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Theodore Ts'o has been shared in 19 public circles

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Gustavo Franco1,547I've started an experiment with my Google+ account disabling this circle (Googlers and Xooglers) from showing up on my home stream. I'll see how it will look like without my coworkers and former coworkers.In case you are wondering how to adjust and even disable the posts from a circle showing up in your home stream, read:https://support.google.com/plus/answer/1269165?hl=enI've moved the circle to be the 1st on my bar though so I still can easily peak at what folks are saying.  In case you are wondering how to do that, read:https://plus.google.com/113895942978964425455/posts/igWgAhX22qM2014-02-15 23:38:47324301
Markos Giannopoulos5,491Geeks rule! // +CircleCount has added a new tag system (see announcement here http://bit.ly/15XaDov). Thousands of profiles have been tagged already, so here are the top (by number of followers) geek-tagged plussers (full list at http://bit.ly/134FoFN) The top ten: 1) +Robert Scoble 2) +Amanda Blain 3) +Darya Pino Rose 4) +Michelle Marie 5) +Brian Matiash 6) +Wick Sakit 7) +Joe Azure 8) +Keith Barrett 9) +Derek Ross 10) +Ahmed Zeeshan  For other rankings see also - Most popular geeks by comments/+1's/shares http://bit.ly/16SAddw- Most engaging geeks http://bit.ly/15XdZYm #circleshare   #circlesunday   #geeks  2013-07-21 15:19:0049018312
Yvan Da Silva4,840Hi everyone,As many of you already know, I have a nice circle called "ReadThis", the name says it all. From time to time I go check what that circle is doing because I know they do great posts, have absolutely brilliant minds and have caught my attention at a moment or another.You don't have to do anything special to get in, this circle is in constant movement. People get in, some people get out etc. Depending on their posts, comments and activity. If you are new to Google+ then this is definitively a circle you might consider. You do not have to add them all, you can actually select which people you want to follow! Hope it will help you find great people.Happy Friday everyone ! #followfriday   #followfridaycircle   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #circleshare   #circlesharing  2012-11-09 16:53:45199303
martin shervington16,177Commoogling Engagers Circle TwoIn a change to my "Great Engagers" circle approach, here we have a collection of people who I have been interacting with quite recently.Many people are newer to Google but all have really engaged with me - especially around my posts on the concept of 'commoogling'.As I am keen to support a culture of collaboration, please add/share and make it your own! #publiccircles   #circleshare   #publiccirclesproject   #publicsharedcircles   #commoogling   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles  2012-10-19 13:34:39499472546
Chris Goldsmith3,152Here is Circle #1 of Linux users I'm sharing this out specifically for +Steven Thompson who is a Linux Newbie and wants to learn - Please share any Linux Resources you have with him2012-10-11 13:19:24481001
martin shervington14,544September: New Engagers circle! (Note: this is 'new' people for the last couple of weeks.)Note: a few well known faces, but I'd missed them before...Well, it has been a very busy few weeks and here is a collection of NEW people who have been engaging with me.If you received an email then you are in the circle.Thank you for all the interactions through +1s, comments and sharesI will add you into the "Great Engagers Circles" when I next publish them.Over the next few weeks I will be focused of "People who comment and share" much more than I have done lately as I am putting in place a new system.As always, I aim to help people on their way and look forward to a bright G+ future together!Please feel free to add this in, share this on, and meet other people who have been relating to me. They are a good bunch! #sharedcircles   #publiccircles   #publiccirclesproject  2012-10-04 07:02:31111221029
Yvan Da Silva4,570I know I don't always read all your post guys, but if you are in here is because you do have posts that ROCK the world :D And because I don't have time to read all your posts, I give here the chance to others to do it :D  #sharedcircles   #circleshare  2012-09-17 12:36:44183602
Chris Macidis1,759The Cream of the Crop of July 2012What's this?On +CircleCount everyday some very interesting persons are choosen and recommended. These are persons without hunders of thousands of followers but with a lot of interesting content. You won't find silent people here leading the rankings, but interesting people that are worth to be followed.You can find the Cream of the Crop daily here:http://www.circlecount.com/daily/Past Cream of the Crop circles:June 2012: http://goo.gl/Ua5UVMay 2012: http://goo.gl/4Tq43April 2012: http://goo.gl/NvbKjMarch 2012: http://goo.gl/3auLoFebruary 2012: http://goo.gl/TWYpKJanuary 2012: http://goo.gl/HBdHbDecember 2011: http://goo.gl/RBCpgNovember 2011: http://goo.gl/x6TJkOctober 2011: http://goo.gl/2xVn92012-08-20 12:54:12302182735
David D. Stanton5,770Here is my Geek's Circle: (Note I have just cleaned my G+ to try to remove inactive users.) Enjoy! 2012-06-25 08:47:49501012
Swapnil Bhartiya2,379My Linux Circle. Add This :-)2012-06-07 10:17:39500402
Mitesh Shah1,953#Linux #Army #Circle Now a days lots of Linux users want to manage their Linux circles,So we think to create the following circles and share these circles.Comment On The Appropriate Circle's Links To Help UsTo Adding More Linux Pages, Distro & Users In Appropriate Circle1. Linux Pages: Google Plus Linux PagesLinux Pages Circle: https://plus.google.com/u/0/111560558537332305125/posts/7LmpstLTaSe2. Linux Distro: Google Plus Official Linux Disto PagesLinux Distro Circle: https://plus.google.com/u/0/111560558537332305125/posts/4FejgZ5o1bz3.Arch Linux: People who writes about #Arch #Linux Arch Linux Circle: https://plus.google.com/u/0/111560558537332305125/posts/fysRXiT6kJ94.Debian Linux: People who writes about #Debian based Linux Distro such as #Ubuntu #LinuxMint Debian Linux Circle: https://plus.google.com/u/0/111560558537332305125/posts/iWturahT2gw5.Redhat Linux: People who writes about #Redhat based Linux Distro such as #Fedora #CentOS Redhat Linux Circle: https://plus.google.com/u/0/111560558537332305125/posts/52JQqx4kfQC6.Linux Army: People in this circle gets all the updates of above circlesLinux Army Circle: https://plus.google.com/u/0/111560558537332305125/posts/6C5HAx2AsVk #SharedCircles #CircleSharing #CircleSunday #PublicCircles #PublicSharedCircles2012-05-19 19:20:26390716
Mitesh Shah1,344Linux Army 60+ New UsersNow a days lots of Linux users want to manage their Linux circles,So we think to create the following circles and share these circles.Comment On The Appropriate Circle's Links To Help UsTo Adding More Linux Pages, Distro & Users In Appropriate Circle1. Linux Pages: Google Plus Linux PagesLinux Pages Circle: https://plus.google.com/111560558537332305125/posts/7XN1rHGxsbn2. Linux Distro: Google Plus Official Linux Disto PagesLinux Distro Circle: https://plus.google.com/111560558537332305125/posts/X3mokqdhL9G3.Arch Linux: People who writes about Arch Linux Arch Linux Circle: https://plus.google.com/111560558537332305125/posts/JtgyhAwibSX4.Debian Linux: People who writes about Debian based Linux Distro such as Ubuntu, Mint EtcDebian Linux Circle: https://plus.google.com/111560558537332305125/posts/CaeYJNkvr3t5.Redhat Linux: People who writes about Redhat based Linux Distro such as Fedora, Centos EtcRedhat Linux Circle: https://plus.google.com/111560558537332305125/posts/SBQdHC8qiUC6.Linux Army: People in this circle gets all the updates of above circlesLinux Army Circle: https://plus.google.com/u/0/111560558537332305125/posts/he5MMjwFTtN2012-03-16 22:04:1131516813
Mitesh Shah298Linux ArmyNow a days lots of Linux users want to manage their Linux circles,So we think to create the following circles and share these circles.Comment On The Appropriate Circle's Links To Help UsTo Adding More Linux Pages, Distro & Users In Appropriate Circle1. Linux Pages: Google Plus Linux PagesLinux Pages Circle: https://plus.google.com/111560558537332305125/posts/7XN1rHGxsbn2. Linux Distro: Google Plus Official Linux Disto PagesLinux Distro Circle: https://plus.google.com/111560558537332305125/posts/X3mokqdhL9G3.Arch Linux: People who writes about Arch Linux Arch Linux Circle: https://plus.google.com/111560558537332305125/posts/JtgyhAwibSX4.Debian Linux: People who writes about Debian based Linux Distro such as Ubuntu, Mint EtcDebian Linux Circle: https://plus.google.com/111560558537332305125/posts/CaeYJNkvr3t5.Redhat Linux: People who writes about Redhat based Linux Distro such as Fedora, Centos EtcRedhat Linux Circle: https://plus.google.com/111560558537332305125/posts/SBQdHC8qiUC6.Linux Army: People in this circle gets all the updates of above circlesLinux Army Circle: https://plus.google.com/111560558537332305125/posts/CFeVM6DSv992012-03-09 12:40:3024835812
Chris Goldsmith1,927If you have my linux circle from prior share this one replaces it _ have removed over 200+ people who were in it by mistake due to circle add gone wrong2012-01-11 15:46:50340100
siam simte856For those who think Google Inc. employee must be Totally Circle ; Here's your chanceWhatever and however they're awesome thoughsiam simte shared a circle with you.2011-10-29 20:18:31473000
Marius Voila183+Chris Porter Yes, you're right sorry about that...I'm correcting that right nowMarius Voilă shared a circle with you.2011-10-20 12:13:24500630
Jon Nellson33Geek CircleJon Nellson shared a circle with you.2011-10-16 15:23:13501765
Robert Scoble161,698A circle of geeks (part I). Here's almost 1,000 active geeks. Programmers, developers, and highly technical people. Here's A-K.Robert Scoble shared a circle with you.2011-10-12 03:14:05493797563
Sean Campbell0The Hack3rs circleSean Campbell shared a circle with you.2011-10-09 00:46:56252011

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

48
comments per post
16
reshares per post
72
+1's per post

687
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 107

2014-04-03 01:44:37 (107 comments, 49 reshares, 136 +1s)Open 

For those who believe the systemd developers are reasonable and will listen to constructive criticism.....

Most reshares: 126

posted image

2014-08-09 23:28:16 (13 comments, 126 reshares, 186 +1s)Open 

If you don't have time to watch this keynote by Dan Geer, and you are at all interested in Cybersecurity, make time.   Alternatively, the text of his speech is here:  http://geer.tinho.net/geer.blackhat.6viii14.txt.   In some ways it's actually better to read the text, since a good part of the conclusion was cut due to time pressure.

Most plusones: 190

posted image

2014-08-31 00:55:45 (72 comments, 59 reshares, 190 +1s)Open 

Вчера Диме +Dmitriy Monakhov дали 15 суток за одиночный пикет против войны с Украиной. В прошлый раз дело закончилось больницей (см. статью).

Как я уже раньше писал, Дима мой коллега, выпускник Физтеха, спортсмен-лыжник и толковый программист -- разработчик ядра Linux. Вот статистика его коммитов в ядро:

[kir@kir-tpad linux]$ git log --pretty=short | grep '^Author: ' | grep -c Monakhov 
169

Latest 50 posts

posted image

2014-11-13 19:20:24 (3 comments, 8 reshares, 41 +1s)Open 

In other news, the FBI is asking the US to trust them and give them more guaranteed access to spy on Americans.

In other news, the FBI is asking the US to trust them and give them more guaranteed access to spy on Americans.___

posted image

2014-11-12 23:37:53 (98 comments, 39 reshares, 166 +1s)Open 

I'm using systemd on my laptop (largely because I figure in the long run I have no choice).   And as the meme below states, I don't actually hate systemd.   What I strongly dislike is when other compoents start using systemd-specific API's such that you can no longer use alternate implementations of various systemd replacements of other low-level components (i.e., ntpd, the resolver, etc., etc.)

I know that +Tom Gundersen very much hates the comparison, but it's much like web sites who start using Microsoft ActiveX controls in their web sites, thus enabling Microsoft's, "Embrace, Extend, Extinguish" statrategy.   It's not that Internet Explorer was evil; it was that it was part and parcel of an Embrace and Extended strategy which was evil.   So if a distribution wants to use systemd, that's fine.   As I said, I'm using it on my laptop.... more »

I'm using systemd on my laptop (largely because I figure in the long run I have no choice).   And as the meme below states, I don't actually hate systemd.   What I strongly dislike is when other compoents start using systemd-specific API's such that you can no longer use alternate implementations of various systemd replacements of other low-level components (i.e., ntpd, the resolver, etc., etc.)

I know that +Tom Gundersen very much hates the comparison, but it's much like web sites who start using Microsoft ActiveX controls in their web sites, thus enabling Microsoft's, "Embrace, Extend, Extinguish" statrategy.   It's not that Internet Explorer was evil; it was that it was part and parcel of an Embrace and Extended strategy which was evil.   So if a distribution wants to use systemd, that's fine.   As I said, I'm using it on my laptop.

But in the name of all that's holy, please, if you are a developer wondering if you should use some systemd-exclusive API or facility, please make it optional at run-time.   If it turns out that there is a horrible security bug in a systemd component or if it only supports a certain desktop use case and is terrible at some other use case, it should be possible to replace it with an equivalent component.   That can only happen if you don't buy in to systemd's lock-in strategy.___

posted image

2014-11-12 16:09:57 (71 comments, 12 reshares, 65 +1s)Open 

Systemd tries to subsume another low level system component.   News at 11.

Systemd tries to subsume another low level system component.   News at 11.___

2014-11-03 21:23:23 (20 comments, 3 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

Dear Lazy G+:  Is anyone aware of a commercial VPN used to provide anonymity / privacy (i.e., uses shared outbound IP addresses, and keeps no logs, etc.) ala privateinternetaccess.com but which does so for both IPv4 and IPv6?    Right now it appears most of the VPN services are IPv4 only, and in fact if you are using a VPN for security and/or privacy, you need to make sure IPv6 is disabled on your host so that you don't have some of your outbound TCP connections bypassing the VPN and going out via the unsecured public coffeehouse network (if it happens to IPv6 enabled).

Of course, at the moment as near as I can tell IPv6 is providing me with no benefit whatsoever, so I don't mind just disabling IPv6 on my laptop, but eventually there will be some hosts that are available on IPv6 only --- and of course I do feel some obligation to support IPv6 if I can.   Any suggestions?

Dear Lazy G+:  Is anyone aware of a commercial VPN used to provide anonymity / privacy (i.e., uses shared outbound IP addresses, and keeps no logs, etc.) ala privateinternetaccess.com but which does so for both IPv4 and IPv6?    Right now it appears most of the VPN services are IPv4 only, and in fact if you are using a VPN for security and/or privacy, you need to make sure IPv6 is disabled on your host so that you don't have some of your outbound TCP connections bypassing the VPN and going out via the unsecured public coffeehouse network (if it happens to IPv6 enabled).

Of course, at the moment as near as I can tell IPv6 is providing me with no benefit whatsoever, so I don't mind just disabling IPv6 on my laptop, but eventually there will be some hosts that are available on IPv6 only --- and of course I do feel some obligation to support IPv6 if I can.   Any suggestions?___

2014-10-21 20:44:49 (22 comments, 31 reshares, 66 +1s)Open 

This is very scary; although the paper talks about this as a Windows 8 / UEFI vulnerability, it looks like it's applicable to any OS running on a vulnerable UEFI bios.

Have you updated your BIOS lately?

This is very scary; although the paper talks about this as a Windows 8 / UEFI vulnerability, it looks like it's applicable to any OS running on a vulnerable UEFI bios.

Have you updated your BIOS lately?___

2014-10-18 01:25:45 (78 comments, 5 reshares, 36 +1s)Open 

After listening to +Karen Sandler's talk at LinuxCon EU about how GNOME has an unfair reputation, I thought I would take a closer look at GNOME 3.14.   Looking at some initial research, it looks like the extensions that provide (or might provide; it's hard to tell because they aren't documented all that well) a static set of workspaces which are laid out in a two-dimensional grid haven't yet been ported to GNOME 3.14, and one of them had an advertisement explicitly stating that it was very likely it would break with every new GNOME release.

Dear Lazy G+, does anyone know if you can make 2-D static workspaces work with GNOME 3.14?   And if so, what magic secret registry settings I might need to make something that works mostly like XFCE?   (i.e., I want control over whether closing the lid suspends the laptop or not, etc., configurable panes on the left and right hand sideswh... more »

After listening to +Karen Sandler's talk at LinuxCon EU about how GNOME has an unfair reputation, I thought I would take a closer look at GNOME 3.14.   Looking at some initial research, it looks like the extensions that provide (or might provide; it's hard to tell because they aren't documented all that well) a static set of workspaces which are laid out in a two-dimensional grid haven't yet been ported to GNOME 3.14, and one of them had an advertisement explicitly stating that it was very likely it would break with every new GNOME release.

Dear Lazy G+, does anyone know if you can make 2-D static workspaces work with GNOME 3.14?   And if so, what magic secret registry settings I might need to make something that works mostly like XFCE?   (i.e., I want control over whether closing the lid suspends the laptop or not, etc., configurable panes on the left and right hand sides where I can control which launchers go where on the panels, the ability to configure keyboard shortcuts for moving between workspaces, moving windows between workstations via up, down, left, right arrows, etc., keyboard shortcuts for locking the screen, manually suspending the laptop, etc.)

If the answer is that GNOME doesn't let me do any of these things, or in a way that isn't guaranteed to not to randomly break from GNOME version to GNOME version, that's fine.   But I'll keep repeating the meme that GNOME is power user hostile --- or at least, hostile to this power user.  :-)___

posted image

2014-10-09 01:37:14 (4 comments, 4 reshares, 39 +1s)Open 

And this is why +Comcastcares doesn't.

Oh boy.

And here's Comcast's quick apology now that the shit hit the fan: http://corporate.comcast.com/comcast-voices/a-public-apology-to-conal-orourke.

What a rotten company, too big to operate in a way that takes good care of customers.___And this is why +Comcastcares doesn't.

posted image

2014-10-06 02:36:01 (32 comments, 12 reshares, 96 +1s)Open 

And this is why we can't trust the legacy newspapers to get anything right.   To paraphrase the +Washington Post: "Backdoors are evil.  But we need a compromise.  What if Apple and Google were to put in a Backdoor?"  #NewspaperEditorsAreIdiots

And this is why we can't trust the legacy newspapers to get anything right.   To paraphrase the +Washington Post: "Backdoors are evil.  But we need a compromise.  What if Apple and Google were to put in a Backdoor?"  #NewspaperEditorsAreIdiots___

2014-09-24 14:11:08 (23 comments, 2 reshares, 70 +1s)Open 

The authors of "How Google Works" have given electronic versions of "How Google Works" to all Google employees.   Since I had already purchased a copy via pre-order, to make life interesting, I've decided to give my Google Play coupon code to someone via an electronic lottery.

EDIT: It's been called to my attention that using the +1 button violates one of Google's G+ policies.   Oops.   So I'm going to use an e-mail based system instead.  For more details, please see:

http://thunk.org/tytso/blog/2014/09/24/google-book-giveaway/

Apologies for the horrible page design.   My blog got restored from backups after my server hard disk crashed, and I've never gotten around to fixing up the Wordpress theme, since I've been using G+ mostly.

The authors of "How Google Works" have given electronic versions of "How Google Works" to all Google employees.   Since I had already purchased a copy via pre-order, to make life interesting, I've decided to give my Google Play coupon code to someone via an electronic lottery.

EDIT: It's been called to my attention that using the +1 button violates one of Google's G+ policies.   Oops.   So I'm going to use an e-mail based system instead.  For more details, please see:

http://thunk.org/tytso/blog/2014/09/24/google-book-giveaway/

Apologies for the horrible page design.   My blog got restored from backups after my server hard disk crashed, and I've never gotten around to fixing up the Wordpress theme, since I've been using G+ mostly.___

posted image

2014-09-23 21:06:36 (22 comments, 7 reshares, 44 +1s)Open 

It's important to have compassion for those who are living in poverty.

Dang.___It's important to have compassion for those who are living in poverty.

posted image

2014-09-10 12:23:43 (10 comments, 44 reshares, 151 +1s)Open 

This was so very funny, even if it had a few low blows....  

"The Apple Watch stands for 'A Pleasantly Plump Little Electronic Watch  Android's Terrible Come Here'."

"Now a lot of people think the Apple Watch requires an iPhone.... and they're right.   If you iPhone 4S or lower, it won't work.   If you have an Android phone, get the f*ck out.  If you have a Windows Phone.... <snicker> just kidding."

"It's the new Apple iWatch... Apple Watch.  You didn't really ask for it, so here you go."

This was so very funny, even if it had a few low blows....  

"The Apple Watch stands for 'A Pleasantly Plump Little Electronic Watch  Android's Terrible Come Here'."

"Now a lot of people think the Apple Watch requires an iPhone.... and they're right.   If you iPhone 4S or lower, it won't work.   If you have an Android phone, get the f*ck out.  If you have a Windows Phone.... <snicker> just kidding."

"It's the new Apple iWatch... Apple Watch.  You didn't really ask for it, so here you go."___

2014-09-08 04:15:25 (24 comments, 2 reshares, 64 +1s)Open 

People sometimes ask me what I do as the ext4 file system maintainer.   It's actually not that glamorous.  Mainly, I review patches; do a lot of code cleanup to keep the code maintainable, and I develop tools so that other ext4 developers can test their work --- which hopefully improves the quality of their code submissions, which saves me time and hopefully makes ext4 users happier.

People sometimes ask me what I do as the ext4 file system maintainer.   It's actually not that glamorous.  Mainly, I review patches; do a lot of code cleanup to keep the code maintainable, and I develop tools so that other ext4 developers can test their work --- which hopefully improves the quality of their code submissions, which saves me time and hopefully makes ext4 users happier.___

posted image

2014-09-02 01:08:42 (9 comments, 26 reshares, 86 +1s)Open 

This is worth watching.  It's a fair comparison of advantages and disadvantages of Linux and Solaris from the perspective of a performance engineer.

Brenden Gregg gives suggestions on how Linux and Solaris can improve, and Joyent is working improving their fork of OpenSolaris (which they call SmartOS).

The audio gets better after the first 2 or 3 minutes.

Video: What Linux Can Learn from Solaris Performance, and Vice-Versa___This is worth watching.  It's a fair comparison of advantages and disadvantages of Linux and Solaris from the perspective of a performance engineer.

Brenden Gregg gives suggestions on how Linux and Solaris can improve, and Joyent is working improving their fork of OpenSolaris (which they call SmartOS).

The audio gets better after the first 2 or 3 minutes.

posted image

2014-08-31 00:55:45 (72 comments, 59 reshares, 190 +1s)Open 

By way of +Frédéric Weisbecker:

"Linux Kernel developer +Dmitry Monakhov (ext4, filesystems...) has been arrested in Moscow and put in jail for 15 days while protesting against the war in Ukraine despite him using no violence nor even leaflet. He was only talking out loud to people in the street...

See these article in Russian (google translate gives the main point):

http://grani.ru/Society/Law/m.232445.html
http://ph.livejournal.com/54547.html
"

+Dmitriy Monakhov is someone I've worked with for quite a while.  I hope and pray that he stays safe.

Вчера Диме +Dmitriy Monakhov дали 15 суток за одиночный пикет против войны с Украиной. В прошлый раз дело закончилось больницей (см. статью).

Как я уже раньше писал, Дима мой коллега, выпускник Физтеха, спортсмен-лыжник и толковый программист -- разработчик ядра Linux. Вот статистика его коммитов в ядро:

[kir@kir-tpad linux]$ git log --pretty=short | grep '^Author: ' | grep -c Monakhov 
169___By way of +Frédéric Weisbecker:

"Linux Kernel developer +Dmitry Monakhov (ext4, filesystems...) has been arrested in Moscow and put in jail for 15 days while protesting against the war in Ukraine despite him using no violence nor even leaflet. He was only talking out loud to people in the street...

See these article in Russian (google translate gives the main point):

http://grani.ru/Society/Law/m.232445.html
http://ph.livejournal.com/54547.html
"

+Dmitriy Monakhov is someone I've worked with for quite a while.  I hope and pray that he stays safe.

posted image

2014-08-28 18:30:00 (12 comments, 10 reshares, 60 +1s)Open 

Although it's a little bit farther from my home, I think I'm going to make a point of shopping more at Market Basket.   I think it's worth making the statement that it's possible to have a company that pays its workers a living wage, while still having better prices than WalMart, by having loyal employees that deliver better customer service.  Such companies deserve to be supported by my business.  Hopefully more companies will be encouraged this strategy, instead of trying to engage in a "race to the bottom" mentality that is all to common that gets pushed by MBA's employed by Private Equity firms.

Although it's a little bit farther from my home, I think I'm going to make a point of shopping more at Market Basket.   I think it's worth making the statement that it's possible to have a company that pays its workers a living wage, while still having better prices than WalMart, by having loyal employees that deliver better customer service.  Such companies deserve to be supported by my business.  Hopefully more companies will be encouraged this strategy, instead of trying to engage in a "race to the bottom" mentality that is all to common that gets pushed by MBA's employed by Private Equity firms.___

posted image

2014-08-23 12:03:11 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 33 +1s)Open 

Via +Paul Fisher -- worth reading.

“Reconstruction was the second phase of the Civil War. It lasted until 1877, when the Confederates won.”___Via +Paul Fisher -- worth reading.

posted image

2014-08-22 23:27:18 (12 comments, 2 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

Sigh, caff is broken with gpg2 -- which I need to use because my signing key is a 4096 bit RSA key stored on a smartcard, which isn't supported by gpg 1.4.18.

Fortunately, I found a workaround.   Run caff with the .caffrc configured to use gpg2; this will fetch the keys and sign them using gpg2 --- and then caff blows up with the error message:

 gpg: Fatal: can't open `/tmp/caff-87B06E946C0596000E8B90D5DBFB07BF052B3F1B-iFIir/trustdb.gpg': No such file or directory
Not all keys in '$CONFIG{'keyid'}' could be imported from caff's GnuPGHOME (with 'export-minimal').

If you then edit your .caffrc to use gpg instead of gpg2, since the keys are already signed, then caff will use gpg to encrypt so only their owners can decrypt the e-mail and then email the keys (thus requiring the owners to prove they control the e-mail named in thek... more »

Sigh, caff is broken with gpg2 -- which I need to use because my signing key is a 4096 bit RSA key stored on a smartcard, which isn't supported by gpg 1.4.18.

Fortunately, I found a workaround.   Run caff with the .caffrc configured to use gpg2; this will fetch the keys and sign them using gpg2 --- and then caff blows up with the error message:

 gpg: Fatal: can't open `/tmp/caff-87B06E946C0596000E8B90D5DBFB07BF052B3F1B-iFIir/trustdb.gpg': No such file or directory
Not all keys in '$CONFIG{'keyid'}' could be imported from caff's GnuPGHOME (with 'export-minimal').

If you then edit your .caffrc to use gpg instead of gpg2, since the keys are already signed, then caff will use gpg to encrypt so only their owners can decrypt the e-mail and then email the keys (thus requiring the owners to prove they control the e-mail named in the key).___

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2014-08-12 14:03:30 (19 comments, 6 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

A few years ago, there was a huge fuss inside Google when a decision was made, on environmental grounds (and I suspect to be frugal with our shareholders' money), to replace bottled water with machines that could dispense filtered hot, cold, room temperature, and sparkling water[1].  Apparently a large number of people really loved their bottled water, and felt deprived as a result.  (BTW, this was derided by many inside Google as a "zeroth world problem".  Not all, and probably not even most, people really feel that entitled.)

[1] http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2009/07/11/sun-valley-cost-cutting-at-google/

But since most of this fuss happened in Mountain View, and Mountain View is inside California, bottled water is apparently not that bad in MTV!   :-P    In the rest of the country, however...

A few years ago, there was a huge fuss inside Google when a decision was made, on environmental grounds (and I suspect to be frugal with our shareholders' money), to replace bottled water with machines that could dispense filtered hot, cold, room temperature, and sparkling water[1].  Apparently a large number of people really loved their bottled water, and felt deprived as a result.  (BTW, this was derided by many inside Google as a "zeroth world problem".  Not all, and probably not even most, people really feel that entitled.)

[1] http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2009/07/11/sun-valley-cost-cutting-at-google/

But since most of this fuss happened in Mountain View, and Mountain View is inside California, bottled water is apparently not that bad in MTV!   :-P    In the rest of the country, however...___

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2014-08-09 23:28:16 (13 comments, 126 reshares, 186 +1s)Open 

If you don't have time to watch this keynote by Dan Geer, and you are at all interested in Cybersecurity, make time.   Alternatively, the text of his speech is here:  http://geer.tinho.net/geer.blackhat.6viii14.txt.   In some ways it's actually better to read the text, since a good part of the conclusion was cut due to time pressure.

If you don't have time to watch this keynote by Dan Geer, and you are at all interested in Cybersecurity, make time.   Alternatively, the text of his speech is here:  http://geer.tinho.net/geer.blackhat.6viii14.txt.   In some ways it's actually better to read the text, since a good part of the conclusion was cut due to time pressure.___

2014-08-04 13:23:42 (33 comments, 20 reshares, 76 +1s)Open 

A public service announcement regarding wanna-be kernel developer Nick Krause.

A public service announcement regarding wanna-be kernel developer Nick Krause.___

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2014-07-25 00:10:42 (9 comments, 10 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

In other news, the law of supply and demand still holds.  More details at 11.

In other news, the law of supply and demand still holds.  More details at 11.___

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2014-07-24 14:01:09 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

Very sad.  I was just in Italy, where apparently it's required that restaurants are required to put a asterisk and an explanation for any frozen foods used in a dish.

Also, places that sell Gelato can specify using formally defined terms whether the Gelato was made on site, and another term which means that it was made artisanally (in small batches).

Very sad.  I was just in Italy, where apparently it's required that restaurants are required to put a asterisk and an explanation for any frozen foods used in a dish.

Also, places that sell Gelato can specify using formally defined terms whether the Gelato was made on site, and another term which means that it was made artisanally (in small batches).___

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2014-07-23 15:36:47 (50 comments, 28 reshares, 114 +1s)Open 

Yikes.  I'm so glad I don't use an iPhone or an iPad.

Yikes.  I'm so glad I don't use an iPhone or an iPad.___

2014-07-20 20:41:59 (22 comments, 4 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

The biggest difference which I think the original author and +Alex Scrivener hasn't mentioned is that the belief systems espoused by both armies and religious organizations is that people who die for a cause bigger than themselves (their nation in the case of armies, to defend their religious beliefs) are considered heroes or martyrs, and those people are awarded things like the Medal of Honor or are declared saints.   Of course, not all soldiers are Medal of Honor recipients, and not all religious people are necessarily willing to die for their faith.  But it is held up as the ideal that a good soldier and a good believer would be willing to do so.

There are many other organizations which are not willing to impose that obligation on their members.   For example, since the original author used Libertarianism as an example, throughout his piece, consider that Ann Rand has argued that beingsel... more »

+Yonatan Zunger asked me to share this as its own post, so here it is.

There is a part of this which has always fascinated me. People today wildly underestimate the Church. You hear people routinely say things like "The Church is a bunch of backwards old men and will collapse into irreverence within a few more years. Maybe a generation or two."

The Church has outlasted two Roman empires, a few European empires, the Caliphate, and every totalitarian dictator since Nero. She has a depth of systematized philosophy underpinning her worldview that has already dealt with every variation of every objection your internet forum will ever come up with, probably spelled out in excruciating detail between 500-1500 years ago. She maintains traditions and ceremonies from so long ago that whole language groups have risen since they were formalized, but she also has a history of incorporating regional and temporal preferences that makes Microsoft's Embrace And Extend policy look like a tropical island cargo cult.

However, there are a few things that I think the author of this piece misses that make the Church less than suitable as a model for his wished-for atheist organization.

The largest problem is that the Church moves VERY slowly. Her first reaction to any new threat is simply to wait for it to die, which almost always works. It worked with Napoleon, for instance. The Church works on a model of Deep Time that is alien to everyone but hard-scifi fans. She isn't planning for the next decade, or the next century. She is planning for eternity; literally till the heat-death of the universe AND BEYOND. If your goal is to change your country within your lifetime, this is a very frustrating process.

Armies can adapt very quickly, but it is difficult for them to do (the risk of training to fight the last war is very real) and only works in what I can only call "mechanical processes". An army can quickly adopt a new way to kill people, but ask an army to come up with a new way to decide if it should wage a war and you will get a lot of blank stares.___The biggest difference which I think the original author and +Alex Scrivener hasn't mentioned is that the belief systems espoused by both armies and religious organizations is that people who die for a cause bigger than themselves (their nation in the case of armies, to defend their religious beliefs) are considered heroes or martyrs, and those people are awarded things like the Medal of Honor or are declared saints.   Of course, not all soldiers are Medal of Honor recipients, and not all religious people are necessarily willing to die for their faith.  But it is held up as the ideal that a good soldier and a good believer would be willing to do so.

There are many other organizations which are not willing to impose that obligation on their members.   For example, since the original author used Libertarianism as an example, throughout his piece, consider that Ann Rand has argued that being selfish is a good thing, and that a rational man will hold his life as his highest value.

Fundamentally, both Armies and Religions espouse different types of collectivism, where ones self-interest sometimes must yield to the needs of others, or the demands of either one's Ultimate Concern, or at least, Concerns which are larger than the continued existence of one's own life.   And if even if you are not willing to give your life, at the very least most will be willing to give money, or to otherwise make some sort of sacrifice for the good of the larger organization.

A wonder how many Libertarians would consider such a choice to be rational or laudable?  And what would they think of organizations that might use various techniques which might be considered forms of psychological coercion to an outsider , to encourage such choices?

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2014-07-10 03:55:43 (11 comments, 2 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

where to tell the TSA to shove it for their 5% tax hike to pay for more security goons: http://www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=TSA-2001-11120-0085

i provided a template of what to say below.

where to tell the TSA to shove it for their 5% tax hike to pay for more security goons: http://www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=TSA-2001-11120-0085

i provided a template of what to say below.___

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2014-07-08 13:00:08 (76 comments, 1 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

Should Isreal treat the home and families of the suspects who burned the Palestinian boy alive as they did the Palestinian suspects who kidnapped and murdered three Jewish teenagers?

Discuss.

Should Isreal treat the home and families of the suspects who burned the Palestinian boy alive as they did the Palestinian suspects who kidnapped and murdered three Jewish teenagers?

Discuss.___

2014-07-02 22:50:42 (5 comments, 6 reshares, 58 +1s)Open 

+Michael Halcrow and I were trying to debug why we were seeing a surprising number of sparse reads while looking at his ext4 encryption patches, and I traced it down to ld doing some truly biazzre and horribly inefficient reads from the output file --- for example, was repeatedly doing lseek(fd, 0, SEEK_SET), and then reading a 4k chunk which was all zeros, over and OVER, and OVER, and OVER again.    Each 4k read of block #0, was interspersed with a write of a some small number of bytes to a random location in the object file --- sometimes as small as 4 bytes, after which point it would seek to the beginning of the file, and read in the first 4k of the file --- which, not surprisingly, was still all zero's.   It's as if ld was obsessively compulsively checking to see after each random write of a small amount of code, whether the first 4k of the output file was still all zero's or not.<... more »

+Michael Halcrow and I were trying to debug why we were seeing a surprising number of sparse reads while looking at his ext4 encryption patches, and I traced it down to ld doing some truly biazzre and horribly inefficient reads from the output file --- for example, was repeatedly doing lseek(fd, 0, SEEK_SET), and then reading a 4k chunk which was all zeros, over and OVER, and OVER, and OVER again.    Each 4k read of block #0, was interspersed with a write of a some small number of bytes to a random location in the object file --- sometimes as small as 4 bytes, after which point it would seek to the beginning of the file, and read in the first 4k of the file --- which, not surprisingly, was still all zero's.   It's as if ld was obsessively compulsively checking to see after each random write of a small amount of code, whether the first 4k of the output file was still all zero's or not.

If you want to replicate my results, create a simple hello world C file, and then run "strace -o /tmp/st -f gcc -o /tmp/hello /tmp/hello.c".  And then prepared to be amazed/horrified.

Funny thing, when I substituted +Ian Lance Taylor's gold linker instead of ld, all of these crazy read/write patterns went away..... 

Which leaves me with one question --- why are we still using the old libbfd based linker in 2014?___

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2014-06-26 13:54:35 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

To those who kvetch that companies like Google sometimes will make donations to organizations such as ALEC.    Note that Chef Justice John "Corporations are People So They Have First Amendment Rights" Roberts just also opined recently that minimization procedures are not a way to bypass fourth amendment protections, "the Founders did not fight a revolution to gain the right to government agency protocols".

Although this opinion swatted down cell phone searches without a warrant, that statement could just as easily be applied against NSA's warrantless surveillance programs.

At the same time +Nancy Pelosi  and Senator +Dianne Feinstein  have been giving aid and comfort to NSA's "collect it all" approach.   Sure, there may be lots of distasteful things that ALEC and Paul Ryan have advocated for.   But the nature of politics is that yousometi... more »

To those who kvetch that companies like Google sometimes will make donations to organizations such as ALEC.    Note that Chef Justice John "Corporations are People So They Have First Amendment Rights" Roberts just also opined recently that minimization procedures are not a way to bypass fourth amendment protections, "the Founders did not fight a revolution to gain the right to government agency protocols".

Although this opinion swatted down cell phone searches without a warrant, that statement could just as easily be applied against NSA's warrantless surveillance programs.

At the same time +Nancy Pelosi  and Senator +Dianne Feinstein  have been giving aid and comfort to NSA's "collect it all" approach.   Sure, there may be lots of distasteful things that ALEC and Paul Ryan have advocated for.   But the nature of politics is that you sometimes have to work with people with whom you don't 100% agree.___

2014-06-16 15:31:20 (26 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Dear Lazy G+,

Since the walking desk was out of commission the past week, I was using my standing desk exclusively, and I found that I was starting to develop low back pain.  The low back pain started going away I started using my home-brew walking desk at home over the weekend, and I definitely noticed a difference where my back was feeling better while I was moving, and then when I switched back to standing desk mode only, it got worse.

What might be a likely explanation?  The one possibility that came to mind was that walking (or using my standing eleptical trainer) forced me to have a better posture, but it wasn't like I was using the walking desk exclusively when it was operational.   Any other explanations that comes to mind?

Dear Lazy G+,

Since the walking desk was out of commission the past week, I was using my standing desk exclusively, and I found that I was starting to develop low back pain.  The low back pain started going away I started using my home-brew walking desk at home over the weekend, and I definitely noticed a difference where my back was feeling better while I was moving, and then when I switched back to standing desk mode only, it got worse.

What might be a likely explanation?  The one possibility that came to mind was that walking (or using my standing eleptical trainer) forced me to have a better posture, but it wasn't like I was using the walking desk exclusively when it was operational.   Any other explanations that comes to mind?___

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2014-05-15 02:15:14 (4 comments, 24 reshares, 75 +1s)Open 

From +Lisa Borel's reshare:

They have changed the phone menu to try to deflect us to email, but you can still get a live person by navigating to file a complaint.
She didn't sound happy that I figured it out, but they aren't concerned about making us happy, are they?

#fcc #netneutrality
If you want to know why you should care about net neutrality just let me know. ___From +Lisa Borel's reshare:

They have changed the phone menu to try to deflect us to email, but you can still get a live person by navigating to file a complaint.
She didn't sound happy that I figured it out, but they aren't concerned about making us happy, are they?

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2014-05-05 01:08:24 (5 comments, 3 reshares, 38 +1s)Open 

I'm really going to miss The Colbert Show after Stephen Colbert moves on to the Late Show.

He managed to work in references to both Macbeth and Waiting for Godot.   Priceless!

I'm really going to miss The Colbert Show after Stephen Colbert moves on to the Late Show.

He managed to work in references to both Macbeth and Waiting for Godot.   Priceless!___

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2014-04-30 18:23:33 (8 comments, 15 reshares, 66 +1s)Open 

"Bank of America: Too big to fail; too dumb to notice"

"Bank of America: Too big to fail; too dumb to notice"___

2014-04-25 14:51:40 (70 comments, 4 reshares, 45 +1s)Open 

I've got to experience Microsoft Exchange's IMAP support now that MIT has migrated all of its IMAP users from Cyrus to Exchange.   And I now have a fresh appreciation of how horrible MS Exchange is.   It's amazing that Red Hat is inflicting Exchange on its employees....

EDIT: Correction, it turns out Red Hat uses Zimbra, not Exchange.  My mistake, and my apologies to Red Hat for the insult.  :-)

Fortunately, it's relatively easy to run your own installation of Dovecot.  I'm tempted to try out using Lucene to add full text search, except the thought of running a JVM on my Linode server is giving  me the willies.

I've got to experience Microsoft Exchange's IMAP support now that MIT has migrated all of its IMAP users from Cyrus to Exchange.   And I now have a fresh appreciation of how horrible MS Exchange is.   It's amazing that Red Hat is inflicting Exchange on its employees....

EDIT: Correction, it turns out Red Hat uses Zimbra, not Exchange.  My mistake, and my apologies to Red Hat for the insult.  :-)

Fortunately, it's relatively easy to run your own installation of Dovecot.  I'm tempted to try out using Lucene to add full text search, except the thought of running a JVM on my Linode server is giving  me the willies.___

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2014-04-18 15:10:44 (9 comments, 19 reshares, 45 +1s)Open 

I've said this before: friends don't let friends run home routers with stock firmware.  (And if you must run the stock firmware, please don't leave the admin password to be the default!)

I've said this before: friends don't let friends run home routers with stock firmware.  (And if you must run the stock firmware, please don't leave the admin password to be the default!)___

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2014-04-16 12:07:44 (22 comments, 22 reshares, 91 +1s)Open 

Just in case you needed a reason not to ever use GoDaddy again....

Just in case you needed a reason not to ever use GoDaddy again....___

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2014-04-15 05:55:02 (22 comments, 19 reshares, 61 +1s)Open 

Why the Bay Area is dysfunctional, part II....

Q: So, why is Silicon Valley studded with an implausibly large number of abandoned barns, shacks, and other things that don't look like they belong here?

A: Because this all used to be orchards. This all made sense, fifty years ago.

Q: Right, but shouldn't they have, like, torn them down by now?

A: No. Abandoned barns in Silicon Valley are a better investment than historical stock market returns.

Q: Wouldn't they be an even better investment if there were, like, usable buildings on the land?

A: No.

Q: You have got to be shitting me.

A: Proposition 13 makes abandoned barns an enormously lucrative investment. You see, the assessed value of a piece of property is capped at a rate well below the rate of increase in property values out here. So you can just get the price of the land reevaluated every year and take tax-free loans against the increase in equity. This is a huge amount of untaxable money. Especially if you're an abandoned shed that's worth seven figures, right smack dab in the middle of the Google campus.

Q: Right, but that's just about low taxes, right?

A: Yeah. Well. Uh. I was going to get to the "except" part.

Q: And what's that? 

A: The increase is capped except upon the sale or the completion of new improvements. Like an apartment building, for instance, to partially solve the housing crisis out here. Or a new building on the Google campus. This means that if the value of the improvement is less than the compounded increase in the value of the property absent the improvement, then it doesn't make any sense to actually build anything.

Q: That's horrible. Why aren't people, like, vandalizing abandoned buildings to get rid of them?

A: The only way you can vandalize anything in California that solves the problem is to literally build a new improvement on the property without the landowner finding out. That resets the tax basis and gives them an incentive to stop holding the land off the market.

Q: That's... double horrible.

A: Yeeeeeeah.___Why the Bay Area is dysfunctional, part II....

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2014-04-15 05:50:02 (10 comments, 10 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

I am so thankful that I don't live in the Bay Area....  there are certainly ways in which Massachusetts politics might be a bit dysfunctional, but nothing like this!

I am so thankful that I don't live in the Bay Area....  there are certainly ways in which Massachusetts politics might be a bit dysfunctional, but nothing like this!___

2014-04-14 03:01:10 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

Compare and contrast how a senior NSA executive tap danced her way around the question of whether or not the NSA sabotaged NIST encryption standards, with the unequivocal denial from the NSA this past week about whether they knew about the Heartbleed vulnerability.  And yet, people like +Benjamin Wittes at the Lawfare blog insist on saying that "there is no evidence that the NSA in fact did sabotage Dual_EC".   Well, we may not have a smoking gun, but this certainly seems like a pretty good indicator that someone has a guilty conscience....

Compare and contrast how a senior NSA executive tap danced her way around the question of whether or not the NSA sabotaged NIST encryption standards, with the unequivocal denial from the NSA this past week about whether they knew about the Heartbleed vulnerability.  And yet, people like +Benjamin Wittes at the Lawfare blog insist on saying that "there is no evidence that the NSA in fact did sabotage Dual_EC".   Well, we may not have a smoking gun, but this certainly seems like a pretty good indicator that someone has a guilty conscience....___

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2014-04-11 13:40:35 (23 comments, 41 reshares, 116 +1s)Open 

Why you should avoid using XML, part 2.

Why you should avoid using XML, part 2.___

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2014-04-08 22:49:29 (27 comments, 24 reshares, 91 +1s)Open 

Safety tip: it's not enough just to install the bug fixed OpenSSL library.  You also need to make sure that you restart your apache server (and any other network daemons that use OpenSSL).   Yes, this should be obvious, but many distributions, including Debian, won't do this automatically.   Testing after you think you've fixed the problem is also a Really Good Idea.

Safety tip: it's not enough just to install the bug fixed OpenSSL library.  You also need to make sure that you restart your apache server (and any other network daemons that use OpenSSL).   Yes, this should be obvious, but many distributions, including Debian, won't do this automatically.   Testing after you think you've fixed the problem is also a Really Good Idea.___

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2014-04-03 23:16:25 (21 comments, 6 reshares, 51 +1s)Open 

I don't think that Microsoft choice to license Windows Phone free of charge (free as in beer), was neither a "bold" move, or as the article claims below, a "desperate" move.   It was just simply something they had to do after the Nokia acquisition, or else their other hardware partners would have said, "Now wait a moment.   We have to pay licensing fee, but phones made by Microsoft don't have to pay a licensing fee --- since it would be going from one Microsoft pocket to another?   That's no fair!"   And they would have started abandoning the platform even faster than they currently were.

I'm sure Microsoft would have forseen this as a natural consequence of the Nokia acquisition, and must have come to terms with this months ago.

I don't think that Microsoft choice to license Windows Phone free of charge (free as in beer), was neither a "bold" move, or as the article claims below, a "desperate" move.   It was just simply something they had to do after the Nokia acquisition, or else their other hardware partners would have said, "Now wait a moment.   We have to pay licensing fee, but phones made by Microsoft don't have to pay a licensing fee --- since it would be going from one Microsoft pocket to another?   That's no fair!"   And they would have started abandoning the platform even faster than they currently were.

I'm sure Microsoft would have forseen this as a natural consequence of the Nokia acquisition, and must have come to terms with this months ago.___

2014-04-03 01:44:37 (107 comments, 49 reshares, 136 +1s)Open 

For those who believe the systemd developers are reasonable and will listen to constructive criticism.....

For those who believe the systemd developers are reasonable and will listen to constructive criticism.....___

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2014-03-31 20:18:22 (25 comments, 26 reshares, 84 +1s)Open 

Another reason to avoid XML.  Windows' compiler decided to use a XML config file.   Parsing this involved pulling in a DLL which several DLL dependencies later, pulled in Internet Explorer.   Developer tried doing a parallel build (i.e, the equivalent of "make -j 12").

Hilarity ensued.

Another reason to avoid XML.  Windows' compiler decided to use a XML config file.   Parsing this involved pulling in a DLL which several DLL dependencies later, pulled in Internet Explorer.   Developer tried doing a parallel build (i.e, the equivalent of "make -j 12").

Hilarity ensued.___

2014-03-31 03:30:35 (95 comments, 41 reshares, 183 +1s)Open 

 A realization that I recently came to while discussing the whole systemd controversy with some friends at the Collab Summit is that a lot of the fear and uncertainty over systemd may not be so much about systemd, but the fear and loathing over radical changes that have been coming down the pike over the past few years, many of which have been not well documented, and worse, had some truly catastrophic design flaws that were extremely hard to fix.   For example, I still have the following magic installed in /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/dont-bug-me.pka:

[Don't Bug Me]
    Identity=unix-group:sudo
    Action=*
    ResultActive=yes

I added this because Network Manager insisted on popping up a window and asking me to type my password whenever I tried joining a new network.   And figuring out how to make Network Manager not do such a brain-damagedthing wa... more »

 A realization that I recently came to while discussing the whole systemd controversy with some friends at the Collab Summit is that a lot of the fear and uncertainty over systemd may not be so much about systemd, but the fear and loathing over radical changes that have been coming down the pike over the past few years, many of which have been not well documented, and worse, had some truly catastrophic design flaws that were extremely hard to fix.   For example, I still have the following magic installed in /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/dont-bug-me.pka:

[Don't Bug Me]
    Identity=unix-group:sudo
    Action=*
    ResultActive=yes

I added this because Network Manager insisted on popping up a window and asking me to type my password whenever I tried joining a new network.   And figuring out how to make Network Manager not do such a brain-damaged thing was so painful, that after going through reams of poorly documented XML schemas, and 50 language translations interspersed with actual configuration in various XML files, I just gave up and used the Big Hammer to make policykit just Completely Go Away.

I could tell similar horror stories about dbus when I had to debug various suspend/resume failures, which is something else which is similarly opaque and impossible to understand, but the point is that many of these failures have caused many people to want simple shell scripts, instead of having to crawl through badly designed XML schemas, or someone else's complex C or C++ code, just to figure out what the hell they did and how to patch around their design fail.

It's not entirely fair to charge all of this to Systemd's account, but I think one of the reasons why this happens is because +Kay Sievers and +Lennart Poettering often have the same response style to criticisms as the +GNOME developers --- go away, you're clueless, we know better than you, and besides, we have commit privs and you don't, so go away.

That being said, I recently did try moving my laptop to systemd, and I was pleasantly surprised by the Debian's integration --- it didn't blow away my rsyslog configuration, or do any number of a things that I'm worried about.  +GNOME  may start depending on more and more of systemd's features, and thus make it even harder to configure away its design failings, but that's +GNOME's problem, not systemd.   And besides, this is why I'm using XFCE and not GNOME.   :-)

I do find it very difficult sometimes to figure out why a particular systemd service gets started, and when I tried putting together a battery target which would automatically shut down various daemons that I don't need when I want to save power, it apparently somehow caused the brightness keys (fn-F5 and fn-F6) to mysteriously stop working --- and as I expected, it was impossible to debug.   So instead of using a systemd target, I'll just hack together a shell script that runs the necessary "service <foo> stop" instead of using a systemd target.  If things start breaking horribly, I'll file debian bugs, and try to find ways to work around the brain damage.   The fact that I won't be able to edit shell scripts to work around brain damage is still a little anxiety-producing, and the fact it's much more difficult to create a runlevel which is "just like runlevel 3 but without certain services running" is unfortunate, but I'll give it a try and see how much pain is involved.

At least with Debian, it's relatively easy (at least at this point) to roll back to sysvinit if systemd proves to be intolerable.   I figure I might as well try it now before I'm forced off of sysvinit and then discover all of the things that break and which can't be easily worked around.___

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2014-03-23 03:56:55 (37 comments, 18 reshares, 32 +1s)Open 

One thought about the NSA "hunting sys admins".  If you believe that they are at least following the law in not spying on US citizens (we'll ignore that period of history during the Bush administration when they probably were breaking the law), this is an argument for why using a US based cloud service might be safer than using a cloud service based in say, Germany or Brazil.   NSA has the authority to completely pwn sysadmins who are not US persons and who are outside of the US.   But they can't pwn a US sys admin without violating the law.   Ergo, it this may mean that your privacy may be more protected if you use a US based service than if you use one based outside of the US.

One thought about the NSA "hunting sys admins".  If you believe that they are at least following the law in not spying on US citizens (we'll ignore that period of history during the Bush administration when they probably were breaking the law), this is an argument for why using a US based cloud service might be safer than using a cloud service based in say, Germany or Brazil.   NSA has the authority to completely pwn sysadmins who are not US persons and who are outside of the US.   But they can't pwn a US sys admin without violating the law.   Ergo, it this may mean that your privacy may be more protected if you use a US based service than if you use one based outside of the US.___

2014-03-13 15:03:09 (17 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

I just set up my Prime membership to not renew in Feb. 2015.   In the next year, I'll see how often I really needed to use the free two-day shipping, and whether there are other shopping services that might be cheaper/better.   Maybe I'll renew next year, and maybe I won't --- but it certainly won't be the default for me.

I just set up my Prime membership to not renew in Feb. 2015.   In the next year, I'll see how often I really needed to use the free two-day shipping, and whether there are other shopping services that might be cheaper/better.   Maybe I'll renew next year, and maybe I won't --- but it certainly won't be the default for me.___

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2014-03-08 02:06:33 (28 comments, 19 reshares, 89 +1s)Open 

"We [Google] were attacked by the Chinese in 2010, we were attacked by the NSA in 2013. These are facts.” -- Eric Schmidt

"We [Google] were attacked by the Chinese in 2010, we were attacked by the NSA in 2013. These are facts.” -- Eric Schmidt___

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2014-03-03 22:28:46 (0 comments, 19 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

For students who are interested in participating in the Google Summer of Code, +Michael Haggerty advice is really good, regardless of which project you are interested in.

For students who are interested in participating in the Google Summer of Code, +Michael Haggerty advice is really good, regardless of which project you are interested in.___

2014-03-03 06:34:08 (9 comments, 38 reshares, 84 +1s)Open 

Yet another in the "friends don't let friends run stock router firmware" series, this time courtesy of +Linksys.

Yet another in the "friends don't let friends run stock router firmware" series, this time courtesy of +Linksys.___

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2014-02-23 19:00:25 (21 comments, 10 reshares, 32 +1s)Open 

A pretty comprehensive list of possibilities to the question I asked here: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+TheodoreTso/posts/GdZh7PtSKz1

A pretty comprehensive list of possibilities to the question I asked here: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+TheodoreTso/posts/GdZh7PtSKz1___

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