, your whole being is full of light.” Jesus

I am more or less back from nearly a month of intensive travel, with spotty to non-existent wifi, and very little unscheduled time. I am actually in Columbus Ohio for the Great American Birding Expo, but that is relatively close to home, with excellent hotel wifi, and some time this morning to properly reflect on the Sunday. I am thankful for the time this morning, but I am also thankful for the travel. I spent a week in Panama, and 11 days in South Africa, and my head and my heart is full of new and memorable sights and experiences. This shot is from a sunset drive at a private, fenced, Game Reserve in South Africa. Tshakudu Game Reserve specializes in Rhinoceros, but they have all of the “big five” game animals on their extensive property. The small herd of Hippos wasbasking... more »

Hippo in the sunset. Happy Sunday!
“If your eye is generous, your whole being is full of light.” Jesus

I am more or less back from nearly a month of intensive travel, with spotty to non-existent wifi, and very little unscheduled time. I am actually in Columbus Ohio for the Great American Birding Expo, but that is relatively close to home, with excellent hotel wifi, and some time this morning to properly reflect on the Sunday. I am thankful for the time this morning, but I am also thankful for the travel. I spent a week in Panama, and 11 days in South Africa, and my head and my heart is full of new and memorable sights and experiences. This shot is from a sunset drive at a private, fenced, Game Reserve in South Africa. Tshakudu Game Reserve specializes in Rhinoceros, but they have all of the “big five” game animals on their extensive property. The small herd of Hippos was basking in one of few ponds that still have water at the height of the severe drought that has the Greater Kruger region in its grip. The water is actually shallow enough so the Hippos are kneeling on the bottom of the pond. This is a classic Africa shot, with the Hippo roaring in the sunset.

I feel incredibly blessed to have stood on the dam in Tshakudu to witness this. And incredibly is just the right word. I am very close to not being able to believe it. Africa has been a dream of mine since childhood, and, now, just after my 69th birthday, it has come true…and it was everything I had dreamed it would be. I went into the trip determined to be as generous as I possibly could be…open-hearted and open eyed as the blessing deserves. I failed, of course, but each day I woke with thanksgiving and did my best to enjoy what might well be a once in a lifetime experience. Just to be there…just to see…just to record…just to share. Overwhelming! God, please grant me generosity of spirit to match the gift. Happy Sunday!___

2016-09-18 00:57:34 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

September 17
Several times today, while passing
through the tents lined with birding
tour operators and countries (mostly
tropical and mostly exotic) trying to
attract birders at the Great American
Birding Expo, I paused just a split
second too long in front of a booth,
or let my eyes linger just a bit to
hungrily (I am after all susceptible
to pretty pictures of birds) on the
display and was, despite my ZEISS
badge, mistaken for a potential customer.

The good folks behind the tables laden
with full color brochures, glossy photos,
and elaborate maps, would leap into
action, and, mostly for politeness (and
and certainly a bit of interest) I would
submit to their appeals (there was certainly
nothing happening at the ZEISS booth to
draw me back to work), appeals both artful
and... more »

September 17
Several times today, while passing
through the tents lined with birding
tour operators and countries (mostly
tropical and mostly exotic) trying to
attract birders at the Great American
Birding Expo, I paused just a split
second too long in front of a booth,
or let my eyes linger just a bit to
hungrily (I am after all susceptible
to pretty pictures of birds) on the
display and was, despite my ZEISS
badge, mistaken for a potential customer.

The good folks behind the tables laden
with full color brochures, glossy photos,
and elaborate maps, would leap into
action, and, mostly for politeness (and
and certainly a bit of interest) I would
submit to their appeals (there was certainly
nothing happening at the ZEISS booth to
draw me back to work), appeals both artful
and artless...polished professional, or just
touchingly enthusiastic...who knows, my
willing ear and gentle questions might
have been the highlight of their day...
and I have to say, those conversations
certainly were the highlight of mine.

And no one, after all, arrested me for
impersonating a customer (but then I
took a bit a care not to get caught).___

posted image

2016-09-17 10:41:30 (29 comments; 7 reshares; 218 +1s; )Open 

Somewhere between Lydenburg and Hoedspruit South Africa, at a tourist stop by a tunnel. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

Somewhere between Lydenburg and Hoedspruit South Africa, at a tourist stop by a tunnel. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. ___

posted image

2016-09-17 09:38:29 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 28 +1s; )Open 

Harvest Moon -1
My Google+ feed is full of moons this morning…Harvest Moons. I took this shot 2 nights ago, before I had been reminded of the significance of this particular full moon, so one day shy of full…just because it was so beautiful emerging from a layer of clouds over Columbus. Grange Insurance Audubon Center, Columbus Ohio.

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. Hand-held Twilight Mode (multiple exposures processed down to one in-camera). Post-processed in Lightroom.



Harvest Moon -1
My Google+ feed is full of moons this morning…Harvest Moons. I took this shot 2 nights ago, before I had been reminded of the significance of this particular full moon, so one day shy of full…just because it was so beautiful emerging from a layer of clouds over Columbus. Grange Insurance Audubon Center, Columbus Ohio.

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. Hand-held Twilight Mode (multiple exposures processed down to one in-camera). Post-processed in Lightroom.

___

2016-09-16 21:06:25 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

September 16
Walking through the tents at
The Great American Birding
Expo in Columbus Ohio, with
both aisles lined with tours
of Patagonia, and Belize, and
Costa Rica, and Honduras, and
Uganda, and South Africa, and
China (they bird in China, who
knew), and Portugal, and
Columbia, and Peru, and far
Australia and New Zealand,
and near Texas and Arizona,
my head spins with possibility,
with opportunities, with dreams
of birds exotic and mundane...
and dream I will, until one by one,
circumstance or special blessing,
makes each one real (or not).



http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-16.html

September 16
Walking through the tents at
The Great American Birding
Expo in Columbus Ohio, with
both aisles lined with tours
of Patagonia, and Belize, and
Costa Rica, and Honduras, and
Uganda, and South Africa, and
China (they bird in China, who
knew), and Portugal, and
Columbia, and Peru, and far
Australia and New Zealand,
and near Texas and Arizona,
my head spins with possibility,
with opportunities, with dreams
of birds exotic and mundane...
and dream I will, until one by one,
circumstance or special blessing,
makes each one real (or not).



http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-16.html___

posted image

2016-09-16 11:11:46 (21 comments; 5 reshares; 259 +1s; )Open 

Three Rondawels. Blyde Canyon Overlook, South Africa. In-camera HDR, Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.

Three Rondawels. Blyde Canyon Overlook, South Africa. In-camera HDR, Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom.___

posted image

2016-09-16 10:12:06 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 26 +1s; )Open 

Run Dumbo Run
Disney would never have gotten away with titling a major release “Dumbo” today…but as a historical association I am stuck with the name. This young, perhaps year old, elephant at Kruger National Park in South Africa had fallen behind his mother and was covering the ground pretty fast to catch up. I have a whole sequence of shots, but, of course, forgot the video button on the camera (as usual). This collage, created in Coolage, captures some of the effect. There were, as I mentioned in a previous post, lots of young elephants among the herds at Kruger.

Sony RX10iii at 580mm equivalent field of view. 1/320th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom and assembled in Coolage.



Run Dumbo Run
Disney would never have gotten away with titling a major release “Dumbo” today…but as a historical association I am stuck with the name. This young, perhaps year old, elephant at Kruger National Park in South Africa had fallen behind his mother and was covering the ground pretty fast to catch up. I have a whole sequence of shots, but, of course, forgot the video button on the camera (as usual). This collage, created in Coolage, captures some of the effect. There were, as I mentioned in a previous post, lots of young elephants among the herds at Kruger.

Sony RX10iii at 580mm equivalent field of view. 1/320th @ ISO 100 @ f4. Processed in Lightroom and assembled in Coolage.

___

posted image

2016-09-16 01:18:31 (63 comments; 20 reshares; 371 +1s; )Open 

Three Rondawels/Blyde Canyon Overlook, South Africa. Justly famous. On the Panorama Route north of Johannesburg. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. 

Three Rondawels/Blyde Canyon Overlook, South Africa. Justly famous. On the Panorama Route north of Johannesburg. In-camera HDR. Sony RX10iii. Processed in Lightroom. ___

2016-09-16 01:05:50 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 9 +1s; )Open 

September 15
So, the luggage handlers on my Delta
flights managed to crack my new
suitcase...a CalPac hard-shell made of
high impact ABS...like an egg. The
split runs all down one side with only
the fabric liner holding my stuff inside.

Disappointing. So I went to the luggage
office and showed the lady at the desk,
and she said, "Can I replace that for you?
We have suitcases like that one...just
black and silver, no cool blue, but much
the same...come see what we have." So
I did, and they must have had 2 dozen
brand new suitcases of pretty much every
description, on shelves in the back, just
waiting for some disgruntled customer
to come in and complain about the luggage
handling. I took a silver one...and as she
said, much the same as the broken one.

Which is one way of... more »

September 15
So, the luggage handlers on my Delta
flights managed to crack my new
suitcase...a CalPac hard-shell made of
high impact ABS...like an egg. The
split runs all down one side with only
the fabric liner holding my stuff inside.

Disappointing. So I went to the luggage
office and showed the lady at the desk,
and she said, "Can I replace that for you?
We have suitcases like that one...just
black and silver, no cool blue, but much
the same...come see what we have." So
I did, and they must have had 2 dozen
brand new suitcases of pretty much every
description, on shelves in the back, just
waiting for some disgruntled customer
to come in and complain about the luggage
handling. I took a silver one...and as she
said, much the same as the broken one.

Which is one way of solving the gorilla
tactics of the luggage handlers...just
maybe not the most efficient or direct.

I guess new suitcases are easier to come
by than good help...___

posted image

2016-09-15 08:21:09 (1 comments; 7 reshares; 59 +1s; )Open 

Red-billed Hornbill
Hornbills are by far the most numerous and visible birds in the South African bush at the end of a dry winter. The most see is the Yellow-billed Hornbill…familiar to most as a main character in the Lion King. Thus is a Red-billed Hornbill. I was two days in Africa before seeing one. 

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. Program Mode. Processed in PhotoShop Express on my Android tablet. 



Red-billed Hornbill
Hornbills are by far the most numerous and visible birds in the South African bush at the end of a dry winter. The most see is the Yellow-billed Hornbill…familiar to most as a main character in the Lion King. Thus is a Red-billed Hornbill. I was two days in Africa before seeing one. 

Sony RX10iii at 600mm equivalent field of view. Program Mode. Processed in PhotoShop Express on my Android tablet. 

___

2016-09-14 22:51:59 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

September 14
Back on the road again, too soon,
still feeling jet lagged from Africa
and I am off way too early tomorrow
for Columbus Ohio and the Great
American Birding Expo...three days
of being ZEISS Guy again, eating
out too often, and too many hours
in an airplane seat each way. Ah
well, it is what it is. If I had not
had to replace a broken suitcase
from the last trip and get some
clothing washed, I could have just
stayed packed...sometimes a
broken suitcase is a small mercy,
a punctuation mark between trips.

http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-14.html

September 14
Back on the road again, too soon,
still feeling jet lagged from Africa
and I am off way too early tomorrow
for Columbus Ohio and the Great
American Birding Expo...three days
of being ZEISS Guy again, eating
out too often, and too many hours
in an airplane seat each way. Ah
well, it is what it is. If I had not
had to replace a broken suitcase
from the last trip and get some
clothing washed, I could have just
stayed packed...sometimes a
broken suitcase is a small mercy,
a punctuation mark between trips.

http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-14.html___

2016-09-14 22:51:18 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s; )Open 

September 14
Back on the road again, too soon,
still feeling jet lagged from Africa
and I am off way too early tomorrow
for Columbus Ohio and the Great
American Birding Expo...three days
of being ZEISS Guy again, eating
out too often, and too many hours
in an airplane seat each way. Ah
well, it is what it is. If I had not
had to replace a broken suitcase
from the last trip and get some
clothing washed, I could have just
stayed packed...sometimes a
broken suitcase is a small mercy,
a punctuation mark between trips.


http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-14.html

September 14
Back on the road again, too soon,
still feeling jet lagged from Africa
and I am off way too early tomorrow
for Columbus Ohio and the Great
American Birding Expo...three days
of being ZEISS Guy again, eating
out too often, and too many hours
in an airplane seat each way. Ah
well, it is what it is. If I had not
had to replace a broken suitcase
from the last trip and get some
clothing washed, I could have just
stayed packed...sometimes a
broken suitcase is a small mercy,
a punctuation mark between trips.


http://daypoems16.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-14.html___

posted image

2016-09-14 10:31:04 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 16 +1s; )Open 

Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa. Field processed for daily posts. 

Greater Kruger National Park, South Africa. Field processed for daily posts. ___

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