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Shared Circles including Theodore Ts'o

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Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 98

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2014-11-12 23:37:53 (98 comments; 44 reshares; 175 +1s)Open 

I'm using systemd on my laptop (largely because I figure in the long run I have no choice).   And as the meme below states, I don't actually hate systemd.   What I strongly dislike is when other compoents start using systemd-specific API's such that you can no longer use alternate implementations of various systemd replacements of other low-level components (i.e., ntpd, the resolver, etc., etc.)

I know that +Tom Gundersen very much hates the comparison, but it's much like web sites who start using Microsoft ActiveX controls in their web sites, thus enabling Microsoft's, "Embrace, Extend, Extinguish" statrategy.   It's not that Internet Explorer was evil; it was that it was part and parcel of an Embrace and Extended strategy which was evil.   So if a distribution wants to use systemd, that's fine.   As I said, I'm using it on my laptop.... more »

Most reshares: 126

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2014-08-09 23:28:16 (14 comments; 126 reshares; 185 +1s)Open 

If you don't have time to watch this keynote by Dan Geer, and you are at all interested in Cybersecurity, make time.   Alternatively, the text of his speech is here:  http://geer.tinho.net/geer.blackhat.6viii14.txt.   In some ways it's actually better to read the text, since a good part of the conclusion was cut due to time pressure.

Most plusones: 187

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2014-08-31 00:55:45 (71 comments; 55 reshares; 187 +1s)Open 

Вчера Диме +Dmitriy Monakhov дали 15 суток за одиночный пикет против войны с Украиной. В прошлый раз дело закончилось больницей (см. статью).

Как я уже раньше писал, Дима мой коллега, выпускник Физтеха, спортсмен-лыжник и толковый программист -- разработчик ядра Linux. Вот статистика его коммитов в ядро:

[kir@kir-tpad linux]$ git log --pretty=short | grep '^Author: ' | grep -c Monakhov 
169

Latest 50 posts

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2016-01-25 23:51:30 (8 comments; 8 reshares; 60 +1s)Open 

Yikes. Apparently Amazon is vulnerable to social engineering attacks Kevin Mitnick was using two decades ago. Sigh.

___Yikes. Apparently Amazon is vulnerable to social engineering attacks Kevin Mitnick was using two decades ago. Sigh.

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2016-01-09 17:11:03 (15 comments; 18 reshares; 86 +1s)Open 

I'd like to give a hat tip to +Corbin Champion​​ and his GNU Root Debian application. This marvelous piece of work uses a ptrace-based environment to allow you to run a Debian environment on an Android tablet without needing to root it. I'm running it on my Pixel C, and so far I've used apt-get to install emacs, git, ssh, mosh --- even Nethack --- and it all works. The X environment doesn't work too well using just the Pixel C keyboard and touchscreen for the mouse, but I suspect if I used a bluetooth mouse it would work just fine. I haven't tried installing gcc yet, but I suspect that if I had an arm32 to arm64 cross compilation toolchain, and enough internal flash storage, I could build AOSP on my Pixel C. Very slowly no doubt, but oh so very Meta. :-)

There are some rough spots. Unfortunately the alt key isn't getting mapped correctly in the terminal version, butgiv... more »

I'd like to give a hat tip to +Corbin Champion​​ and his GNU Root Debian application. This marvelous piece of work uses a ptrace-based environment to allow you to run a Debian environment on an Android tablet without needing to root it. I'm running it on my Pixel C, and so far I've used apt-get to install emacs, git, ssh, mosh --- even Nethack --- and it all works. The X environment doesn't work too well using just the Pixel C keyboard and touchscreen for the mouse, but I suspect if I used a bluetooth mouse it would work just fine. I haven't tried installing gcc yet, but I suspect that if I had an arm32 to arm64 cross compilation toolchain, and enough internal flash storage, I could build AOSP on my Pixel C. Very slowly no doubt, but oh so very Meta. :-)

There are some rough spots. Unfortunately the alt key isn't getting mapped correctly in the terminal version, but given that it is mapped when running in X (although unfortunately by default it's mapped to the Alt modifier as opposed to the more useful Meta modifier --- fixable using xmodmap) this appears to be something that should be able to fixed in the console mode by tweaking its terminal emulator.

EDIT: There is a preference mode which will allow the meta key to do the right thing.  Unfortunately it also intercepts the "..." key on the Pixel C character, which is used to provide access to various special characters such as the pipe character, as well as the square and curly brace characters.   TERMux gets this right, so hopefully a future version of GNURoot can follow TERMux's lead in this matter.

What I really like about this is I can now take notes using emacs from my tablet. Being able to use ssh and mosh without having to fight with some fancy GUI interface to set up keys, use host certificates, etc., is also awfully nice. And, of course, I can use apt-get to install anything that Debian has ported to the 32-bit armhf architecture.
___

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2016-01-05 16:01:59 (12 comments; 11 reshares; 69 +1s)Open 

This is what is wrong with law enforcement in America.

This is what is wrong with law enforcement in America.___

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2015-12-24 01:26:33 (25 comments; 1 reshares; 39 +1s)Open 

As a 2nd generation Chinese American, Rachel E. Gross speaks for me.   Bad Chinese food is not Cultural Appropriation.   Foods cooked in the fryolator (which includes "Boneless Spare Ribs" and "General Gao's Chicken" as served at most fast food joints) may be extremely unhealthy for you and may be gross.  It may say something about the revealed, expressed preferences of the mass market American palate and the choices made by entrepreneurial Chinese immigrants to adapt their cuisine in order to maximize their profit and so to be able send their kids to colleges like Oberlin.  But it's not cultural appropriation.   :-)

As a 2nd generation Chinese American, Rachel E. Gross speaks for me.   Bad Chinese food is not Cultural Appropriation.   Foods cooked in the fryolator (which includes "Boneless Spare Ribs" and "General Gao's Chicken" as served at most fast food joints) may be extremely unhealthy for you and may be gross.  It may say something about the revealed, expressed preferences of the mass market American palate and the choices made by entrepreneurial Chinese immigrants to adapt their cuisine in order to maximize their profit and so to be able send their kids to colleges like Oberlin.  But it's not cultural appropriation.   :-)___

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2015-11-18 16:51:33 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 14 +1s)Open 

(Let's try this again, this time with hopefully better network access and using the desktop client.)

Just outside St. George's Pilgrimage Guesthouse where we are staying in Jerusalem. 

(Let's try this again, this time with hopefully better network access and using the desktop client.)

Just outside St. George's Pilgrimage Guesthouse where we are staying in Jerusalem. ___

2015-11-18 04:11:40 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

Just outside St. George's Pilgrimage Guesthouse where we are staying in Jerusalem. 

Just outside St. George's Pilgrimage Guesthouse where we are staying in Jerusalem. ___

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2015-10-27 18:31:49 (4 comments; 12 reshares; 57 +1s)Open 

Apropos of +Kees Cook's presentation on "Improving Security"[1]  at the Kernel Summit, I thought this Onion article was hilarious.  (Or depressing if we focus on what it means about the work we have to do, but sometimes laughing is a better alternative than crying.  :-)

[1] https://outflux.net/slides/2015/ks/security.pdf

Apropos of +Kees Cook's presentation on "Improving Security"[1]  at the Kernel Summit, I thought this Onion article was hilarious.  (Or depressing if we focus on what it means about the work we have to do, but sometimes laughing is a better alternative than crying.  :-)

[1] https://outflux.net/slides/2015/ks/security.pdf___

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2015-09-17 10:42:52 (32 comments; 7 reshares; 67 +1s)Open 

Not only is Taylor Wilson not brown, and not Muslim, he doesn't go to both high school in Texas and his teachers aren't idiots. #IStandWithAhmed

Homeland Security and the Department of Energy got wind of what Taylor was up to and invited him to Washington so he could submit a grant proposal to develop the weapons detector.

But if you're 14 and build a clock while brown and Muslim you can expect to get arrested!
#IStandwithAhmed  ___Not only is Taylor Wilson not brown, and not Muslim, he doesn't go to both high school in Texas and his teachers aren't idiots. #IStandWithAhmed

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2015-09-08 00:57:04 (57 comments; 30 reshares; 131 +1s)Open 

Actually, I like using Mutt.  It's fast and supports real mail threading (unlike, say, GMail), and so it can deal with high volume mailing lists like LKML.  The fact that it's more secure is just a bonus.  (One way it's more secure --- I can much more quickly determine which e-mails are phishing attempts.)

Actually, I like using Mutt.  It's fast and supports real mail threading (unlike, say, GMail), and so it can deal with high volume mailing lists like LKML.  The fact that it's more secure is just a bonus.  (One way it's more secure --- I can much more quickly determine which e-mails are phishing attempts.)___

2015-09-06 00:38:02 (35 comments; 9 reshares; 57 +1s)Open 

Very interesting.   If systemd developers go too insane[1], I wonder how hard it would be to port these daemons from OpenBSD to say, Debian.  :-)

[1] In other news, they've recently reimplemented "su"

Very interesting.   If systemd developers go too insane[1], I wonder how hard it would be to port these daemons from OpenBSD to say, Debian.  :-)

[1] In other news, they've recently reimplemented "su"___

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2015-08-25 22:37:24 (24 comments; 31 reshares; 82 +1s)Open 

+AT&T: The same company that cooperated with the NSA is now playing man-in-the-middle and manipulating your http connections to inject advertisements.

+AT&T: The same company that cooperated with the NSA is now playing man-in-the-middle and manipulating your http connections to inject advertisements.___

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2015-08-16 01:05:02 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 26 +1s)Open 

I just wanted to give a shout out to +SendGrid.  Even though I'm very clearly outside their primary target market as far as paying customers are concerned, they quickly provisioned me with a free tier account which I was able to use with gce-xfstests so that someone can get e-mail notifications from a GCE VM running the file system regression tests.

Setting it up was relatively painless: https://git.kernel.org/cgit/fs/ext2/xfstests-bld.git/commit/?id=052e1564a5c2b17f23a2eae27be7c27be737e7c7

If you're using gce-xfstests, you will need to get your own sendgrid account (just ask to have a free tier account provisioned), and then configure GCE_SG_USER and GCE_SG_PASS in ~/.config/kvm-xfstests.

Thanks, +SendGrid!

I just wanted to give a shout out to +SendGrid.  Even though I'm very clearly outside their primary target market as far as paying customers are concerned, they quickly provisioned me with a free tier account which I was able to use with gce-xfstests so that someone can get e-mail notifications from a GCE VM running the file system regression tests.

Setting it up was relatively painless: https://git.kernel.org/cgit/fs/ext2/xfstests-bld.git/commit/?id=052e1564a5c2b17f23a2eae27be7c27be737e7c7

If you're using gce-xfstests, you will need to get your own sendgrid account (just ask to have a free tier account provisioned), and then configure GCE_SG_USER and GCE_SG_PASS in ~/.config/kvm-xfstests.

Thanks, +SendGrid!___

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2015-08-06 21:32:44 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

Dear lazy G+ --- has anyone managed to compile coreutils for aarch64-android (i..e, arm64 for Android's bionic libc)?    I'm aware of Sonelli's docker repo[1], but it only supports 32-bit arm, and it's not at all obvious how the patches in that repo work around the truly awe-inspiring abstraction violations committed by coreutils into the C library's stdio implementation (among other non-portable hacks perpetrated by the coreutils sources).

If you have, patches and instructions for how to set up the cross compilation environment (preferably using the Android NDK, but I'm not picky) would be gratefully appreciated.

[1] https://github.com/Sonelli/android-coreutils

EDIT: Wasn't as bad as I feared.   Using coreutils 8.24 fixed most of the problems, and the rest weren't that nasty to work around, mercifully.

Dear lazy G+ --- has anyone managed to compile coreutils for aarch64-android (i..e, arm64 for Android's bionic libc)?    I'm aware of Sonelli's docker repo[1], but it only supports 32-bit arm, and it's not at all obvious how the patches in that repo work around the truly awe-inspiring abstraction violations committed by coreutils into the C library's stdio implementation (among other non-portable hacks perpetrated by the coreutils sources).

If you have, patches and instructions for how to set up the cross compilation environment (preferably using the Android NDK, but I'm not picky) would be gratefully appreciated.

[1] https://github.com/Sonelli/android-coreutils

EDIT: Wasn't as bad as I feared.   Using coreutils 8.24 fixed most of the problems, and the rest weren't that nasty to work around, mercifully.___

2015-08-04 16:30:22 (14 comments; 5 reshares; 66 +1s)Open 

I have xfstests running under Google Compute Engine!   It uses kexec to launch the kernel to be tested, and using a n1-highcpu-4 machine with 100GB of SSD provisioned Persistent Disk, and given that I have 10 test configs with each test config taking 40 minutes to run the auto test group for a total of test runtime of around 7 hours, I estimate that it costs roughly $1.25 to do a complete regression test run for ext4.  (BTW, this used to take 24 hours to run on my laptop or desktop)

I have xfstests running under Google Compute Engine!   It uses kexec to launch the kernel to be tested, and using a n1-highcpu-4 machine with 100GB of SSD provisioned Persistent Disk, and given that I have 10 test configs with each test config taking 40 minutes to run the auto test group for a total of test runtime of around 7 hours, I estimate that it costs roughly $1.25 to do a complete regression test run for ext4.  (BTW, this used to take 24 hours to run on my laptop or desktop)___

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2015-07-15 23:04:46 (12 comments; 7 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

Very interesting... some vegatables (including organic veggies, so paying $$$ extra may not help; in fact, it might make it worse) may be using fertilizer which has a lot of heavy metals.    

Very interesting... some vegatables (including organic veggies, so paying $$$ extra may not help; in fact, it might make it worse) may be using fertilizer which has a lot of heavy metals.    ___

2015-07-02 22:42:39 (15 comments; 3 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

To people making commits to the Linux kernel.  It would save me a bunch of work (and for others are trying to gather statistics for things like "who writes the Linux kernel") if you use an editor macro to add the "Signed-off-by" and "Acked-by" lines.   This avoids noise like this:

1 Eric Dumaze <edumazet@google.com>
441 Eric Dumazet <edumazet@google.com>
1 Eric Dumazet  <edumazet@google.com>
1 Eric DUmazet <edumazet@google.com>
1 Eric Dumazet <edumzet@google.com>
1 Eric Dumazet <eric.dumazet@gmail.com>

I also see variation in the git Author and Committer fields, although admittedly less since this tends to be automated; however there are times when it's obvious that some developers don't have a .gitconfig file on all of their systems.

kthxbye

To people making commits to the Linux kernel.  It would save me a bunch of work (and for others are trying to gather statistics for things like "who writes the Linux kernel") if you use an editor macro to add the "Signed-off-by" and "Acked-by" lines.   This avoids noise like this:

1 Eric Dumaze <edumazet@google.com>
441 Eric Dumazet <edumazet@google.com>
1 Eric Dumazet  <edumazet@google.com>
1 Eric DUmazet <edumazet@google.com>
1 Eric Dumazet <edumzet@google.com>
1 Eric Dumazet <eric.dumazet@gmail.com>

I also see variation in the git Author and Committer fields, although admittedly less since this tends to be automated; however there are times when it's obvious that some developers don't have a .gitconfig file on all of their systems.

kthxbye___

2015-06-12 03:43:01 (28 comments; 2 reshares; 37 +1s)Open 

Trying to port features to the Qualcom msm kernel makes me very grumpy.   It would be awfully nice if Qualcomm engineers would (a) not break building the kernel under x86, and (b) use randconfig to make sure the kernel builds with something other than a very specific .config file.    Sigh....

Trying to port features to the Qualcom msm kernel makes me very grumpy.   It would be awfully nice if Qualcomm engineers would (a) not break building the kernel under x86, and (b) use randconfig to make sure the kernel builds with something other than a very specific .config file.    Sigh....___

2015-04-24 01:48:23 (11 comments; 1 reshares; 39 +1s)Open 

So it looks like Chrome beta finally has High DPI support for Linux.   Excellent!

(I'm currently running 43.0.2357.18 but I see 43.0.2357.37 has been downloaded and I should get that as soon as I restart my browser.)

So it looks like Chrome beta finally has High DPI support for Linux.   Excellent!

(I'm currently running 43.0.2357.18 but I see 43.0.2357.37 has been downloaded and I should get that as soon as I restart my browser.)___

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2015-03-26 00:11:16 (6 comments; 10 reshares; 59 +1s)Open 

If you are a voter in the US, please consider signing this.

If you aren't, don't be too smug. Pretty much all other countries have less controls on their spooks compared to the US; some countries might be less competent at implementing a panopticon, but GHCQ (for example) has admitted that they can put any British subject under surveillance if they feel like it, without needing to suspect that the person has committed a crime, and without asking a judge first. 

If you are a voter in the US, please consider signing this.

If you aren't, don't be too smug. Pretty much all other countries have less controls on their spooks compared to the US; some countries might be less competent at implementing a panopticon, but GHCQ (for example) has admitted that they can put any British subject under surveillance if they feel like it, without needing to suspect that the person has committed a crime, and without asking a judge first. ___

2015-03-17 22:08:34 (35 comments; 17 reshares; 76 +1s)Open 

Very, very, scary.   This once again proves that if you can run local code, you can probably break root one way or another.

+Jej B This is an example of a vulnerability for which if you use a hypervisor, you would be much safer than if you were merely using containers for your security isolation.

Very, very, scary.   This once again proves that if you can run local code, you can probably break root one way or another.

+Jej B This is an example of a vulnerability for which if you use a hypervisor, you would be much safer than if you were merely using containers for your security isolation.___

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2015-03-16 16:45:36 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

I like this live version better than the version on the "Dot the Dragon's Eyes" album!

I like this live version better than the version on the "Dot the Dragon's Eyes" album!___

2015-03-07 17:03:46 (8 comments; 3 reshares; 41 +1s)Open 

With apologies to John von Neumann, anyone who makes function prototypes change depending on a #define, like those who considers arithmetical methods of producing random digits, is in a state of sin.

With apologies to John von Neumann, anyone who makes function prototypes change depending on a #define, like those who considers arithmetical methods of producing random digits, is in a state of sin.___

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2015-03-07 14:42:04 (12 comments; 3 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

No matter how rational this sounds, I'm sure the crazies on the right (in the US and in Israel) will say that The Haaretz is filled with self-hating Jews.....

No matter how rational this sounds, I'm sure the crazies on the right (in the US and in Israel) will say that The Haaretz is filled with self-hating Jews.....___

2015-03-05 13:13:24 (30 comments; 3 reshares; 88 +1s)Open 

Friends don't let friends use libtool. 

Friends don't let friends use libtool. ___

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2015-03-04 03:25:59 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

It's really neat to come across a sermon that uses a Science Fiction novel as a hook --- especially when said science fiction story is a send up of the Star Trek convention of Red Shirts.

It's really neat to come across a sermon that uses a Science Fiction novel as a hook --- especially when said science fiction story is a send up of the Star Trek convention of Red Shirts.___

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2015-02-28 00:39:21 (21 comments; 9 reshares; 67 +1s)Open 

This is so cool!  (Hmm, maybe a poor choice of words)  Due to the permafrost melting due to higher temperatures, pockets of methane that had been previously contained within snow and ice are bursting forth leaving a gigantic crater behind.  In some cases, the methane gas has even ignited.

And as I recall Methane is a rather potent greenhouse gas.   <sarcasm>But, as some will point out, this isn't a direct result of human activity, so we don't need to do anything about it.</sarcasm>

This is so cool!  (Hmm, maybe a poor choice of words)  Due to the permafrost melting due to higher temperatures, pockets of methane that had been previously contained within snow and ice are bursting forth leaving a gigantic crater behind.  In some cases, the methane gas has even ignited.

And as I recall Methane is a rather potent greenhouse gas.   <sarcasm>But, as some will point out, this isn't a direct result of human activity, so we don't need to do anything about it.</sarcasm>___

2015-02-09 20:10:33 (29 comments; 1 reshares; 30 +1s)Open 

I tried building util-linux 2.17.2 using a modern autotools; autopoint called m4 in a way that caused it loop infinitely.   I tried bypassing it, calling aclocal manually, and it blew up.   And this is why I refuse to use anything other than autoconf, with the macros that come with it, and why I check in a generated configure script into git. 

I tried building util-linux 2.17.2 using a modern autotools; autopoint called m4 in a way that caused it loop infinitely.   I tried bypassing it, calling aclocal manually, and it blew up.   And this is why I refuse to use anything other than autoconf, with the macros that come with it, and why I check in a generated configure script into git. ___

2015-02-08 23:47:19 (13 comments; 10 reshares; 61 +1s)Open 

Fortunately, Google interviews are nothing like this.

However, we might ask you demonstrate your facility with using a hammer (writing code on a whiteboard) and if you've been spoiled by using a nail gun (some fancy IDE), you might find yourself surprised.

We might also ask you to do the programming equivalent of being able to do a Dovetail joint using hand tools, even if in practice of the time you will be using joist hangers.

Which might seem like a waste of time, but after I've seen what happens to a system like say, Lotus Notes, when you say something like "cache line miss" to a Java programmer and they look at you with this "deer-in-headlights" look, I actually think it's a good idea.

"Well, our architects have all started using rocks, and they like it."___Fortunately, Google interviews are nothing like this.

However, we might ask you demonstrate your facility with using a hammer (writing code on a whiteboard) and if you've been spoiled by using a nail gun (some fancy IDE), you might find yourself surprised.

We might also ask you to do the programming equivalent of being able to do a Dovetail joint using hand tools, even if in practice of the time you will be using joist hangers.

Which might seem like a waste of time, but after I've seen what happens to a system like say, Lotus Notes, when you say something like "cache line miss" to a Java programmer and they look at you with this "deer-in-headlights" look, I actually think it's a good idea.

2014-12-24 02:58:23 (23 comments; 22 reshares; 69 +1s)Open 

+Marriott  is trying to get the FCC to say that it's OK for hotels (and them, specifically) to block Wifi signals from their customers hotspots, so they can rip them off with their $$$ pricey crappy wifi service.

If this bothers you, feel free to comment here: http://apps.fcc.gov/ecfs/proceeding/view?name=RM-11737

+Marriott  is trying to get the FCC to say that it's OK for hotels (and them, specifically) to block Wifi signals from their customers hotspots, so they can rip them off with their $$$ pricey crappy wifi service.

If this bothers you, feel free to comment here: http://apps.fcc.gov/ecfs/proceeding/view?name=RM-11737___

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2014-12-16 21:13:45 (30 comments; 34 reshares; 122 +1s)Open 

"Yes, I know that Microsoft likes to have everything glued together like a kindergarten art project gone berserk, but this is ridiculous. Having been a Unix guy for decades, I’m accustomed to a philosophy of using simple programs and then building applications up from them. What Microsoft was requiring — get the patch, uninstall Office, install the hotfix, and then reinstall Office — makes my skin crawl. To me, it’s just unacceptable, even in beta."

Fortunately, in Linux we would never try to glue together lots of low-level system components into a kindergarten art project gone berserk, right?

"Yes, I know that Microsoft likes to have everything glued together like a kindergarten art project gone berserk, but this is ridiculous. Having been a Unix guy for decades, I’m accustomed to a philosophy of using simple programs and then building applications up from them. What Microsoft was requiring — get the patch, uninstall Office, install the hotfix, and then reinstall Office — makes my skin crawl. To me, it’s just unacceptable, even in beta."

Fortunately, in Linux we would never try to glue together lots of low-level system components into a kindergarten art project gone berserk, right?___

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2014-12-11 14:15:54 (36 comments; 6 reshares; 61 +1s)Open 

From a defender of the CIA:

"In the end, this doesn’t come down to a question of human rights because the enemies we are dealing with don’t deserve the label of “human” to many of us. "

Sigh....

From a defender of the CIA:

"In the end, this doesn’t come down to a question of human rights because the enemies we are dealing with don’t deserve the label of “human” to many of us. "

Sigh....___

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2014-11-13 19:20:24 (3 comments; 8 reshares; 39 +1s)Open 

In other news, the FBI is asking the US to trust them and give them more guaranteed access to spy on Americans.

In other news, the FBI is asking the US to trust them and give them more guaranteed access to spy on Americans.___

posted image

2014-11-12 23:37:53 (98 comments; 44 reshares; 175 +1s)Open 

I'm using systemd on my laptop (largely because I figure in the long run I have no choice).   And as the meme below states, I don't actually hate systemd.   What I strongly dislike is when other compoents start using systemd-specific API's such that you can no longer use alternate implementations of various systemd replacements of other low-level components (i.e., ntpd, the resolver, etc., etc.)

I know that +Tom Gundersen very much hates the comparison, but it's much like web sites who start using Microsoft ActiveX controls in their web sites, thus enabling Microsoft's, "Embrace, Extend, Extinguish" statrategy.   It's not that Internet Explorer was evil; it was that it was part and parcel of an Embrace and Extended strategy which was evil.   So if a distribution wants to use systemd, that's fine.   As I said, I'm using it on my laptop.... more »

I'm using systemd on my laptop (largely because I figure in the long run I have no choice).   And as the meme below states, I don't actually hate systemd.   What I strongly dislike is when other compoents start using systemd-specific API's such that you can no longer use alternate implementations of various systemd replacements of other low-level components (i.e., ntpd, the resolver, etc., etc.)

I know that +Tom Gundersen very much hates the comparison, but it's much like web sites who start using Microsoft ActiveX controls in their web sites, thus enabling Microsoft's, "Embrace, Extend, Extinguish" statrategy.   It's not that Internet Explorer was evil; it was that it was part and parcel of an Embrace and Extended strategy which was evil.   So if a distribution wants to use systemd, that's fine.   As I said, I'm using it on my laptop.

But in the name of all that's holy, please, if you are a developer wondering if you should use some systemd-exclusive API or facility, please make it optional at run-time.   If it turns out that there is a horrible security bug in a systemd component or if it only supports a certain desktop use case and is terrible at some other use case, it should be possible to replace it with an equivalent component.   That can only happen if you don't buy in to systemd's lock-in strategy.___

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2014-11-12 16:09:57 (71 comments; 12 reshares; 66 +1s)Open 

Systemd tries to subsume another low level system component.   News at 11.

Systemd tries to subsume another low level system component.   News at 11.___

2014-11-03 21:23:23 (20 comments; 2 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

Dear Lazy G+:  Is anyone aware of a commercial VPN used to provide anonymity / privacy (i.e., uses shared outbound IP addresses, and keeps no logs, etc.) ala privateinternetaccess.com but which does so for both IPv4 and IPv6?    Right now it appears most of the VPN services are IPv4 only, and in fact if you are using a VPN for security and/or privacy, you need to make sure IPv6 is disabled on your host so that you don't have some of your outbound TCP connections bypassing the VPN and going out via the unsecured public coffeehouse network (if it happens to IPv6 enabled).

Of course, at the moment as near as I can tell IPv6 is providing me with no benefit whatsoever, so I don't mind just disabling IPv6 on my laptop, but eventually there will be some hosts that are available on IPv6 only --- and of course I do feel some obligation to support IPv6 if I can.   Any suggestions?

Dear Lazy G+:  Is anyone aware of a commercial VPN used to provide anonymity / privacy (i.e., uses shared outbound IP addresses, and keeps no logs, etc.) ala privateinternetaccess.com but which does so for both IPv4 and IPv6?    Right now it appears most of the VPN services are IPv4 only, and in fact if you are using a VPN for security and/or privacy, you need to make sure IPv6 is disabled on your host so that you don't have some of your outbound TCP connections bypassing the VPN and going out via the unsecured public coffeehouse network (if it happens to IPv6 enabled).

Of course, at the moment as near as I can tell IPv6 is providing me with no benefit whatsoever, so I don't mind just disabling IPv6 on my laptop, but eventually there will be some hosts that are available on IPv6 only --- and of course I do feel some obligation to support IPv6 if I can.   Any suggestions?___

2014-10-21 20:44:49 (22 comments; 31 reshares; 65 +1s)Open 

This is very scary; although the paper talks about this as a Windows 8 / UEFI vulnerability, it looks like it's applicable to any OS running on a vulnerable UEFI bios.

Have you updated your BIOS lately?

This is very scary; although the paper talks about this as a Windows 8 / UEFI vulnerability, it looks like it's applicable to any OS running on a vulnerable UEFI bios.

Have you updated your BIOS lately?___

2014-10-18 01:25:45 (75 comments; 5 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

After listening to +Karen Sandler's talk at LinuxCon EU about how GNOME has an unfair reputation, I thought I would take a closer look at GNOME 3.14.   Looking at some initial research, it looks like the extensions that provide (or might provide; it's hard to tell because they aren't documented all that well) a static set of workspaces which are laid out in a two-dimensional grid haven't yet been ported to GNOME 3.14, and one of them had an advertisement explicitly stating that it was very likely it would break with every new GNOME release.

Dear Lazy G+, does anyone know if you can make 2-D static workspaces work with GNOME 3.14?   And if so, what magic secret registry settings I might need to make something that works mostly like XFCE?   (i.e., I want control over whether closing the lid suspends the laptop or not, etc., configurable panes on the left and right hand sideswh... more »

After listening to +Karen Sandler's talk at LinuxCon EU about how GNOME has an unfair reputation, I thought I would take a closer look at GNOME 3.14.   Looking at some initial research, it looks like the extensions that provide (or might provide; it's hard to tell because they aren't documented all that well) a static set of workspaces which are laid out in a two-dimensional grid haven't yet been ported to GNOME 3.14, and one of them had an advertisement explicitly stating that it was very likely it would break with every new GNOME release.

Dear Lazy G+, does anyone know if you can make 2-D static workspaces work with GNOME 3.14?   And if so, what magic secret registry settings I might need to make something that works mostly like XFCE?   (i.e., I want control over whether closing the lid suspends the laptop or not, etc., configurable panes on the left and right hand sides where I can control which launchers go where on the panels, the ability to configure keyboard shortcuts for moving between workspaces, moving windows between workstations via up, down, left, right arrows, etc., keyboard shortcuts for locking the screen, manually suspending the laptop, etc.)

If the answer is that GNOME doesn't let me do any of these things, or in a way that isn't guaranteed to not to randomly break from GNOME version to GNOME version, that's fine.   But I'll keep repeating the meme that GNOME is power user hostile --- or at least, hostile to this power user.  :-)___

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2014-10-09 01:37:14 (4 comments; 4 reshares; 39 +1s)Open 

And this is why +Comcastcares doesn't.

Oh boy.

And here's Comcast's quick apology now that the shit hit the fan: http://corporate.comcast.com/comcast-voices/a-public-apology-to-conal-orourke.

What a rotten company, too big to operate in a way that takes good care of customers.___And this is why +Comcastcares doesn't.

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2014-10-06 02:36:01 (31 comments; 12 reshares; 96 +1s)Open 

And this is why we can't trust the legacy newspapers to get anything right.   To paraphrase the +Washington Post: "Backdoors are evil.  But we need a compromise.  What if Apple and Google were to put in a Backdoor?"  #NewspaperEditorsAreIdiots

And this is why we can't trust the legacy newspapers to get anything right.   To paraphrase the +Washington Post: "Backdoors are evil.  But we need a compromise.  What if Apple and Google were to put in a Backdoor?"  #NewspaperEditorsAreIdiots___

2014-09-24 14:11:08 (23 comments; 2 reshares; 68 +1s)Open 

The authors of "How Google Works" have given electronic versions of "How Google Works" to all Google employees.   Since I had already purchased a copy via pre-order, to make life interesting, I've decided to give my Google Play coupon code to someone via an electronic lottery.

EDIT: It's been called to my attention that using the +1 button violates one of Google's G+ policies.   Oops.   So I'm going to use an e-mail based system instead.  For more details, please see:

http://thunk.org/tytso/blog/2014/09/24/google-book-giveaway/

Apologies for the horrible page design.   My blog got restored from backups after my server hard disk crashed, and I've never gotten around to fixing up the Wordpress theme, since I've been using G+ mostly.

The authors of "How Google Works" have given electronic versions of "How Google Works" to all Google employees.   Since I had already purchased a copy via pre-order, to make life interesting, I've decided to give my Google Play coupon code to someone via an electronic lottery.

EDIT: It's been called to my attention that using the +1 button violates one of Google's G+ policies.   Oops.   So I'm going to use an e-mail based system instead.  For more details, please see:

http://thunk.org/tytso/blog/2014/09/24/google-book-giveaway/

Apologies for the horrible page design.   My blog got restored from backups after my server hard disk crashed, and I've never gotten around to fixing up the Wordpress theme, since I've been using G+ mostly.___

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2014-09-23 21:06:36 (22 comments; 7 reshares; 44 +1s)Open 

It's important to have compassion for those who are living in poverty.

Dang.___It's important to have compassion for those who are living in poverty.

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2014-09-10 12:23:43 (9 comments; 43 reshares; 150 +1s)Open 

This was so very funny, even if it had a few low blows....  

"The Apple Watch stands for 'A Pleasantly Plump Little Electronic Watch  Android's Terrible Come Here'."

"Now a lot of people think the Apple Watch requires an iPhone.... and they're right.   If you iPhone 4S or lower, it won't work.   If you have an Android phone, get the f*ck out.  If you have a Windows Phone.... <snicker> just kidding."

"It's the new Apple iWatch... Apple Watch.  You didn't really ask for it, so here you go."

This was so very funny, even if it had a few low blows....  

"The Apple Watch stands for 'A Pleasantly Plump Little Electronic Watch  Android's Terrible Come Here'."

"Now a lot of people think the Apple Watch requires an iPhone.... and they're right.   If you iPhone 4S or lower, it won't work.   If you have an Android phone, get the f*ck out.  If you have a Windows Phone.... <snicker> just kidding."

"It's the new Apple iWatch... Apple Watch.  You didn't really ask for it, so here you go."___

2014-09-08 04:15:25 (24 comments; 2 reshares; 61 +1s)Open 

People sometimes ask me what I do as the ext4 file system maintainer.   It's actually not that glamorous.  Mainly, I review patches; do a lot of code cleanup to keep the code maintainable, and I develop tools so that other ext4 developers can test their work --- which hopefully improves the quality of their code submissions, which saves me time and hopefully makes ext4 users happier.

People sometimes ask me what I do as the ext4 file system maintainer.   It's actually not that glamorous.  Mainly, I review patches; do a lot of code cleanup to keep the code maintainable, and I develop tools so that other ext4 developers can test their work --- which hopefully improves the quality of their code submissions, which saves me time and hopefully makes ext4 users happier.___

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2014-09-02 01:08:42 (9 comments; 25 reshares; 83 +1s)Open 

This is worth watching.  It's a fair comparison of advantages and disadvantages of Linux and Solaris from the perspective of a performance engineer.

Brenden Gregg gives suggestions on how Linux and Solaris can improve, and Joyent is working improving their fork of OpenSolaris (which they call SmartOS).

The audio gets better after the first 2 or 3 minutes.

Video: What Linux Can Learn from Solaris Performance, and Vice-Versa___This is worth watching.  It's a fair comparison of advantages and disadvantages of Linux and Solaris from the perspective of a performance engineer.

Brenden Gregg gives suggestions on how Linux and Solaris can improve, and Joyent is working improving their fork of OpenSolaris (which they call SmartOS).

The audio gets better after the first 2 or 3 minutes.

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2014-08-31 00:55:45 (71 comments; 55 reshares; 187 +1s)Open 

By way of +Frédéric Weisbecker:

"Linux Kernel developer +Dmitry Monakhov (ext4, filesystems...) has been arrested in Moscow and put in jail for 15 days while protesting against the war in Ukraine despite him using no violence nor even leaflet. He was only talking out loud to people in the street...

See these article in Russian (google translate gives the main point):

http://grani.ru/Society/Law/m.232445.html
http://ph.livejournal.com/54547.html
"

+Dmitriy Monakhov is someone I've worked with for quite a while.  I hope and pray that he stays safe.

Вчера Диме +Dmitriy Monakhov дали 15 суток за одиночный пикет против войны с Украиной. В прошлый раз дело закончилось больницей (см. статью).

Как я уже раньше писал, Дима мой коллега, выпускник Физтеха, спортсмен-лыжник и толковый программист -- разработчик ядра Linux. Вот статистика его коммитов в ядро:

[kir@kir-tpad linux]$ git log --pretty=short | grep '^Author: ' | grep -c Monakhov 
169___By way of +Frédéric Weisbecker:

"Linux Kernel developer +Dmitry Monakhov (ext4, filesystems...) has been arrested in Moscow and put in jail for 15 days while protesting against the war in Ukraine despite him using no violence nor even leaflet. He was only talking out loud to people in the street...

See these article in Russian (google translate gives the main point):

http://grani.ru/Society/Law/m.232445.html
http://ph.livejournal.com/54547.html
"

+Dmitriy Monakhov is someone I've worked with for quite a while.  I hope and pray that he stays safe.

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2014-08-28 18:30:00 (12 comments; 10 reshares; 59 +1s)Open 

Although it's a little bit farther from my home, I think I'm going to make a point of shopping more at Market Basket.   I think it's worth making the statement that it's possible to have a company that pays its workers a living wage, while still having better prices than WalMart, by having loyal employees that deliver better customer service.  Such companies deserve to be supported by my business.  Hopefully more companies will be encouraged this strategy, instead of trying to engage in a "race to the bottom" mentality that is all to common that gets pushed by MBA's employed by Private Equity firms.

Although it's a little bit farther from my home, I think I'm going to make a point of shopping more at Market Basket.   I think it's worth making the statement that it's possible to have a company that pays its workers a living wage, while still having better prices than WalMart, by having loyal employees that deliver better customer service.  Such companies deserve to be supported by my business.  Hopefully more companies will be encouraged this strategy, instead of trying to engage in a "race to the bottom" mentality that is all to common that gets pushed by MBA's employed by Private Equity firms.___

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2014-08-23 12:03:11 (1 comments; 7 reshares; 32 +1s)Open 

Via +Paul Fisher -- worth reading.

“Reconstruction was the second phase of the Civil War. It lasted until 1877, when the Confederates won.”___Via +Paul Fisher -- worth reading.

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2014-08-22 23:27:18 (12 comments; 2 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Sigh, caff is broken with gpg2 -- which I need to use because my signing key is a 4096 bit RSA key stored on a smartcard, which isn't supported by gpg 1.4.18.

Fortunately, I found a workaround.   Run caff with the .caffrc configured to use gpg2; this will fetch the keys and sign them using gpg2 --- and then caff blows up with the error message:

 gpg: Fatal: can't open `/tmp/caff-87B06E946C0596000E8B90D5DBFB07BF052B3F1B-iFIir/trustdb.gpg': No such file or directory
Not all keys in '$CONFIG{'keyid'}' could be imported from caff's GnuPGHOME (with 'export-minimal').

If you then edit your .caffrc to use gpg instead of gpg2, since the keys are already signed, then caff will use gpg to encrypt so only their owners can decrypt the e-mail and then email the keys (thus requiring the owners to prove they control the e-mail named in thek... more »

Sigh, caff is broken with gpg2 -- which I need to use because my signing key is a 4096 bit RSA key stored on a smartcard, which isn't supported by gpg 1.4.18.

Fortunately, I found a workaround.   Run caff with the .caffrc configured to use gpg2; this will fetch the keys and sign them using gpg2 --- and then caff blows up with the error message:

 gpg: Fatal: can't open `/tmp/caff-87B06E946C0596000E8B90D5DBFB07BF052B3F1B-iFIir/trustdb.gpg': No such file or directory
Not all keys in '$CONFIG{'keyid'}' could be imported from caff's GnuPGHOME (with 'export-minimal').

If you then edit your .caffrc to use gpg instead of gpg2, since the keys are already signed, then caff will use gpg to encrypt so only their owners can decrypt the e-mail and then email the keys (thus requiring the owners to prove they control the e-mail named in the key).___

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2014-08-12 14:03:30 (19 comments; 8 reshares; 24 +1s)Open 

A few years ago, there was a huge fuss inside Google when a decision was made, on environmental grounds (and I suspect to be frugal with our shareholders' money), to replace bottled water with machines that could dispense filtered hot, cold, room temperature, and sparkling water[1].  Apparently a large number of people really loved their bottled water, and felt deprived as a result.  (BTW, this was derided by many inside Google as a "zeroth world problem".  Not all, and probably not even most, people really feel that entitled.)

[1] http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2009/07/11/sun-valley-cost-cutting-at-google/

But since most of this fuss happened in Mountain View, and Mountain View is inside California, bottled water is apparently not that bad in MTV!   :-P    In the rest of the country, however...

A few years ago, there was a huge fuss inside Google when a decision was made, on environmental grounds (and I suspect to be frugal with our shareholders' money), to replace bottled water with machines that could dispense filtered hot, cold, room temperature, and sparkling water[1].  Apparently a large number of people really loved their bottled water, and felt deprived as a result.  (BTW, this was derided by many inside Google as a "zeroth world problem".  Not all, and probably not even most, people really feel that entitled.)

[1] http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2009/07/11/sun-valley-cost-cutting-at-google/

But since most of this fuss happened in Mountain View, and Mountain View is inside California, bottled water is apparently not that bad in MTV!   :-P    In the rest of the country, however...___

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2014-08-09 23:28:16 (14 comments; 126 reshares; 185 +1s)Open 

If you don't have time to watch this keynote by Dan Geer, and you are at all interested in Cybersecurity, make time.   Alternatively, the text of his speech is here:  http://geer.tinho.net/geer.blackhat.6viii14.txt.   In some ways it's actually better to read the text, since a good part of the conclusion was cut due to time pressure.

If you don't have time to watch this keynote by Dan Geer, and you are at all interested in Cybersecurity, make time.   Alternatively, the text of his speech is here:  http://geer.tinho.net/geer.blackhat.6viii14.txt.   In some ways it's actually better to read the text, since a good part of the conclusion was cut due to time pressure.___

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