Login now

Not your profile? Login and get free access to your reports and analysis.

Tags

Sign in

No tag added here yet.
You can login on CircleCount to add some tags here.

Are you missing a tag in the list of available tags? You can suggest new tags here.

Login now

Do you want to see a more detailed chart? Check your settings and define your favorite chart type.

Or click here to get the detailed chart only once.

Upaya Zen Center has been shared in 24 public circles

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Johnny Stork7,288Spirituality & Self Development CircleWe all strive towards various personal, professional and for many, spiritual goals in life. In our increasingly crowded and interconnected planet, we are often reminded of how each of out lives intersect and how each of us share many of the same values and needs. Many of these shared values and shared needs included the welfare of others, the welfare of the entire planet and the welfare of all living creatures.One way to think of what it means to be "spiritual" or concerned with "self" development is simply to be concerned with something, or someone, beyond yourself, beyond the personal. Holding a transpersonal world-view.The people in this circle share these values, these interests in developing personally, professionally and spiritually for the sake of all people as well as themselves. I am honoured to share this circle of humanitarian, compassionate, learned and transpersonally inclined friends. #transpersonalpsychology   #spirituality   #selfdevelopment   #positivepsychology  2014-02-05 00:55:3849011616
Paul Finnerty2,166Spiritual Circle Thanks +Laura Sanna for the share!@#sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircles   #circlesharing   #circleshared   #publiccirclesproject   #publicsharedcircles   #circleofthedayInteresting folks of spiritual shares!  #circleshare   Last share is over 200 total shares, plusses and comments yet again so let's keep it rolling!Add the circle, add yourself and reshare the circle!  Make sure you use the hash marks!2012-09-17 01:23:002723010
Marc Pitman4,748Whoops. I wanted to share my Nonprofit Org circle, but it has 694 organizaitons and, apparently, I can only share 500 at a time! Sorry. But enjoy this many anyway!2012-08-24 00:52:47500501
Trever McGhee11,187+Rolf Tschochohei created an amazing circle of caring people and included me, which we're very grateful.Add the circle for a week and see how it brightens your stream, keep the sunshine ones and take the rest and put them a sided for you never know when it's their turn to brighten your day.Day 95 of our journey away from home to inspire you to Take2seconds to follow us, so that sponsors invest more in the community projects that generate income to fund more community projects.+Take2seconds  #Take2seconds  +Circle Plus +Best Shared Circle +The Best Circles on Google+ +Full Circle +CircleCount +Nothing but Circles +Public Circles +Wanna Be Circled +CIRCLES +Circles 2012-08-19 09:27:532513512
Werner Brock4,388#BuddhistCircle  open to all lineages or groups, we are sharing here #Buddhist   topics, news, questions, discussions and wisdom in a tolerant and mutually supporting way.Please add and share this circle.Please use the hashtag #BuddhistCircle  for posting and reading by search.If you want to be added, please leave a message here.Today we received Khenpo Sonam Gyatso Rinpoche´s offer to share some time for us. +Khenpo Sogyal is professor for Buddhist Philosophy and Logic at Benares (Varanasi) University in India. We will start a new thread for discussion with Khenpo-la. 2012-07-29 10:16:56292757
Tommy Deis334#SharedCircle2012-05-19 15:10:49477000
Full Circle1,058437 Total Brands Only Circle (Google + Pages only)#circleshared #sharedcircles #publiccirclesproject #publicsharedcircles #sharedpubliccircles #reshare #sharedcircles #publiccircles #sharedpubliccircles #sharedpubliccircles #circleoftheday #circleoflife #brandpagescircles2012-04-03 19:56:51427012
Full Circle939Revised Brands Only Google + Circle Version 3 (Updated 3-26-12) #sharedcircles #brandspages #brandpagecircles #businesspagecircles #sharedcircle2012-03-26 16:32:56425002
Daniel Harrington12,055490 Non-Profts - Brand Pages Only #circleshare #sharedcircle #brandpages #nonprofits2012-03-26 07:41:57490131
Full Circle797423 Updated Brands (Google Pages) Only Circle Version 3, Updated 3.20.12 #sharedcircles #brandpages #branding #pages #sharedpubliccircles2012-03-20 14:01:40423332
Full Circle637419 Google + Brand Pages Only Version 3 - Updated 3-17-12+1 for inclusion in this circle (Google Pages/Businesses Only)2012-03-17 13:29:44419028
Full Circle562408 Brand Only Google + Pages Version 32012-03-14 02:38:43411001
Full Circle490411 Brands Only Google + Pages Version 32012-03-09 03:35:14411004
Daniel Harrington10,695The Whopper BRANDS AND BUSINESS PAGES ONLY CIRCLE - Please Share! (You Can Add This To A Brand Page)#brandpagescircles #brandcircles #circlesharing #brandpage #circleshared #circles #marketing #socialmedia #circleshare #brandpages #pages #brands #sharedcircles #publiccircles #publiccirclesproject #brandspages #seo #sem #brandpage #publiccircles #tech #business #socialnetworks #googleplus #circleoftheday #socialmediamarketing2012-02-26 02:50:17500012
Apple iPhone and iPad Apps, News and Updates0Brand Pages Only Circle! #sharedcircle2012-02-23 18:34:11388000
SEO0Brand Pages ONLY - Circle IV #circlesharing #sharedcircle #businesspages #brandpages #brands #circleshare #socialmedia #googleplus2012-02-23 03:42:27401000
Daniel Harrington10,570Great #BrandPages Only Circle! - Can Be Added To Brand Pages. Enjoy and Please Share! Thank You!#circlesharing #publiccirclesproject #sharedcircles #circleshare #circles #circlesdatabase #circlestoshare #sharecircle #brands #business #marketing #businesspages #socialmediamarketing #socialmedia #googleplus #sharedcircles #circles2012-02-21 16:25:03500010
Daniel Harrington10,083Do You Have A #BrandPage or #BusinessPage and Want More Followers? Well You Can Only Add Brand Pages To Brand Pages On #GooglePlus So You Have To Find a Big #Circle That Includes Only Brand Pages and Not One Personal Page or It Will Be Rejected When You Try To Add It - SO....Here Is That Circle!! Please Share! #brands #business #marketing #products #companies #logos #tech #cars #food #recipes #institutions #organizations #corporations #smallbusiness #circlesharing #sharedcircles2012-02-17 00:42:19500101
Nonprofit Organizations1,593Just added my 600th nonprofit to my "Nonprofit Organizations" Circle. However, it appears you can only "Share" a maximum of 500 pages circled. 600 in this circle, but only shows 500 when shared. Hmm... will have to think about that...2011-11-18 16:49:105009513
The Chronicle of Philanthropy0An updated circle of nonprofits on Google+. Help us build our list by sharing others.2011-11-14 22:48:0317429446
SocialCX0Wondering what brands are up to on Google+? Check out this shared circle of 400 brand pages for some great examples!2011-11-14 18:32:084001077
Beth Kanter68,942Here's my open nonprofit brand circle and my scoop.it curation of google + for nonprofits resources - http://www.scoop.it/t/google-for-nonprofits2011-11-11 22:20:25101281918
G+ Business Pages Directory0Charities, Non-Profits, Organizations ... Leave your own, friends' and ones you've circled!!!#pages #googleplus #sharedcircle#coolpages2011-11-10 08:17:36721126
The Chronicle of Philanthropy0With an assist from +Beth Kanter we've been able to further expand the list of nonprofits that have created Google+ pages. Keep sharing examples in the comments area and we'll keep building the list.2011-11-09 16:12:37115762

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

0
comments per post
1
reshares per post
5
+1's per post

618
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 2

posted image

2014-10-09 04:33:18 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 38 +1s)Open 

“In this world of dreams, drifting off still more; and once again speaking and dreaming of dreams. Just let it be.” 

~Ryokan

Most reshares: 7

posted image

2014-10-04 12:07:11 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

Most plusones: 38

posted image

2014-10-09 04:33:18 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 38 +1s)Open 

“In this world of dreams, drifting off still more; and once again speaking and dreaming of dreams. Just let it be.” 

~Ryokan

Latest 50 posts

posted image

2014-10-23 17:23:56 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Our beloved chef Sandra is up for an Edible Santa Fe Local Hero award. Cast your vote here!

Our beloved chef Sandra is up for an Edible Santa Fe Local Hero award. Cast your vote here!___

posted image

2014-10-23 12:12:36 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Reflections on Precepts Practice—A Dharma Talk on Desire, Craving, & Intimacy: Sensei Al Genkai Kaszniak

An Old Woman Burns Down a Hermitage: A Koan of Desire, Craving, and Intimacy
From: Entangling Vines: A Classic Collection of Zen Koans
Case one hundred, fifty-four
Translated by Thomas Yuho Kirchner

There was an old woman who supported a hermit. For twenty years she always had a girl, sixteen or seventeen years old, take the hermit his food and wait on him.

One day she told the girl to give the monk a close hug and ask, “What do you feel just now?”

The hermit responded,

An old tree on a cold cliff;
Midwinter – no warmth.

The girl went back and told this to the old woman. The woman said, “For twenty years I’ve supported this vulgar good-for-nothing!” So saying, she threw the monk out and burneddown the herm... more »

Reflections on Precepts Practice—A Dharma Talk on Desire, Craving, & Intimacy: Sensei Al Genkai Kaszniak

An Old Woman Burns Down a Hermitage: A Koan of Desire, Craving, and Intimacy
From: Entangling Vines: A Classic Collection of Zen Koans
Case one hundred, fifty-four
Translated by Thomas Yuho Kirchner

There was an old woman who supported a hermit. For twenty years she always had a girl, sixteen or seventeen years old, take the hermit his food and wait on him.

One day she told the girl to give the monk a close hug and ask, “What do you feel just now?”

The hermit responded,

An old tree on a cold cliff;
Midwinter – no warmth.

The girl went back and told this to the old woman. The woman said, “For twenty years I’ve supported this vulgar good-for-nothing!” So saying, she threw the monk out and burned down the hermitage.

What is going on here? Wasn’t celibacy required of Chan monks in China? What’s the problem with the hermit monk’s response to the girl’s physical advance and question? And why was the old woman so angered at this as to burn down his lodging? Given the distressing history of sexual misconduct by Buddhist teachers, particularly in recent time here in North America, shouldn’t the woman be praising the hermit’s words and restraint?

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/EPknUI___

posted image

2014-10-22 22:15:00 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

(Upaya eNews)-October 21: The Intimacy of Awareness—Sensei Al Kaszniak, Jenn Lemas, Shinzan Palma, Hongzhi Zhengjue

Silent and serene, forgetting words, bright clarity appears before you.
When you reflect it you become vast, where you embody it you are spiritually uplifted. Spiritually solitary and shining, inner illumination restores wonder,
Dew in the moonlight, a river of stars, snow-covered pines, clouds enveloping the peaks. In darkness it is most bright, while hidden all the more manifest.

—Guidepost of Silent Illumination by Hongzhi Zhengjue

(Upaya eNews)-October 21: The Intimacy of Awareness—Sensei Al Kaszniak, Jenn Lemas, Shinzan Palma, Hongzhi Zhengjue

Silent and serene, forgetting words, bright clarity appears before you.
When you reflect it you become vast, where you embody it you are spiritually uplifted. Spiritually solitary and shining, inner illumination restores wonder,
Dew in the moonlight, a river of stars, snow-covered pines, clouds enveloping the peaks. In darkness it is most bright, while hidden all the more manifest.

—Guidepost of Silent Illumination by Hongzhi Zhengjue___

posted image

2014-10-22 18:37:28 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Real Love - May 2015 w/Sharon Salzberg & Roshi Joan Halifax

Details: http://goo.gl/4oGYGT

Real Love - May 2015 w/Sharon Salzberg & Roshi Joan Halifax

Details: http://goo.gl/4oGYGT___

posted image

2014-10-22 12:11:54 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Wisdom Through Discernment

Shinzan Palma embarks on the question, “how do we make difficult decisions?” in his inimitably warm and engaging manner — and in service to answering it, he makes a substantial study of the theory and practice of “wisdom” in Buddhism. Theory-wise, he covers wisdom’s place in several classical Buddhist “lists” (the threefold this & seven factors of that); the non-linear feedback loop of ethics/meditation/wisdom; the core Buddhist principle that wisdom and compassion are two expressions of a single thing. Practice-wise, he shares his own journey of hard decisions. He says such moments are deeply creative: they’re wisdom moments and wisdom always takes us where we haven’t been before, births a new being.

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/d3PchE

Wisdom Through Discernment

Shinzan Palma embarks on the question, “how do we make difficult decisions?” in his inimitably warm and engaging manner — and in service to answering it, he makes a substantial study of the theory and practice of “wisdom” in Buddhism. Theory-wise, he covers wisdom’s place in several classical Buddhist “lists” (the threefold this & seven factors of that); the non-linear feedback loop of ethics/meditation/wisdom; the core Buddhist principle that wisdom and compassion are two expressions of a single thing. Practice-wise, he shares his own journey of hard decisions. He says such moments are deeply creative: they’re wisdom moments and wisdom always takes us where we haven’t been before, births a new being.

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/d3PchE___

posted image

2014-10-21 20:40:44 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Join us tomorrow, Wed. October 22, for a dharma talk by Sean Murphy,  "Cultivating of Wisdom," 5:30 p.m. in the Circle of the Way Temple. 

Join us tomorrow, Wed. October 22, for a dharma talk by Sean Murphy,  "Cultivating of Wisdom," 5:30 p.m. in the Circle of the Way Temple. ___

posted image

2014-10-21 12:16:12 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Deepening Our Resilience Zone: A Reflection on SRM Training

During times of stress the nervous system can get bumped out of our resilience zone causing us to feel off balance. Individuals with shallow resilience zones experience even small stressors as a threat, therefore bumping them out of their resilience zone. At such times, directing the attention to a supportive and safe resource, provides a parasympathetic release in the body which restores balance. Over time, developing this skill of redirecting our attention from sensations of stress to sensations of safety and support enhances or deepens our resilience zone.

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/8pWsQy

Deepening Our Resilience Zone: A Reflection on SRM Training

During times of stress the nervous system can get bumped out of our resilience zone causing us to feel off balance. Individuals with shallow resilience zones experience even small stressors as a threat, therefore bumping them out of their resilience zone. At such times, directing the attention to a supportive and safe resource, provides a parasympathetic release in the body which restores balance. Over time, developing this skill of redirecting our attention from sensations of stress to sensations of safety and support enhances or deepens our resilience zone.

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/8pWsQy___

posted image

2014-10-20 23:00:46 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

The instructors said a good question to ask ourselves at the end of the day is: How many times during the day did I impact someone’s threat system (Sypathetic Nervous System) or safety system (Parasympathetic Nervous System). This statement stunned me as I had not considered that my behavior would impact another’s threat system. I know how much I suffer when I am afraid. I would not want to be the cause of another person feeling afraid, at least not intentionally.

The instructors said a good question to ask ourselves at the end of the day is: How many times during the day did I impact someone’s threat system (Sypathetic Nervous System) or safety system (Parasympathetic Nervous System). This statement stunned me as I had not considered that my behavior would impact another’s threat system. I know how much I suffer when I am afraid. I would not want to be the cause of another person feeling afraid, at least not intentionally.___

posted image

2014-10-20 12:33:17 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

What's The Matter With Now?

Upaya’s Ray Olson discusses the beneficial yet difficult ability to stay in the Now. With personal anecdotes and insight from teachers like the late Steve Stuky and Peter Matthiessen, Ray connects us with the ways we are not present, how we can stay present, and why a person would want to take up a contemplative practice. He offers practical advice concerning the attractions, aversions, doubts and boredom that come up during meditation and the rest of our lives. When we drop our stories regarding our social identity and stay right here through our meditation practices, we can actualize our Buddha Nature, which Ray explains is safe, comforting, peaceful, serene, and grants us access to wisdom.

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/EOfB9h

What's The Matter With Now?

Upaya’s Ray Olson discusses the beneficial yet difficult ability to stay in the Now. With personal anecdotes and insight from teachers like the late Steve Stuky and Peter Matthiessen, Ray connects us with the ways we are not present, how we can stay present, and why a person would want to take up a contemplative practice. He offers practical advice concerning the attractions, aversions, doubts and boredom that come up during meditation and the rest of our lives. When we drop our stories regarding our social identity and stay right here through our meditation practices, we can actualize our Buddha Nature, which Ray explains is safe, comforting, peaceful, serene, and grants us access to wisdom.

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/EOfB9h___

posted image

2014-10-19 12:51:19 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"This is the path of the human being who does the best that they can without being attached to outcome, because, after all, one can never exactly know what the outcome will be. There is no good karma to be gained, no bad karma to be burned away. There is only the simple, direct and difficult act itself, the act of one hand taking care of the other."

~Roshi Joan Halifax

http://goo.gl/Yu16GS

"This is the path of the human being who does the best that they can without being attached to outcome, because, after all, one can never exactly know what the outcome will be. There is no good karma to be gained, no bad karma to be burned away. There is only the simple, direct and difficult act itself, the act of one hand taking care of the other."

~Roshi Joan Halifax

http://goo.gl/Yu16GS___

posted image

2014-10-19 02:57:41 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"The first time I heard the word “Buddha,” the figure of a bald man with a big belly and a smiling face came to mind as did superstition and magic. In Mexico there is a saying “Rub the Buddha’s belly for good luck.” Many people have a Buddha statue surrounded by charms in their businesses for good fortune. I never imagined that Buddhism was a religion.

After friends and I were in a car accident, I realized how important it was to be alive. I became more responsible for myself and began searching for a spiritual path. I was twenty years old. I practiced yoga from a book for a while and from there emerged an interest in meditation. A friend taught me Zen meditation. I didn’t give it much consideration because..."

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/I9sykh

"The first time I heard the word “Buddha,” the figure of a bald man with a big belly and a smiling face came to mind as did superstition and magic. In Mexico there is a saying “Rub the Buddha’s belly for good luck.” Many people have a Buddha statue surrounded by charms in their businesses for good fortune. I never imagined that Buddhism was a religion.

After friends and I were in a car accident, I realized how important it was to be alive. I became more responsible for myself and began searching for a spiritual path. I was twenty years old. I practiced yoga from a book for a while and from there emerged an interest in meditation. A friend taught me Zen meditation. I didn’t give it much consideration because..."

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/I9sykh___

posted image

2014-10-18 12:33:26 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Real Love with Sharon Salzberg & Roshi Joan Halifax

Details: http://goo.gl/OM8hNi

Real Love with Sharon Salzberg & Roshi Joan Halifax

Details: http://goo.gl/OM8hNi___

posted image

2014-10-17 11:56:25 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

The Ease and Joy of Mornings

Upaya is pleased to offer (donation only) a half-day of meditation practice for the community: dwelling, contemplating and relaxing into silence.  For those new to meditation, this day will be a perfect  introduction, and for those already established in their practice you will have the opportunity to nourish it further.

Details:  http://goo.gl/TLoYeZ

The Ease and Joy of Mornings

Upaya is pleased to offer (donation only) a half-day of meditation practice for the community: dwelling, contemplating and relaxing into silence.  For those new to meditation, this day will be a perfect  introduction, and for those already established in their practice you will have the opportunity to nourish it further.

Details:  http://goo.gl/TLoYeZ___

posted image

2014-10-16 16:45:47 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Upaya’s Shinzan Palma embarks on the question, “how do we make difficult decisions?” in his inimitably warm and engaging manner — and in service to answering it, he makes a substantial study of the theory and practice of “wisdom” in Buddhism. Theory-wise, he covers wisdom’s place in several classical Buddhist “lists” (the threefold this & seven factors of that); the non-linear feedback loop of ethics/meditation/wisdom; the core Buddhist principle that wisdom and compassion are two expressions of a single thing. Practice-wise, he shares his own journey of hard decisions. He says such moments are deeply creative: they’re wisdom moments and wisdom always takes us where we haven’t been before, births a new being.

Upaya’s Shinzan Palma embarks on the question, “how do we make difficult decisions?” in his inimitably warm and engaging manner — and in service to answering it, he makes a substantial study of the theory and practice of “wisdom” in Buddhism. Theory-wise, he covers wisdom’s place in several classical Buddhist “lists” (the threefold this & seven factors of that); the non-linear feedback loop of ethics/meditation/wisdom; the core Buddhist principle that wisdom and compassion are two expressions of a single thing. Practice-wise, he shares his own journey of hard decisions. He says such moments are deeply creative: they’re wisdom moments and wisdom always takes us where we haven’t been before, births a new being.___

posted image

2014-10-16 11:49:52 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Embodying Risk, Embracing Failure
by Dr. Laurie Leitch

This notion of sensory wisdom moves away from the trap of thinking. For example, I was reading about a concept called affective priming. And affective priming is when you read something or you hear something and it shapes how you become. In this particular example, they took a group of elderly people, and they read and had them read a list of words, negative words, about the aging process. And then they watched as the people walked around afterwards

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/NlCPc5

Embodying Risk, Embracing Failure
by Dr. Laurie Leitch

This notion of sensory wisdom moves away from the trap of thinking. For example, I was reading about a concept called affective priming. And affective priming is when you read something or you hear something and it shapes how you become. In this particular example, they took a group of elderly people, and they read and had them read a list of words, negative words, about the aging process. And then they watched as the people walked around afterwards

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/NlCPc5___

posted image

2014-10-15 17:44:41 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

This notion of sensory wisdom moves away from the trap of thinking. For example, I was reading about a concept called affective priming. And affective priming is when you read something or you hear something and it shapes how you become. In this particular example, they took a group of elderly people, and they read and had them read a list of words, negative words, about the aging process. And then they watched as the people walked around afterwards. And what they saw is that the people who’d read the negative list of words walked way more slowly, they tended to be more hunched over than a group that didn’t read those words that just read a list of neutral words. So what they were talking about is how what we take in begins to shape how we walk in the world.

This notion of sensory wisdom moves away from the trap of thinking. For example, I was reading about a concept called affective priming. And affective priming is when you read something or you hear something and it shapes how you become. In this particular example, they took a group of elderly people, and they read and had them read a list of words, negative words, about the aging process. And then they watched as the people walked around afterwards. And what they saw is that the people who’d read the negative list of words walked way more slowly, they tended to be more hunched over than a group that didn’t read those words that just read a list of neutral words. So what they were talking about is how what we take in begins to shape how we walk in the world.___

posted image

2014-10-15 12:42:30 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Zen Brain: The Embedded Mind - Perspectives from Buddhism and Cognitive Science

Contemplative practice depends on social context which shapes and gives meaning to experience, behavior, and action. From a scientific perspective, the idea that the social environment actively constitutes cognition is central to the study of embedded cognition. This groundbreaking retreat focuses on the embedded dimension of contemplative practice and experience. The retreat combines the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and Buddhist studies and practice in order to illuminate the role that social context plays in shaping the mind. Talks, discussions, and explorations with participants are embedded within Zazen practice throughout each day.

Details & Registration: http://goo.gl/HdTSwQ

Zen Brain: The Embedded Mind - Perspectives from Buddhism and Cognitive Science

Contemplative practice depends on social context which shapes and gives meaning to experience, behavior, and action. From a scientific perspective, the idea that the social environment actively constitutes cognition is central to the study of embedded cognition. This groundbreaking retreat focuses on the embedded dimension of contemplative practice and experience. The retreat combines the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and Buddhist studies and practice in order to illuminate the role that social context plays in shaping the mind. Talks, discussions, and explorations with participants are embedded within Zazen practice throughout each day.

Details & Registration: http://goo.gl/HdTSwQ___

posted image

2014-10-15 02:47:46 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Consciousness, Neuroscience and Zen Practice

"Enlightenment is like the moon reflected on the water. The moon does not get wet, nor is the water broken. Although its light is wide and great, the moon is reflected even in a puddle an inch wide. The whole moon, the entire sky, are reflected in one dewdrop on the grass."

~Dogen

Can you feel that open, unbounded nature [that Dogen talks about]? Now, the particle-like contents of consciousness, of the mental formations that arise and pass away in this formless conscious field, I think, then begin to be seen as like clouds that arise and pass away in the sky. And we don’t grasp onto and identify with them then, as self. When we observe this passing mental phenomenon, without clinging, we can also see how our conscious experience of these mental contents are colored by other mental factors that themselves are notw... more »

Consciousness, Neuroscience and Zen Practice

"Enlightenment is like the moon reflected on the water. The moon does not get wet, nor is the water broken. Although its light is wide and great, the moon is reflected even in a puddle an inch wide. The whole moon, the entire sky, are reflected in one dewdrop on the grass."

~Dogen

Can you feel that open, unbounded nature [that Dogen talks about]? Now, the particle-like contents of consciousness, of the mental formations that arise and pass away in this formless conscious field, I think, then begin to be seen as like clouds that arise and pass away in the sky. And we don’t grasp onto and identify with them then, as self. When we observe this passing mental phenomenon, without clinging, we can also see how our conscious experience of these mental contents are colored by other mental factors that themselves are not within our conscious awareness.

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/i4XVz6___

posted image

2014-10-14 19:26:50 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Local sangha, you should know there is no dharma talk tomorrow, and that all practice sessions will be held in Cerro Gordo Temple from Oct. 15-21.

Local sangha, you should know there is no dharma talk tomorrow, and that all practice sessions will be held in Cerro Gordo Temple from Oct. 15-21.___

posted image

2014-10-14 12:13:15 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

“Maybe like Odysseus, we are finally ready simply to return home to what we are, to our beauty and strength as well as our limitations. Maybe we are ready to see that what is wanted and needed is what was there all along, our animal life, our love, and our presence. Maybe we’re finally ready to become the creatures that our deepest stories and metaphors have always described, half-heavenly, half-stupidly earthbound, full of wonder and awe, powerful, and vulnerable. Maybe the point of our life’s journey, our spiritual odyssey, is not conquest or perfection, whether spiritual or worldly, but rather this simple transformation into what we have been all along, flesh and blood people in a flesh and blood world, feeling what people feel and doing what people do, returning home to what we are. Could this be enough?”

~Roshi Norman Fischer, Sailing Home

“Maybe like Odysseus, we are finally ready simply to return home to what we are, to our beauty and strength as well as our limitations. Maybe we are ready to see that what is wanted and needed is what was there all along, our animal life, our love, and our presence. Maybe we’re finally ready to become the creatures that our deepest stories and metaphors have always described, half-heavenly, half-stupidly earthbound, full of wonder and awe, powerful, and vulnerable. Maybe the point of our life’s journey, our spiritual odyssey, is not conquest or perfection, whether spiritual or worldly, but rather this simple transformation into what we have been all along, flesh and blood people in a flesh and blood world, feeling what people feel and doing what people do, returning home to what we are. Could this be enough?”

~Roshi Norman Fischer, Sailing Home___

posted image

2014-10-13 12:21:32 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Wisdom Through Discernment

Upaya’s Shinzan Palma embarks on the question, “how do we make difficult decisions?” in his inimitably warm and engaging manner — and in service to answering it, he makes a substantial study of the theory and practice of “wisdom” in Buddhism. Theory-wise, he covers wisdom’s place in several classical Buddhist “lists” (the threefold this & seven factors of that); the non-linear feedback loop of ethics/meditation/wisdom; the core Buddhist principle that wisdom and compassion are two expressions of a single thing. Practice-wise, he shares his own journey of hard decisions. He says such moments are deeply creative: they’re wisdom moments and wisdom always takes us where we haven’t been before, births a new being.

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/VjJsrT

Wisdom Through Discernment

Upaya’s Shinzan Palma embarks on the question, “how do we make difficult decisions?” in his inimitably warm and engaging manner — and in service to answering it, he makes a substantial study of the theory and practice of “wisdom” in Buddhism. Theory-wise, he covers wisdom’s place in several classical Buddhist “lists” (the threefold this & seven factors of that); the non-linear feedback loop of ethics/meditation/wisdom; the core Buddhist principle that wisdom and compassion are two expressions of a single thing. Practice-wise, he shares his own journey of hard decisions. He says such moments are deeply creative: they’re wisdom moments and wisdom always takes us where we haven’t been before, births a new being.

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/VjJsrT___

posted image

2014-10-12 14:35:39 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Fall Practice Period - Cultivating the Boundless Field

This autumn retreat focuses on the depth and breadth of "silent illumination," shikantaza, “just sitting.” A spacious schedule allows for long periods of silent meditation, dharma talks and seminars. We begin by exploring Bodhidharma’s vision of direct pointing to mind, and end with Zen Master Dogen’s practice of shikantaza, the direct realization of Buddha mind itself, and explore the views of great Chinese masters Huineng and Hongzhi, who set the field for the practice of zazen.

Find out more: http://goo.gl/931ONf

Fall Practice Period - Cultivating the Boundless Field

This autumn retreat focuses on the depth and breadth of "silent illumination," shikantaza, “just sitting.” A spacious schedule allows for long periods of silent meditation, dharma talks and seminars. We begin by exploring Bodhidharma’s vision of direct pointing to mind, and end with Zen Master Dogen’s practice of shikantaza, the direct realization of Buddha mind itself, and explore the views of great Chinese masters Huineng and Hongzhi, who set the field for the practice of zazen.

Find out more: http://goo.gl/931ONf___

posted image

2014-10-10 20:35:50 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Sensei Robert continues his investigation of possibility as the nature of things, now in connection with “living by vow.” If limited karmic activity — acquiring and rejecting — is a reaction to the world of vast possibility, then vow is how we transcend such a reaction. In place of seeing all appearances as assets or impediments to our pleasure, we ask how we can fulfill our vows with each one. We “free numberless creations” — forms, beings — by embracing them, meeting them just as they appear; not merely using them.

Sensei Robert continues his investigation of possibility as the nature of things, now in connection with “living by vow.” If limited karmic activity — acquiring and rejecting — is a reaction to the world of vast possibility, then vow is how we transcend such a reaction. In place of seeing all appearances as assets or impediments to our pleasure, we ask how we can fulfill our vows with each one. We “free numberless creations” — forms, beings — by embracing them, meeting them just as they appear; not merely using them.___

posted image

2014-10-10 17:25:02 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Consciousness, Neuroscience, and Zen Practice: Sensei Al Kaszniak, PhD

This word consciousness is actually quite ambiguous. One of the meanings is this state that we associate with wakefulness; it’s related to higher arousal that can be measured in the brain, and it also occurs in that wakefulness-like state that we call dreaming. But there’s another meaning and that is, the kind of subjective texture of our experience, particularly the experience of things that arise in our mental continuum: sensations, perceptions, thoughts, images, feelings. In philosophy, this aspect of consciousness is often referred to as qualia, the kind of raw feel of our experience, or what another philosopher named Tom Nagel referred to as “what it is like to be,” how it feels to us. Consciousness, I think, is often thought of as these objects of mind: thought, sensations, perceptions, etc. and that’s oftentypically... more »

Consciousness, Neuroscience, and Zen Practice: Sensei Al Kaszniak, PhD

This word consciousness is actually quite ambiguous. One of the meanings is this state that we associate with wakefulness; it’s related to higher arousal that can be measured in the brain, and it also occurs in that wakefulness-like state that we call dreaming. But there’s another meaning and that is, the kind of subjective texture of our experience, particularly the experience of things that arise in our mental continuum: sensations, perceptions, thoughts, images, feelings. In philosophy, this aspect of consciousness is often referred to as qualia, the kind of raw feel of our experience, or what another philosopher named Tom Nagel referred to as “what it is like to be,” how it feels to us. Consciousness, I think, is often thought of as these objects of mind: thought, sensations, perceptions, etc. and that’s often typically the way it’s scientifically studied. I think we may imagine that these contents of our consciousness are, in some way, reality and who we are. In other words, we identify with these contents of consciousness.

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/3AgIig___

posted image

2014-10-10 02:07:34 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

(Upaya eNews)-October 7: Without Anxiety About Imperfection-Sensei Al Kaszniak, Shinzan Palma, Laurie Leitch 

Read online or subscribe!

There once was a little hut called Fei'tien, meaning "rich field,"
where a monk lived for thirty years.
(Fugai: Maybe he did not know how to move.)
He had only one tray made of clay. 
(Fugai: Expensive things are not always precious.)
One day a monk, who studied under him, broke that tray accidentally.
(Fugai: The real treasure appears from the breaking.)
-The Iron Flute, Case 90
http://www.upaya.org/newsletter/view/2014/10/07

(Upaya eNews)-October 7: Without Anxiety About Imperfection-Sensei Al Kaszniak, Shinzan Palma, Laurie Leitch 

Read online or subscribe!

There once was a little hut called Fei'tien, meaning "rich field,"
where a monk lived for thirty years.
(Fugai: Maybe he did not know how to move.)
He had only one tray made of clay. 
(Fugai: Expensive things are not always precious.)
One day a monk, who studied under him, broke that tray accidentally.
(Fugai: The real treasure appears from the breaking.)
-The Iron Flute, Case 90
http://www.upaya.org/newsletter/view/2014/10/07___

posted image

2014-10-09 04:33:18 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 38 +1s)Open 

“In this world of dreams, drifting off still more; and once again speaking and dreaming of dreams. Just let it be.” 

~Ryokan

“In this world of dreams, drifting off still more; and once again speaking and dreaming of dreams. Just let it be.” 

~Ryokan___

posted image

2014-10-08 15:52:10 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

There is a Buddhist saying that says, “To be enlightened is to be without anxiety about imperfection.” …And there’s a sort of irreverent—to go from reverence to irreverence, which is always a wonderful dialectic… a quote by Martha Beck who writes in Oprah Magazine. I love this… she says, “The Perfectionist’s Credo” is: If I try hard enough and I’m very careful and I follow all the rules, everything will go right, everyone will love me, and I’ll feel good all the time."

There is a Buddhist saying that says, “To be enlightened is to be without anxiety about imperfection.” …And there’s a sort of irreverent—to go from reverence to irreverence, which is always a wonderful dialectic… a quote by Martha Beck who writes in Oprah Magazine. I love this… she says, “The Perfectionist’s Credo” is: If I try hard enough and I’m very careful and I follow all the rules, everything will go right, everyone will love me, and I’ll feel good all the time."___

posted image

2014-10-08 12:08:12 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Constant Practice

"The first time I heard the word “Buddha,” the figure of a bald man with a big belly and a smiling face came to mind as did superstition and magic. In Mexico there is a saying “Rub the Buddha’s belly for good luck.” Many people have a Buddha statue surrounded by charms in their businesses for good fortune. I never imagined that Buddhism was a religion.

After friends and I were in a car accident, I realized how important it was to be alive. I became more responsible for myself and began searching for a spiritual path. I was twenty years old. I practiced yoga from a book for a while and from there emerged an interest in meditation. A friend taught me Zen meditation. I didn’t give it much consideration because..."

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/I9sykh

Constant Practice

"The first time I heard the word “Buddha,” the figure of a bald man with a big belly and a smiling face came to mind as did superstition and magic. In Mexico there is a saying “Rub the Buddha’s belly for good luck.” Many people have a Buddha statue surrounded by charms in their businesses for good fortune. I never imagined that Buddhism was a religion.

After friends and I were in a car accident, I realized how important it was to be alive. I became more responsible for myself and began searching for a spiritual path. I was twenty years old. I practiced yoga from a book for a while and from there emerged an interest in meditation. A friend taught me Zen meditation. I didn’t give it much consideration because..."

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/I9sykh___

posted image

2014-10-07 20:54:08 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Join us tomorrow for a dharma talk, "Wisdom Through Discernment," by priest & Dharma Holder Shinzan Palma.  5:30 p.m. in the Circle of the Way Temple.  

Join us tomorrow for a dharma talk, "Wisdom Through Discernment," by priest & Dharma Holder Shinzan Palma.  5:30 p.m. in the Circle of the Way Temple.  ___

posted image

2014-10-07 12:06:04 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Traveling the Dark Path, Transmitting the Light: A Reflection on Sesshin

Sensei Robert talked about the importance of doing the work of practice ourselves; he quoted Dogen saying, “To study the Buddha Way is to study the self.” He emphasized that in Zen, it’s not about being intellectual, but all about “being careful and considerate.”

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/Yu1YRn

Traveling the Dark Path, Transmitting the Light: A Reflection on Sesshin

Sensei Robert talked about the importance of doing the work of practice ourselves; he quoted Dogen saying, “To study the Buddha Way is to study the self.” He emphasized that in Zen, it’s not about being intellectual, but all about “being careful and considerate.”

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/Yu1YRn___

posted image

2014-10-06 12:46:05 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Dharma Talk: A Zen Buddhist Vision of Possibility 

Sensei Robert continues his investigation of possibility as the nature of things, now in connection with “living by vow.” If limited karmic activity — acquiring and rejecting — is a reaction to the world of vast possibility, then vow is how we transcend such a reaction. In place of seeing all appearances as assets or impediments to our pleasure, we ask how we can fulfill our vows with each one. We “free numberless creations” — forms, beings — by embracing them, meeting them just as they appear; not merely using them.

Listen: http://goo.gl/eIgXgY

Dharma Talk: A Zen Buddhist Vision of Possibility 

Sensei Robert continues his investigation of possibility as the nature of things, now in connection with “living by vow.” If limited karmic activity — acquiring and rejecting — is a reaction to the world of vast possibility, then vow is how we transcend such a reaction. In place of seeing all appearances as assets or impediments to our pleasure, we ask how we can fulfill our vows with each one. We “free numberless creations” — forms, beings — by embracing them, meeting them just as they appear; not merely using them.

Listen: http://goo.gl/eIgXgY___

posted image

2014-10-05 14:35:13 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

The Bowery & The Buddha

Drawing on his experience bearing witness to homelessness in one of Bernie Glassman’s recent street retreats in New York City, Joshin shares insights into the traditional ceremony “The Gate of Sweet Nectar, ” in which he participated daily during the retreat and may date back to the Buddha’s time. The ceremony calls in all of our ancient wisdom, all aspects of us, and all beings that are forgotten in this world.

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/bDByOz

The Bowery & The Buddha

Drawing on his experience bearing witness to homelessness in one of Bernie Glassman’s recent street retreats in New York City, Joshin shares insights into the traditional ceremony “The Gate of Sweet Nectar, ” in which he participated daily during the retreat and may date back to the Buddha’s time. The ceremony calls in all of our ancient wisdom, all aspects of us, and all beings that are forgotten in this world.

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/bDByOz___

posted image

2014-10-04 12:07:11 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

___

posted image

2014-10-03 11:58:55 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Zen Brain: The Embedded Mind - Perspectives from Buddhism and Cognitive Science

Contemplative practice depends on social context which shapes and gives meaning to experience, behavior, and action. From a scientific perspective, the idea that the social environment actively constitutes cognition is central to the study of embedded cognition. This groundbreaking retreat focuses on the embedded dimension of contemplative practice and experience. The retreat combines the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and Buddhist studies and practice in order to illuminate the role that social context plays in shaping the mind. Talks, discussions, and explorations with participants are embedded within Zazen practice throughout each day.

Details & Registration: http://goo.gl/HdTSwQ

Zen Brain: The Embedded Mind - Perspectives from Buddhism and Cognitive Science

Contemplative practice depends on social context which shapes and gives meaning to experience, behavior, and action. From a scientific perspective, the idea that the social environment actively constitutes cognition is central to the study of embedded cognition. This groundbreaking retreat focuses on the embedded dimension of contemplative practice and experience. The retreat combines the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and Buddhist studies and practice in order to illuminate the role that social context plays in shaping the mind. Talks, discussions, and explorations with participants are embedded within Zazen practice throughout each day.

Details & Registration: http://goo.gl/HdTSwQ___

posted image

2014-10-02 13:37:14 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Letting Go

I wrote that poem a very long time ago and the essence of it’s meaning holds true for me today.  It reflects on “loss” which comes in all shapes, colors and creeds and the gap/chasm that’s left behind.  Loss does not discriminate, as it touches on every single one of us from the moment we exit the safe and serene pouch in our mother’s belly: that is our very first loss –  of comfort, home, familiarity, connection. And, so, “loss”, in it’s various expressions is a reality of life and it behooves us  to find the tools and skills to adapt/process when it shows up, being fearless and looking into that resulting gap/chasm and allow something new to evolve and grow.  Cultivating this skill just may be the single most important ability we learn in order to live a flourishing life...

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/aVhajS

Letting Go

I wrote that poem a very long time ago and the essence of it’s meaning holds true for me today.  It reflects on “loss” which comes in all shapes, colors and creeds and the gap/chasm that’s left behind.  Loss does not discriminate, as it touches on every single one of us from the moment we exit the safe and serene pouch in our mother’s belly: that is our very first loss –  of comfort, home, familiarity, connection. And, so, “loss”, in it’s various expressions is a reality of life and it behooves us  to find the tools and skills to adapt/process when it shows up, being fearless and looking into that resulting gap/chasm and allow something new to evolve and grow.  Cultivating this skill just may be the single most important ability we learn in order to live a flourishing life...

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/aVhajS___

posted image

2014-10-01 18:57:23 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

"My continuing passion is to part a curtain that invisible veil of indifference that falls between us and that blinds us to each other's presence, each other's wonder, each other's human plight."

~Eudora Welty

"My continuing passion is to part a curtain that invisible veil of indifference that falls between us and that blinds us to each other's presence, each other's wonder, each other's human plight."

~Eudora Welty___

posted image

2014-10-01 11:54:07 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

The Ring In The Bell’s Steel: Learning to Trust our Voices

Jimmy Baca delivers a rhapsody to the world-transfiguring power that comes upon us when we discover, and continually honor, voice — voice in all our expressions, all our relations; forever shape-shifting, surprising, and brave. He says it must be impromptu and even uncomfortable if you want to make hardened killers weep in your arms...

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/RqxVdA

The Ring In The Bell’s Steel: Learning to Trust our Voices

Jimmy Baca delivers a rhapsody to the world-transfiguring power that comes upon us when we discover, and continually honor, voice — voice in all our expressions, all our relations; forever shape-shifting, surprising, and brave. He says it must be impromptu and even uncomfortable if you want to make hardened killers weep in your arms...

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/RqxVdA___

posted image

2014-09-30 02:07:00 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

A Zen Buddhist Vision of Possibility

Do-An Thomas says that life — and you — are possibility itself; that possibility is the stuff everything’s made of. This creative potency comes precisely because we and every thing exist only in utter mutual dependence, because even the most static phenomenon is nothing but flow. We needn’t therefore rouse ourselves to manufacture possibility — it is ever arriving from beyond the horizon; we can just receive it. Do-An touches on his bout with cancer and on the Trikaya, or “Buddha Bodies,” which he describes in fresh, immediate terms as our three bodies of possibility.

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/oFu3eE

A Zen Buddhist Vision of Possibility

Do-An Thomas says that life — and you — are possibility itself; that possibility is the stuff everything’s made of. This creative potency comes precisely because we and every thing exist only in utter mutual dependence, because even the most static phenomenon is nothing but flow. We needn’t therefore rouse ourselves to manufacture possibility — it is ever arriving from beyond the horizon; we can just receive it. Do-An touches on his bout with cancer and on the Trikaya, or “Buddha Bodies,” which he describes in fresh, immediate terms as our three bodies of possibility.

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/oFu3eE___

posted image

2014-09-29 12:04:31 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Zen Brain: The Embedded Mind - Perspectives from Buddhism and Cognitive Science

Contemplative practice depends on social context which shapes and gives meaning to experience, behavior, and action. From a scientific perspective, the idea that the social environment actively constitutes cognition is central to the study of embedded cognition. This groundbreaking retreat focuses on the embedded dimension of contemplative practice and experience. The retreat combines the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and Buddhist studies and practice in order to illuminate the role that social context plays in shaping the mind. Talks, discussions, and explorations with participants are embedded within Zazen practice throughout each day.

Details & Registration: http://goo.gl/HdTSwQ

Zen Brain: The Embedded Mind - Perspectives from Buddhism and Cognitive Science

Contemplative practice depends on social context which shapes and gives meaning to experience, behavior, and action. From a scientific perspective, the idea that the social environment actively constitutes cognition is central to the study of embedded cognition. This groundbreaking retreat focuses on the embedded dimension of contemplative practice and experience. The retreat combines the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and Buddhist studies and practice in order to illuminate the role that social context plays in shaping the mind. Talks, discussions, and explorations with participants are embedded within Zazen practice throughout each day.

Details & Registration: http://goo.gl/HdTSwQ___

posted image

2014-09-26 04:40:32 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Fall Practice Period: Cultivating the Boundless Field

This autumn retreat focuses on the depth and breadth of "silent illumination," shikantaza, “just sitting.” A spacious schedule allows for long periods of silent meditation, dharma talks and seminars. We begin by exploring Bodhidharma’s vision of direct pointing to mind, and end with Zen Master Dogen’s practice of shikantaza, the direct realization of Buddha mind itself, and explore the views of great Chinese masters Huineng and Hongzhi, who set the field for the practice of zazen.

Continue Reading & Register: http://goo.gl/NsLjEP

Fall Practice Period: Cultivating the Boundless Field

This autumn retreat focuses on the depth and breadth of "silent illumination," shikantaza, “just sitting.” A spacious schedule allows for long periods of silent meditation, dharma talks and seminars. We begin by exploring Bodhidharma’s vision of direct pointing to mind, and end with Zen Master Dogen’s practice of shikantaza, the direct realization of Buddha mind itself, and explore the views of great Chinese masters Huineng and Hongzhi, who set the field for the practice of zazen.

Continue Reading & Register: http://goo.gl/NsLjEP___

posted image

2014-09-25 21:41:49 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"With a powerful intention toward cultivating spiritual depth and skill in the practice of chaplaincy, I joined Roshi Joan and a sangha of meditators on pilgrimage to the Mustang Valley this autumn."

"With a powerful intention toward cultivating spiritual depth and skill in the practice of chaplaincy, I joined Roshi Joan and a sangha of meditators on pilgrimage to the Mustang Valley this autumn."___

posted image

2014-09-25 21:15:26 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Zen Brain: The Embedded Mind - Perspectives from Buddhism and Cognitive Science 

Contemplative practice depends on social context which shapes and gives meaning to experience, behavior, and action. From a scientific perspective, the idea that the social environment actively constitutes cognition is central to the study of embedded cognition. This groundbreaking retreat focuses on the embedded dimension of contemplative practice and experience. The retreat combines the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and Buddhist studies and practice in order to illuminate the role that social context plays in shaping the mind. Talks, discussions, and explorations with participants are embedded within Zazen practice throughout each day.

Details & Registration: http://goo.gl/HdTSwQ

Zen Brain: The Embedded Mind - Perspectives from Buddhism and Cognitive Science 

Contemplative practice depends on social context which shapes and gives meaning to experience, behavior, and action. From a scientific perspective, the idea that the social environment actively constitutes cognition is central to the study of embedded cognition. This groundbreaking retreat focuses on the embedded dimension of contemplative practice and experience. The retreat combines the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and Buddhist studies and practice in order to illuminate the role that social context plays in shaping the mind. Talks, discussions, and explorations with participants are embedded within Zazen practice throughout each day.

Details & Registration: http://goo.gl/HdTSwQ___

posted image

2014-09-24 15:24:03 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Join Sensei Do-On Robert Thomas for a dharma talk tomorrow, Wednesday 9/24: "A Zen Buddhist Vision of Possibility: Part One," 5:30 p.m. in the Circle of the Way Temple.

Join Sensei Do-On Robert Thomas for a dharma talk tomorrow, Wednesday 9/24: "A Zen Buddhist Vision of Possibility: Part One," 5:30 p.m. in the Circle of the Way Temple.___

posted image

2014-09-24 11:28:04 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

The Glowing Embers in the Heart: A Reflection on Sesshin

The question from Anne Lammott that Roshi shared with us—How alive am I willing to be? — inspired a profound re-evaluation for me, a raking through the ashes in the hearth of my heart. A clarity came upon me, a clear view that the light was going out of my five-year romantic partnership. I could see that its dying wasn’t particularly what I wanted, nor what my partner wanted, but that it was simply happening, it had slowly been happening for awhile, and it was for me to decide whether I would fight, resist, and hold on, or find the courage to let go. How alive am I willing to be?

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/gwsR4h

The Glowing Embers in the Heart: A Reflection on Sesshin

The question from Anne Lammott that Roshi shared with us—How alive am I willing to be? — inspired a profound re-evaluation for me, a raking through the ashes in the hearth of my heart. A clarity came upon me, a clear view that the light was going out of my five-year romantic partnership. I could see that its dying wasn’t particularly what I wanted, nor what my partner wanted, but that it was simply happening, it had slowly been happening for awhile, and it was for me to decide whether I would fight, resist, and hold on, or find the courage to let go. How alive am I willing to be?

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/gwsR4h___

posted image

2014-09-23 11:55:54 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

"Like the little stream 
Making its way 
Through the mossy crevices 
I, too, quietly 
Turn clear and transparent."

~Ryokan

"Like the little stream 
Making its way 
Through the mossy crevices 
I, too, quietly 
Turn clear and transparent."

~Ryokan___

posted image

2014-09-22 19:21:36 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Help! Help! I Gotta Get Out of Here: Upaya & The Correction System

Armed with thorough facts, close acquaintance and prisoners’ own words, Upaya’s Ray Olson paints a startling portrait of U.S. prisons, which are criminal themselves in so many respects. He also offers an exact list of remedies. He shares his chaplaincy strategies, his vital ways of framing Buddhist practice to illuminate its relevance to prisoners. He wonders, can everyone be rehabilitated — in light of factors like mental illness, cultural poverty and unpreparedness, empathy-deficient brain structures, genes…? In closing he challenges and invites each of us to volunteer in prisons and so experience firsthand how prisoners are our neighbors, are us... 

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/iZtqRM

Help! Help! I Gotta Get Out of Here: Upaya & The Correction System

Armed with thorough facts, close acquaintance and prisoners’ own words, Upaya’s Ray Olson paints a startling portrait of U.S. prisons, which are criminal themselves in so many respects. He also offers an exact list of remedies. He shares his chaplaincy strategies, his vital ways of framing Buddhist practice to illuminate its relevance to prisoners. He wonders, can everyone be rehabilitated — in light of factors like mental illness, cultural poverty and unpreparedness, empathy-deficient brain structures, genes…? In closing he challenges and invites each of us to volunteer in prisons and so experience firsthand how prisoners are our neighbors, are us... 

Continue Reading & Listen: http://goo.gl/iZtqRM___

posted image

2014-09-22 12:06:29 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

The True Secret with Natalie Goldeberg - Nov 12-16

At this dark time of the year, we are going to explore writing practice at the edge of the world, drawing on the inspiration of timeless meditation texts. Using ancient short teachings we aim to crack open our writing and to see inside out...

Program Details: http://goo.gl/yYHDbO

The True Secret with Natalie Goldeberg - Nov 12-16

At this dark time of the year, we are going to explore writing practice at the edge of the world, drawing on the inspiration of timeless meditation texts. Using ancient short teachings we aim to crack open our writing and to see inside out...

Program Details: http://goo.gl/yYHDbO___

posted image

2014-09-22 12:03:32 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Brian Byrnes: The Bowery and the Buddha

Drawing on his experience bearing witness to homelessness in one of Bernie Glassman’s recent street retreats in New York City, Joshin shares insights into the traditional ceremony “The Gate of Sweet Nectar, ” in which he participated daily during the retreat and may date back to the Buddha’s time. The ceremony calls in all of our ancient wisdom, all aspects of us, and all beings that are forgotten in this world. Joshin relates how by letting go of prejudices and inviting everyone in for the ceremony and accompanying meal he, other participants including the homeless, and even hedge fund managers formed the...

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/q4lp6V

Brian Byrnes: The Bowery and the Buddha

Drawing on his experience bearing witness to homelessness in one of Bernie Glassman’s recent street retreats in New York City, Joshin shares insights into the traditional ceremony “The Gate of Sweet Nectar, ” in which he participated daily during the retreat and may date back to the Buddha’s time. The ceremony calls in all of our ancient wisdom, all aspects of us, and all beings that are forgotten in this world. Joshin relates how by letting go of prejudices and inviting everyone in for the ceremony and accompanying meal he, other participants including the homeless, and even hedge fund managers formed the...

Continue Reading: http://goo.gl/q4lp6V___

posted image

2014-09-20 14:54:16 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

In this session for Upaya’s chaplaincy training, Father John Dear speaks of the chaplaincy of nonviolence in both pastoral and prophetic roles — including among the many Christians who don’t see Jesus as a model of nonviolence. He underlines that compassionate listening is the singular healing service to wounded hearts, and tells tales from his devoted career: of being put on the spot to direct 600 chaplains at Ground Zero, of facilitating a deathbed change of heart in a rage-aholic wife-beater. He takes questions on the practicality of Gandhian resistance, details of contemporary Catholic rites and doctrines, and how hope differs from optimism.
https://www.upaya.org/2014/09/john-dear-08-20-2014-chaplaincy-of-nonviolence/

In this session for Upaya’s chaplaincy training, Father John Dear speaks of the chaplaincy of nonviolence in both pastoral and prophetic roles — including among the many Christians who don’t see Jesus as a model of nonviolence. He underlines that compassionate listening is the singular healing service to wounded hearts, and tells tales from his devoted career: of being put on the spot to direct 600 chaplains at Ground Zero, of facilitating a deathbed change of heart in a rage-aholic wife-beater. He takes questions on the practicality of Gandhian resistance, details of contemporary Catholic rites and doctrines, and how hope differs from optimism.
https://www.upaya.org/2014/09/john-dear-08-20-2014-chaplaincy-of-nonviolence/___

posted image

2014-09-20 14:53:46 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

In this session for Upaya’s chaplaincy training, Father John Dear speaks of the chaplaincy of nonviolence in both pastoral and prophetic roles — including among the many Christians who don’t see Jesus as a model of nonviolence. He underlines that compassionate listening is the singular healing service to wounded hearts, and tells tales from his devoted career: of being put on the spot to direct 600 chaplains at Ground Zero, of facilitating a deathbed change of heart in a rage-aholic wife-beater. He takes questions on the practicality of Gandhian resistance, details of contemporary Catholic rites and doctrines, and how hope differs from optimism.
https://www.upaya.org/2014/09/john-dear-08-20-2014-chaplaincy-of-nonviolence/

In this session for Upaya’s chaplaincy training, Father John Dear speaks of the chaplaincy of nonviolence in both pastoral and prophetic roles — including among the many Christians who don’t see Jesus as a model of nonviolence. He underlines that compassionate listening is the singular healing service to wounded hearts, and tells tales from his devoted career: of being put on the spot to direct 600 chaplains at Ground Zero, of facilitating a deathbed change of heart in a rage-aholic wife-beater. He takes questions on the practicality of Gandhian resistance, details of contemporary Catholic rites and doctrines, and how hope differs from optimism.
https://www.upaya.org/2014/09/john-dear-08-20-2014-chaplaincy-of-nonviolence/___

Buttons

A special service of CircleCount.com is the following button.

The button shows the number of followers you have directly in a small button. You can add this button to your website, like the +1-Button of Google or the Like-Button of Facebook.






You can add this button directly in your website. For more information about the CircleCount Buttons and the description how to add them to another page click here.

Upaya Zen CenterCircloscope