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Steven Spence

Steven Spence Verified in Google 

nerdy; stargazer; legend in my own mind; wannabe photographer, may post occasional spider pictures - you have been warned!

Occupation: IT Manager (at a large corporation)

Location: Germany

Followers: 19,535

Following: 3,495

Views: 65,558,113

Cream of the Crop: 08/14/2012

Added to CircleCount.com: 08/05/2011That's the date, where Steven Spence has been indexed by CircleCount.com.
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Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

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reshares per post
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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 40

posted image

2016-08-14 21:46:50 (40 comments; 15 reshares; 392 +1s; )Open 

Missed It

Today was a beautiful day. I spent a very long afternoon slowly wandering through a nature preserve, scouting for promising locations for nature photography. I didn't come away with the photos I hoped for, but I had a wonderful time.

The raptors were far. far away- I did see them and hear their cries, but it wouldn't have been a good picture with the equipment I have, so I didn't bother with trying to take photos of them. I heard several (red and green) woodpeckers, but never got an angle on them.

I found a promising spot near the river. Although I was quiet, I still surprised two grey herons. They got away before I could get a photo, but mostly I regretted not being able to watch them longer. I slid down a small embankment, messed up my jeans, and hurt my right knee. No big deal, just stiff and sore. The camera wasn't damaged, so all is... more »

Most reshares: 31

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2016-07-31 15:56:18 (37 comments; 31 reshares; 493 +1s; )Open 

Following the mass extinction that wiped out most dinosaurs 65 million years ago, a few bird lineages were left unscathed. The remarkable diversity of birds arose from these in the space of just 15 million years. In an evolutionary heartbeat, all of the bird groups familiar to us today flourished, producing a staggering variety of modern birds—perhaps as many as 18,000 species.
Hoatzins are the only living representatives of one of the most ancient lineages of birds, with origins about 64 million years ago. Young hoatzin have two claws on the bones that support their flight feathers—that is, on their hands. If a chick falls from the nest, which is a common cause of death among many baby birds, it can claw its way back to safety.
Learn more in the exhibition Dinosaurs Among Us, now open: http://bit.ly/2am5LHz

Most plusones: 493

posted image

2016-07-31 15:56:18 (37 comments; 31 reshares; 493 +1s; )Open 

Following the mass extinction that wiped out most dinosaurs 65 million years ago, a few bird lineages were left unscathed. The remarkable diversity of birds arose from these in the space of just 15 million years. In an evolutionary heartbeat, all of the bird groups familiar to us today flourished, producing a staggering variety of modern birds—perhaps as many as 18,000 species.
Hoatzins are the only living representatives of one of the most ancient lineages of birds, with origins about 64 million years ago. Young hoatzin have two claws on the bones that support their flight feathers—that is, on their hands. If a chick falls from the nest, which is a common cause of death among many baby birds, it can claw its way back to safety.
Learn more in the exhibition Dinosaurs Among Us, now open: http://bit.ly/2am5LHz

Latest 50 posts

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2016-08-27 18:23:02 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 38 +1s; )Open 

Today's Fishing Village

Winds were 75 kmh today, so instead of a walk we went to the Viking museum in Borg. Our accomodation for the night is at the end of the road. It's a converted fishing cottage in Sorvågen/Å i Lofoten. Quite a drive, but the scenery is worth it. I hope for calmer weather and no rain so we can try a hike near here. Otherwise we'll have to start back without a hike.

Photo: LG4 smartphone. Edited with Snapseed (painted 10% brighter in harbor and mountains.)

Today's Fishing Village

Winds were 75 kmh today, so instead of a walk we went to the Viking museum in Borg. Our accomodation for the night is at the end of the road. It's a converted fishing cottage in Sorvågen/Å i Lofoten. Quite a drive, but the scenery is worth it. I hope for calmer weather and no rain so we can try a hike near here. Otherwise we'll have to start back without a hike.

Photo: LG4 smartphone. Edited with Snapseed (painted 10% brighter in harbor and mountains.)___

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2016-08-26 19:42:58 (6 comments; 0 reshares; 57 +1s; )Open 

Lurid Smartphone Sunset

The smartphone camera isn't very subtle. It is missing the pinks and purples. I hope they come out well on my normal camera. I am experimenting with it on interval timer. We'll see... Getting quite cold for August (in my book). Still above 0C, but definitely single digits. I am getting cold fingers now. :-) have a great Friday!

Lurid Smartphone Sunset

The smartphone camera isn't very subtle. It is missing the pinks and purples. I hope they come out well on my normal camera. I am experimenting with it on interval timer. We'll see... Getting quite cold for August (in my book). Still above 0C, but definitely single digits. I am getting cold fingers now. :-) have a great Friday!___

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2016-08-26 16:51:16 (17 comments; 1 reshares; 68 +1s; )Open 

The weather improved. Staying in an old fishing cottage. 

The weather improved. Staying in an old fishing cottage. ___

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2016-08-25 09:17:13 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 76 +1s; )Open 

A great photo of a bird that I will probably never see. By Phabulous +John Pham​

Red-crested Cardinal

This species is native to South America, but was introduced to the Hawaiian Islands around 1930. In Hawaii, these birds prefer parks, lawns and dry thickets in Hawaii; however, within their South American range, they can be found in subtropical or tropical dry shrub-land and degraded forests.

Kapiolani Regional Park, Oahu

#BirdsGallery curated by +Heinrich Wagner
+HQSP Birds curated by +Andy Brown +Dilip Mundkur
+Ian Calland and +Anja Wessels #hqspbirds
#BTPBirdPro – +BTP Bird Pro . owned by +Nancy Dempsey ,curated by
+Lynn Wiezycki
#Animalia (+Animalia) created by +Adelphe BACHELET
___A great photo of a bird that I will probably never see. By Phabulous +John Pham​

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2016-08-24 14:40:34 (8 comments; 5 reshares; 59 +1s; )Open 

Words of wisdom or regret??

Words of wisdom or regret??___

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2016-08-24 14:38:06 (15 comments; 0 reshares; 47 +1s; )Open 

Lunch... Oslo harbor

Lunch... Oslo harbor___

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2016-08-23 17:43:58 (6 comments; 4 reshares; 66 +1s; )Open 

Truth in Advertising

I'm a bad person: I laughed.

Truth in Advertising

I'm a bad person: I laughed.___

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2016-08-22 19:32:44 (3 comments; 1 reshares; 48 +1s; )Open 

I Cannot Deny

I enjoy pad thai.

I Cannot Deny

I enjoy pad thai.___

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2016-08-22 19:23:45 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 31 +1s; )Open 

Owl! In Oslo.

Owl! In Oslo.___

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2016-08-22 19:23:10 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 43 +1s; )Open 

Oslo

Oslo___

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2016-08-22 19:22:48 (5 comments; 6 reshares; 49 +1s; )Open 

Seen in Oslo

Seen in Oslo___

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2016-08-22 19:22:11 (5 comments; 0 reshares; 64 +1s; )Open 

Seen in Oslo

Seen in Oslo___

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2016-08-22 19:19:19 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 37 +1s; )Open 

Trey is a great source of information about bees. The law seems well intentioned, but impractical.

New FDA rules concerning beekeeping
 
Starting this January beekeepers will need to hire a veterinarian if they need to apply antibiotics to their colonies. Why would beekeepers be adding antibiotics to their hives? American and European Foulbrood are two devastating diseases of bees that are treated with antibiotics as a preventative measure. If the disease is not treated the only solution for a colony affected is destruction of the colony by fire. Yes, the entire hive is set aflame (bees are killed first), as the spores of the disease can remain viable in the wood for up to 40 years! 
 
Until the new law goes into effect beekeepers can apply their own antibiotics. Once the new year arrives a veterinarian will have to be hired to inspect the hives. The problem?  Most vets have little, or no knowledge of bees, or beekeeping. It's also unclear if all the hives a particular beekeeper owns will need to be inspected. This could be quite time consuming with large beekeeping operations.
 
The new rules are designed to keep unwanted antibiotics out of our food supply. Meat, eggs, milk, etc. often contain these antibiotics, which we then consume. Honey is different however, as it's a processed food. Honeybees add enzymes to flower nectar that help convert sucrose into fructose and glucose, which is a lot different that getting milk straight from a cow. It's unclear if these antibiotics are ever present in the honey. 
 
Photo:
By Jrmgkia - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31431865
 
#honeybee 
#beekeeping
#rules___Trey is a great source of information about bees. The law seems well intentioned, but impractical.

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2016-08-22 16:48:04 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 28 +1s; )Open 

Reshare to Bee Collection.

Stunning Photos and Education for me

A few weeks ago +John Kimbler​ volunteered to contribute to +GotScience.org​. I was fortunate to be tapped to review his outstanding macro photography. We decided to collaborate on an article starring his "cuckoo" bee photos.

As I learned while researching the subject, ~90% of bee species are solitary and most cuckoo bee species are too. The article discusses cuckoo bees that attack solitary nests and also the more complex interactions in "cuckooing" a social bee hive (bumbleebees were the ones I read the material). I certainly learned a lot preparing this article.

Please take a few minutes when you can to view +John Kimbler​'s absolutely stunning photos.


H/t +Kate Stone​, +Jess Romaine​, and +GotScience.org​
___Reshare to Bee Collection.

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2016-08-22 16:46:08 (20 comments; 10 reshares; 126 +1s; )Open 

Stunning Photos and Education for me

A few weeks ago +John Kimbler​ volunteered to contribute to +GotScience.org​. I was fortunate to be tapped to review his outstanding macro photography. We decided to collaborate on an article starring his "cuckoo" bee photos.

As I learned while researching the subject, ~90% of bee species are solitary and most cuckoo bee species are too. The article discusses cuckoo bees that attack solitary nests and also the more complex interactions in "cuckooing" a social bee hive (bumbleebees were the ones I read the material). I certainly learned a lot preparing this article.

Please take a few minutes when you can to view +John Kimbler​'s absolutely stunning photos.


H/t +Kate Stone​, +Jess Romaine​, and +GotScience.org​


Stunning Photos and Education for me

A few weeks ago +John Kimbler​ volunteered to contribute to +GotScience.org​. I was fortunate to be tapped to review his outstanding macro photography. We decided to collaborate on an article starring his "cuckoo" bee photos.

As I learned while researching the subject, ~90% of bee species are solitary and most cuckoo bee species are too. The article discusses cuckoo bees that attack solitary nests and also the more complex interactions in "cuckooing" a social bee hive (bumbleebees were the ones I read the material). I certainly learned a lot preparing this article.

Please take a few minutes when you can to view +John Kimbler​'s absolutely stunning photos.


H/t +Kate Stone​, +Jess Romaine​, and +GotScience.org​
___

posted image

2016-08-19 22:25:53 (27 comments; 4 reshares; 77 +1s; )Open 

Resting on a Rock in a River

A duck is a common enough sight. This one tool a break on a rock in the River Rems. You can see the typical one-footed stance. If you look closely you'll also see that the white at the front edge of the bill isn't some reflection from the water rather it is a downy feather from a grooming session.

What about the green diagonal areas at the top left and the bottom right? Simple - foliage. I photographed from the bank through the leaves of the trees lining the river. Wild animals aren't overly fond of what looks like a big black eyeball staring at them. It also helps to put the shutter on "silent" (not really, but quieter than usual) and have the sounds of the river to help mask the shutter and mirror sounds.

Resting on a Rock in a River

A duck is a common enough sight. This one tool a break on a rock in the River Rems. You can see the typical one-footed stance. If you look closely you'll also see that the white at the front edge of the bill isn't some reflection from the water rather it is a downy feather from a grooming session.

What about the green diagonal areas at the top left and the bottom right? Simple - foliage. I photographed from the bank through the leaves of the trees lining the river. Wild animals aren't overly fond of what looks like a big black eyeball staring at them. It also helps to put the shutter on "silent" (not really, but quieter than usual) and have the sounds of the river to help mask the shutter and mirror sounds.___

posted image

2016-08-19 21:47:38 (3 comments; 1 reshares; 48 +1s; )Open 

Beauty in Imperfection

Beauty, danger, physically amazing structures, and spider webs all the way down. I caught two webs next to each other on a rare (this year) sunny day. The foreground web is imperfect yet structurally sound and fully functional. It was damaged and patched up a few times.

Beauty in Imperfection

Beauty, danger, physically amazing structures, and spider webs all the way down. I caught two webs next to each other on a rare (this year) sunny day. The foreground web is imperfect yet structurally sound and fully functional. It was damaged and patched up a few times.___

posted image

2016-08-19 21:30:15 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 30 +1s; )Open 

It has been a while since I wandered around a town with my camera. I happened upon this outside a bakery in Tübingen.

It has been a while since I wandered around a town with my camera. I happened upon this outside a bakery in Tübingen.___

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2016-08-17 20:51:29 (7 comments; 2 reshares; 50 +1s; )Open 

I had no idea

Thanks +Trey Pitsenberger for this intriguing information about bees and ancient cultures.

Greek Bee Fibula, 4th century BC
 
The bee, found in the artifacts of Ancient Near East and Aegean cultures, was believed to be the sacred insect that bridged the natural world to the underworld. Potnia, the Minoan-Mycenaean “mistress” goddess,  was referred to as “The Pure Mother Bee”. Her priestesses received the name of “Melissa” (“bee”). It is interesting to note that Mycenaean tholos tombs were shaped like beehives.
 
In another myth, the Homeric Hymn to Apollo acknowledges that Apollo’s gift of prophecy first came to him from three bee maidens, usually identified with the Thriae. The Thriae was a trinity of pre-Hellenic Aegean bee goddesses.
 
source:
Archaic Wonder
http://bit.ly/2bdrm2L
 
#bees 
#jewelry 
#myths___I had no idea

Thanks +Trey Pitsenberger for this intriguing information about bees and ancient cultures.

posted image

2016-08-17 07:08:27 (18 comments; 4 reshares; 105 +1s; )Open 

Thistles Attract Bees

Although thistles are considered weeds by gardeners they are important natural plants for bees and other insects. It's not uncommon for me to find multiple insects sharing a thistle. Thistle blossoms are also attractive in my opinion.

Thistles Attract Bees

Although thistles are considered weeds by gardeners they are important natural plants for bees and other insects. It's not uncommon for me to find multiple insects sharing a thistle. Thistle blossoms are also attractive in my opinion.___

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2016-08-17 06:56:36 (18 comments; 4 reshares; 79 +1s; )Open 

Bumblebee and Blackberry Bush

A bee on a blackberry bush. You can see by the flower that blackberries are related to roses. If you look closely at the bee you can see its proboscis extended to drink the nectar. This was seen along the River Rems in a recently protected area.

Bumblebee and Blackberry Bush

A bee on a blackberry bush. You can see by the flower that blackberries are related to roses. If you look closely at the bee you can see its proboscis extended to drink the nectar. This was seen along the River Rems in a recently protected area.___

posted image

2016-08-16 18:43:31 (20 comments; 4 reshares; 129 +1s; )Open 

Great Visualization of What We Lose to Light Pollution

It's very enjoyable to watch the video and see the foreground rotate against the Milky Way, but if you don't have time or bandwidth for a video check out the article. It has still images showing varying degrees of light pollution.

seen on +PetaPixel 

Great Visualization of What We Lose to Light Pollution

It's very enjoyable to watch the video and see the foreground rotate against the Milky Way, but if you don't have time or bandwidth for a video check out the article. It has still images showing varying degrees of light pollution.

seen on +PetaPixel ___

posted image

2016-08-16 06:28:32 (15 comments; 7 reshares; 74 +1s; )Open 

Very Nicely Made Video on White Dwarves

The video is ~5 1/2 minutes and even discusses the helium flash and thermal pulse, which produce gorgeous "planetary" nebulas.

h/t +Socratica  (Kimberly Harrison)

Very Nicely Made Video on White Dwarves

The video is ~5 1/2 minutes and even discusses the helium flash and thermal pulse, which produce gorgeous "planetary" nebulas.

h/t +Socratica  (Kimberly Harrison)___

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2016-08-15 19:15:32 (15 comments; 3 reshares; 140 +1s; )Open 

Studies Sometimes Are Valuable For Other Insights

Join +Neha Jain as she shares how a long-term study of toads revealed a climate response trend that may be valuable in understanding how other animals react to a warming climate.

Studies Sometimes Are Valuable For Other Insights

Join +Neha Jain as she shares how a long-term study of toads revealed a climate response trend that may be valuable in understanding how other animals react to a warming climate.___

posted image

2016-08-14 21:46:50 (40 comments; 15 reshares; 392 +1s; )Open 

Missed It

Today was a beautiful day. I spent a very long afternoon slowly wandering through a nature preserve, scouting for promising locations for nature photography. I didn't come away with the photos I hoped for, but I had a wonderful time.

The raptors were far. far away- I did see them and hear their cries, but it wouldn't have been a good picture with the equipment I have, so I didn't bother with trying to take photos of them. I heard several (red and green) woodpeckers, but never got an angle on them.

I found a promising spot near the river. Although I was quiet, I still surprised two grey herons. They got away before I could get a photo, but mostly I regretted not being able to watch them longer. I slid down a small embankment, messed up my jeans, and hurt my right knee. No big deal, just stiff and sore. The camera wasn't damaged, so all is... more »

Missed It

Today was a beautiful day. I spent a very long afternoon slowly wandering through a nature preserve, scouting for promising locations for nature photography. I didn't come away with the photos I hoped for, but I had a wonderful time.

The raptors were far. far away- I did see them and hear their cries, but it wouldn't have been a good picture with the equipment I have, so I didn't bother with trying to take photos of them. I heard several (red and green) woodpeckers, but never got an angle on them.

I found a promising spot near the river. Although I was quiet, I still surprised two grey herons. They got away before I could get a photo, but mostly I regretted not being able to watch them longer. I slid down a small embankment, messed up my jeans, and hurt my right knee. No big deal, just stiff and sore. The camera wasn't damaged, so all is good.

I spent hours listening and watching. I had three encounters with a kingfisher, but I don't have one photo to show for it. I expect that I saw the kingfisher for less than 3 seconds total, but they were magic. Maybe you've seen that photo where the photographer captured a kingfisher just before it broke the surface of the water. An awesome shot of it going in vertically. Not like that with me. Mine was flying just above the water and dipped in and out faster than you can blink. It went in about 4 meters from me, but there was no way I could get it on camera. Once I saw it and tracked it for over a second, but I just watched it. A tiny blue, orange, and white bullet. magnificent!

Most of my time was spent with damselflies. I now know more than I ever wanted to know about their mating habits. They were presenting, dancing, and clasping all around and even on me. Beautiful creatures with apparently only one thing on their little minds.

The walk back wasn't so nice, because my knee was nagging me, but the sun, the air, the meadows, and the bird songs were wonderful.

Photo: typical of my experience. I think it gives a good impression of everything flitting around me. Of course I nailed some photos, but I liked this one as a reflection of the day. Sometimes just being there and taking it in is all that really matters.___

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2016-08-13 16:26:39 (8 comments; 3 reshares; 62 +1s; )Open 

seems like a natural for Bees and Blossoms.

Weekend Greetings

It has been a while since I had time to sit down and look through my photos. I've had a relaxing afternoon and found a few photos I liked.
Now I think it is time for pizza, a beer, and a movie.

Have a great weekend!___seems like a natural for Bees and Blossoms.

posted image

2016-08-13 16:26:06 (13 comments; 5 reshares; 82 +1s; )Open 

Weekend Greetings

It has been a while since I had time to sit down and look through my photos. I've had a relaxing afternoon and found a few photos I liked.
Now I think it is time for pizza, a beer, and a movie.

Have a great weekend!

Weekend Greetings

It has been a while since I had time to sit down and look through my photos. I've had a relaxing afternoon and found a few photos I liked.
Now I think it is time for pizza, a beer, and a movie.

Have a great weekend!___

posted image

2016-08-13 14:50:19 (18 comments; 0 reshares; 50 +1s; )Open 

Alien Symmetry

This plant caught my eye with its multiple radial blossoms. I have no idea what it is, but it looks like mathematics come to life.

Alien Symmetry

This plant caught my eye with its multiple radial blossoms. I have no idea what it is, but it looks like mathematics come to life.___

posted image

2016-08-13 08:45:19 (11 comments; 0 reshares; 60 +1s; )Open 

Little Furball

Ginger sends greetings and wishes you a Happy Caturday! At least that's what I interpreted when she managed to halfway open an eye and purr something at me.

Must lead a tough life to need all that sleep.

Little Furball

Ginger sends greetings and wishes you a Happy Caturday! At least that's what I interpreted when she managed to halfway open an eye and purr something at me.

Must lead a tough life to need all that sleep.___

posted image

2016-08-11 21:00:19 (8 comments; 6 reshares; 63 +1s; )Open 

Scientific Love-Letter to the Great Cities of the World

Dr. Jonathan Trinastic reviews Science and the City for +GotScience.org It sounds like a very engaging and educational book.

Scientific Love-Letter to the Great Cities of the World

Dr. Jonathan Trinastic reviews Science and the City for +GotScience.org It sounds like a very engaging and educational book.___

posted image

2016-08-10 20:59:51 (5 comments; 1 reshares; 36 +1s; )Open 

It's an amazing squirrel's eye view of the world. The only way to top this would be if a hawk picked up the squirrel and the camera. :-)

It's an amazing squirrel's eye view of the world. The only way to top this would be if a hawk picked up the squirrel and the camera. :-)___

posted image

2016-08-09 06:34:14 (20 comments; 9 reshares; 116 +1s; )Open 

Triple Threat Tuesday on a Thistle

Delightful to see three species of bees enjoying a thistles at the same time.

Triple Threat Tuesday on a Thistle

Delightful to see three species of bees enjoying a thistles at the same time.___

posted image

2016-08-09 05:41:56 (12 comments; 7 reshares; 148 +1s; )Open 

A Stunning Find

Two partial wings of dinosaurs have been found in 99 Million year old amber. A recent study published in Nature at the end of June provides stunning insights into feathers and dinosaur hands.

For here, in Burmese amber, we have the first evidence of skin snugly binding the second and third finger together, with the entire manus wreathed in feathers. In life, these tiny basal birds would have shown little sign of discrete naked fingers as they flew and folded their wings, only the hint of claws protruding from feathers—if even that

+Emily Willoughby , paleoartist walks us through the findings and how our images of dinosaurs can become more accurate. Emily really gets the bird-dinosaur relationship and this find helps confirm the direction she and some other paleoartists have taken, but read more in the article (2 pages), look at the scientificar... more »

A Stunning Find

Two partial wings of dinosaurs have been found in 99 Million year old amber. A recent study published in Nature at the end of June provides stunning insights into feathers and dinosaur hands.

For here, in Burmese amber, we have the first evidence of skin snugly binding the second and third finger together, with the entire manus wreathed in feathers. In life, these tiny basal birds would have shown little sign of discrete naked fingers as they flew and folded their wings, only the hint of claws protruding from feathers—if even that

+Emily Willoughby , paleoartist walks us through the findings and how our images of dinosaurs can become more accurate. Emily really gets the bird-dinosaur relationship and this find helps confirm the direction she and some other paleoartists have taken, but read more in the article (2 pages), look at the scientific artifacts, and the excellent artistic representations.

This is really a huge find and deserves more reporting!

h/t to +Kate Stone and +GotScience.org  for getting this out quickly.___

posted image

2016-08-07 22:48:30 (5 comments; 1 reshares; 45 +1s; )Open 

Post Processing Blur by Zoom

Just having a little fun before calling it a night. Have a great start to the new week!

Post Processing Blur by Zoom

Just having a little fun before calling it a night. Have a great start to the new week!___

posted image

2016-08-07 22:47:16 (14 comments; 4 reshares; 98 +1s; )Open 

Seen on a rainy day

I was feeling cooped up that day, so I went out despite the weather. I like the lines and colors on the central area of the flower. Raindrops and a green background are bonuses.

Have a great start to the week!

Seen on a rainy day

I was feeling cooped up that day, so I went out despite the weather. I like the lines and colors on the central area of the flower. Raindrops and a green background are bonuses.

Have a great start to the week!___

posted image

2016-08-05 06:51:27 (39 comments; 5 reshares; 108 +1s; )Open 

Interesting Study

This article was published on the BBC.

h/t to +Terence Petersen-Ajbro 

Men may have evolved better 'making up' skills - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-36969103___Interesting Study

This article was published on the BBC.

h/t to +Terence Petersen-Ajbro 

posted image

2016-08-04 21:46:08 (11 comments; 14 reshares; 154 +1s; )Open 

Exoplanet Discovery Out of Science Fiction

Guest contributor Luigi Papagno debuts on +GotScience.org with an astronomical discovery that sounds like something out of science fiction.

#astronomy   #exoplanets   #science  

h/t to +Kate Stone 

Exoplanet Discovery Out of Science Fiction

Guest contributor Luigi Papagno debuts on +GotScience.org with an astronomical discovery that sounds like something out of science fiction.

#astronomy   #exoplanets   #science  

h/t to +Kate Stone ___

posted image

2016-08-03 21:06:01 (2 comments; 8 reshares; 141 +1s; )Open 

Solar power, hard work, and a bit of ingenuity save childrens' lives

Pneumonia, caused by an infection in the tiny air sacs of the lungs, is the leading cause of death in children worldwide

The systems were installed by local engineers and technicians. The initial cost to build the system was $18,000. Once installed, the maintenance costs are low, and the daily inputs on which the system runs, sun and air, are free.

Read the whole story in +Neha Jain 's article.

Solar power, hard work, and a bit of ingenuity save childrens' lives

Pneumonia, caused by an infection in the tiny air sacs of the lungs, is the leading cause of death in children worldwide

The systems were installed by local engineers and technicians. The initial cost to build the system was $18,000. Once installed, the maintenance costs are low, and the daily inputs on which the system runs, sun and air, are free.

Read the whole story in +Neha Jain 's article.___

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2016-08-02 16:58:32 (8 comments; 8 reshares; 110 +1s; )Open 

Genes and Their Impact on Behavior

+Emily Willoughby , produced another outstanding article. This time it is from her new field in graduate studies.

Emily's three page article explains some topics relevant to "nature vs. nurture" and that evolution / selective forces are on-going today. One especially interesting topic she covers is genome-wide association (GWA), which is used to identify specific genetic correlates of observable traits

A great read!


h/t +Kate Stone and the +GotScience.org team.

Genes and Their Impact on Behavior

+Emily Willoughby , produced another outstanding article. This time it is from her new field in graduate studies.

Emily's three page article explains some topics relevant to "nature vs. nurture" and that evolution / selective forces are on-going today. One especially interesting topic she covers is genome-wide association (GWA), which is used to identify specific genetic correlates of observable traits

A great read!


h/t +Kate Stone and the +GotScience.org team.___

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2016-08-01 22:20:50 (21 comments; 4 reshares; 86 +1s; )Open 

Sexist Stereotype

When will we finally treat people appropriately regardless of sex or appearance?

women may feel pressure to downplay aspects of their female identity in order to be taken seriously as scientists, or to downplay their scientific identity to be taken seriously women

Please if you're female and study science or already are a scientist, consider a hashtag, perhaps #iLookLikeAScientist  .

Efforts need to be made to broaden and diversify media depictions and actual representation of men and women who challenge STEM stereotypes. We need to help people see that anyone can be a scientist. The #iLookLikeAnEngineer hashtag is a great example of how people in engineering are celebrating that there is no one type of engineer. This hashtag went viral after Isis Wenger, a female engineer who was featured in her company’s advertisement, had herst... more »

Sexist Stereotype

When will we finally treat people appropriately regardless of sex or appearance?

women may feel pressure to downplay aspects of their female identity in order to be taken seriously as scientists, or to downplay their scientific identity to be taken seriously women

Please if you're female and study science or already are a scientist, consider a hashtag, perhaps #iLookLikeAScientist  .

Efforts need to be made to broaden and diversify media depictions and actual representation of men and women who challenge STEM stereotypes. We need to help people see that anyone can be a scientist. The #iLookLikeAnEngineer hashtag is a great example of how people in engineering are celebrating that there is no one type of engineer. This hashtag went viral after Isis Wenger, a female engineer who was featured in her company’s advertisement, had her status as a programmer questioned online because she was “too pretty” to possibly be an engineer. In response, she posted her photo with the hashtag and encouraged others to do the same. The hashtag is now being used in campaigns to broaden everyone’s idea of what an engineer can look like.

Via +ResearchGate and +GotScience.org ___

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2016-07-31 15:56:18 (37 comments; 31 reshares; 493 +1s; )Open 

Dinosaurs Among Us

The American Museum of Natural History has a current exhibit called "Dinosaurs Among Us". If you are in the area (NYC, Central Park area) be sure to visit it.

Following the mass extinction that wiped out most dinosaurs 65 million years ago, a few bird lineages were left unscathed. The remarkable diversity of birds arose from these in the space of just 15 million years. In an evolutionary heartbeat, all of the bird groups familiar to us today flourished, producing a staggering variety of modern birds—perhaps as many as 18,000 species.
Hoatzins are the only living representatives of one of the most ancient lineages of birds, with origins about 64 million years ago. Young hoatzin have two claws on the bones that support their flight feathers—that is, on their hands. If a chick falls from the nest, which is a common cause of death among many baby birds, it can claw its way back to safety.
Learn more in the exhibition Dinosaurs Among Us, now open: http://bit.ly/2am5LHz___Dinosaurs Among Us

The American Museum of Natural History has a current exhibit called "Dinosaurs Among Us". If you are in the area (NYC, Central Park area) be sure to visit it.

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2016-07-31 14:04:15 (10 comments; 3 reshares; 60 +1s; )Open 

Lucked into this one. When I logged on to GPlus +Carrie Simpson 's photo of a beetle ( #AnimalLoversPhotoChallenge ) was at the top of my stream. By coincidence, I was out taking pictures today and came back with one of a ladybird beetle, so I can finally play along on one of these daily themes. Thanks, Carrie!

Photo: Ladybird doing what ladybirds do. She has a meal on her mind. On the right side is a bug doing pullups. :-) Guess he was showing off for her.

Lucked into this one. When I logged on to GPlus +Carrie Simpson 's photo of a beetle ( #AnimalLoversPhotoChallenge ) was at the top of my stream. By coincidence, I was out taking pictures today and came back with one of a ladybird beetle, so I can finally play along on one of these daily themes. Thanks, Carrie!

Photo: Ladybird doing what ladybirds do. She has a meal on her mind. On the right side is a bug doing pullups. :-) Guess he was showing off for her.___

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2016-07-31 13:40:26 (19 comments; 9 reshares; 48 +1s; )Open 

Lavender Chicken

This worked out well: very well in fact. Thanks to +Azlin Bloor  for her inspiration! Here's her original recipe: http://linsfood.com/lavender-and-sumac-roast-chicken/

Mine was along those lines. I put onions and lemon slices inside the chicken, a spoon of white wine, rubbed the chicken in butter, salt, and a little bit of herbes de provence. I cooked it in a plastic baking bag for 70 minutes at 200°C. Oh, of course I had lots of lavender blossoms in the bag as well.

After 70 minutes were up, I took it out of the bag, brushed it with butter and topped it with a lavender flower, salt, and garlic mixture (see Azlin's recipe) and browned it for another 10 minutes.

It made a nice Sunday dinner.

Lavender Chicken

This worked out well: very well in fact. Thanks to +Azlin Bloor  for her inspiration! Here's her original recipe: http://linsfood.com/lavender-and-sumac-roast-chicken/

Mine was along those lines. I put onions and lemon slices inside the chicken, a spoon of white wine, rubbed the chicken in butter, salt, and a little bit of herbes de provence. I cooked it in a plastic baking bag for 70 minutes at 200°C. Oh, of course I had lots of lavender blossoms in the bag as well.

After 70 minutes were up, I took it out of the bag, brushed it with butter and topped it with a lavender flower, salt, and garlic mixture (see Azlin's recipe) and browned it for another 10 minutes.

It made a nice Sunday dinner.___

posted image

2016-07-30 17:59:40 (14 comments; 3 reshares; 67 +1s; )Open 

Bees Love Them

The bees really seemed to enjoy climbing in these flowers to get nectar.


As a bonus it's #pinkandgreen which should appeal to +Mz Maau 

Bees Love Them

The bees really seemed to enjoy climbing in these flowers to get nectar.


As a bonus it's #pinkandgreen which should appeal to +Mz Maau ___

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2016-07-30 17:53:18 (39 comments; 12 reshares; 339 +1s; )Open 

Lazy Day

I'm not feeling motivated to read research or write anything today, so here's a picture of a "damselfly" from last weekend.

Have a great weekend!

Lazy Day

I'm not feeling motivated to read research or write anything today, so here's a picture of a "damselfly" from last weekend.

Have a great weekend!___

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2016-07-27 22:30:51 (11 comments; 2 reshares; 84 +1s; )Open 

Another data point. The best pesticide is no pesticide. Use plants or biological control agents (ladybird beetles, etc.) when you can. If a pesticide is your best recourse, use wisely and use sparingly.

Male bees have lower sperm counts when exposed to neonicotinoid pesticides
 
According to The Proceeding of The Royal Society B, "There is clear evidence for sublethal effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on non-target ecosystem service-providing insects.". In addition they have also found neonicotinoids will, "significantly reduce the reproductive capacity of male honeybees (drones), Apis mellifera."
 
"The data clearly showed reduced drone lifespan, as well as reduced sperm viability (percentage living versus dead) and living sperm quantity by 39%. Our results demonstrate for the first time that neonicotinoid insecticides can negatively affect male insect reproductive capacity, and provide a possible mechanistic explanation for managed honeybee queen failure and wild insect pollinator decline."
 
Neonicotinoid pesticides work by entering the plant, and protecting it from insect attack. The target insect "pest" ingests the sap from the plant with the insecticide in it, and dies. The problem, the pesticide is also found in the nectar of the plants.  The "non-target" bee ingests that nectar, and takes some of the pesticide back to the hive while gathering the nectar. 
 
Drones are the males of the honeybee world. The sole purpose of the drone bee is to mate with the queen at the appointed time. Once mating is complete, the drone dies. If their sperm count is reduced by up to 39%, as the study indicates, this might explain some of the difficulties honey bees are currently experiencing. 
 
The study can be found here:
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/283/1835/20160506
 
#bees 
#pesticides 
#drones 
 
(Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim/GNU 1.2)___Another data point. The best pesticide is no pesticide. Use plants or biological control agents (ladybird beetles, etc.) when you can. If a pesticide is your best recourse, use wisely and use sparingly.

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2016-07-27 21:04:28 (29 comments; 11 reshares; 184 +1s; )Open 

Update 15. AUG. 2016. ISMD effort is fully funded!! Thanks to everyone who supported the effort.

details here: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/save-mongolia-s-dinosaurs-science-education#/


Mongolian Dinosaur Fossils

Help keep these incredible fossils in Mongolia and open to scientific investigation instead of being smuggled out on the black market.

Also don't miss +Emily Willoughby 's artwork.

Update 15. AUG. 2016. ISMD effort is fully funded!! Thanks to everyone who supported the effort.

details here: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/save-mongolia-s-dinosaurs-science-education#/


Mongolian Dinosaur Fossils

Help keep these incredible fossils in Mongolia and open to scientific investigation instead of being smuggled out on the black market.

Also don't miss +Emily Willoughby 's artwork.___

posted image

2016-07-27 07:01:23 (23 comments; 7 reshares; 118 +1s; )Open 

Something New (for me)

I hadn't encountered this behavior before. A black kite ( milvus migrans ) on the ground in the woods. I was walking through a local river valley (Remstal) and on a meadow next to woods. I heard something in the woods and immediately stood still to look. I thought maybe there was a deer near me. It took a while for my eyes to adjust to the shade, but when they finally did I saw a bird shape in the area I was scanning. A rather large bird in fact.

I was only able to get two photos and yes, there are branches and leaves between us. This is just how it is most of the time in nature. I'm pretty sure the kite was watching for rodents nearby on the meadow. There were lots of mole holes and some mouse paths out there. Probably it was in a good spot to see what happened and yet remain under cover.

I was very pleased to be so close to one of... more »

Something New (for me)

I hadn't encountered this behavior before. A black kite ( milvus migrans ) on the ground in the woods. I was walking through a local river valley (Remstal) and on a meadow next to woods. I heard something in the woods and immediately stood still to look. I thought maybe there was a deer near me. It took a while for my eyes to adjust to the shade, but when they finally did I saw a bird shape in the area I was scanning. A rather large bird in fact.

I was only able to get two photos and yes, there are branches and leaves between us. This is just how it is most of the time in nature. I'm pretty sure the kite was watching for rodents nearby on the meadow. There were lots of mole holes and some mouse paths out there. Probably it was in a good spot to see what happened and yet remain under cover.

I was very pleased to be so close to one of these raptors.

Photo: it was quite dim, so this was shot at a high ISO 2500. My camera gets rather noisy over ISO 1600, so a lot of noise reduction had to be used, which reduced the sharpness.___

posted image

2016-07-27 07:00:46 (33 comments; 10 reshares; 342 +1s; )Open 

Something New (for me)

I hadn't encountered this behavior before. A black kite ( milvus migrans ) on the ground in the woods. I was walking through a local river valley (Remstal) and on a meadow next to woods. I heard something in the woods and immediately stood still to look. I thought maybe there was a deer near me. It took a while for my eyes to adjust to the shade, but when they finally did I saw a bird shape in the area I was scanning. A rather large bird in fact.

I was only able to get two photos and yes, there are branches and leaves between us. This is just how it is most of the time in nature. I'm pretty sure the kite was watching for rodents nearby on the meadow. There were lots of mole holes and some mouse paths out there. Probably it was in a good spot to see what happened and yet remain under cover.

I was very pleased to be so close to one of... more »

Something New (for me)

I hadn't encountered this behavior before. A black kite ( milvus migrans ) on the ground in the woods. I was walking through a local river valley (Remstal) and on a meadow next to woods. I heard something in the woods and immediately stood still to look. I thought maybe there was a deer near me. It took a while for my eyes to adjust to the shade, but when they finally did I saw a bird shape in the area I was scanning. A rather large bird in fact.

I was only able to get two photos and yes, there are branches and leaves between us. This is just how it is most of the time in nature. I'm pretty sure the kite was watching for rodents nearby on the meadow. There were lots of mole holes and some mouse paths out there. Probably it was in a good spot to see what happened and yet remain under cover.

I was very pleased to be so close to one of these raptors.

Photo: it was quite dim, so this was shot at a high ISO 2500. My camera gets rather noisy over ISO 1600, so a lot of noise reduction had to be used, which reduced the sharpness.___

posted image

2016-07-26 22:00:03 (25 comments; 8 reshares; 158 +1s; )Open 

Very Concerning

comparison of the average number of butterflies at sites regularly monitored during the periods 1997–2001 and 2010–2014 shows that the number of overwintering monarchs fell by 74%.

Very Concerning

comparison of the average number of butterflies at sites regularly monitored during the periods 1997–2001 and 2010–2014 shows that the number of overwintering monarchs fell by 74%.___

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