Login now

Not your profile? Login and get free access to your reports and analysis.

Tags

Sign in

No tag added here yet.
You can login on CircleCount to add some tags here.

Are you missing a tag in the list of available tags? You can suggest new tags here.

Login now

Do you want to see a more detailed chart? Check your settings and define your favorite chart type.

Or click here to get the detailed chart only once.

Trey Harris has been shared in 62 public circles

You can see here the 50 latest shared circles.
If this is your profile, you can check your dashboard to see all shared circles you have been included.

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Frank Gainsford39,299A share of this circle within the public space will be appreciated as these are truly a great flock of influential and helpful folk, and the more places their profiles are found, the better the GOOGLESPHERE will become.A circle of people who are known and trusted for their advice and help in getting things done here in the Google sphere.If you are stuck and need some advice this is the team that can help you solve your problem.  These folk are all friendly, and active within the PLUSOSPHEREAdd this circle to your profile for a bunch of friendly and helpful advice on ALL THINGS GOOGLE with a very clear and distinct flavor of Google plus as the best social media platform to use for either social or business.PS you will not be added to this circle unless I have made personal use of a tip or advice that you have offered within your personal or business profile.  this is not a free for all circle, but a curated circle of those who have helped me, either knowingly or unknowingly with their  public posts being the source of the help I used.2014-08-27 11:11:30252224
Becky Collins13,434Mobile Operator Circle:Circle of very #social #engagerspeople and companiesTo be included in my shares (#sharedcircle), be so kind to:1 - Do +1 t the post2 - Comment the post and specify your "category" (job or interest) Ex: Fashion, SEO, Companies, Social Media Marketing, Sailing, Photography, Bloggers/Writers, Web graphics and design, Italy, Artists, Sport, Finance/Economy ...3 - include the circle among your circles4 - share the circle (include yourself)Improve your popularity, be social be cool !Keep yourself updated, enjoy the Shared Circles Hellenic Alliance, you can share your shared circles inside the upcoming Community:https://plus.google.com/communities/112552559573595396104  #socialmedia  #media  #circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing  #circlecircle   #beckyscircle   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles  #sharedcircleoftheday  +Becky Collins ?2014-07-24 05:16:124763112
Becky Collins10,282Mobile Circle :Circle of very #social #engagerspeople and companiesTo be included in my shares (#sharedcircle), be so kind to:1 - Do +1 t the post2 - Comment the post and specify your "category" (job or interest) Ex: Fashion, SEO, Companies, Social Media Marketing, Sailing, Photography, Bloggers/Writers, Web graphics and design, Italy, Artists, Sport, Finance/Economy ...3 - include the circle among your circles4 - share the circle (include yourself)Improve your popularity, be social be cool !Keep yourself updated, enjoy the Shared Circles Hellenic Alliance, you can share your shared circles inside the upcoming Community:https://plus.google.com/communities/112552559573595396104  #socialmedia   #media   #circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlecircle   #beckyscircle   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday  +Becky Collins ?2014-05-28 05:03:174777219
andi steven320please add me my profile in your circle,Reshare if you like! Please plus to tell me you have seen it! *There is no need to thank me, this is me thanking you! *1. Plus The Post2. Comment3. Add People To Circles4. Share The Circle!#circlesharing #circleshare #circles #circle #googleplustips #googleplus #indonesia #artists #artist #artistphotographeramateurorprofessional2014-05-09 04:02:2150111514
Gustavo Franco1,547I've started an experiment with my Google+ account disabling this circle (Googlers and Xooglers) from showing up on my home stream. I'll see how it will look like without my coworkers and former coworkers.In case you are wondering how to adjust and even disable the posts from a circle showing up in your home stream, read:https://support.google.com/plus/answer/1269165?hl=enI've moved the circle to be the 1st on my bar though so I still can easily peak at what folks are saying.  In case you are wondering how to do that, read:https://plus.google.com/113895942978964425455/posts/igWgAhX22qM2014-02-15 23:38:47324301
Ian Archibald16,093Circle of Google PlussersSo, I often get asked Who should I circle?  I say whomever strikes your interest. Find topics of interest and connect with those people who share that interest.I would very much like to share with you "my" circle of Plussers of whom I LOVE to engage with.  There are people in science, sports, networking, technology, comics, art and medicine found inside, and likely some others as well.  I've been spending the last couple years curating this list.I hope that you will connect with some of these folks!Have a great weekend everyone!2014-02-15 01:16:53326182225
Ian Archibald14,517Google PlussersThis would be my circle of other awesome people who I have connected with over the past couple years here on Google+. Some awesome people here!As the cool kids say, These kids are dopeI don't take requests to add to this circle. To be added, engage with me, and the others here. You'll be noticed, trust me.2014-01-27 23:35:29320221629
Justin Hart6,912Justin's Circle Share....quick circle I put together of people that engage and provide content to keep your circles humming! 1. Plus The Post 2. Comment3. Add People To Circles4. Share The Circle!#sharedcircle   #topsharedcircle #circleoftheday #sharedcircle #trustinme   #circlesharing   #circleshare  #circles         #circleoftheday #sharedpubliccircles  #sharedcircles  #share   #vipsnowballcircle #sharedcircleoftheday  #sharewithyou               #followme  #followers #followback #circle #googleplus #coolpeople  #circleshare #sharedcircles #sharedcircle  #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles  #circleshare #circlesharing #fullcircleshare2013-12-17 03:07:5650011923
Ben Douglas0WE LOVE TECHNOLOGY! #circleshare   #sharedcircles   #technologytrends  2013-12-16 15:10:48500101
David Leonhardt2,546I built on the Sunday Circle by +Ian Archibald to spread it even further.Recommended:1. Plus the circle.2. Leave a comment3. Save the circle as one of your own circles (Click on "Add people" to do this).4. Share the circle as I am doing now (but don't forget to "Include yourself" when sharing).5. Get offline for a while, too.  :-).#circles   #circleshare   #sharedcircle   #circlesharing#followers #social #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles  #circleshared    #sharedcircleoftheday #addmetoyourcircles   #awesomepeople   #circlecount  #newfollowers   #googleplus  2013-12-16 01:30:4323211213
Ian Archibald9,118Sunday Circle Share of Google PlussersThis is my top circle filled with some of the top Google Plussers, Engagers, and Educators.  You will also find some people you likely don't know, but should.You all know people like +Mike Allton +Michael Q Todd +Christine DeGraff and +Billy Funk who bring the awesome every day. But do you know +Rusty Ferguson +Milan Pavlovic +Steven Krohn +David Oldenburg or +Brandee Sweesy ?  All of whom are simply awesome people who have a lot of great content, and engage!.Add this circle to your own today.  If you have other Engagers, add them to the circle, share it out and tag me in your share. Always looking for more engagers!I would be honoured if you would +1, Comment and Share this circle.Hope you all have a fantastic week!!2013-12-15 14:08:26229221330
Ramón Sansone López436Awsome #sharedcircle #bestengagersComment, Do +1 and share it, you'll belong to one of my best #sharedcircles 2013-09-05 06:26:23501003
Don Dobbie3,342#sharedcircles  2013-05-29 19:26:154863212
AyJay Schibig16,440ECLECTIC CIRCLEFeel free to add  and re-share. this  Eclectic Circle of  G Plussers! Circles I am curating:21ST CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHERS (1&2), ALL KINDS, DISCOVERY, FULL CIRCLE,SOCIAL, ECLECTIC,ENGAGERS, AWESOME, NEW HORIZONS and BOOST#circleoftheday   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlesharingforthepeopleplc   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharedcircleday   #publiccirclesproject   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles  #sharedpublicircles   #circle   #circles   #circlemeup  #awesomepeople   #awesomecircle   #circleme   #sharedpoint   #sharewithyou     #ShareYourCircle2013-04-13 06:43:023024213
Justin Fournier534Tech Engage CircleHello Everyone just following the footsteps of +martin shervington  and attempting to circle share fully engaged circles with you.  Below I'm sharing a circle of definite Technology posters. If your new to this platform and needed a circle for sure fire tech news and help.  *Be sure to add and re-share this circle.*  Later Guys!2013-03-10 16:15:55296516
AyJay Schibig15,217ECLECTIC CIRCLEFeel free to add  and re-share. this  Eclectic Circle of  G Plussers! Circles I am curating:21ST CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHERS (1&2), ALL KINDS, DISCOVERY, FULL CIRCLE,SOCIAL, ECLECTIC,ENGAGERS, AWESOME, NEW HORIZONS and BOOST#circleoftheday   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlesharingforthepeopleplc   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharedcircleday   #publiccirclesproject   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles  #sharedpublicircles   #circle   #circles   #circlemeup  #awesomepeople   #awesomecircle   #circleme   #sharedpoint   #sharewithyou     #ShareYourCircle2013-03-02 11:23:44245206
AyJay Schibig13,588ECLECTIC CIRCLEFeel free to add  and re-share. this  Eclectic Circle of  G Plussers! #circleoftheday   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlesharingforthepeopleplc   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharedcircleday   #publiccirclesproject   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles  #sharedpublicircles   #circle   #circles   #circlemeup  #awesomepeople   #awesomecircle   #circleme   #sharedpoint   #sharewithyou 2013-01-10 07:15:50257003
AyJay Schibig12,717ECLECTIC CIRCLEFeel free to add  and re-share. this  Eclectic Circle of  G Plussers! #circleoftheday   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlesharingforthepeopleplc   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharedcircleday   #publiccirclesproject   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles  #sharedpublicircles   #circle   #circles   #circlemeup  #awesomepeople   #awesomecircle   #circleme   #sharedpoint   #sharewithyou 2012-12-21 06:26:433277010
AyJay Schibig12,080ECLECTIC CIRCLEFeel free to add  and re-share. this  Eclectic Circle of  G Plussers! #circleoftheday   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlesharingforthepeopleplc   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday   #sharedcircleday   #publiccirclesproject   #publiccircles   #publicsharedcircles  #sharedpublicircles   #circle   #circles   #circlemeup  #awesomepeople   #awesomecircle   #circleme   #sharedpoint   #sharewithyou 2012-12-12 04:23:1442210216
Ivonne García423This is my Geeks CirclePeople who share great content that only matters to us, technology geeks and people interested in the latest advances. :D Enjoy! #sharedcircle   #circles   #tech   #technology   #geeks   #geekcircle   #sharedcircleoftheday  2012-12-01 17:28:23332314
Cynthia Yildirim23,029New Google+ users might not have this circle yet of Google Employees on G+, I'm  not an employee, but going to include myself in the circle anyway. :D  #sharedcircles   #Google  2012-11-09 01:27:54213201
George Station1,600With the addition of +Google Cultural Institute as Number 100 this seems an excellent time for a fresh share of my Googlish Folks Circle.(Ah, round numbers in base 10! Thank you, Dogbert.)I note for the record:  Many others also enhance and improve my Google+ experience in specific interest areas such as "teaching & learning" or "social media and education." And I enjoy several very cool Circles that other fine G+ers have shared.But when I wonder "What Would G+ Do?" (which I'll bet does not quite align with what Google Proper would do)... I generally check the undamped, unfettered Stream of this Circle.2012-10-07 00:21:32100404
Tim Moore23,874My Go To Circle when I'm using +Google+ from my mobile --- which is a lot!IF you use +Google+ from your mobile device and want GREAT CONTENT, then this is a money circle for you.  All the guys and gals in here are fantastic and post very shareable items.Created for the circle when you want to reliably find and share great content quickly from your mobile!>>> Help your friends who may be new here to +Google+ - share this circle with them.  They will love you forever......... or at least until payday. :) #greatcontent   #sharing  +Shared Circles on G+ +Public Circles +CircleCount +Nothing but Circles  #sharedcircles   #circlesharing   #circleoftheday  +Shared a circle with you +Full Circle  #mobile  2012-10-02 19:10:48484723561
Tim Moore23,086My Shared Circle of the weekGooglers who are just #awesome . _Don't stalk, just talk, they won't bite_  #sharedcircles   #Google  2012-08-29 20:23:364492010
Tim Moore22,583My +Best Shared Circle of the week.These are my top quality +Google+ sharers.  I hope you find them as rewarding as I do.2012-08-08 15:57:01445451844
Kurt Smith122Google+ Power Users Circle ShareThis G+ Power Users group includes some really good people to follow and many whom will follow you back. Make sure you've got them in a circle. #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #publiccircles   #publiccircleshare   #circleshare   #circlessharing  2012-07-28 17:08:3749918516
Tim Moore20,643Here is my #sharedcircleoftheday , it is around those who have helped directly with +Sparkstir or have inspired us in building it over the last year. These are not e-lebrities, but real people with vision on how to use +Google+ to help reach people globally with what they know and sharing it. We applaud them. We would also like to you join us - we've left plenty of room, so add yourself and pass it on to others anywhere in the world who want to help others increase their knowledge, quality of life and overall happiness and personal joy. #Sharedcircle   #sharedpubliccircles   #Sparkstir   #circleshare   #uniting   #circlesharing   #globalchange   #globalrevolution   #educationalresources   #education   #googleplus   #googlehangout   #hangouts   #peoplearoundus   #bettertogether  2012-07-10 14:52:1189929
Jessica Garcia156I am not sure who originally shared this but I know I pulled it from +Chris Brogan. If you want to change Google+ from a ghost town to a party just follow the circle. 2012-07-07 20:23:22499429
Tim Moore19,665Hi friends,Here is my #sharedcircleoftheday  I wanted to share this circle with you of Top Google+ Sharers - They may not all be E-lebrities, but they have embraced our +Google+ community and consistently contribute great content and do engage with one another.This is a quality circle that I know could have more folks added to it , so please 1) Save this circle. 2) Add some of your favorite G+Sharers, 3) If you'd like to include yourself, check the box at the very bottom of the Share circle dialog box 'Include yourself in shared circle', *4) Share with the world.Have a wonderful Friday my friends!  #GooglePlus   #sharedcircle   #PayItForward  2012-07-06 17:13:42247228230
matthew rappaport52,599500 Active +Hangouters for you to Chat with and Get to know . . Again this is just Part I, you were not "omitted" by me, if you feel bad you didn'tmake this +Shared Circles on G+!I feel like I +mention ed all of you yesterday... still working on it..https://plus.google.com/111048918866742956374/posts/hYTZsRoWZje+Tom Samacicio for instance is in this circle and he's great.. CIRCLE UP!Ask him about CB Radios!+Pearl Lombardo is a lot of fun too.. CIRCLE HER (she calls SHENANIGANS a lot!)Happy 1st #PLUSversary  week to you all! #sharedcircles  Enjoy your FRIDAY and see some of you tomorrow with +Vivienne Gucwa leading the +The Google + One Year Anniversary Photowalk in Central Park tomorrow12012-06-29 20:33:37500414444
Alister Macintyre7,169Here by request of one of the people in it, is my main circle of people who share G+ Tips from time to time.  It includes both people who generate them, and people who use them.  Also see this other related circle. https://plus.google.com/u/0/108007903544513887227/posts/XfV7Xek2XK3  People are in one or the other or neither.  Drop me a comment if you want to be in one of these circles.2012-06-13 03:13:14184102
Arvid Bux25,492Curated circle with English profilesFor my upcoming eBook release, I have curated several circles. This one contains 219 profiles of people who post mostly in English. These people will spice up your stream with all kinds of content, being it news, photos, links, videos, you name it! Apologies when you are not in this circle. Curation is done manually and thus I can make mistakes! Feel free to leave a comment so I can add you and people might see it and add you!#sharedcircle2012-06-11 18:29:4521927811
Jaana Nyström50,117My 8 circles of Googlers!This is just the beginning...I have found out that even Google employees are not really connected on Google+... This must be remedied!For Google employeesSo after many gruelling hours of collecting people and sorting out the circles here are the results.I will start with Google 1 by Jaana and also notify all the people in the 8 circles WITH THE POST YOU'RE IN so that you may get connected if you wish.The circle in +CircleCount:  http://www.circlecount.com/sharedcircle/?id=z12wdxwjttr3xxo0u22celljpvm0wvzfsLook for the other 8 circles, they're coming up soon.EDIT:  One or two mistaken identities or job changes have come up in all the circles so far, sorry about that. #Google   #circleshare     #Jaanatip  2012-06-08 17:49:159421224
Michael Kendle299Here's a circle of tech people. The circle is bigger but only lets me share 500. If you're interested in tech, this is a good place to start.2012-06-07 13:57:05501115
Jaana Nyström49,593I've been hoarding these peeps...My Googlers CircleGoogle employeesEveryone in this circle works for Google, been collecting the guys since July last year.Well, worked at the time of me adding them, anyway...Here it is in +CircleCount:http://www.circlecount.com/sharedcircle/?id=z13uvt3okqj2cxxvc22celljpvm0wvzfsVery international...  If you have some more to add that I've missed, please comment! #circleshare   #CircleSunday  2012-06-03 13:44:1447836829
Robert Pitt21,486[CIRCLE]Thought I would share my Googlers circle, enjoy and make sure you give feedback to these guys :)2012-04-16 19:51:00222114
Jack Durst484In honor of #FollowFriday Some of my favorite #technology experts on google+2012-04-13 18:31:53648518
Alister Macintyre4,949+rahul roy Here is my main G+ circle for G+ Tips. it includes both sources of tips, and people who like to receive them. I have not posted many tips recently, but if people are struggling with something, ask, and maybe we can help.2012-02-27 23:47:31179113
Jaana Nyström27,889#circlesharing #circlesunday My Google employees CircleHave you noticed that there is another circle sharing possibility: When you look at a certain circle's stream, there is a green button on the right saying Share this circle.That's what I'm testing right now. Works like a charm.I've been collecting this circle for a long time. Googlers from all over the globe.Enjoy! :-)#G+Tip #googleplustip #Jaanatip PING +The Best Circles on Google+ +Shared Circles on G+PS: Here's a Googler circle from +Natalie Villalobos with +58 peeps different from my circle. You might like to add this, too:https://plus.google.com/u/0/109895887909967698705/posts/VrfWQrgcVmUCombining the two circles is a good idea, that's what I did. Now it's a MEGA Googlers circle, have to share that later! :-)2012-02-05 10:04:22335221021
Chris Lang19,558+Michael Q Todd Suggested I share this circle as THE G+ Power Users Circle So Here Tis, The People That Bring Me The News I Need On G+That's the people I follow every day. Some of the IM profiles like +Ryan Lee and +Ryan Deiss are not active publicly. But the are the multi millionaires that dominate my world so there are in the circle.Lot's of just plain good peeps like +John Hardy and +Jannik Lindquist that usually disagree with me but have very good viewpoints on Google and the web.2012-01-16 22:09:3637013611
Chris Hoyt1,112Circle Back to GoogleLooking for people who work at Google? Here's a great circle that's a strong addition to any search you've already performed on Google Plus and that I'd include with any other search for Googlers that you've already conducted.What's interesting to me (and that I'm getting around to pointing out) is that whether you're just looking to expand your network as a member of Google+ or actively #recruiting and #sourcing online, I believe that you'll find infinite value from the proper care and feeding of Google Plus circles. In fact, if done correctly (and maintained) it's a fantastic way to filter your Google Plus stream and check the pulse of any company, organization or interest group.In the event you missed it, I did an article back in August that mentioned my interest in Circles and how I'd be exploring the management of them. (http://www.recruiterguy.net/recruiting-management-circles) So far, I've not been disappointed in the ability to really hone in on an area of interest by filtering my streams based on these circles and simply watching the conversation flow. Of course, being able to quickly see all of the updates from a particular company or interest group is just the start. The more proficient we get with our filtering, the easier it is to get the latest from fun entrepreneurs, CEO's, diversity interest groups, active and passive jobseekers and more - these are just a few of my own circles, mind you. You have the ability to filter by profession, seniority, geography, language, etc.The possibilities are endless!I'd love to hear how you, or others, are using circles to manage the information stream you've found in G+ so far.2012-01-04 20:07:36348211
Stephanie L Davis19,590I was asked by #SMMCamp attendees to share my "Googlers" circle. These are people who work for Google; community managers, engineers, developers, free-lancers; staff... etc. Cheers!2011-12-08 20:06:303648513
Jaana Nyström13,601All Googlers CircleThis is my Googlesphere with people and Pages: Did I miss someone?Their posts are not all about Google, but about life and stuff, too! :-)Did not include myself... Oh how I wish I could! Hahhahaaa! *wink *wink2011-12-03 15:10:281711238
Louis Gray71,017It's been a little while since I shared with you my Googlers circle. This circle includes a massive number of people working on the Google+ project, company execs, and a lot of sharp people working on many of the services you use every day, including +Blogger +Android +YouTube, etc. Now that we can share 500 at a time, have at it. But this circle isn't for everyone, so if you do add them, expect geekiness ahead.2011-11-22 19:13:55500623470
Raghd Hamzeh5,495#google #PublicCirclesI think it's about time I shared this circle of Googlers.. Over 680 people in it! (only 500 can be shared at the same time)Some of them are obvious, some of them you've met, some of them post on blogs, and some you have to hunt down!You will find an interesting insight on the people who power this juggernaut :)2011-11-20 21:15:53500101
Alister Macintyre43This is my Google Workers circle which I am re-sharing with Shared Circles on G+ page. These are people who are employed by the Google company. Some of them talk about the company's products, but most are just interesting people.2011-11-14 03:10:13168131
siam simte856For those who think Google Inc. employee must be Totally Circle ; Here's your chanceWhatever and however they're awesome thoughsiam simte shared a circle with you.2011-10-29 20:18:31473000
Dan Soto8,096Since the beginning, I've been collecting "Googlers" in a circle much like +Chris Pirillo collects Legos© . Anyway, here is a circle of close to 200 people that work for Google in some fashion. I've gone through it to remove accidental additions and am 99.99% sure all of these are legit.Enjoy ....Dan Soto shared a circle with you.2011-10-20 17:45:37187605
Kris Courtney2,408A great collection of talent - Bless you ...Kris Courtney shared a circle with you.2011-10-19 16:40:43475001
David Williams51GooglersDavid Williams shared a circle with you.2011-10-16 19:56:53344104

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

2
comments per post
0
reshares per post
2
+1's per post

1,837
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 22

posted image

2014-12-28 22:38:47 (22 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

I've read some disturbing stories about the "churn score": people who made a habit of regularly treating "no obligation introductory rates" as if they, in fact, had no obligation, or who used promotions by competing phone or cable companies as opportunities to play providers against one another for the best deals, finding that they suddenly couldn't get service at all. 

I'm curious what my more ardent free-market libertarian friends make of this sort of development? It's seemed to me that the traditional libertarian arguments against commercial regulation become shaky when applied to the power imbalance of individual consumers versus large corporations offering nonnegotiable take-it-or-leave-it contracts, insisting on waiving rights of redress or due process through mandatory arbitration clauses or even, it now seems, the right to negotiate at all.
more »

Most reshares: 9

posted image

2014-12-08 20:12:12 (8 comments, 9 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

textql: Execute SQL against structured text docs like CSV

Where have you been all my life? I'm surprised I haven't seen this before, especially given the number of times I've written special-purpose programs to do exactly this, but couldn't afford the time to generalize it....

The most useful way to call textql, I think, is like:

~/go/bin/textql --source=./source.csv --save-to=./dest.db --header=true

which makes it save a sqlite3 file you can use at leisure; the last argument assumes the first line of the CSV file was a header.

It's also a pretty decent example of a relatively short real-world Go program to solve a simple data-munging problem, if you're learning Go and are ready to start reading real code.

Most plusones: 27

posted image

2015-03-06 20:34:31 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 27 +1s)Open 

The auto-tuned fake-news fake viral video potential real viral video (parse that three times fast!) at the start of the great new Tina Fey comedy on Netflix, The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, isn't a parody of the Gregory Brothers; it is the Gregory Brothers. Excellent.

Latest 50 posts

2015-04-22 20:09:39 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Firefox on Android: URLs on NFC tags always launch Firefox. You can't fix it short of uninstalling.

This isn't exactly a #lazyweb  question because I can find answers by searching, I just don't believe them....

I was surprised today, when I attempted to launch a browser via an NFC tag that had only an https URL encoded on it, and Firefox loaded. I rarely use Firefox on Android and hadn't selected it as the default for anything. I checked the Apps Settings, where you can usually "clear defaults" so that Android will ask to select an application the next time the URL is triggered, but no defaults were set for Firefox.

I uninstalled Firefox, and the tag launched Chrome, as expected. I re-installed Firefox, and — without asking — Android went back to using Firefox for the URL.

It's an https docs.google.com URL,so n... more »

Firefox on Android: URLs on NFC tags always launch Firefox. You can't fix it short of uninstalling.

This isn't exactly a #lazyweb  question because I can find answers by searching, I just don't believe them....

I was surprised today, when I attempted to launch a browser via an NFC tag that had only an https URL encoded on it, and Firefox loaded. I rarely use Firefox on Android and hadn't selected it as the default for anything. I checked the Apps Settings, where you can usually "clear defaults" so that Android will ask to select an application the next time the URL is triggered, but no defaults were set for Firefox.

I uninstalled Firefox, and the tag launched Chrome, as expected. I re-installed Firefox, and — without asking — Android went back to using Firefox for the URL.

It's an https docs.google.com URL, so nothing I'd expect Firefox to intercept. And in fact that URL isn't sent to Firefox if I invoke it any other way (a link in an email or a notification, for instance).

Searching seems to suggest that a) any Android app is free to respond to any NFC tag URL it wants, b) Firefox asks the OS to give it all NFC URL's while Chrome does not, so c) Android doesn't offer a choice when only one app has asked to respond to a given URL, and d) there's absolutely nothing the phone owner can do about this except for uninstalling Firefox or installing some other app that tries to similarly intercept all NFC URL's (since Chrome does not, installing another app won't help you, if what you want is to launch Chrome).

Is this all correct? I have difficulty believing it, as it suggests unusually anti-user and anti-security decisionmaking by Mozilla and Google.___

posted image

2015-04-20 20:19:21 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

A new search URL for the new Google Contacts

When I was migrated to the new-UI Google Contacts "preview", I had to change my site-specific search engine I'd mapped to the keyword contacts because the preview's URLs use a new scheme: 
https://contacts.google.com/preview/search/%s

As I've discussed before (see the link below), I love site-specific searches, which you can add to Chrome via the chrome://settings/searchEngines preference. Any website that has a variable content encoded in the URL, you can make quickly navigable simply by adding that URL with "%s" wherever the search term appears and giving it a keyword; from then on, open a new Chrome tab, type the keyword and a space or tab, and the search term, and Chrome will go directly there. (For instance, "http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Special:Search&search=%s"... more »

A new search URL for the new Google Contacts

When I was migrated to the new-UI Google Contacts "preview", I had to change my site-specific search engine I'd mapped to the keyword contacts because the preview's URLs use a new scheme: 
https://contacts.google.com/preview/search/%s

As I've discussed before (see the link below), I love site-specific searches, which you can add to Chrome via the chrome://settings/searchEngines preference. Any website that has a variable content encoded in the URL, you can make quickly navigable simply by adding that URL with "%s" wherever the search term appears and giving it a keyword; from then on, open a new Chrome tab, type the keyword and a space or tab, and the search term, and Chrome will go directly there. (For instance, "http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Special:Search&search=%s" will give you a direct search into the English Wikipedia, so you can skip the home page.)

At some point I'd imagine the "preview" will go away from the URL and I'll have to change it again, but it might be a long time, as evinced by the years that the new Maps UI had "preview" in its URLs.

On most websites, you can navigate to the site's home page, right-click in the search box, and select "Add As Search Engine..." Unfortunately, the new Contacts doesn't support this because of the way its search box is implemented. (Googlers, someone should open a bug on this.) Hopefully that will be fixed soon, but in the meantime, I thought I'd share this.

#chrometips  ___

2015-04-15 19:15:44 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Expansion with string concatenation?

(I'm a little afraid of what the G+ comment markup is going to do to the legibility of this post, but I'll give it a try...)

I frequently use the postfix modifiers to do things like this:

# cd into the directory contaning File::Util; perldoc -l gives
# location of the library as an absolute pathname, (:h) modifier
# works like dirname
cd $($perldoc -l File::Util)(:h)


Another thing I frequently use in conjunction with this is to use a directory or filename to name something for another command. For instance, I may want to make a Git branch for editing a particular executable. I can get the name of the executable like so:

# Just one executable in bin/util.pl
# Create new branch called util-feature
git branch $(echo bin/*(:t:r))-feature

This works, but feels like... more »

Expansion with string concatenation?

(I'm a little afraid of what the G+ comment markup is going to do to the legibility of this post, but I'll give it a try...)

I frequently use the postfix modifiers to do things like this:

# cd into the directory contaning File::Util; perldoc -l gives
# location of the library as an absolute pathname, (:h) modifier
# works like dirname
cd $($perldoc -l File::Util)(:h)


Another thing I frequently use in conjunction with this is to use a directory or filename to name something for another command. For instance, I may want to make a Git branch for editing a particular executable. I can get the name of the executable like so:

# Just one executable in bin/util.pl
# Create new branch called util-feature
git branch $(echo bin/*(:t:r))-feature

This works, but feels like a gratuitous use of `echo`. Anyone know another option? I can make use of zsh's interactive expansion by typing `git branch bin/*(:t:r)⇥`, which will fill in to `git branch util`, which I can then finish with `-feature↩`. That's certainly the most straightforward way for this particular case.

But when I'm doing it programmatically, is there another way to skip the `echo`? (Give it a try before throwing out a possible answer; some that came to me like surrounding the expansion in braces or parens or something just didn't work.)___

2015-04-03 02:16:18 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Looking for not-so-great headphones

After running dry in my own search, I'm looking for some recommendations for some decent inexpensive headphones for my boyfriend meeting the following criteria:

• On-ear or over-ear phones, not in-ear or earbuds

• Not noise-cancelling or heavily isolating (active noise cancellation that can be turned off would be fine, but probably doesn't exist at this price point)

• With a microphone that works on Android phones and Macs (he primarily uses them for podcasts and music on the go, but needs to make and receive phone and Skype calls as well)

• Wired, not wireless, with a cord that's detachable (for safety) and replaceable (for economy), because...

• ...not requiring batteries (or if rechargeable, still capable of being used even when the battery runs down) is a must.
• Output ... more »

Looking for not-so-great headphones

After running dry in my own search, I'm looking for some recommendations for some decent inexpensive headphones for my boyfriend meeting the following criteria:

• On-ear or over-ear phones, not in-ear or earbuds

• Not noise-cancelling or heavily isolating (active noise cancellation that can be turned off would be fine, but probably doesn't exist at this price point)

• With a microphone that works on Android phones and Macs (he primarily uses them for podcasts and music on the go, but needs to make and receive phone and Skype calls as well)

• Wired, not wireless, with a cord that's detachable (for safety) and replaceable (for economy), because...

• ...not requiring batteries (or if rechargeable, still capable of being used even when the battery runs down) is a must.

• Output sound quality is entirely irrelevant, but...

• ...the mic, on the other hand, needs to be good enough so the person he's talking to won't think he's on a perpetually bad connection (it's frustrating how many headphones' mics are in fact that bad).

• And last, but definitely not least, they need to be at an optimal point on the durable-but-expensive vs. cheap-but-fragile scale. He treats them roughly enough to where they will get broken at some point, so a very expensive pair lasts a little longer, but just makes him feel really bad when he finally does break them. Yet when he tried the cheapest acceptable ones he could find—on the theory that he could just treat them as disposable—they broke so quickly that it just felt even worse.

I'll be darned if I can figure out how to search for a product like this. Soooo... it's #lazyweb  time! Maybe you know of a pair that might fill the bill?___

2015-03-27 18:23:54 (10 comments, 1 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Any better Android TOTP choices than Google Authenticator?

My new job requires a slew of 2FA accounts and I'm getting annoyed by the lack of organizational features (and worst, the inability to reorder accounts like you can even on Google Authenticator for iOS).

Anyone have suggestions for a better one. (FWIW, I really would prefer one on the Play Store because of side-loading restrictions.)

Any better Android TOTP choices than Google Authenticator?

My new job requires a slew of 2FA accounts and I'm getting annoyed by the lack of organizational features (and worst, the inability to reorder accounts like you can even on Google Authenticator for iOS).

Anyone have suggestions for a better one. (FWIW, I really would prefer one on the Play Store because of side-loading restrictions.)___

posted image

2015-03-26 19:14:52 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Mr. Ciesielski, who is on disability, said he would think twice about taking on acting jobs this year to avoid the same predicament when he files his 2015 taxes.

This is why one thing that Keynesians and non-Keynesian free-marketers can agree on is that taxes should always phase-in and deductions and credits should phase-out. Setting thresholds (floors or ceilings) results in perverse economic incentives.

(Economists—aside from behavioral economists, anyway—tend to discount the cost of complex policy, though. It could be argued that any phase-in of penalties or phase-out of subsidies would seem so complicated that average folks would be completely bamboozled come tax time, and there was political need for the ACA, with all its requisite complexity, to be as simple as possible in its interface with ordinary taxpayers.

After all, there's evidence every election thatman... more »

Mr. Ciesielski, who is on disability, said he would think twice about taking on acting jobs this year to avoid the same predicament when he files his 2015 taxes.

This is why one thing that Keynesians and non-Keynesian free-marketers can agree on is that taxes should always phase-in and deductions and credits should phase-out. Setting thresholds (floors or ceilings) results in perverse economic incentives.

(Economists—aside from behavioral economists, anyway—tend to discount the cost of complex policy, though. It could be argued that any phase-in of penalties or phase-out of subsidies would seem so complicated that average folks would be completely bamboozled come tax time, and there was political need for the ACA, with all its requisite complexity, to be as simple as possible in its interface with ordinary taxpayers.

After all, there's evidence every election that many people love a flat tax, even though it will hurt them, simply because marginal tax is so hard for people to understand. The number of people who came forward on the news in the run-up to the 2012  election saying that they'd avoid taking a job or making an investment that might push them into a higher tax bracket shows how many people misunderstand marginal tax, even when it's vital to their own interests that they understand it.)___

2015-03-25 19:37:13 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Smaller sit-stand desks?

I'm telecommuting in my new position with +Apcera  and I wonder if any of you could recommend a medium-sized sit/stand desk? Most I've found are either in the 65" range (way too big for my space, which is 50" wide) or are lightweight and inteded for use as a secondary desk.

Ideally, I could get one with a monitor arm and a keyboard tray.

Any suggestions about what to look at? Thanks!

(And please don't just point me at your favorite sit-stand maker as people have been doing to me in other fora without checking they have a narrower desk.)

Smaller sit-stand desks?

I'm telecommuting in my new position with +Apcera  and I wonder if any of you could recommend a medium-sized sit/stand desk? Most I've found are either in the 65" range (way too big for my space, which is 50" wide) or are lightweight and inteded for use as a secondary desk.

Ideally, I could get one with a monitor arm and a keyboard tray.

Any suggestions about what to look at? Thanks!

(And please don't just point me at your favorite sit-stand maker as people have been doing to me in other fora without checking they have a narrower desk.)___

posted image

2015-03-21 21:14:15 (4 comments, 2 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Tabs Outliner: finally, a way to tame out-of-control Chrome tabs

I've used my share of tab and session management extensions over the years, but they've all been lacking in one way or another. This one, though, is head and shoulders above the others.

For the first time ever, in literally years of looking, I've finally found a way to recover in a sane and systematic way after I've opened so many tabs that the system is freezing up. Before, my only real choices were to:

1) Spend an afternoon reading and dismissing old tabs. This always sounds a lot more doable than it is, because invariably while reading I see a link I want to click, but if I click it, at best I've voided my progress in reducing the total number of tabs; usually I've made the problem even worse than before.

2) Methods I've heard others suggest, like reading tabs... more »

Tabs Outliner: finally, a way to tame out-of-control Chrome tabs

I've used my share of tab and session management extensions over the years, but they've all been lacking in one way or another. This one, though, is head and shoulders above the others.

For the first time ever, in literally years of looking, I've finally found a way to recover in a sane and systematic way after I've opened so many tabs that the system is freezing up. Before, my only real choices were to:

1) Spend an afternoon reading and dismissing old tabs. This always sounds a lot more doable than it is, because invariably while reading I see a link I want to click, but if I click it, at best I've voided my progress in reducing the total number of tabs; usually I've made the problem even worse than before.

2) Methods I've heard others suggest, like reading tabs one by one, deleting it if you finish the tab, but just stopping your reading and moving on to the next one (without deleting the current one) if you see a link you want to read, then looping back and opening a new tab for that link, then repeating until you've actually gotten the total tab count down. The problem with methods like this is they require discipline and a block of unbroken time long enough to visit every tab.

3) Just "declaring tab bankruptcy" and closing everything, just hoping you'll be able to find anything you need later.

Tabs Outliner is the solution I've been looking for. I can organize and re-organize my open tabs; close—without permanently losing—any open tabs¹; group together tabs, groups of tabs, and even windows topically and then activate, close and save, or close and forget them later; attach notes to any tab (or group or window); and much more.

It has a bit of a learning curve, and the author's English isn't perfect, but it's well worth it.

I'd just offer a few hints I'd wished I'd known about to start:

• I initially thought that windows and groups could only be named Window and Group, and was adding a note describing them to each. But you can rename windows and groups by clicking the pencil icon on the right side of the line.

• If you SHIFT-double-click a tab in the outline, it will open a new copy (whether the tab in the outline is open or saved). Since you can do this with groups too, this is a convenient way to have "hierarchical bookmarks" in a more powerful way than the "Open all" bookmarks command.

  If you just double-click on a saved tab, you'll also open the tab, but anything you do (clicking on links, opening new tabs, etc.) will change the entry in the outline. So: double-click ephemeral saved tabs you just wanted to save (once) for later, shift-double-click saved tabs you will re-open frequently (say, a window with both a web app and tabs for the documentation).

• To operate on a whole section of the outline at once, collapse it first by clicking the little dot on the left edge of the action popup. Then clicking the green X will close and save any and all open tabs within, and clicking the trash can will permanently close all those tabs. If you don't collapse the part of the outline you want to operate on first, you'll just act on a single tab.

• Middle-clicking or control-clicking a link on a webpage you're reading will, as always, open the link in a new tab. But it will also store the tab in Tabs Outliner as a child of the current tab. In other words, if you open the front page of a news site and middle-click all the articles you want to read, they'll remain grouped together in the outline automatically. (Here's where the utility of having to collapse before operating on a line becomes evident: say you open Slate magazine and open in new tabs five articles to read. In the outline, you can trash-can just the tab with the Slate homepage, but all the articles will remain open and grouped together. Collapse first, and they'll all go away.)

• Tabs Outliner doesn't replace "Reopen Closed Tab" for when you inadvertently close something. But it does replace "restore" after a Chrome or system crash. Instead of clicking Chrome's restore button, leave that new window open and open Tabs Outliner instead. Now you can restore and/or save just the tabs you want to.

This thing is great. Like I said, definitely has a learning curve, but very, very worth it.

¹ You can safely close any tab that doesn't have form or app data filled out and for which you don't care about losing history; Tabs Outliner will hold onto the URL and continue to let you manipulate the greyed-out "tab", restoring it whenever you wish.___

posted image

2015-03-19 19:10:08 (21 comments, 0 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

Yowza, I've been quoted at length in The New York Times as, "Trey Harris, a New York City reader". I feel like such a grown-up.

Yowza, I've been quoted at length in The New York Times as, "Trey Harris, a New York City reader". I feel like such a grown-up.___

posted image

2015-03-18 19:29:46 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

+Nick Bilton and The Times should be ashamed of this article. It sounds cautious enough in tone, but it's a "teach the controversy" piece: it legitimizes the illegitimate unscientific claim simply by giving it "better safe than sorry" attention. Ugh, where do I begin?

The Style section is an inappropriate place to analyze a topic like cancer risk. Style and technology reporters and editors are not qualified to report what is science and what is quackery (pseudo-science):

Failing to explain true science: the article didn't mention two important factors in all such possible-cancer-risk studies. Studies like the ones the article relies on are unreliable, and must be repeated many times by different researchers before venturing a conclusion; and, by science's very nature, it is impossible to ever rule out any cause as definitively not a cancerri... more »

+Nick Bilton and The Times should be ashamed of this article. It sounds cautious enough in tone, but it's a "teach the controversy" piece: it legitimizes the illegitimate unscientific claim simply by giving it "better safe than sorry" attention. Ugh, where do I begin?

The Style section is an inappropriate place to analyze a topic like cancer risk. Style and technology reporters and editors are not qualified to report what is science and what is quackery (pseudo-science):

Failing to explain true science: the article didn't mention two important factors in all such possible-cancer-risk studies. Studies like the ones the article relies on are unreliable, and must be repeated many times by different researchers before venturing a conclusion; and, by science's very nature, it is impossible to ever rule out any cause as definitively not a cancer risk. 

Failing to recognize quackery, exhibit A: "extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof." Unlike the sort of radiation we are usually concerned about, like x-rays or nuclear fallout, no mechanism is known to exist whereby cancer can result from non-ionizing radiation like that put out by cell phones. This goes unmentioned.

Failing to recognize quackery, exhibit B: A simple web search on the names of the two doctors quoted, Drs. Mercola and Hardell, reveals many questions about their research and possible conflicts of interest. (Mercola, specifically, is so notorious that I bet a number of Times science and health reporters felt sick simply seeing that name in print as a source.) A disturbing question arises: did Mr. Bilton and his editors not do such a simple fact check? Or were they aware of these doctors' reputation, yet chose to advance their claims without mentioning their controversial nature?

The one bone to critics, the line:
(Note that the group hedged its findings with the word “possibly.”)
is insufficient and incorrect: "possibly" has a very specific meaning in science. This note would be similar to a crime article reading, "the jurors hedged their not-guilty verdict with the words 'beyond a reasonable doubt'".

The Times's own Upshot contributor, Dr. +Aaron Carroll, has done a video on precisely this research. He entitled it: "Your Cell Phone Won't Give You Cancer" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6GYQyJEIeg). Mr. Bilton would have done well to call an expert closer to home before publishing this scaremongering piece.___

posted image

2015-03-06 20:34:31 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 27 +1s)Open 

The auto-tuned fake-news fake viral video potential real viral video (parse that three times fast!) at the start of the great new Tina Fey comedy on Netflix, The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, isn't a parody of the Gregory Brothers; it is the Gregory Brothers. Excellent.

The auto-tuned fake-news fake viral video potential real viral video (parse that three times fast!) at the start of the great new Tina Fey comedy on Netflix, The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, isn't a parody of the Gregory Brothers; it is the Gregory Brothers. Excellent.___

2015-03-03 19:04:31 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Not being able to use Google Authenticator (and, perhaps more arguably, Google Voice integration) in Android's Safe Mode makes it useless for any spontaneous reboot diagnosis, unless you already have a repeatable way to force the reboot.

Not being able to use Google Authenticator (and, perhaps more arguably, Google Voice integration) in Android's Safe Mode makes it useless for any spontaneous reboot diagnosis, unless you already have a repeatable way to force the reboot.___

2015-03-03 16:20:33 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Bibi is, literally, giving Congress the whole Megillah. He invoked Haman, where's my rattle?!?

Bibi is, literally, giving Congress the whole Megillah. He invoked Haman, where's my rattle?!?___

2015-02-28 20:27:18 (18 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Do you know how to coil cables the "right" way?

This question is mainly for professional geeks who work (or have worked) with hardware, especially system and network admins, IT and data techs, telecom folks, and so on.

If you were lucky, you started out with a mentor who indoctrinated you in the mysteries of twisted-pair cabling:

• Don't wrap a cable around anything unless it was specifically designed for the cable to be wrapped around, like a spool or the flip-out tabs of a MagSafe connector¹.

• When disconnecting a cable, always pull on the plug's plastic jacket, not the wire or connector.

• Don't bend a cable beyond its minimum bend radius (use 5 cm (2") to be safe) — this one carried with it myriad consequences like if a cable got routed around a corner or into a cable run, tie it down on either side so itdoesn... more »

Do you know how to coil cables the "right" way?

This question is mainly for professional geeks who work (or have worked) with hardware, especially system and network admins, IT and data techs, telecom folks, and so on.

If you were lucky, you started out with a mentor who indoctrinated you in the mysteries of twisted-pair cabling:

• Don't wrap a cable around anything unless it was specifically designed for the cable to be wrapped around, like a spool or the flip-out tabs of a MagSafe connector¹.

• When disconnecting a cable, always pull on the plug's plastic jacket, not the wire or connector.

• Don't bend a cable beyond its minimum bend radius (use 5 cm (2") to be safe) — this one carried with it myriad consequences like if a cable got routed around a corner or into a cable run, tie it down on either side so it doesn't get bent when pulled on either end; a device needed plenty of clearance on its back so cables didn't get bent against a wall, and if it had oddly-oriented ports like side- or bottom-facing ones, you couldn't force it into a cabling scheme assuming all the cables terminated horizontally at the back.

• If using a cable-to-cable connection like an extension cord, both sides need to be locked down if any part of either cable has slack (in theater tech and carpentry they'll knot together two cables around the plugs so they won't disconnect if an end gets pulled on, and if they do it a lot, like roadies might, they'll sacrifice a couple feet of length to do an elaborate knot that won't cause any part of the cable to be bent beyond its minimum bending radius).

• Don't use tight cable ties or staples for staying or bundling just one or two cables; the compression can cause wear or even a sever. Instead, use flexible plastic clips or make a loop knot (with an appropriate bending radius) and a loose tie. Use tight cable ties for bundles of cables instead.

I'm sure I also learned some lore that was pure superstition. For instance, I was taught that you shouldn't leave a length of cable running along the floor connected to a device at one end because it could become an antenna and damage the equipment. This happens to be true of coaxial cable, if the core made contact with something that could serve as an aerial (and in fact, "leaky coax" signal distribution depends on this effect), but I can't see how unshielded twisted-pair could do this, certainly not in typical run lengths.

But there's one thing that I've found even consummate professionals often never learned: how to correctly coil wire for storage. I suspect it's because, unlike these other things, you can't easily figure it out (or even realize it's an issue, necessarily) on your own, and it's not something that's typically done as part of where it really matters to your job, namely build-outs (of data centers or offices) so nobody's invested in policing it.

I think it's useful to resuscitate this knowledge given how many cables many of us pack and unpack every day as part of our comings and goings. Incorrect coiling can cause even worse wear than over-bending.

So I should tell you how to do it, right?

First, my poll. Here I'm asking specifically about the way you coil a cable, like around the MagSafe flip-out tabs or before putting them in storage, not the lore above. There is a wrong way—just wrapping and wrapping and wrapping like around a spool². There's also a right way (and no, I'm not talking about one of the "tangle-free" or length-shortening coils the DIY hack sites often feature—I'm talking about just a simple coil that will look more or less identical to the wrap-wrap-wrap coil. I'm specifically not saying what that coil is, I'll followup on that after the poll.)

I realize "I always do it" and "I don't bother" are a false dichotomy, but I have a 40 character limit and I just want you to pick which is closer to correct. Do you do it for cables you especially care about or as part of work? Choose "always". Do you not think the wear caused by incorrect coiling is as big a deal as people make it out to be? Say you don't bother.

I think a little looseness doesn't disqualify you from the "always" answer.
For instance, a typical thick USB 3.0 cable of the type you get when you're buying a USB cable (rather than getting a cheap one included with a device) has an outer diameter of about an eighth of an inch (30 mm) and USB cable generally has a minimum bend radius of 10×OD, so USB cables should be stored with a bend radii no less than 1-1/4" (3 cm). (For reference, that's the radius of a typical beer bottle. So try wrapping a USB cable around a beer bottle; it shouldn't be bent any more than that.)

I have a large but thin front pocket on my pack that is perfect for holding circular coils of cable, so I put expensive cables like Thunderbolt (which, incidentally, has an insanely small 5mm minimum bend radius², so strictly speaking keeping it in a circular coil isn't necessary) and a selection of backup and can't-easily-replace cables there. But that pocket's hard to get to and hard to find things in, so cables I need all the time are in a zippered "stuff pouch". And those—while coiled correctly, always!—get stayed with little bungies and smooshed into the pouch so that they undoubtedly bend a bit beyond the safe limit. I'm willing to shorten the life of these cables for the convenience.


¹ Only true for the DC (MagSafe connector) cable; the AC (wall) cable is not supposed to be wrapped around the power brick, lifehacking exhortations to the contrary.

² As i previously mentioned, the specific spools that a cable came on or were designed specifically for the cable in question are fine.

³ For the copper cables, that is. Counter-intuitively, both Apple and Corning claim (in their spec sheets!) that optical Thunderbolt and USB cables have a zero minimum bend radius. This is clearly impossible, so I take it to mean the actual minimum bend radius is tighter than the outer jacket can physically be bent. That's still pretty insane.

(In case you're wondering whether Thunderbolt ports unexpectedly have integral optical transceivers, like MacBook Pro headphone ports do, and are totally confused by the concept of an "optical USB cable": the plugs have optical transceivers powered by the devices. Since they have no copper end-to-end, they can't be used as power/charging cables, but they can stretch extremely long distances while still being thin and light, and apparently can be sharply bent as well. I would have gone squee! at seeing one of these when I was last regularly working with fiber, back in the FDDI days.)___

2015-02-27 12:22:14 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Just as I'd expect, I see the white/gold when I've been staring at my (slightly warm) screen for awhile, but the blue/black if I look at it immediately after looking at my (neutral on average) room lighting or (rather cool) television.  (Though it's certainly a startling effect, so maybe "expect" is too strong a word.)

Just as I'd expect, I see the white/gold when I've been staring at my (slightly warm) screen for awhile, but the blue/black if I look at it immediately after looking at my (neutral on average) room lighting or (rather cool) television.  (Though it's certainly a startling effect, so maybe "expect" is too strong a word.)___

posted image

2015-02-26 18:42:19 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Probably the most ludicrous piece of technology I ever owned

I had one of these, a Pioneer PR-7820, a.k.a. the MCA DiscoVision. This was early 90's, so several years pre-DVD, and it was already over 15 years old at the time. I got it as a gift from a friend who was a LaserDisc enthusiast—it had been his first player, also a hand-me-down, but he'd since bought a more modern player and wanted to share the joy of LaserDisc with me. Blockbuster didn't carry LaserDisc, but almost all the other video stores still had small sections for disc rental. It was also pretty common to find entire boxes of LaserDiscs at garage sales and flea markets, often at pennies-per-movie.

This thing was brilliant. Brilliantly ridiculous.

First, as you can see starting at the 2:01 point in this (hilarious) instructional video, you had to mount it on a spindle, which lockedd... more »

Probably the most ludicrous piece of technology I ever owned

I had one of these, a Pioneer PR-7820, a.k.a. the MCA DiscoVision. This was early 90's, so several years pre-DVD, and it was already over 15 years old at the time. I got it as a gift from a friend who was a LaserDisc enthusiast—it had been his first player, also a hand-me-down, but he'd since bought a more modern player and wanted to share the joy of LaserDisc with me. Blockbuster didn't carry LaserDisc, but almost all the other video stores still had small sections for disc rental. It was also pretty common to find entire boxes of LaserDiscs at garage sales and flea markets, often at pennies-per-movie.

This thing was brilliant. Brilliantly ridiculous.

First, as you can see starting at the 2:01 point in this (hilarious) instructional video, you had to mount it on a spindle, which locked down with a satisfyingly loud thwack.

Unfortunately, the video doesn’t show you what's next: the smoked Plexiglas window in the lid let you see what was happening while the disc played. Unlike most players that had a moving pickup like a record player (and which enabled front-slot loading), the DiscoVision's laser pickup was stationary; the spindle moved. Which is why the thing is so huge; it had to have room within the chassis for the entire disc to move from edge to center. So you could look in and see the spindle and disc move, and you could actually see the laser pickup!

Two funny things about this technological monstrosity:

First, just as with pretty much every other home-movie technology ever developed, when this player was released there was a format war of sorts going. But compared to Beta/VHS, VideoCD/DVD, and Blu-ray/HD DVD, the LaserDisc format war was relatively mundane, as far as format wars go. Since these discs were double-sided like a record (each side held up to 60 minutes, so most movies required a flip and sometimes a second disc), it was just a disagreement over which side was the "A" side and which the "B". Vendors who wanted to put the laser pickup beneath the disc wanted the "A" side "down", i.e., on the opposite side from the label reading "side A". Vendors who wanted the laser pickup above the disc wanted side "A" to be "up".

This poor thing was on the losing team, so when you played a commercial LaserDisc, you had to put it on the spindle with the "B" label up, then flip it halfway so the "A" label was up. (The latest models had pickups on both sides so no flipping was necessary.)

The second funny thing was a result of the moving-spindle design, which meant the disc spun freely without resting on a turntable, and it spun fast (at one rotation per video frame, 1800 rpm). If the disc was locked to the spindle incorrectly with a bit of a tilt (not easy, but possible to do on an old machine) this nearly 30-POUND hulk would start shaking, and could easily walk itself off a table if you weren't paying attention. Remarkably, despite containing a precision motor, not to mention a frigging laser, it kept running even after hitting the floor from a height of a few inches. This thing was a tank.

The DiscoVision has its own Wikipedia page (http://goo.gl/sBPQvY). It totally deserves it.___

2015-02-21 03:08:42 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Good lord, somehow I managed to change some setting in Yosemite so that the menu bar's reverted to the antediluvian behavior of menus only staying open if you hold down the button.

I remember Back in The Day that it was always funny watching a Windows person try to deal with a Mac as they clicked on the menu, released, and had the menu disappear, then tried again, totally befuddled. Now I'm doing it myself, and even though it's been going on for the better part of a day, I'm so habituated to the "new" way that OS X introduced that, every damn time, I have to have the menu go away once before I remember to hold the mouse again. (The fact that most pop-up menus on the web don't actually pop open until you release the button just makes this worse as I get conflicting habituation stimuli....)

I'm be darned if I can find the setting anywhere, and as usual... more »

Good lord, somehow I managed to change some setting in Yosemite so that the menu bar's reverted to the antediluvian behavior of menus only staying open if you hold down the button.

I remember Back in The Day that it was always funny watching a Windows person try to deal with a Mac as they clicked on the menu, released, and had the menu disappear, then tried again, totally befuddled. Now I'm doing it myself, and even though it's been going on for the better part of a day, I'm so habituated to the "new" way that OS X introduced that, every damn time, I have to have the menu go away once before I remember to hold the mouse again. (The fact that most pop-up menus on the web don't actually pop open until you release the button just makes this worse as I get conflicting habituation stimuli....)

I'm be darned if I can find the setting anywhere, and as usual Apple support forums are ridiculous, filled with people describing a problem and responders telling them no, what they describe isn't actually happening to them, because that would be broken, and the thing they're using is definitely not broken. Someone, anyone, please save me from this strange new hell.

(I've been pondering whether supposing screencaps were easily available and up/downloadable ten years ago, the Apple support forums might actually be useful, since "you're obviously doing it wrong" paroxysms could be nipped in the bud with a simple "video or it didn't happen" proof.)___

2015-02-20 14:41:03 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Lenovo's #superfish  "uninstaller" is about like a cancer "treatment" of destroying all the records that say you have cancer.

Lenovo's #superfish  "uninstaller" is about like a cancer "treatment" of destroying all the records that say you have cancer.___

2015-02-13 18:00:35 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Estimating totals based on novelty of samples?

Argh, I am so bad at remembering the names of algorithms, which makes it hard when I want to look them up, especially when they're in a rather crowded space, like this one, "estimation algorithms"... 

Suppose you are drawing random items from a bag of unique items that are replaced after selection. You can identify whether you have seen an item before (you keep a persistent record of samples seen). How do you estimate the total number of items in the bag, and your margin for error, based on how many new ones are recognizable to you? (Extra credit: if replacement does not happen immediately—perhaps you draw a queue of n items with the oldest going back into the bag—how do you estimate then?)

A pointer to a formal treatment (I have Knuth, Skiena, and the ACM Safari libraries available to me), or to animpl... more »

Estimating totals based on novelty of samples?

Argh, I am so bad at remembering the names of algorithms, which makes it hard when I want to look them up, especially when they're in a rather crowded space, like this one, "estimation algorithms"... 

Suppose you are drawing random items from a bag of unique items that are replaced after selection. You can identify whether you have seen an item before (you keep a persistent record of samples seen). How do you estimate the total number of items in the bag, and your margin for error, based on how many new ones are recognizable to you? (Extra credit: if replacement does not happen immediately—perhaps you draw a queue of n items with the oldest going back into the bag—how do you estimate then?)

A pointer to a formal treatment (I have Knuth, Skiena, and the ACM Safari libraries available to me), or to an implementation, would be preferable to an ad-hoc description of the algorithm.

(This is one of those intuitive algorithms we use all the time—"you never see the same one twice" is a way to say "we think the total number must be very large". Or we assume that if we pay the same cashier every time we go to a shop, that the shop doesn't have many cashiers in total. But as intuitive as it is, formalizing it is difficult. I'm pretty sure I could work from first principles and derive it in an hour or less, but I'd rather just look it up.)___

2015-02-11 03:59:29 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

#secondhandnews : Larry Wilmore is leaving The Nightly Show for the next six months, to do a stint as managing editor of the Daily News. 

#secondhandnews : Larry Wilmore is leaving The Nightly Show for the next six months, to do a stint as managing editor of the Daily News. ___

2015-02-09 19:43:42 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Source for QWERTY/Dvorak replacement keycaps?

I once saw a set of replacement keycaps, for Cherry MX-style keyboards, that had both QWERTY and Dvorak lettering. I think it was QWERTY on the key tops and Dvorak on the key fronts. Anyone happen to know who sells these?

(I usually type in Dvorak, and can touch type both, but every now and then—usually when trying to learn a new keyboard shortcut in some application or another—I glance down, and it would be nice to not have to visualize myself typing a word containing the necessary character in order to find the correct key.

(I could pop the keys, and swap them all into Dvorak positions. But my boyfriend uses the keyboard too, in QWERTY. And anyway, if I swapped all the key caps, the homing bumps on the F and J keys would no longer be in the right place; the F bump would be on the top row where Y is on QWERTY whilethe... more »

Source for QWERTY/Dvorak replacement keycaps?

I once saw a set of replacement keycaps, for Cherry MX-style keyboards, that had both QWERTY and Dvorak lettering. I think it was QWERTY on the key tops and Dvorak on the key fronts. Anyone happen to know who sells these?

(I usually type in Dvorak, and can touch type both, but every now and then—usually when trying to learn a new keyboard shortcut in some application or another—I glance down, and it would be nice to not have to visualize myself typing a word containing the necessary character in order to find the correct key.

(I could pop the keys, and swap them all into Dvorak positions. But my boyfriend uses the keyboard too, in QWERTY. And anyway, if I swapped all the key caps, the homing bumps on the F and J keys would no longer be in the right place; the F bump would be on the top row where Y is on QWERTY while the J bump would be on the bottom row where QWERTY C is. Years ago I happened to have a broken keyboard I was throwing out, so I tried swapping all the keys and sanding down the bumps and adding new bumps to U and H with a dab of epoxy. It worked, sort of, but didn't feel right.)

This is one of those frustrating cases where the search terms one might use (QWERTY, Dvorak, key caps, keycaps, etc.) turn up lots of results relevant to the search terms, but irrelevant to the info desired.

#lazyweb___

posted image

2015-02-07 22:11:08 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Tracking down source of an iOS calendar invite?

This is a strange one... One of my doctors always sends me calendar invites when I make an appointment. This has always been nice—they were Gmail invites, so I had less paper and less fiddling to deal with.

But today I was just trying to figure out when my next appointment with him was—I knew it was late March or early April—and while I'd usually use my Google calendar, I happened to have my iPad close at hand, so I looked, and found it, on March 31 (see the first and second screenshots attached).

Since the appoitnment had no location and was named "trey harris" (useful for my doctor, but not really for me!) I wanted to fix these things, for which I grabbed my MacBook Pro. But I couldn't find it on my primary (Google) calendar (third screenshot). Weird.

I opened the OS X calendar(four... more »

Tracking down source of an iOS calendar invite?

This is a strange one... One of my doctors always sends me calendar invites when I make an appointment. This has always been nice—they were Gmail invites, so I had less paper and less fiddling to deal with.

But today I was just trying to figure out when my next appointment with him was—I knew it was late March or early April—and while I'd usually use my Google calendar, I happened to have my iPad close at hand, so I looked, and found it, on March 31 (see the first and second screenshots attached).

Since the appoitnment had no location and was named "trey harris" (useful for my doctor, but not really for me!) I wanted to fix these things, for which I grabbed my MacBook Pro. But I couldn't find it on my primary (Google) calendar (third screenshot). Weird.

I opened the OS X calendar (fourth screenshot), and once again, nothing there—my Mac does sync to my Google calendar, but checking my Internet Account Preferences, it did not sync to my iCloud calendar.

So I added the iCloud calendar sync, and there, the event appeared (final screenshot). But here's my questions:

1. How did the doctor get this onto the calendar in the first place? There's no corresponding invite in my Gmail, I don't use Apple mail and I only gave the doctor my Gmail address.

2. Is there some way to copy the event over from the iCloud (which I don't use for scheduling) to my Google calendar, or do I just have to reenter the information?

3. If you know what the doctor did to send the invite, whatever the doctor did this time is different from all the previous times. If it wasn't a fluke and I expect these non-Google invites to continue, is there some way I can get a notification (on Android or Gmail) of the invite? I don't carry an iPhone and my iPad usually stays at home, it's just a "player for iOS-only software", so iOS notifications are fairly useless to me.___

posted image

2015-02-06 19:51:57 (6 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Brother P-touch label-printing scripting library?

Dear lazyweb,

Either this does not exist, or my search-fu is particularly bad today. Anyone know of a library in any of the major Unix high-level languages (preferably Perl, Python or Ruby, but I'm willing to go farther afield) to help automate the printing of labels for things like cable identification?

My label printer (a Brother P-touch PT-2700) is exposed as a standard printer queue, so I could experiment using standard raster generators, but really—a product that datacenter techs could use for organization purposes and no one's written a library for it in Perl, Python or Ruby? No, not possible. Therefore, it's my search-fu that's failing me.

Can someone, please, help me try to figure out why I'm so inept at searching for this and what I might do to rectify that?

(Note: Ia... more »

Brother P-touch label-printing scripting library?

Dear lazyweb,

Either this does not exist, or my search-fu is particularly bad today. Anyone know of a library in any of the major Unix high-level languages (preferably Perl, Python or Ruby, but I'm willing to go farther afield) to help automate the printing of labels for things like cable identification?

My label printer (a Brother P-touch PT-2700) is exposed as a standard printer queue, so I could experiment using standard raster generators, but really—a product that datacenter techs could use for organization purposes and no one's written a library for it in Perl, Python or Ruby? No, not possible. Therefore, it's my search-fu that's failing me.

Can someone, please, help me try to figure out why I'm so inept at searching for this and what I might do to rectify that?

(Note: I am aware of one program, B-Label, linked below, but it hasn't been updated in quite some time, is written in Perl but doesn't run except as a GUI application (!?! this is Perl, people!), and doesn't support graphics, which I need.)___

posted image

2015-01-26 18:31:25 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

"The discrepancy in the New York metro is due to expected narrow bands of intense snowfall only a few miles in width, for which meteorologists haven’t yet evolved significant predictive skill beyond just a few hours in advance. We’ll know more details once the storm gets cranking."

A good reminder that while snow total forecasts are coming down from the worst predictions of last night, especially for NYC, that may indicate good news—but, as appears to be the case here, it may just indicate the models are less confident.

I'm waiting for the 2 p.m. Euro model; if it follows the NWS in substantially lowering the snow total in NYC, I'll feel more confident about the lessened snow forecasts.

In other blizzard news, Mayor de Blasio just finished a press conference in which he said only emergency vehicles are to be on the street after 11 p.m. tonight.Combi... more »

"The discrepancy in the New York metro is due to expected narrow bands of intense snowfall only a few miles in width, for which meteorologists haven’t yet evolved significant predictive skill beyond just a few hours in advance. We’ll know more details once the storm gets cranking."

A good reminder that while snow total forecasts are coming down from the worst predictions of last night, especially for NYC, that may indicate good news—but, as appears to be the case here, it may just indicate the models are less confident.

I'm waiting for the 2 p.m. Euro model; if it follows the NWS in substantially lowering the snow total in NYC, I'll feel more confident about the lessened snow forecasts.

In other blizzard news, Mayor de Blasio just finished a press conference in which he said only emergency vehicles are to be on the street after 11 p.m. tonight. Combine that with the likelihood of public transit shutting down around 9 p.m., and we have the closest thing to a curfew I can ever recall in New York.___

2015-01-25 20:55:07 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"The blizzard watch is no longer in effect" seems like an unfortunate sentence to include in a blizzard warning that goes on to predict "possibly the worst winter storm in decades", seeing as that sentence is exactly long enough to be read in a glance on a typical weather streamer, with no other context. Puts one in mind of jokes with the setup being, "the doctor says, 'The good news is...'"

"The blizzard watch is no longer in effect" seems like an unfortunate sentence to include in a blizzard warning that goes on to predict "possibly the worst winter storm in decades", seeing as that sentence is exactly long enough to be read in a glance on a typical weather streamer, with no other context. Puts one in mind of jokes with the setup being, "the doctor says, 'The good news is...'"___

posted image

2015-01-24 22:51:58 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Disney withholding Blu-ray 3D in the U.S.?

I went to pre-order Big Hero 6 and found that while there's a Blu-ray, there's no 3D. I haven't bought a (non-Marvel) Disney disc since Tangled in 3D, so haven't previously noticed it, but apparently the same was true for Frozen and Brave — despite being presented in theaters in 3D, you can't get it on Blu-ray 3D.

Well, you can't get 3D on an American release, anyway. The weird part is the UK and Australia did get Frozen and Brave released on Blu-ray 3D—on region-free discs, so you can import them!

Anyone know if a 3D release of Big Hero 6 on disc has been announced elsewhere?

And does anyone know why Disney's doing this? Yes, I know that 3D HDTV's are less popular here than in other parts of the world, but other studios (including Disney's own Marvel Studios) releaseBlu... more »

Disney withholding Blu-ray 3D in the U.S.?

I went to pre-order Big Hero 6 and found that while there's a Blu-ray, there's no 3D. I haven't bought a (non-Marvel) Disney disc since Tangled in 3D, so haven't previously noticed it, but apparently the same was true for Frozen and Brave — despite being presented in theaters in 3D, you can't get it on Blu-ray 3D.

Well, you can't get 3D on an American release, anyway. The weird part is the UK and Australia did get Frozen and Brave released on Blu-ray 3D—on region-free discs, so you can import them!

Anyone know if a 3D release of Big Hero 6 on disc has been announced elsewhere?

And does anyone know why Disney's doing this? Yes, I know that 3D HDTV's are less popular here than in other parts of the world, but other studios (including Disney's own Marvel Studios) release Blu-rays of their 3D movies as a set with a non-3D Blu-ray and a DVD.

One could argue they're slow-rolling, hoping people will buy the 2D now and the 3D also later, but the global 3D releases of prior movies only a few weeks later than the US non-3D releases seem to belie that—not to mention that there's still no American release of either Frozen or of Brave in 3D, so if it's a slow roll, it's a very slow roll.

(This is the sort of thing that Googles poorly—it turns up plenty of shopping links, a smattering of sites that just massage and repost press releases, and thousands of forum posts of people complaining about the same issue, but no informative sources.)___

2015-01-23 22:06:53 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Something English has that I wished it lacked... uh... not?

At risk of getting my Descriptivist Card™ voided: I think I've stumbled upon one way that English is demonstrably worse than many other languages.

I was watching an anchor on the news who said something like (emphasis mine and rewritten from memory): "[The proposed path for New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's suggested] elevated railway to LaGuardia goes exactly the wrong way for the total travel time to be longer than it would be for almost anyone in any part of New York City... to go shorter times, taking less time... to... go faster by... some other mechanism... uh... like the bus."

At the point of the italics, the anchor has made a common speech error, a mental slip substituting an antonym (longer) for the intended word (shorter). This error is common—and, despite the persistentmyt... more »

Something English has that I wished it lacked... uh... not?

At risk of getting my Descriptivist Card™ voided: I think I've stumbled upon one way that English is demonstrably worse than many other languages.

I was watching an anchor on the news who said something like (emphasis mine and rewritten from memory): "[The proposed path for New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's suggested] elevated railway to LaGuardia goes exactly the wrong way for the total travel time to be longer than it would be for almost anyone in any part of New York City... to go shorter times, taking less time... to... go faster by... some other mechanism... uh... like the bus."

At the point of the italics, the anchor has made a common speech error, a mental slip substituting an antonym (longer) for the intended word (shorter). This error is common—and, despite the persistent myth, does not seem to indicate the speaker's subconscious views.

It's especially common in sentences with many dependent clauses—and utterances including the error often go completely unnoticed, even by copy editors in written speech, as pragmatics take over. If the anchor had just said, "[the] railway to LaGuardia goes exactly the wrong way for the total travel time to be longer than it would be for almost anyone in any part of New York City than just taking the bus", I suspect most listeners wouldn't notice the mistake, nor would they think the anchor was decrying the alleged speediness of the proposed ride as some sort of disadvantage.

But the anchor noticed the slip. And TV news people are trained on some things, like avoiding "um", remembering to look at the camera while narrating but not look at the camera when interviewing someone, and so on, with the relevant one here being "if something goes awry, just keep going". An correction on a mispronunciation or wrong word is often awkward. So the anchor tries to recover without explicitly admitting an error.

Sometimes recovery is possible; if the intended sentence were, "the President's proposal is to lower taxes on the middle class and pay for it by raising taxes on the ultra-wealthy", an anchor can recover from the slip, "the President's proposal is to raise taxes on the...", by flipping around the upcoming noun phrases, to "...ultra-wealthy, in order to pay for lowered taxes on the middle class"—at least, if the anchor is quick-witted enough.

But once, in linguistics terms, you have a "bound predicate", meaning you not only have a context-free relational expression—like "X takes longer than Y"—but have bound it to some context—like "a hoped-for trip takes longer than a current trip",—it's too late; in semantic terms, "a truth value has been obtained", and either the statement matches the real world (and the statement is true) or it doesn't (and the statement is in error or a lie).

In English, we can negate an entire complex sentence before it begins with things like, "it is not the case that...", we can negate clauses with a simple "not", and many adjectives and adverbs can take negative prefixes—though these prefixes are stubbornly unproductive¹, as clumsy attempts to make words like "non-private" (or is it "unprivate"?) show.

But English has a paucity of postfix negations. The postfixes –less and –free are even less productive than un- and non-. The only common clause-level postfix negation is the sarcastic "... NOT!"

At an even higher level, we have rhetorical negation in the form of quoting someone the speaker disagrees with—or, as seen frequently this week in the President's State of the Union address and its myriad responses, "quoting" a straw-man, as in, "some people say there's no point in even trying. I say they're wrong."²

So at the sentence level, the best we can manage is a strained retroactive straw-man quote, like "...is what an idiot might say."

So that's the sad state of English. But many other languages have productive, unremarkable postfix negations. Japanese, for instance, has particles (postfixes) to negate many parts of speech, including verbs and adjectives. (Japanese textbooks in English insist on referring to this process as "conjugation", giving fits to generations of Japanese-language students trying to figure out why they're conjugating the past tense of "green".)

SOV languages (where the typical word order is subject-object-verb, unlike English, an SVO language) allow the verb to be deferred so late that an entire clause or sentence can typically be negated at the last moment. Even free word-order SVO languages like Russian often allow a speaker, upon realizing an antonym-substitution error, to recover by negating a later phrase, using function-marking inflection to grammatically "move" it back up to where the error was.

So: here I posit that English is, by one objective measure, inferior to many (perhaps most in terms of speakers?) other world languages.


¹ "Unproductive" in the linguistics sense: a rule that works for one case (happy → unhappy) doesn't work for another it seems it "should" work with (sleepy → *unsleepy). When a rule is entirely unproductive, or when certain morphemes refuse to admit a productive rule (Mary → Mary's / you → *you's) we call its outputs "irregular". (Asterisks, following usual linguistic practice, mean the following expression seems to be ungrammatical.)

² It never ceases to amaze me how often politicians do this, given the ease with which an opponent's political ad can edit out the explanatory bits and make it seem like the politicians were actually making the statement they disagreed with.___

posted image

2015-01-17 23:44:32 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Not sure I agree with this bit about Jewish and gay inclusion in Harry Potter:

Seanan McGuire on Dumbledore:

“I do not consider Dumbledore to be successful representation. If you have to tell me after the fact that you should get credit for having gay content because this character, whose romantic life was never, ever, ever, never, ever, ever once mentioned, really liked the same gender—no, you failed. I love J.K. Rowling, I love Harry Potter, she does not get credit for that, any more than she gets credit for having Jewish inclusion because she recently mentioned that there was one Jewish wizard at Hogwarts. You know what? No. Show me the Jewish wizard at Hogwarts having serious philosophical issues with, ‘Can I cast spells on the Sabbath?’ Show me the kitchen dealing with the ramifications of preparing kosher food when you can’t bring a rabbi in but everybody else isgetting m... more »

Not sure I agree with this bit about Jewish and gay inclusion in Harry Potter:

Seanan McGuire on Dumbledore:

“I do not consider Dumbledore to be successful representation. If you have to tell me after the fact that you should get credit for having gay content because this character, whose romantic life was never, ever, ever, never, ever, ever once mentioned, really liked the same gender—no, you failed. I love J.K. Rowling, I love Harry Potter, she does not get credit for that, any more than she gets credit for having Jewish inclusion because she recently mentioned that there was one Jewish wizard at Hogwarts. You know what? No. Show me the Jewish wizard at Hogwarts having serious philosophical issues with, ‘Can I cast spells on the Sabbath?’ Show me the kitchen dealing with the ramifications of preparing kosher food when you can’t bring a rabbi in but everybody else is getting meat. It does not work. Dumbledore is not successful representation. … You do not get credit for Dumbledore. That is not even doing the bare minimum.”

I think I agree more on Jewish inclusion, but to the extent I disagree, it's for the same reason I disagree on Dumbledore.

On whether the Jewish inclusion is credible, I'm not sure Senan's questions are so vital. Everyone disagrees on what it means to be "observant" (as the old saying goes, for every two Jews you get three opinions), but I don't think observance, and specifically, keeping kosher or Shabbat is a terribly central question.

Keeping kosher can serve as a rough proxy for observance that can be reasonably compared between Jews in different denominations, cultures, and countries, if only because it's more objective than most other measures. Is a Jew who observes all the big holidays, but doesn't fully observe the Sabbath, and only keeps kosher for Passover more, or less, observant than one who observes the Sabbath and is kosher, but only bothers with Yom Kippur, Passover, and Purim (because it's fun)? It's so much easier to ask a survey respondent, "do you keep kosher?"

And maybe kashrut is more relevant in Britain—from what stats I've been able to dig up, it seems like maybe a third of British Jews self-report that they fully keep kosher (or at least would like to), about double the proportion of Jewish Americans. But one could reasonably presume that a hefty majority of Jewish Hogwarts students—assuming they're no more or less observant than British Jewish Muggles—wouldn't worry about the details Senan fixates on.

Sure, it's not terribly meaningful inclusion, but, really—in reading Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, when a Ravenclaw by the name of "Anthony Goldstein" is mentioned, could any Jew miss the hint? It may have been coded, token inclusion, but it wasn't retconned.

The same, but more so, goes for Dumbledore. Senan writes that Dumbledore's "romantic life was never, ever, ever, never, ever, ever once mentioned", but I think that's simply untrue.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows has a subplot, in the form of quotations from Rita Skeeter's gossipy, unauthorized, posthumous biography of Dumbledore. I would think that anyone familiar with that style of celebrity gossip (especially the way that British celebrity journalism, without the exception to libel laws for public figures we have in the U.S., makes veiled insinuations) would immediately recognize the descriptions of young Albus Dumbledore's fraught relationship with young dark wizard Gellert Grindelwald as typical for a British gossip writer to insinuate homosexuality. (Even in 2007 when the book was published, alleging homosexuality was legally libelous in Britain, and it was most definitely so in the mid-90's when the book was set.)

I know in my reading the book when it came out—some three months before Rowling said Dumbledore was gay—I was disappointed the book left Dumbledore's gayness as mere insinuation, but I assumed either Rowling or her publishers decided that a children's book—especially one so widely translated and distributed into even the most anti-gay countries—couldn't be overt about it. But there was no doubt in my mind that Rowling had written, unequivocally, that Dumbledore was gay, and telling any readers capable of understanding the message. Doing a search limited to the period between the book's release and Rowling's Carnegie Hall appearance, I see many reviewers and fans also caught the message, and wrote about it at the time.

I may simply be suffering from selective memory, but I can't recall a case where any other character's background was delved into beyond what the plot required.

The only thing that surprised me when the headlines appeared in October 2007, after Rowling's answer to a fan in New York, was how long they'd taken. So here too, I think the inclusion was token and coded, but it wasn't retconning.___

2015-01-10 21:25:39 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Apple ID two-step now supports Google Voice SMS?

For years now, I've had to make an exception to always using two-factor authentication when offered in the case of my Apple ID. Apple has only supported SMS codes and their "find my iOS device" service as second factors, and that was a problem for me because a) I don't have an iPhone (and don't carry my iPad around with me usually) and b) Apple wouldn't deliver SMS codes to Google Voice numbers.

The suggested workaround has been to use your phone's native number to receive the SMS, but I have SMS blocked by my carrier (aside from these infrequently-needed verification codes, the only SMS's I ever received to the native number were spam and wrong numbers).  So my Apple ID has been single-factor for far too long for my comfort.

I tried every few months to see if Apple codes to Google... more »

Apple ID two-step now supports Google Voice SMS?

For years now, I've had to make an exception to always using two-factor authentication when offered in the case of my Apple ID. Apple has only supported SMS codes and their "find my iOS device" service as second factors, and that was a problem for me because a) I don't have an iPhone (and don't carry my iPad around with me usually) and b) Apple wouldn't deliver SMS codes to Google Voice numbers.

The suggested workaround has been to use your phone's native number to receive the SMS, but I have SMS blocked by my carrier (aside from these infrequently-needed verification codes, the only SMS's I ever received to the native number were spam and wrong numbers).  So my Apple ID has been single-factor for far too long for my comfort.

I tried every few months to see if Apple codes to Google Voice would start working, and lo and behold, this week it did! I don't see any announcements on the matter, so I'm not sure when it changed, but it must have been fairly recently. If you've been holding off on setting up two-step on your Apple ID for this reason, now's the time to fix that.___

2015-01-09 19:58:13 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

I've had a series of tests this week at New York Presbyterian/Cornell Weill, which is on the Upper East Side a twelve-minute walk from the nearest subway. Because it's hard to get there, I've had so many trips back and forth (two a day each way) and it's been so cold, I've used Uber for the first time. (I know, get with the times, right?)

Overall the service works nicely, and I especially like how you can set up a trip by starting with directions in Google Maps. But why, oh why, did they think it was a good idea for the Uber app to display a splash screen every single time you open it--even when just switching to another app then back?

If I'm standing on a street corner, waiting, of course I'm going to open another app while I wait. And of course I'm going to want to frequently switch back to check on my pickup. The splash screen, and the few... more »

I've had a series of tests this week at New York Presbyterian/Cornell Weill, which is on the Upper East Side a twelve-minute walk from the nearest subway. Because it's hard to get there, I've had so many trips back and forth (two a day each way) and it's been so cold, I've used Uber for the first time. (I know, get with the times, right?)

Overall the service works nicely, and I especially like how you can set up a trip by starting with directions in Google Maps. But why, oh why, did they think it was a good idea for the Uber app to display a splash screen every single time you open it--even when just switching to another app then back?

If I'm standing on a street corner, waiting, of course I'm going to open another app while I wait. And of course I'm going to want to frequently switch back to check on my pickup. The splash screen, and the few seconds' wait, does absolutely nothing but raise my blood pressure.___

2015-01-08 15:34:38 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Android and Sheets app URL launching? (UPDATE)

Google Forms is a product whose relationship to... (bah, there are times I really want to use a Google-internal codename, because the marketing names just don't make any technical sense...) to Google Drive Sheets, as opposed to the old Google Doc Spreadsheets, has lately been somewhat diaphanous. But it mostly works seamlessly, so why worry?

An annoyance I can't figure out if it's even possible to fix, though: I have a Form whose post-submit "thank you" page has a link to the Sheet in question. But if I tap it on Android, it opens the sheet in Chrome, not in the Sheets app. This is bad because even small spreadsheets tend to hang Chrome on Android, and this spreadsheet isn't small. But I've tried resetting both Chrome's and Sheet's launch intents, and I still can't choose to go to the Form... more »

Android and Sheets app URL launching? (UPDATE)

Google Forms is a product whose relationship to... (bah, there are times I really want to use a Google-internal codename, because the marketing names just don't make any technical sense...) to Google Drive Sheets, as opposed to the old Google Doc Spreadsheets, has lately been somewhat diaphanous. But it mostly works seamlessly, so why worry?

An annoyance I can't figure out if it's even possible to fix, though: I have a Form whose post-submit "thank you" page has a link to the Sheet in question. But if I tap it on Android, it opens the sheet in Chrome, not in the Sheets app. This is bad because even small spreadsheets tend to hang Chrome on Android, and this spreadsheet isn't small. But I've tried resetting both Chrome's and Sheet's launch intents, and I still can't choose to go to the Form in Chrome without also going to the spreadsheet in Chrome.

Anyone have a solution? (And no, you can't open a Form in the Sheets app.)

Update, 9 Jan 14:30 EST: And randomly, it's working now, at least on my tablet.___

2015-01-07 22:20:37 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

I'm finally catching up with Serial (remarkably, I've managed to avoid spoilers, though I know Jay gave a post-Serial interview last week) and just listened to episode 10—a spoiler's coming up if you haven't gotten that far yet, but , really, what fan of Serial would still be that far behind? :-) 

I'm not naïve; I know Sarah Koenig is giving the listeners the slow roll. But the bit she drops into the last few minutes of episode 10 about Jay being furnished a lawyer by the prosecution was so jaw-dropping, "burying the lede" doesn't even seem to begin to describe it....

I'm finally catching up with Serial (remarkably, I've managed to avoid spoilers, though I know Jay gave a post-Serial interview last week) and just listened to episode 10—a spoiler's coming up if you haven't gotten that far yet, but , really, what fan of Serial would still be that far behind? :-) 

I'm not naïve; I know Sarah Koenig is giving the listeners the slow roll. But the bit she drops into the last few minutes of episode 10 about Jay being furnished a lawyer by the prosecution was so jaw-dropping, "burying the lede" doesn't even seem to begin to describe it....___

2015-01-04 21:11:48 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

defaults manager for OS X?

I know at some point I saw a project on GitHub for managing the defaults database on OS X, so that you could migrate your defaults modifications from Mac to Mac, version control them with your config files, and so on. But while I thought I'd bookmarked it, I guess I didn't.

Anyone know what utility I'm thinking of?

defaults manager for OS X?

I know at some point I saw a project on GitHub for managing the defaults database on OS X, so that you could migrate your defaults modifications from Mac to Mac, version control them with your config files, and so on. But while I thought I'd bookmarked it, I guess I didn't.

Anyone know what utility I'm thinking of?___

2015-01-03 21:24:01 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

CLI to list GitHub repo branches without cloning?

I feel like this is a dumb question I should be able to answer via manpages and, failing that, Google searches, but it eludes me...

I'd like to iterate over all the branches of all my repos on GitHub, without cloning them first. (By "iterate", I just mean I need a list of all of them and can take it from there.)

Neither the hub (GitHub's own official CLI overlay to the git command) nor the NodeGH (an independent node.js effort with different design goals) documentation suggests a way to do this.

I could write a crawler that parses the GitHub HTML (assuming it is designed in such a way that the info is attainable without user interaction or JavaScript); that would be fairly easy since gh re --list gives me the repo names and it's trivial to construct a github URL given the repo name.... more »

CLI to list GitHub repo branches without cloning?

I feel like this is a dumb question I should be able to answer via manpages and, failing that, Google searches, but it eludes me...

I'd like to iterate over all the branches of all my repos on GitHub, without cloning them first. (By "iterate", I just mean I need a list of all of them and can take it from there.)

Neither the hub (GitHub's own official CLI overlay to the git command) nor the NodeGH (an independent node.js effort with different design goals) documentation suggests a way to do this.

I could write a crawler that parses the GitHub HTML (assuming it is designed in such a way that the info is attainable without user interaction or JavaScript); that would be fairly easy since gh re --list gives me the repo names and it's trivial to construct a github URL given the repo name.

I could also do it by creating temporary local clones, and then I could interrogate each remote for its branches. But unless I'm mistaken, there's no way to do a git clone without pulling the code down.

So: anyone know a way to list all branches from within a script without cloning?___

posted image

2015-01-01 22:48:20 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

This has been bugging me ever since I first started writing Go: the official +The Go Programming Language documentation pages (for example, the one for the math package below, at http://golang.org/pkg/math/) install a jQuery hotkey handler that intercepts all keystrokes.

The handler doesn't pass along keystrokes it doesn't recognize, it just silences them. So several Chrome extensions I like to use on pages like this are unusable unless they can be invoked some way other than hotkeys. The way this handler is written, even if the extension offers re-configurable hotkeys, you still can't invoke it since the page intercepts all keystrokes.

In the video I show this by setting keyboard event handler breakpoints, then returning focus to the page. I press slash (the invocation key for Quick Find, on the Chrome Store at http://goo.gl/b3ibwC). That results in the breakpointg... more »

This has been bugging me ever since I first started writing Go: the official +The Go Programming Language documentation pages (for example, the one for the math package below, at http://golang.org/pkg/math/) install a jQuery hotkey handler that intercepts all keystrokes.

The handler doesn't pass along keystrokes it doesn't recognize, it just silences them. So several Chrome extensions I like to use on pages like this are unusable unless they can be invoked some way other than hotkeys. The way this handler is written, even if the extension offers re-configurable hotkeys, you still can't invoke it since the page intercepts all keystrokes.

In the video I show this by setting keyboard event handler breakpoints, then returning focus to the page. I press slash (the invocation key for Quick Find, on the Chrome Store at http://goo.gl/b3ibwC). That results in the breakpoint getting triggered. As you can see, it's just a single line of code, and once you step past it, control returns—but the keystroke event is gone, no other handler can capture it.

I don't see a website contact on golang.org; it seems to just list contacts for issues with the language itself, and I didn't see a tracker category for website issues. If anyone happens to know who the maintainers of the website are, I'd like to pass this on.___

posted image

2014-12-28 22:38:47 (22 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

I've read some disturbing stories about the "churn score": people who made a habit of regularly treating "no obligation introductory rates" as if they, in fact, had no obligation, or who used promotions by competing phone or cable companies as opportunities to play providers against one another for the best deals, finding that they suddenly couldn't get service at all. 

I'm curious what my more ardent free-market libertarian friends make of this sort of development? It's seemed to me that the traditional libertarian arguments against commercial regulation become shaky when applied to the power imbalance of individual consumers versus large corporations offering nonnegotiable take-it-or-leave-it contracts, insisting on waiving rights of redress or due process through mandatory arbitration clauses or even, it now seems, the right to negotiate at all.
more »

I've read some disturbing stories about the "churn score": people who made a habit of regularly treating "no obligation introductory rates" as if they, in fact, had no obligation, or who used promotions by competing phone or cable companies as opportunities to play providers against one another for the best deals, finding that they suddenly couldn't get service at all. 

I'm curious what my more ardent free-market libertarian friends make of this sort of development? It's seemed to me that the traditional libertarian arguments against commercial regulation become shaky when applied to the power imbalance of individual consumers versus large corporations offering nonnegotiable take-it-or-leave-it contracts, insisting on waiving rights of redress or due process through mandatory arbitration clauses or even, it now seems, the right to negotiate at all.

(I concede that, if one could retcon the entire world into a utopian free market, where the forces that have impelled so many necessary services into oligopoly never happened, some of these gross power imbalances may have never existed. But I rarely if ever hear free-market libertarians support regulation even as a corrective to past regulatory mistakes; otherwise I'd think the editorial pages of the Wall Street Journal would be constantly clamoring for antitrust action.)___

2014-12-26 21:56:44 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Y'know, I'm really glad when we gave my boyfriend's little brother a PS4 for Christmas, we didn’t bother with any games on disc, because downloading games from PSN is so much more convenient. He's just had loads of fun playing with his new console since Christmas. #thingsthatdidnthappen  

Y'know, I'm really glad when we gave my boyfriend's little brother a PS4 for Christmas, we didn’t bother with any games on disc, because downloading games from PSN is so much more convenient. He's just had loads of fun playing with his new console since Christmas. #thingsthatdidnthappen  ___

posted image

2014-12-26 21:42:17 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Mac resource bundle version shenanigans?

This seems weird...

On my MacBook Pro, I just noticed that a QuickLook generator I use (The BetterZip Quick Look Generator, http://goo.gl/wkBHVE, which lets you inspect the contents of archive files using the spacebar preview function) was an outdated version, 1.2.

(I discovered it was outdated because of some broken functionality; I determined which version I'd ben running by going to /Library/QuickLook and doing a Get Info on the bundle.)

So I downloaded the new version, 1.5, into /Library/QuickLook, and when it asked if I wanted to replace the preexisting bundle there, I said yes, and authenticated to root when Finder prompted me to. Just to check, I think did Get Info on the new bundle. It still said "1.2".

Odd. So I tried again, once again saying yes to replacement and... more »

Mac resource bundle version shenanigans?

This seems weird...

On my MacBook Pro, I just noticed that a QuickLook generator I use (The BetterZip Quick Look Generator, http://goo.gl/wkBHVE, which lets you inspect the contents of archive files using the spacebar preview function) was an outdated version, 1.2.

(I discovered it was outdated because of some broken functionality; I determined which version I'd ben running by going to /Library/QuickLook and doing a Get Info on the bundle.)

So I downloaded the new version, 1.5, into /Library/QuickLook, and when it asked if I wanted to replace the preexisting bundle there, I said yes, and authenticated to root when Finder prompted me to. Just to check, I think did Get Info on the new bundle. It still said "1.2".

Odd. So I tried again, once again saying yes to replacement and re-authenticating. Still 1.2. Oh, well, I thought, the developer must've forgotten to update the version of the bundle before shipping. So I verified that by unzipping the downloaded 1.5 archive and ran Get Info on that: 1.5.

Oops, guess my hypothesis wasn't correct. Second hypothesis: I must have had the old 1.2 version skulking around my download folder somewhere. So I re-downloaded into an otherwise empty directory, unzipped, checked the bundle with Get Info (version 1.5, it reported), dragged the 1.5 bundle to /Library/QuickLook (again with the replace/re-authenticate ceremony), and ran Get Info: 1.2, again.

Hmm, maybe Finder's reporting it's overwriting the old with the new, but it isn't, or is doing it wrong (like by putting the bundle inside the old bundle).So to check, I re-unpacked the 1.5 archive and diffed the contents against what I'd just installed. Nope, they're identical, so I definitely installed the 1.5 bundle.

Next hypothesis: something's funny about Finder's "Replace" functionality specifically. So I moved the installed bundle into the trash, and dragged the (verified 1.5) bundle in again. This time, I still had to re-authenticate, but I didn't have to agree to overwrite, obviously. When it finished i ran Get Info, and it said: 1.2. What?

I trashed it and ran Get Info against it in the Trash. 1.5. Clicked the button to return it from the Trash, Get Info: 1.2.

Some weird file-association thing? I deleted (really deleted, with rm, not just trashed) every copy of the 1.2 I could find, and all the 1.5 ones and even the downloaded archive file as well for good measure, re-downloaded it, unpacked it and ran Get Info (1.5), reinstalled it to /Library/QuickLook, and ran Get Info. 1.2.

This is where I get that occasional reminder that Macs aren't really fully Unix boxes after all. So, tell me: what the heck's going on?___

posted image

2014-12-19 16:37:56 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

About halfway through the Colbert Report finale musical number last night, right after the cuts to Afghanistan and the ISS, two voices—a man's and a woman's—started carrying the whole room. Even as the number of singers, literally, climbed into the hundreds. "Who are they?" I said out loud. It wasn't volume; it was just technique.

I've watched it a few times now, and I'm pretty certain it's the moment when Barry Manilow and Cyndi Lauper end up being jostled next to one another. The greats are great for a reason.

That goes for Colbert too.

About halfway through the Colbert Report finale musical number last night, right after the cuts to Afghanistan and the ISS, two voices—a man's and a woman's—started carrying the whole room. Even as the number of singers, literally, climbed into the hundreds. "Who are they?" I said out loud. It wasn't volume; it was just technique.

I've watched it a few times now, and I'm pretty certain it's the moment when Barry Manilow and Cyndi Lauper end up being jostled next to one another. The greats are great for a reason.

That goes for Colbert too.___

posted image

2014-12-08 20:12:12 (8 comments, 9 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

textql: Execute SQL against structured text docs like CSV

Where have you been all my life? I'm surprised I haven't seen this before, especially given the number of times I've written special-purpose programs to do exactly this, but couldn't afford the time to generalize it....

The most useful way to call textql, I think, is like:

~/go/bin/textql --source=./source.csv --save-to=./dest.db --header=true

which makes it save a sqlite3 file you can use at leisure; the last argument assumes the first line of the CSV file was a header.

It's also a pretty decent example of a relatively short real-world Go program to solve a simple data-munging problem, if you're learning Go and are ready to start reading real code.

textql: Execute SQL against structured text docs like CSV

Where have you been all my life? I'm surprised I haven't seen this before, especially given the number of times I've written special-purpose programs to do exactly this, but couldn't afford the time to generalize it....

The most useful way to call textql, I think, is like:

~/go/bin/textql --source=./source.csv --save-to=./dest.db --header=true

which makes it save a sqlite3 file you can use at leisure; the last argument assumes the first line of the CSV file was a header.

It's also a pretty decent example of a relatively short real-world Go program to solve a simple data-munging problem, if you're learning Go and are ready to start reading real code.___

2014-12-07 22:11:15 (8 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Inbox and multiple labels: missing for now, or gone for good?

Since switching my personal mail to Gmail several years ago, I've found one of the most useful features has been labels (and ways to automatically assign messages to them, either via manually-created filters or the "smart" scanning that Gmail's been doing, at least since the switch to the tabbed interface).

Part of what's made labels so useful to me is precisely the reason Gmail's "labels" were designed to be better than the "folders" used in previous email systems—conversations can belong to more than one at a time.

I've used this feature to slice-and-dice my mail in many useful ways. For instance, an email receipt for a taxicab goes into the "Purchases" label, the "Travel" label, and my custom "Receipts/Taxis" label. Thef... more »

Inbox and multiple labels: missing for now, or gone for good?

Since switching my personal mail to Gmail several years ago, I've found one of the most useful features has been labels (and ways to automatically assign messages to them, either via manually-created filters or the "smart" scanning that Gmail's been doing, at least since the switch to the tabbed interface).

Part of what's made labels so useful to me is precisely the reason Gmail's "labels" were designed to be better than the "folders" used in previous email systems—conversations can belong to more than one at a time.

I've used this feature to slice-and-dice my mail in many useful ways. For instance, an email receipt for a taxicab goes into the "Purchases" label, the "Travel" label, and my custom "Receipts/Taxis" label. The first two are useful during intake processing, when I'm first reading the message. The custom label is useful for later searches—when I'm doing an expense report, for example.

Since getting my invitation last month, I've grown to really like Inbox, the invite-only beta Google released earlier this year. The "snooze" feature—which lets you attach a reminder to an email, then getting it out of the way until it's time to deal with it—is fantastic, and really is Inbox's killer feature.

Snooze bridges that annoying gap folks who use GTD-like organization methods or try to practice inbox-zero are so familiar with: the just-arrived email that needs your attention, but can't be dealt with immediately. In the GTD model, your only choices in this circumstance is either to file a pointer to the email in your "trusted system" to be dealt with some undefined time later, when you're dealing with other tasks like the one in the email, or, if it needs to be dealt with by a deadline, filing a pointer to the email in your calendar. Inbox's snooze gives you a much-needed third option: snooze the email until a specific point in the future when you will be able to deal with it, without resorting to some organizational cruft. This new option for processing is so useful, I've basically switched entirely to using Inbox for email reading.

But using Inbox instead of the traditional Gmail interface brings a very unfortunate (and, I think, unnecessary) limitation: you can't easily assign emails to multiple labels. You can still do it using the Gmail interface; either with filters, or manual label assignment, using the "apply labels" drop-down.

You can also assign more than one label from within Inbox, but the procedure is cumbersome and unintuitive:

1. Use the labels drop-down (presented, confusingly, in the three-dots menu next to the subject line; the other three-dots menu, next to the date, gives actions like reply, forward, and print) to move the message to another label;
2. Since moving the message has made it disappear from your screen, search for the message, click the three dots, and select the first label again. (You must search for it; if you go to the new bundle in Inbox you moved it to instead and do it from there, you'll once again move it back to the old label, rather than adding it to the existing ones.)
3. Repeat for any other labels you want the message added to.

The procedure's a bit different depending on whether all, some, or none of the labels you want the message assigned to are "bundled" labels or not.

If you ask me, this is a really unfortunate loss of an incredibly useful feature. That a new app would omit some features found in the old one is unsurprising and to be expected. But losing one of the defining features of Gmail, one that Google trumpeted in its original announcements as being the real killer feature, more important even than the greatly expanded storage compared to other webmail systems? That's really quite puzzling.

It could just be a lagging feature in the pipeline; after all, the "Move labels" button in Gmail arrived separately from the "Apply labels" button. But given the centrality of the Move action in the Inbox interface, I have the sinking feeling that Inbox's designers want to do away with multiple-label application. I hope I'm wrong on that.___

2014-12-05 23:39:00 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

For my phone/VoIP geek friends: it's been an issue known for a long time that Internet-based text messaging systems don't always play well together. I have never been able to receive a second-factor auth code from my bank to my Google Voice number, for instance, and there are lots of examples of this kind of thing.

My question is, do similar problems crop up with fax servers, specifically when a fax sending service interacts with another fax receiving service?

I know it can't be precisely the same issues as with SMS, since faxes travel over the POTS channels directly. But I've been having an ongoing issue where my doctor's office tries to use their electronic records system to send faxes to my insurance company, and the insurance company reports they've never been received, even as the doctor's office gets confirmation they were successfully sent.
... more »

For my phone/VoIP geek friends: it's been an issue known for a long time that Internet-based text messaging systems don't always play well together. I have never been able to receive a second-factor auth code from my bank to my Google Voice number, for instance, and there are lots of examples of this kind of thing.

My question is, do similar problems crop up with fax servers, specifically when a fax sending service interacts with another fax receiving service?

I know it can't be precisely the same issues as with SMS, since faxes travel over the POTS channels directly. But I've been having an ongoing issue where my doctor's office tries to use their electronic records system to send faxes to my insurance company, and the insurance company reports they've never been received, even as the doctor's office gets confirmation they were successfully sent.

When the doctor's office uses the old-fashioned fax machine rather than the service provided by their electronic records company, it gets through. When they used the service to send a fax to an actual fax machine at the insurance company, it gets through. But consistently, when the doctor's office tries using their service to connect to the insurance company's service, it silently fails.

(Both sides shrug their collective shoulders, saying "we don't have trouble sending faxes to anyone else, we send dozens a day" or "we don't have trouble receiving faxes from anyone else, we receive hundreds a day". They both are simply flat-out accusing the other side of lying.)___

2014-12-05 20:02:58 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Inbox: accepting Hangouts invites?

It doesn't appear that the Inbox web app has the same Hangouts invite view that Gmail does. I'm probably just missing the knobbin to click to see it. Can anyone point me in the right direction, or do I just need to use the Android Hangouts app or Gmail?

Inbox: accepting Hangouts invites?

It doesn't appear that the Inbox web app has the same Hangouts invite view that Gmail does. I'm probably just missing the knobbin to click to see it. Can anyone point me in the right direction, or do I just need to use the Android Hangouts app or Gmail?___

2014-12-04 20:17:43 (8 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Is there a way, besides muting the phone entirely, to make Hangouts stop playing its notification ring every time you receive a message, even when the Hangout is the foreground app and the phone is turned on?

I like my Hangouts tone to be a loud attention-getter--for when my phone is turned off and in a pocket or another room. But it makes me want to fling the durn thing across the room when it beeps, and beeps, and beeps, in my hands when I'm trying to have a conversation with someone.

Is there a way, besides muting the phone entirely, to make Hangouts stop playing its notification ring every time you receive a message, even when the Hangout is the foreground app and the phone is turned on?

I like my Hangouts tone to be a loud attention-getter--for when my phone is turned off and in a pocket or another room. But it makes me want to fling the durn thing across the room when it beeps, and beeps, and beeps, in my hands when I'm trying to have a conversation with someone.___

posted image

2014-12-04 17:44:06 (5 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

A very interesting blog post by The Wire creator David Simon about the tradeoffs in re-releasing the show in HD.

Overall, he seems ambivalent about it: happy that he had a chance to intervene before HBO released a version that, by his account at least, had numerous problems (including crew, equipment and even actors whose characters were not in a scene appearing at the edges of shots), but he stresses that this is not the same film he and his crew created.

Simon also notes there were some HD resolution issues with some FX—like Bubbles' dental prosthetics and some CGI—that couldn't be resampled (and so, I presume, look artificial or "Photoshopped"). This is maybe the most common reason that studio TV can't be easily remastered in HD, even if shot on film; pre-HD-era crew like set designers, costume and makeup artists, and FX technicians knew how to produceres... more »

A very interesting blog post by The Wire creator David Simon about the tradeoffs in re-releasing the show in HD.

Overall, he seems ambivalent about it: happy that he had a chance to intervene before HBO released a version that, by his account at least, had numerous problems (including crew, equipment and even actors whose characters were not in a scene appearing at the edges of shots), but he stresses that this is not the same film he and his crew created.

Simon also notes there were some HD resolution issues with some FX—like Bubbles' dental prosthetics and some CGI—that couldn't be resampled (and so, I presume, look artificial or "Photoshopped"). This is maybe the most common reason that studio TV can't be easily remastered in HD, even if shot on film; pre-HD-era crew like set designers, costume and makeup artists, and FX technicians knew how to produce results that looked good in their medium, which was standard-definition TV.

Something like the Blu-Ray release of Star Trek: TNG requires extensive computer retouching of essentially every single frame—even ones lacking any FX in the original—just to repair makeup, costume and scenery. (I've seen original uniform costumes from ST:TNG close-up; they look significantly better on the Blu-Ray than they ever did on set!)

I suspect The Wire had an advantage there from its documentary style; so few shots were "properly" lit—many shots were entirely lit by practicals (i.e., lights that existed in the scene from sources like streetlamps rather than studio lighting)—that the makeup was probably not overdone very much¹, and costumes were often just purchased off-the-rack from places in Baltimore where the characters might have gotten their clothes. So the painstaking process of retouching every frame to fix makeup and costume issues probably wasn't such an issue. (I assume so, if HBO originally was willing to release a version with mike booms and the wrong actors in the frame!)

All that said, I wonder what twenty years from now, the connoisseur's choice for enjoying pre-HD television will be—something like what letterboxed Criterion Collection movies were in the DVD era. Almost certainly remasters like this one of The Wire won't be it, if only because Simon and his original crew aren't running the entire process. (A remaster shepherded by a show's creators is more problematic: it could be a faithful translation, but it also has the potential for George Lucas-esque embellishments, and the subsequent backlash.)

I wonder what a pillarboxed HD remaster of The Wire, with no reframing, would be like? Any show shot on film (or even on many later formats of DV) could be remastered that way. With no further postprocessing, the makeup and FX would still be a real problem.

But, let's face it—a pristine 480i 60 Hz SD signal presented on a 1080p 30 Hz LCD, plasma or OLED display just looks awful. Even the best TV company's built-it downconverters are crap. But on a CRT HDTV (try finding one of those now!), it looks great.

I hold out the hope that someone comes up with a postprocessor that makes SD look good (defined as, "roughly equivalent to what I'd have seen on a high-quality CRT in the 90's"), but a 1080i pillarbox resampling would probably be even better for shows without too much CGI or studio makeup. In other words, show like The Wire. I'd love to see Law & Order done that way—I'd bet the Law halves would look great while the Order halves looked like everyone was wearing clown makeup.

¹ You often hear TV folks mention "HD makeup"—usually followed by a vomit pantomime. They're usually reacting to the fact that HD is so unforgiving that even small blemishes, crow's feet and smile lines must be dealt with. But my understanding is that HD makeup is less garish than television makeup used to be, and more like real-life makeup. Very fancy real-life makeup. Real-life makeup for the bride at a wedding, anyway.

My point is, the makeup for HD—at least when it's not trying to cover up blemishes or aging—looks more acceptable in real life than SD-era TV makeup ever did, so I suspect the reverse—makeup for a gritty documentary-like show like The Wire being more acceptable remastered into HD—may be true as well. But I could be totally wrong about that, anyone with practical information know?___

posted image

2014-11-22 19:15:35 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

I've seen several clips this week of Texas Governor Rick Perry appearing in sit-down stage discussions with yet another iteration of his "new look" he's adopted in the early run-up to 2016—an even newer pair of nerd glasses (which Bill Maher said he needed to give back to MSNBC, their anchors can't see anything without them), grey jacket with no tie, and collar open (I guess the man finally got the memo that he has no neck).

What's funny is that at least three times I've been distracted, with the TV in the background, audio off, and I look up and my first thought has been, "why is Rachel Maddow speaking at a Republican event?" Just do an images search for "Rachel Maddow Rick Perry" and focus a few inches away from your screen. It's a little eerie.

(By the way, is Rachel anti-Superman? She only appears on her show wearing contacts,e... more »

I've seen several clips this week of Texas Governor Rick Perry appearing in sit-down stage discussions with yet another iteration of his "new look" he's adopted in the early run-up to 2016—an even newer pair of nerd glasses (which Bill Maher said he needed to give back to MSNBC, their anchors can't see anything without them), grey jacket with no tie, and collar open (I guess the man finally got the memo that he has no neck).

What's funny is that at least three times I've been distracted, with the TV in the background, audio off, and I look up and my first thought has been, "why is Rachel Maddow speaking at a Republican event?" Just do an images search for "Rachel Maddow Rick Perry" and focus a few inches away from your screen. It's a little eerie.

(By the way, is Rachel anti-Superman? She only appears on her show wearing contacts, every appearance she makes in front of audiences or on non-MSNBC shows like Late Night she's wearing her glasses, which are very distinctive, which seems like something you'd want to push to "sell your brand". Or at least was very distinctive before Rick Perry started doing this strange unwitting power-lesbian impersonation act.)

(Sorry, Tricia and Laura—I'm not making fun of your boss, really. I'm making fun of Rick Perry's in-progress transformation where every tweak seems intended to make him look a little more like your boss. And anyway—she called herself "mannish" on the show just a couple weeks ago.  :-)___

posted image

2014-11-21 17:00:14 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

When I was a little kid I loved The Electric Company, and the "sign songs" were one of my favorite recurring bits. I happened to see this one today and I was surprised to see that the building is 111 Eighth Avenue, now the Google NYC building.

I'm sure my six-year-old self would have been thrilled at the idea that I'd ever work in New York City in that building.

When I was a little kid I loved The Electric Company, and the "sign songs" were one of my favorite recurring bits. I happened to see this one today and I was surprised to see that the building is 111 Eighth Avenue, now the Google NYC building.

I'm sure my six-year-old self would have been thrilled at the idea that I'd ever work in New York City in that building.___

posted image

2014-11-20 20:19:12 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Sous-vide Thanksgiving turkey?

For Thanksgiving this year, I was thinking I might sous-vide the bird. I've seen a number of suggestions on how to go about doing that, and I think I've devised a workable plan of my own.

All involve butchering the turkey, which I know some think is a travesty on Thanksgiving—seeing the Norman Rockwellesque presentation of the whole roasted bird as essential—but I'm okay with that, as I've been at least spatchcocking whole birds for roasting forever. Cutting oven time (and energy, and heating the kitchen) by more than half while increasing the chances of having palatable and safe breast and leg meat is well worth losing the fleeting ooh! moment of bringing out the whole mahogany bird for your guests to exclaim at.

(After all, even when you do do that picturesque presentation, you have to take the bird back into thekit... more »

Sous-vide Thanksgiving turkey?

For Thanksgiving this year, I was thinking I might sous-vide the bird. I've seen a number of suggestions on how to go about doing that, and I think I've devised a workable plan of my own.

All involve butchering the turkey, which I know some think is a travesty on Thanksgiving—seeing the Norman Rockwellesque presentation of the whole roasted bird as essential—but I'm okay with that, as I've been at least spatchcocking whole birds for roasting forever. Cutting oven time (and energy, and heating the kitchen) by more than half while increasing the chances of having palatable and safe breast and leg meat is well worth losing the fleeting ooh! moment of bringing out the whole mahogany bird for your guests to exclaim at.

(After all, even when you do do that picturesque presentation, you have to take the bird back into the kitchen, get it off the platter and onto cutting board, carve and re-platter it, anyway. Anyone who actually tries to carve at the table is going to make a complete mess of it and waste half the meat, or is using an electric knife—which then kind of ruins the whole Norman Rockwell vibe anyway.)

Anyway, while all the sous-vide recipes require butchering the bird, they differ in a) how to butcher the turkey, b) the water-bath time and temperature, and c) how to finish the cooked poultry after removing it from the water bath.

For the butchering, all the recipes I've found say you must hack the bird into parts, at least into separated breasts, wings, and legs; some cut the legs into thighs and drumsticks and/or split the breasts as well. Some specify boning (at least the breasts and thighs), some do not.

This one linked here (http://goo.gl/BCdQYF) at the website of PolyScience Culinary (the cooking division of a company that makes laboratory immersion circulators) is a bit innovative, in suggesting after boning you stuff the thighs. I wonder how much flavor you get from that; generally the reason—aside from tradition—for stuffing the bird, rather than baking a dressing casserole on the side—is that the juices and fat dripping into the cavity add so much flavor. Given how much of those juices and fat come from parts of the bird you don't eat, like the back and neck, I wouldn't think a thigh would add enough to a stuffing to make it worthwhile. I'm tempted to try it, though, just to see.

As nearly always with sous-vide, time and temp gives a choice between a slow cook at equilibrium temperature (where timing is irrelevant; once you reach temperature, you can hold the food there indefinitely with no chance of overcooking), or a faster cook at a higher-than-equilibrium temp (where timing is as important as any traditional cooking method, since you must stop before the bird reaches temp so it doesn't overcook).

For finishing, the favored methods seem to be deep-fat frying (much safer than frying a whole bird, and something I can actually do in a Manhattan apartment!), pan-searing, shallow frying (like fried chicken), high-temp roasting or broiling, or (of course) blowtorch.

So what to do?

If I were just winging it—pardon the pun—I think I would butcher the bird into wings, thighs, drumsticks, and boneless breasts, using five bags (each breast half getting a bag), and brine overnight in the bag. I wouldn't bother with stuffing or boning the thighs, since it's easier to just bake stuffing anyway. I'd then cook the turkey parts in a 64.0 °C (147 °F) bath—which is an equilibrium temp at ≥ 4 hours.

I chose 64.0 °C because that's a point where thighs are just done but breasts aren't overdone. I'm tempted to try medium-rare, which would be about 60.0 °C (140 °F), and should be perfectly safe after at least four hours in the water bath, but a) I don't want a big dinner with guests to be the first time I experiment with poultry at a temperature that would traditionally be considered "underdone", and b) I know many people are alarmed even by the natural pink of an well-done heirloom bird; I don't want anyone to reject the turkey untasted because of its color.

The finishing I'm leaning toward is a shallow-fat fry. At the expense of five extra vacuum bags, I can remove the parts one by one, pat dry, fry just long enough to get that browned skin, reseal in a new dry bag, and plop back into the bath to keep it warm while frying the contents of the next bag.

(This batching procedure would be a bad idea for fried chicken—another surprisingly good use for sous-vide—because, post-fry, the steam in the bag would make the crust soggy. I think it should be fine for a crustless skin like this. If you have firsthand experience to the contrary, let me know; I can still keep the cooked parts warm by other means.)

This all sounds good to me; the only thing missing is gravy. You can, in fact, make gravy just from the juices left in the bag post-cooking—though if you used the bag for brining, you probably need to take the brined meat out and seal it into a clean bag (or if you're using resealables, empty the bag of liquid), before cooking; otherwise most of the "juices" will actually be brine, which does not generally make a tasty gravy! But I think a modification of the way I usually make gravy with a traditionally-roasted spatchcocked bird will help here: after the back and neck are removed in spatchcocking, I put these bones into a second small roasting pan that goes into the oven with the bird; an hour or so later, with the bird still roasting, I remove the roasted bones and use them to make a quick turkey stock.

I think I could use basically the same process here: butcher the bird, put the meaty parts into the sous-vide bags, and put the rest into a roasting pan in the oven. While the meat is still cooking in the water bath, take out the roasted bones, reserving the rendered fat and juices, then make the turkey stock. When the meat is done, add the juices from the bags to the reserved juices from the roasting pan, defat, and make a gravy with those juices and the stock, using some of the turkey fat to make the roux. This seems to me like an easy way to make use of the juices left behind in the sous-vide bags, and still get those roasted flavors into the gravy.

I'm curious what you—especially, those of you who have been cooking sous-vide for awhile—think of my plan?

#thanksgivingdinner   #sousvide   #thanksgivingrecipes   #turkey  ___

posted image

2014-11-14 20:03:40 (8 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

If you use your Mac to power your phone or tablet, for various reasons you might want to disable Android File Transfer's automatic startup-on-connect. Some people just get annoyed at the bouncing icon and/or dialog box.

In my case, there's an outstanding bug (that seems to be consistent for some people) where the USB 3.0 Hi-Speed Bus wedges after disconnecting an Android device while Android File Transfer is running. This is kind of problematic: it's how a Mac laptop's internal keyboard and trackpad are connected, so if you don't have an external keyboard or mouse to connect, your only out is to powercycle the laptop. Oops.

Removing a startup item from Login Items is pretty simple (although most programs that add themselves to Login Items will, on update, add themselves again even if you've removed them; I'm not sure if Android File Transfer does this). But... more »

If you use your Mac to power your phone or tablet, for various reasons you might want to disable Android File Transfer's automatic startup-on-connect. Some people just get annoyed at the bouncing icon and/or dialog box.

In my case, there's an outstanding bug (that seems to be consistent for some people) where the USB 3.0 Hi-Speed Bus wedges after disconnecting an Android device while Android File Transfer is running. This is kind of problematic: it's how a Mac laptop's internal keyboard and trackpad are connected, so if you don't have an external keyboard or mouse to connect, your only out is to powercycle the laptop. Oops.

Removing a startup item from Login Items is pretty simple (although most programs that add themselves to Login Items will, on update, add themselves again even if you've removed them; I'm not sure if Android File Transfer does this). But disabling the agent (a "daemon", for us old Unix types) requires a bit of CLI pokery.___

posted image

2014-11-13 22:03:38 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Table manners: fraught-laden finger foods, and can we just stop worrying, already?

From the Gentleman Scholar: "It is always correct to treat roasted asparagus as a finger food." That's exactly what I learned as a kid, and I had the fancy-pants etiquette training Southerners still style as "cotillion school". But again and again, at dinner parties or in restaurants, I've found I startle people when I pick up a spear and munch.

I think a certain class-conscious hypercorrection results in over-fastidiousness in "fancy" dining situations, leading people to think the rule is "don't touch food with your fingers", resulting in comical attempts at eating sandwiches, fried chicken on the bone, or even corn on the cob with knife and fork.

And I'll grant the asparagus spear is probably the easiest of the "mandatory... more »

Table manners: fraught-laden finger foods, and can we just stop worrying, already?

From the Gentleman Scholar: "It is always correct to treat roasted asparagus as a finger food." That's exactly what I learned as a kid, and I had the fancy-pants etiquette training Southerners still style as "cotillion school". But again and again, at dinner parties or in restaurants, I've found I startle people when I pick up a spear and munch.

I think a certain class-conscious hypercorrection results in over-fastidiousness in "fancy" dining situations, leading people to think the rule is "don't touch food with your fingers", resulting in comical attempts at eating sandwiches, fried chicken on the bone, or even corn on the cob with knife and fork.

And I'll grant the asparagus spear is probably the easiest of the "mandatory finger-foods" to eat with utensils. There are plenty of other foods that seem to me worth much higher priority in the finger-dispensation line. Despite shrimp being a favorite food since childhood, I have never mastered the technique of removing the tail-shell from a partially-peeled shrimp or prawn without touching it—but yet, only completely unpeeled shrimp (or cocktail shrimp) are properly considered finger foods.

You can, of course, simply use your fork to spear the shrimp right at the point where shell ends, lift it to your mouth, and bite such that enough shrimp is left behind to transport the tail back to the plate on the fork, thus fulfilling the "anything returning to the plate must get there by the same means it left the plate" rule. But you waste half the meat this way! If you throw the rules out the window and reach into a saucy dish to extract a shrimp, you can do the same thing you do with shrimp cocktail—squeeze the bit of shell left to hold the tail in place to pop the meat into your mouth, returning the tail to your plate.

But at that point, you've made a hash of the fancy-pants etiquette rules—and, honestly, even the not-so-fancy-pants rules: reaching into a bowl of gumbo or a pasta dish to fish out a morsel is just disgusting.

(I know, I know: "in many cultures they eat the shrimp shells!" Firstly, people saying that, I've found, are almost always the ones not eating shrimp. Secondly, during most of the year, the Gulf and Atlantic shrimp that predominate in the U.S. have thicker, more chitinous shells than most other shrimp and prawn; if you try to eat an unpeeled shrimp whole, you're likely to end up with bleeding gums. Thirdly, dishes where shrimp are typically eaten with peel on either use just-molted shrimp (like soft-shell crabs), or flash-fry the shells into crispness the teeth can negotiate.)

With shrimp, chicken on the bone, or anything that's in the "sometimes finger-food" category, the same rules as with the asparagus applies: if it's saucy and integrated into a dish, you must use utensils; if it's saucy but not integrated into the dish (think a lobster boil or a shell-laden cioppino), you move the item with utensils onto the small plate that has been thoughtfully provided by your host¹, wait for it to cool and drip dry a bit, then eat it with fingers; but if it's very lightly sauced, such as roasted with olive oil or in a vinaigrette, it's a finger food, whether it's on a plate by itself, a garnish, or is itself the main attraction.

Cooks would do well to keep the etiquette of eating their dishes in mind. I always remove head, peel, and tail when I serve a dish like gumbo, so that guests aren't bound to choose between several unattractive options for disposing of those dratted uropods. Chefs who insist on serving tail-on shrimp in pasta, or fried chicken with gravy already slathered on, or whole spears of asparagus mixed in with a chopped salad or other precut mélange (which is the bigger no-no, taking knife and fork to your salad, or reaching into it to extract the asparagus?) are reducing enjoyment of their dish due to diner awkwardness, no matter how good it otherwise would be.² 

I have the following attitude about table manners:

- Be aware of what's considered "proper", but be relaxed in its application.

- If you find yourself in a dilemma or novel situation, avoid a turgid internal exegesis on the rules of propriety—and for heaven's sake, avoid a discussion of what's proper!—and just do something to diffuse and move on; if possible, try to do it with some aplomb, as if it's the most natural resolution in the world. One discomfitted person can turn a dinner party sour; so don't be that person!

- Never correct another diner's table manners, either with words or with body language. (You may very well be "wrong" by the fussiest of rules, like those who stared at my picking up asparagus.) In the hierarchy of dining-table incidents, failure to follow some arbitrary rule ranks well below causing an awkward silence, and that ranks even farther below diners taking it upon themselves to correct another.

-  Contrariwise, if a fellow diner seems flummoxed about a situation, you can and should offer assistance, but you must do so in a way that doesn't shame your mate in front of the whole party. If you're in a position to do so, like at a dinner party or having a restaurant tasting menu where everyone's eating the same dish, you can lead by example. If not, you can make it a topic of conversation: glance at your friend's plate (before they've done something that's garnered attention, otherwise you're engaging in the unforgivable, public correction!), and say, "I always wondered what you were supposed to do with mussels in the shell; eating them seems so messy. Then I found out..." If you're sitting next to the distressed dinner, you may be tempted to whisper advice. Don't! It's always rude to whisper to someone during a meal, and in any case, you'd have to whisper something that would sound like a correction, which we've already established you don't do, right?³

- If someone does commit an error so great that others at the table are clearly uncomfortable, it's time for misdirection and razzle-dazzle. I once was eating at a restaurant with some colleagues at a conference, and one diner picked up an enormous porterhouse steak and began tearing at it with his teeth. He wasn't even gnawing at the last bits on the bone he couldn't get to with knife and fork (which is acceptable en famille, and I might do it with friends; at that point, how is it so different than eating ribs?), but bringing an entire, enormous, steak to his mouth and dispensing with the utensils entirely. Everyone froze for a moment, but then a man directly across from the steak-eater, who has some zinger stories, started telling one of his barn-burners—one that involved lots of demonstrative gesturing and facial expressions, so every had to keep their eyes on him. It was brilliant, and by the time he was finished, the newly-denuded bone was safely back on the plate.

Remember whatever the circumstances, you're supposed to be there to enjoy yourself, not to impress anyone, or, worse yet, to be in fear of humiliating yourself. (And you certainly aren't there to humiliate your companions.) Judith Martin, "Miss Manners", has told a story about a time when, after the dishes were cleared at a restaurant of some Asian cuisine with which the diners weren't familiar, the owner proudly brought out what looked like a punch bowl with ladle, placed it in the center of the table, and then doled out small empty glass bowls to each diner before retreating to the kitchen. 

The party stared at one another, unsure of what to do. Then one took the ladle and filled his bowl with a slightly cloudy liquid. Lacking utensils, he lifted it to his nose, sniffed—pleasantly citrusy—and took a sip. Bland, warm, lemony. A palate cleanser of some sort? The other diners followed suit filling their bowls, and pretty soon they were all slurping at their warm lemon soup. When the owner returned, they murmured their appreciation and approval, but the owner was flabbergasted—by all these crazy white people drinking their finger-bowls. It was "wrong" (for a rather less completely arbitrary definition thereof than most violations of table manners), but it wasn't rude, it was funny, and a story that all the diners cherished.

An attitude of gusto trumps all. Remember Colonel Sanders: "finger-lickin' good" was supposed to be a good thing. Think how much better things would go if, when a diner saw another "break the rules", he or she smiled and reacted as if the violation were a lovely thing, evidence of such enjoyment that all stuffiness must be dispensed with!

¹ If your host wasn't so thoughtful, you must improvise and use your bread plate, the plate on which the bowl was set, the rim of the bowl, or, as last resort, simply lever (not spear) the item out of the liquid with fork, let it drain, then pick it up from the fork.

² If you go to a truly innovative world-class restaurant, you'll notice that when a novel dish requiring something unusual of the diner is presented, the presenter will softly murmur not just a description of the dish, but instructions on how to go about eating it. ("Tear open the bag of scented mist before you begin to eat.") Awkwardness successfully avoided.

³ There are exceptions. If you're friends with someone about to make a gaffe that could cause a sure-to-be-overblown incident—say, your friend, required to make a formal toast at a wedding reception, about to rise with an empty glass in hand—by all means, grab at his sleeve, keep him in his chair, and advise him, sotto voce, to wait until his glass is filled.___

Buttons

A special service of CircleCount.com is the following button.

The button shows the number of followers you have directly in a small button. You can add this button to your website, like the +1-Button of Google or the Like-Button of Facebook.






You can add this button directly in your website. For more information about the CircleCount Buttons and the description how to add them to another page click here.

Trey HarrisTwitterLinkedInCircloscope