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Ward Plunet has been at 4 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Google+13,799,499The Google+ team will be sharing a few updates. RSVP to this event to watch the broadcast live.A Morning with Google+2013-10-29 17:30:0033508  
Sarah Hill2,872,663Calling all inhabitants of the Ghost Town.   Let's #HIRL in Austin, TX!!!   (Hangout In Real Life). Hear how ★ Plusketeers are using the +Google+  platform to create their own #humanmedia posse and how 2013 could be the year for + Google +.  Our venue only holds 100 so you *must RVSP* early and email googleplus@vu.com if you'd like to join us for lunch. +Veterans United is picking up the tab for free food and drinks but you're ghosts...so you don't eat much right?  ♥♥♥   #SXSWHIRL  HIRL in Austin, TX2013-03-09 12:00:00242  
Blythe Metz292,824This is a Hangout On Air, 4pm PST or 7pm EST, with +Marc Stevens and +Bradford Lowry . Dr. Marc Stevens will be discussing  ways to stay healthy this holiday. Please feel free to post your questions on this events page, We will be answering those questions during the HOA (hangout On Air). Staying Healthy This Holiday with Nutrition2012-12-18 01:00:0065  
Fraser Cain987,877To celebrate the landing of NASA's Curiosity Rover - the Mars Science Laboratory - we'll be running a special live hangout.  In conjunction with @106911959181067745693. We'll have all your favorite space/astronomy journalists on hand to discuss the mission in depth, and celebrate the landing live, when it happens. Join Fraser Cain, @109036978092446954908, @108952536790629690817 and @102887292457967781591 for this special event. Over the course of this 4-hour Google+ Hangout on Air, we'll interview members of the Curiosity team live in the hangout, as well as other special guests from the @111419948721791453320 and the @108759765804984663877. @109479143173251353583 and @107051665537162034944 will be on location at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to interview members of the engineering team, and show you what it's like to be at NASA during this amazing moment. We'll update this event as we lock down more of the guests and participants. See you there! You can follow the hashtag #marshangout   (this will replace our regular Sunday night @100902337165997768522)Google+ Hangout - Curiosity Landing Coverage2012-08-06 05:00:004832  

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Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

4
comments per post
8
reshares per post
44
+1's per post

1,116
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 30

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2017-02-19 17:10:41 (30 comments; 24 reshares; 224 +1s; )Open 

Beautifully Designed Cliff House

link: http://www.ifitshipitshere.com/wild-cliffside-home-with-zinc-roof-by-gilbartolome-architects/

Most reshares: 24

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2017-02-19 17:10:41 (30 comments; 24 reshares; 224 +1s; )Open 

Beautifully Designed Cliff House

link: http://www.ifitshipitshere.com/wild-cliffside-home-with-zinc-roof-by-gilbartolome-architects/

Most plusones: 224

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2017-02-19 17:10:41 (30 comments; 24 reshares; 224 +1s; )Open 

Beautifully Designed Cliff House

link: http://www.ifitshipitshere.com/wild-cliffside-home-with-zinc-roof-by-gilbartolome-architects/

Latest 50 posts

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2017-02-25 00:47:23 (1 comments; 9 reshares; 67 +1s; )Open 

Regular aerobic exercise beginning in middle age may lessen severity of stroke in old age

Mice that started exercising regularly at twelve months-age (equivalent to 40 years-age in humans) had the same abundance of collateral vessels when they reached 25 months-age (equivalent to 70 humans years) as seen at 3 months-age (equivalent to 16 human years), unlike their non-exercising 25-month-old counterparts who had fewer collaterals of smaller diameter. When the exercising 25-month-old mice suffered strokes, they had much less brain damage, i.e., the same as seen in young 3-month-old mice. The exercising mice also had higher levels of molecules that help blood vessels work properly and stay healthy. Researchers said their findings suggest that regular aerobic exercise may protect the collateral circulation and lessen the severity of strokes later in life.

Regular aerobic exercise beginning in middle age may lessen severity of stroke in old age

Mice that started exercising regularly at twelve months-age (equivalent to 40 years-age in humans) had the same abundance of collateral vessels when they reached 25 months-age (equivalent to 70 humans years) as seen at 3 months-age (equivalent to 16 human years), unlike their non-exercising 25-month-old counterparts who had fewer collaterals of smaller diameter. When the exercising 25-month-old mice suffered strokes, they had much less brain damage, i.e., the same as seen in young 3-month-old mice. The exercising mice also had higher levels of molecules that help blood vessels work properly and stay healthy. Researchers said their findings suggest that regular aerobic exercise may protect the collateral circulation and lessen the severity of strokes later in life.___

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2017-02-24 17:46:34 (2 comments; 7 reshares; 34 +1s; )Open 

Surge in opioid epidemic death rate continues, hitting 2.5-fold increase

Opioid’s deadly grip on the US continued to tighten in 2015, pushing up death rates across the board, according to new data released Friday by the National Center for Health Statistics, a division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Overall, drug overdose deaths rose to 16.3 per 100,000 in 2015—that’s 2.5 times the 1999 rate of 6.1 per 100,000. In that time range, increases were seen for both men and women, as well as across all age groups and races, with whites seeing the most dramatic increases. Generally, overdoses of opioid painkillers continued to be a leading killer, but heroin and synthetic opioids, such as deadly fentanyl, are behind an increasing number of deaths.

Surge in opioid epidemic death rate continues, hitting 2.5-fold increase

Opioid’s deadly grip on the US continued to tighten in 2015, pushing up death rates across the board, according to new data released Friday by the National Center for Health Statistics, a division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Overall, drug overdose deaths rose to 16.3 per 100,000 in 2015—that’s 2.5 times the 1999 rate of 6.1 per 100,000. In that time range, increases were seen for both men and women, as well as across all age groups and races, with whites seeing the most dramatic increases. Generally, overdoses of opioid painkillers continued to be a leading killer, but heroin and synthetic opioids, such as deadly fentanyl, are behind an increasing number of deaths.___

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2017-02-24 17:44:32 (1 comments; 4 reshares; 20 +1s; )Open 

Morphing drone takes off like a helicopter, flies like a plane

Thought Google also had something similar.

A shape-shifting drone takes off like a helicopter and transforms into a plane in mid-air to fly all day on solar power. The drone is designed to provide affordable aerial surveys for farmers, so they can see where to irrigate and use fertiliser and herbicide only where needed...A low-cost drone with greater endurance than existing models would be very helpful to farmers and businesses that oversee large areas of crops, says Ivan Grove at Harper Adams University in Shropshire, UK. “The current range of VTOL [vertical take-off and landing aircraft] are mainly the multirotors, which suffer from short flight times in comparison to their fixed-wing counterparts.” Although the SUAV:Q is aimed at farmers, its long flight time should make it attractive for other uses, such asins... more »

Morphing drone takes off like a helicopter, flies like a plane

Thought Google also had something similar.

A shape-shifting drone takes off like a helicopter and transforms into a plane in mid-air to fly all day on solar power. The drone is designed to provide affordable aerial surveys for farmers, so they can see where to irrigate and use fertiliser and herbicide only where needed...A low-cost drone with greater endurance than existing models would be very helpful to farmers and businesses that oversee large areas of crops, says Ivan Grove at Harper Adams University in Shropshire, UK. “The current range of VTOL [vertical take-off and landing aircraft] are mainly the multirotors, which suffer from short flight times in comparison to their fixed-wing counterparts.” Although the SUAV:Q is aimed at farmers, its long flight time should make it attractive for other uses, such as inspecting infrastructure, forestry and firefighting.___

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2017-02-24 17:29:27 (0 comments; 4 reshares; 12 +1s; )Open 

Everything You Need to Know About Cloudbleed, the Latest Internet Security Disaster

Have you heard? A tiny bug in Cloudflare’s code has led an unknown quantity of data—including passwords, personal information, messages, cookies, and more—to leak all over the internet. If you haven’t heard of the so-called Cloudbleed vulnerability, keep reading. This is a scary big deal. Let’s start with the good news. Cloudflare, one of the world’s largest internet security companies, acted fast when security researcher Tavis Ormandy of Google’s Project Zero identified the vulnerability. The bad news is that the Cloudflare-backed websites had been leaking data for months before Ormandy noticed the bug. Cloudflare says the earliest data leak dates back to September 2016. It’s so far unclear if blackhat hackers had already found the vulnerability and exploited it secretly before Cloudflarefixed its code.... more »

Everything You Need to Know About Cloudbleed, the Latest Internet Security Disaster

Have you heard? A tiny bug in Cloudflare’s code has led an unknown quantity of data—including passwords, personal information, messages, cookies, and more—to leak all over the internet. If you haven’t heard of the so-called Cloudbleed vulnerability, keep reading. This is a scary big deal. Let’s start with the good news. Cloudflare, one of the world’s largest internet security companies, acted fast when security researcher Tavis Ormandy of Google’s Project Zero identified the vulnerability. The bad news is that the Cloudflare-backed websites had been leaking data for months before Ormandy noticed the bug. Cloudflare says the earliest data leak dates back to September 2016. It’s so far unclear if blackhat hackers had already found the vulnerability and exploited it secretly before Cloudflare fixed its code. Cloudflare’s clients include huge companies like Uber, OKCupid, 1Password, and FitBit. That means a holy fuck ton of sensitive data has potentially been compromised.

___

2017-02-24 16:46:53 (1 comments; 8 reshares; 34 +1s; )Open 

Teach yourself everyday happiness with imagery training

Researchers have found that self-guided positive imagery training can successfully combat negative emotions in our daily lives. This tool is so powerful that it also changes the way our brain functions...o find out if we can train ourselves to use imagery techniques and optimize our emotional state, Velikova and co-workers turned to 30 healthy volunteers. During a two-day workshop the volunteers learnt a series of imagery techniques. They learnt how to cope with negative emotions from past events through imagery transformation, how to use positive imagery for future events or goals, and techniques to improve social interactions and enhance their emotional balance in daily life. They then spent the next 12 weeks training themselves at home for 15-20 minutes a day, before attending another similar two-day workshop. Velikova compared the... more »

Teach yourself everyday happiness with imagery training

Researchers have found that self-guided positive imagery training can successfully combat negative emotions in our daily lives. This tool is so powerful that it also changes the way our brain functions...o find out if we can train ourselves to use imagery techniques and optimize our emotional state, Velikova and co-workers turned to 30 healthy volunteers. During a two-day workshop the volunteers learnt a series of imagery techniques. They learnt how to cope with negative emotions from past events through imagery transformation, how to use positive imagery for future events or goals, and techniques to improve social interactions and enhance their emotional balance in daily life. They then spent the next 12 weeks training themselves at home for 15-20 minutes a day, before attending another similar two-day workshop. Velikova compared the results of participant psychological assessment and brain activity, or electroencephalographic (EEG), measurement, before and after the experiment. "The psychological testing showed that depressive symptoms were less prominent. The number of those with subthreshold depression, expressing depressive symptoms but not meeting the criteria for depression, was halved. Overall, volunteers were more satisfied with life and perceived themselves as more efficient" she explains.

Brain changes

Following analysis, the EEG data showed significant changes in the beta activity in the right medial prefrontal cortex of the brain. Velikova notes that this region is known to be involved in imaging pleasant emotions and contributing to the degree of satisfaction with life. There were also changes in the functional connectivity of the brain, including increased connectivity between the temporal regions from both hemispheres, which Velikova attributes to enhanced coordination of networks linked to processing of images. She concludes, "this combination of EEG findings also suggests a possible increase in the activity of GABA (gamma -aminobutyric acid), well known for its anti-anxiety and antidepressant properties."___

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2017-02-24 16:15:58 (2 comments; 5 reshares; 12 +1s; )Open 

Artificial synapse for neural networks

A new organic artificial synapse could support computers that better recreate the way the human brain processes information. It could also lead to improvements in brain-machine technologies...When we learn, electrical signals are sent between neurons in our brain. The most energy is needed the first time a synapse is traversed. Every time afterward, the connection requires less energy. This is how synapses efficiently facilitate both learning something new and remembering what we've learned. The artificial synapse, unlike most other versions of brain-like computing, also fulfills these two tasks simultaneously, and does so with substantial energy savings. "Deep learning algorithms are very powerful but they rely on processors to calculate and simulate the electrical states and store them somewhere else, which is inefficient in terms of energy... more »

Artificial synapse for neural networks

A new organic artificial synapse could support computers that better recreate the way the human brain processes information. It could also lead to improvements in brain-machine technologies...When we learn, electrical signals are sent between neurons in our brain. The most energy is needed the first time a synapse is traversed. Every time afterward, the connection requires less energy. This is how synapses efficiently facilitate both learning something new and remembering what we've learned. The artificial synapse, unlike most other versions of brain-like computing, also fulfills these two tasks simultaneously, and does so with substantial energy savings. "Deep learning algorithms are very powerful but they rely on processors to calculate and simulate the electrical states and store them somewhere else, which is inefficient in terms of energy and time," said Yoeri van de Burgt, former postdoctoral scholar in the Salleo lab and lead author of the paper. "Instead of simulating a neural network, our work is trying to make a neural network." The artificial synapse is based off a battery design. It consists of two thin, flexible films with three terminals, connected by an electrolyte of salty water. The device works as a transistor, with one of the terminals controlling the flow of electricity between the other two. Like a neural path in a brain being reinforced through learning, the researchers program the artificial synapse by discharging and recharging it repeatedly. Through this training, they have been able to predict within 1 percent of uncertainly what voltage will be required to get the synapse to a specific electrical state and, once there, it remains at that state. In other words, unlike a common computer, where you save your work to the hard drive before you turn it off, the artificial synapse can recall its programming without any additional actions or parts.___

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2017-02-24 16:03:14 (0 comments; 6 reshares; 38 +1s; )Open 

Cancer vs. the machine: how to personalise treatment using computing power

“We can intervene with a programme [in a model] and manipulate it - mimicking the effect of drugs to figure out where we want to target the cells, in order to make them behave in a desired rather than undesired way,” she says. In 2015, her lab helped build a model that showed how the processes behind abnormal blood production can give rise to cancers like leukaemia and lymphoma. The model provided a framework for doing rapid, simulated experiments that helped identify drugs targets. “You can simulate situations that you haven’t yet tested experimentally,” Fisher explains. Through thousands of rapid-fire simulations like these, researchers can reveal how cells would behave in different scenarios. The more data that’s factored in, the higher-resolution the models become, allowing better and quickerpredictions... more »

Cancer vs. the machine: how to personalise treatment using computing power

“We can intervene with a programme [in a model] and manipulate it - mimicking the effect of drugs to figure out where we want to target the cells, in order to make them behave in a desired rather than undesired way,” she says. In 2015, her lab helped build a model that showed how the processes behind abnormal blood production can give rise to cancers like leukaemia and lymphoma. The model provided a framework for doing rapid, simulated experiments that helped identify drugs targets. “You can simulate situations that you haven’t yet tested experimentally,” Fisher explains. Through thousands of rapid-fire simulations like these, researchers can reveal how cells would behave in different scenarios. The more data that’s factored in, the higher-resolution the models become, allowing better and quicker predictions about cell behaviour. It could also direct researchers towards more promising outcomes, by getting through a lot of the experimental trial and error that can slow down scientific progress in the lab. These are just some of the reasons why modelling can trump traditional, lab-based experiments. “It really saves a lot of time, money, animals, and resources. You can do it in the order of seconds or minutes, and get insights into what it is that you really want to test experimentally,” Fisher says. So, should we be moving toward a future where cloud computing replaces traditional experiments? In Fisher’s opinion, no. After all, her computational work depends on data produced in the lab. “Everything we do can’t replace experimental biology; it just complements it in a very smart and essential way,” she says. “But I think it’s not just a nice ‘added value’ either - it’s absolutely essential, because of the complexity of the puzzle.” For personalised medicine, in which treatments are tailored to individual patients, this approach holds special promise; that’s true of cancer especially, because of the huge variability of the disease.___

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2017-02-24 01:52:22 (3 comments; 9 reshares; 82 +1s; )Open 

Extinct Neanderthals still control expression of human genes

Neanderthals are still affecting what illnesses some people develop, how tall they are and how their immune systems work, despite being extinct for 40,000 years. This is thanks to the Neanderthal DNA those of non-African descent inherited from ancestors who mated with our cousins some 50,000 years ago. A study has now revealed how this genetic legacy is still controlling how some people’s genes work, with possible consequences for their health. Tellingly, the Neanderthal influence has waned fastest in parts of the body that evolved most rapidly around that time, especially the brain. It suggests that once our direct human ancestors had evolved the equipment for sophisticated language and problem-solving, mating with Neanderthals – and the DNA that came with it – rapidly fell out of fashion. But Neanderthal control of humangenes... more »

Extinct Neanderthals still control expression of human genes

Neanderthals are still affecting what illnesses some people develop, how tall they are and how their immune systems work, despite being extinct for 40,000 years. This is thanks to the Neanderthal DNA those of non-African descent inherited from ancestors who mated with our cousins some 50,000 years ago. A study has now revealed how this genetic legacy is still controlling how some people’s genes work, with possible consequences for their health. Tellingly, the Neanderthal influence has waned fastest in parts of the body that evolved most rapidly around that time, especially the brain. It suggests that once our direct human ancestors had evolved the equipment for sophisticated language and problem-solving, mating with Neanderthals – and the DNA that came with it – rapidly fell out of fashion. But Neanderthal control of human genes endures, some of it positive and some negative. Evidence comes from an in-depth analysis of DNA from 214 people in the US, focusing on individuals of European ancestry. By comparing their modern DNA with that from Neanderthals ­– whose genome was sequenced in 2008 ­– a team led by Joshua Akey at the University of Washington in Seattle was able to identify which Neanderthal gene fragments had survived and were still active in 52 different types of human tissue. The team found that some people had one human and one Neanderthal copy of the same gene. When comparing these genes, Akey and his colleagues found that a quarter showed differences in activity between the modern and Neanderthal versions of the same gene. More importantly, the researchers could tell which variant had the upper hand.___

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2017-02-23 20:32:01 (14 comments; 20 reshares; 43 +1s; )Open 

Now Anyone Can Deploy Google’s Troll-Fighting AI

On Thursday, Jigsaw and its partners on Google’s Counter Abuse Technology Team released a new piece of code called Perspective, an API that gives any developer access to the anti-harassment tools that Jigsaw has worked on for over a year. Part of the team’s broader Conversation AI initiative, Perspective uses machine learning to automatically detect insults, harassment, and abusive speech online. Enter a sentence into its interface, and Jigsaw says its AI can immediately spit out an assessment of the phrase’s “toxicity” more accurately than any keyword blacklist, and faster than any human moderator. The Perspective release brings Conversation AI a step closer to its goal of helping to foster troll-free discussion online, and filtering out the abusive comments that silence vulnerable voices—or, as the project’s critics haveless generously... more »

Now Anyone Can Deploy Google’s Troll-Fighting AI

On Thursday, Jigsaw and its partners on Google’s Counter Abuse Technology Team released a new piece of code called Perspective, an API that gives any developer access to the anti-harassment tools that Jigsaw has worked on for over a year. Part of the team’s broader Conversation AI initiative, Perspective uses machine learning to automatically detect insults, harassment, and abusive speech online. Enter a sentence into its interface, and Jigsaw says its AI can immediately spit out an assessment of the phrase’s “toxicity” more accurately than any keyword blacklist, and faster than any human moderator. The Perspective release brings Conversation AI a step closer to its goal of helping to foster troll-free discussion online, and filtering out the abusive comments that silence vulnerable voices—or, as the project’s critics have less generously put it, to sanitize public discussions based on algorithmic decisions.___

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2017-02-23 17:49:54 (1 comments; 17 reshares; 48 +1s; )Open 

DeepCoder builds programs using code it finds lying around

Like all great programmers I get most of my code from StackOverflow questions. Can’t figure out how to add authentication to Flask? Easy. Want to shut down sendmail? Boom. Now, thanks to all the code on the Internet, a robot can be as smart as a $180,000 coder. The system, called DeepCoder, basically searches a corpus of code to build a project that works to spec. It’s been used to complete programming competitions and could be pointed at a larger set of data to build more complex products.

DeepCoder builds programs using code it finds lying around

Like all great programmers I get most of my code from StackOverflow questions. Can’t figure out how to add authentication to Flask? Easy. Want to shut down sendmail? Boom. Now, thanks to all the code on the Internet, a robot can be as smart as a $180,000 coder. The system, called DeepCoder, basically searches a corpus of code to build a project that works to spec. It’s been used to complete programming competitions and could be pointed at a larger set of data to build more complex products.___

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2017-02-23 16:38:46 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 9 +1s; )Open 

Qualcomm announces new VR headset, Leap Motion partnership, and accelerator program

Qualcomm is launching an accelerator program for VR headset manufacturers, releasing a new headset reference design, and partnering with hand tracking company Leap Motion. The company is looking to kickstart production of headsets with features not found in the Oculus Rift or HTC Vive, including an all-in-one wireless design that removes the need for wires or external tracking devices. This continues a mission it first announced last year, but with updated hardware and a goal of making it easier to build off Qualcomm’s work. The virtual reality development kit, as Qualcomm calls it, is a self-contained design built on the company’s Snapdragon 835 chip. It has a 2560 x 1440 screen (equivalent to the Gear VR), 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of flash memory. There are also cameras both inside and outside thehea... more »

Qualcomm announces new VR headset, Leap Motion partnership, and accelerator program

Qualcomm is launching an accelerator program for VR headset manufacturers, releasing a new headset reference design, and partnering with hand tracking company Leap Motion. The company is looking to kickstart production of headsets with features not found in the Oculus Rift or HTC Vive, including an all-in-one wireless design that removes the need for wires or external tracking devices. This continues a mission it first announced last year, but with updated hardware and a goal of making it easier to build off Qualcomm’s work. The virtual reality development kit, as Qualcomm calls it, is a self-contained design built on the company’s Snapdragon 835 chip. It has a 2560 x 1440 screen (equivalent to the Gear VR), 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of flash memory. There are also cameras both inside and outside the headset. On the inside, they enable eye tracking, a sometimes-gimmicky feature that can also make it easier to push high-quality graphics inside a headset. On the outside, they allow for inside-out (or “six degree of freedom”) tracking, which means people can experience moving around in VR without needing a specially assembled “VR room.” The deal with Leap Motion, probably the most advanced independent hand tracking company, also puts an exciting new interface on the table.___

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2017-02-23 16:33:52 (4 comments; 13 reshares; 63 +1s; )Open 

Fructose is generated in the human brain

Fructose, a form of sugar linked to obesity and diabetes, is converted in the human brain from glucose, according to a new Yale study. The finding raises questions about fructose's effects on the brain and eating behavior. The study was published on Feb. 23 by JCI Insight.
Fructose is a simple sugar found in fruits, vegetables, table sugar, and many processed foods. Excess consumption of fructose contributes to high blood sugar and chronic diseases like obesity. The Yale research team had demonstrated in a prior study that fructose and another simple sugar, glucose, had different effects on brain activity. But it was not known whether fructose was produced in the brain or crossed over from the bloodstream. To investigate, the research team gave eight healthy, lean individuals infusions of glucose over a four-hour period. They measured sugar... more »

Fructose is generated in the human brain

Fructose, a form of sugar linked to obesity and diabetes, is converted in the human brain from glucose, according to a new Yale study. The finding raises questions about fructose's effects on the brain and eating behavior. The study was published on Feb. 23 by JCI Insight.
Fructose is a simple sugar found in fruits, vegetables, table sugar, and many processed foods. Excess consumption of fructose contributes to high blood sugar and chronic diseases like obesity. The Yale research team had demonstrated in a prior study that fructose and another simple sugar, glucose, had different effects on brain activity. But it was not known whether fructose was produced in the brain or crossed over from the bloodstream. To investigate, the research team gave eight healthy, lean individuals infusions of glucose over a four-hour period. They measured sugar concentrations in the brains of the study participants using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a noninvasive neuroimaging technique. Sugar concentrations in the blood were also assessed.
The researchers found cerebral fructose levels rose significantly in response to a glucose infusion, with minimal changes in fructose levels in the blood. They surmised that the high concentration of fructose in the brain was due to a metabolic pathway called the polyol pathway that converts glucose to fructose."In this study, we show for the first time that fructose can be produced in the human brain," said first author Janice Hwang, M.D., assistant professor of medicine. While the production of fructose in the brain had been seen in animals, it had not been demonstrated in humans, Hwang noted. The finding raises several key research questions, which the research team plans to pursue. "By showing that fructose in the brain is not simply due to dietary consumption of fructose, we've shown fructose can be generated from any sugar you eat," said Hwang. "It adds another dimension into understanding fructose's effects on the brain."_
___

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2017-02-23 16:29:15 (13 comments; 14 reshares; 54 +1s; )Open 

Study finds sons of cocaine-using fathers have profound memory impairments

Fathers who use cocaine at the time of conceiving a child may be putting their sons at risk of learning disabilities and memory loss. The findings of the animal study were published online in Molecular Psychiatry by a team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The researchers say the findings reveal that drug abuse by fathers—separate from the well-established effects of cocaine use in mothers— may negatively impact cognitive development in their male offspring.

Study finds sons of cocaine-using fathers have profound memory impairments

Fathers who use cocaine at the time of conceiving a child may be putting their sons at risk of learning disabilities and memory loss. The findings of the animal study were published online in Molecular Psychiatry by a team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The researchers say the findings reveal that drug abuse by fathers—separate from the well-established effects of cocaine use in mothers— may negatively impact cognitive development in their male offspring.___

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2017-02-23 01:48:57 (6 comments; 14 reshares; 82 +1s; )Open 

Temperate earth-sized worlds found in extraordinarily rich planetary system

Astronomers have found a system of seven Earth-sized planets just 40 light-years away. They were detected as they passed in front of their parent star, the dwarf star TRAPPIST-1. Three of them lie in the habitable zone and could harbour water, increasing the possibility that the system could play host to life. It has both the largest number of Earth-sized planets yet found and the largest number of worlds that could support liquid water.

Temperate earth-sized worlds found in extraordinarily rich planetary system

Astronomers have found a system of seven Earth-sized planets just 40 light-years away. They were detected as they passed in front of their parent star, the dwarf star TRAPPIST-1. Three of them lie in the habitable zone and could harbour water, increasing the possibility that the system could play host to life. It has both the largest number of Earth-sized planets yet found and the largest number of worlds that could support liquid water.___

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2017-02-22 22:27:13 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 14 +1s; )Open 

Malware Lets a Drone Steal Data by Watching a Computer’s Blinking LED

An air gap, in computer security, is sometimes seen as an impenetrable defense. Hackers can’t compromise a computer that’s not connected to the internet or other internet-connected machines, the logic goes. But malware like Stuxnet and the Agent.btz worm that infected American military systems a decade ago have proven that air gaps can’t entirely keep motivated hackers out of ultra-secret systems—even isolated systems need code updates and new data, opening them to attackers with physical access. And once an air-gapped system is infected, researchers have demonstrated a grab bag of methods for extracting information from them despite their lack of an internet connection, from electromagnetic emanations to acoustic and heat signaling techniques—many developed by the same Ben-Gurion researchers who generatedthe new LED... more »

Malware Lets a Drone Steal Data by Watching a Computer’s Blinking LED

An air gap, in computer security, is sometimes seen as an impenetrable defense. Hackers can’t compromise a computer that’s not connected to the internet or other internet-connected machines, the logic goes. But malware like Stuxnet and the Agent.btz worm that infected American military systems a decade ago have proven that air gaps can’t entirely keep motivated hackers out of ultra-secret systems—even isolated systems need code updates and new data, opening them to attackers with physical access. And once an air-gapped system is infected, researchers have demonstrated a grab bag of methods for extracting information from them despite their lack of an internet connection, from electromagnetic emanations to acoustic and heat signaling techniques—many developed by the same Ben-Gurion researchers who generated the new LED-spying trick. But exploiting the computer’s hard drive indicator LED has the potential to be a stealthier, higher-bandwidth, and longer-distance form of air-gap-hopping communications. By transmitting data from a computer’s hard drive LED with a kind of morse-code-like patterns of on and off signals, the researchers found they could move data as fast as 4,000 bits a second, or close to a megabyte every half hour. That may not sound like much, but it’s fast enough to steal an encryption key in seconds. And the recipient could record those optical messages to decode them later; the malware could even replay its blinks on a loop, Guri says, to ensure that no part of the transmission goes unseen. The technique also isn’t as limited in range as other clever systems that transmit electromagnetic signals or ultrasonic noises from speakers or a computer’s fans. And compared to other optical techniques that use the computer’s screen or keyboard light to secretly transmit information, the hard-drive LED indicator—which blinks anytime a program accesses the hard drive—routinely flashes even when a computer is asleep. Any malware that merely gains the ability of a normal user, rather than deeper administrative privileges, can manipulate it. The team used a Linux computer for their testing, but the effects should be the same on a Windows device. “The LED is always blinking as it’s doing searching and indexing, so no one suspects, even in the night,” says Guri. “It’s very covert, actually.”

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2017-02-22 19:36:23 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s; )Open 

The dramatic rise in hacktivism

What is hacktivism (also spelled “hactivism” by some)? Simply stated, it is the subversive use of computers and computer networks to promote a political or social agenda. No doubt, some will say that many of these hacks were sponsored by major world powers, such as Russia. Foreign government involvement is likely the case; nevertheless, there is disagreement in the intelligence community over who was behind many of these hacks in 2016 and what their motives were.

The dramatic rise in hacktivism

What is hacktivism (also spelled “hactivism” by some)? Simply stated, it is the subversive use of computers and computer networks to promote a political or social agenda. No doubt, some will say that many of these hacks were sponsored by major world powers, such as Russia. Foreign government involvement is likely the case; nevertheless, there is disagreement in the intelligence community over who was behind many of these hacks in 2016 and what their motives were.___

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2017-02-22 16:47:13 (2 comments; 6 reshares; 28 +1s; )Open 

The fastest mobile internet by country, Nov 2016-Jan 2017

United States not in the top 30.

The fastest mobile internet by country, Nov 2016-Jan 2017

United States not in the top 30.___

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2017-02-22 16:37:50 (2 comments; 10 reshares; 27 +1s; )Open 

The Long-Shot Bid to Put Crispr in the Hands of the People

In 1999, the NIH recommended that patent holders nonexclusively license research tools developed with federal funds, so more entrepreneurs could commercialize them. Berkeley and the Broad are following that recommendation—sort of. They’re not doing anything to stop scientists who want to use Crispr for science’s sake; both have granted nonexclusive licenses to researchers at universities and nonprofit institutions. But the buck stops the moment any of those license-holders try to take a Crispr-ed product to market. At that point, the researcher needs to buy the appropriate sublicense from whichever company—Editas or Caribou or Crispr Therapeutics—holds it. These biotechs are surrogates for patent holders like Berkeley and the Broad, taking over the role of patent owner (plus the majority of profits). And that extralicensing... more »

The Long-Shot Bid to Put Crispr in the Hands of the People

In 1999, the NIH recommended that patent holders nonexclusively license research tools developed with federal funds, so more entrepreneurs could commercialize them. Berkeley and the Broad are following that recommendation—sort of. They’re not doing anything to stop scientists who want to use Crispr for science’s sake; both have granted nonexclusive licenses to researchers at universities and nonprofit institutions. But the buck stops the moment any of those license-holders try to take a Crispr-ed product to market. At that point, the researcher needs to buy the appropriate sublicense from whichever company—Editas or Caribou or Crispr Therapeutics—holds it. These biotechs are surrogates for patent holders like Berkeley and the Broad, taking over the role of patent owner (plus the majority of profits). And that extra licensing step has the potential to stop innovative applications of Crispr.

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2017-02-22 16:17:52 (5 comments; 6 reshares; 36 +1s; )Open 

CPU competition at last: AMD Ryzen brings 8 cores from just $329

On March 2, and preorderable today, the first three Ryzen processors will be available to buy. All three processors use AMD's brand-new Zen core. All are eight-core, 16-thread parts; all have a 16MB level 3 cache shared across all cores; and all three are unlocked for overclocking. The top-end part is the R7 1800X. This $499 chip will have a 3.6GHz base speed and a 4.0GHz boost speed, with a 95W TDP. AMD is positioning it against Intel's i7-6900K, a $1,050 processor using the Broadwell-E core running at 3.2 GHz, and turboing up to 3.7GHz. In the Cinebench R15 multithreaded rendering test, AMD says that its new processor scores about 9 percent higher than Intel's. In the single threaded version of the same test, it's a dead heat. AMD hasn't quite matched Broadwell's instructions per clock—it'sr... more »

CPU competition at last: AMD Ryzen brings 8 cores from just $329

On March 2, and preorderable today, the first three Ryzen processors will be available to buy. All three processors use AMD's brand-new Zen core. All are eight-core, 16-thread parts; all have a 16MB level 3 cache shared across all cores; and all three are unlocked for overclocking. The top-end part is the R7 1800X. This $499 chip will have a 3.6GHz base speed and a 4.0GHz boost speed, with a 95W TDP. AMD is positioning it against Intel's i7-6900K, a $1,050 processor using the Broadwell-E core running at 3.2 GHz, and turboing up to 3.7GHz. In the Cinebench R15 multithreaded rendering test, AMD says that its new processor scores about 9 percent higher than Intel's. In the single threaded version of the same test, it's a dead heat. AMD hasn't quite matched Broadwell's instructions per clock—it's relying on a few hundred extra megahertz to achieve that tied score—but it's not far off. And given that the Ryzen ships at a few hundred extra megahertz more than Intel's twice-as-expensive chip, the shortfall in IPC is largely academic. IPC is interesting in that it gives a sense of how cores are designed, but workloads aren't constrained by IPC or clock speed per se; they're constrained by thermal and power constraints. And AMD compares very favorably there, too: the Intel chip is a 140W part, so can use about 50 percent more power than the AMD.___

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2017-02-22 16:07:27 (12 comments; 3 reshares; 42 +1s; )Open 

Study sees U.S. life expectancy falling further behind other countries

Life expectancy in the United States is already much lower than most other high-income countries and is expected to fall even further behind by 2030, new research published today predicts. According to the most recent government figures, life expectancy at birth in the United States is 76.3 years for men and 81.2 years for women. Using a number of forecasting models, researchers from the U.K. predict life expectancy in the U.S. will improve to 83.3 years for women and 79.5 years for men by the year 2030. But despite these modest gains, the United States is still lagging behind other developed countries. “The USA has the highest child and maternal mortality, homicide rate, and body-mass index of any high-income country, and was the first of high-income countries to experience a halt or possibly reversal of increase inh... more »

Study sees U.S. life expectancy falling further behind other countries

Life expectancy in the United States is already much lower than most other high-income countries and is expected to fall even further behind by 2030, new research published today predicts. According to the most recent government figures, life expectancy at birth in the United States is 76.3 years for men and 81.2 years for women. Using a number of forecasting models, researchers from the U.K. predict life expectancy in the U.S. will improve to 83.3 years for women and 79.5 years for men by the year 2030. But despite these modest gains, the United States is still lagging behind other developed countries. “The USA has the highest child and maternal mortality, homicide rate, and body-mass index of any high-income country, and was the first of high-income countries to experience a halt or possibly reversal of increase in height in adulthood, which is associated with higher longevity,” the authors write. The United States also lacks universal health coverage available in other high-income countries and has the largest share of unmet health care needs due to financial costs.___

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2017-02-22 03:59:00 (4 comments; 5 reshares; 32 +1s; )Open 

Man Loses More Than 50 Pounds Playing A VR Game

Man Loses More Than 50 Pounds Playing A VR Game___

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2017-02-22 02:10:33 (0 comments; 8 reshares; 50 +1s; )Open 

Scientists present the smallest member of the CRISPR-Cas9 family developed to date

Scientists at the Center for Genome Engineering, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), in collaboration with KIM Eunji (ToolGen Inc.) and KIM Jeong Hun (Seoul National University) have engineered the smallest CRISPR-Cas9 to date, delivered it to the muscle cells and in the eyes of mice via adeno-associated viruses (AAV) and used it to modify a gene causing blindness. Published on Nature Communications, this CRISPR-Cas9 system, originated from Campylobacter jejuni (CjCas9), is expected to become a useful therapeutic tool against common and "undruggable" disease targets.

Scientists present the smallest member of the CRISPR-Cas9 family developed to date

Scientists at the Center for Genome Engineering, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), in collaboration with KIM Eunji (ToolGen Inc.) and KIM Jeong Hun (Seoul National University) have engineered the smallest CRISPR-Cas9 to date, delivered it to the muscle cells and in the eyes of mice via adeno-associated viruses (AAV) and used it to modify a gene causing blindness. Published on Nature Communications, this CRISPR-Cas9 system, originated from Campylobacter jejuni (CjCas9), is expected to become a useful therapeutic tool against common and "undruggable" disease targets.___

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2017-02-22 01:57:27 (15 comments; 11 reshares; 103 +1s; )Open 

Fifth of world's food lost to over-eating and waste, study finds

Almost 20 per cent of the food made available to consumers is lost through over-eating or waste, a study suggests. The world population consumes around 10 per cent more food than it needs, while almost nine per cent is thrown away or left to spoil, researchers say.

Fifth of world's food lost to over-eating and waste, study finds

Almost 20 per cent of the food made available to consumers is lost through over-eating or waste, a study suggests. The world population consumes around 10 per cent more food than it needs, while almost nine per cent is thrown away or left to spoil, researchers say.___

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2017-02-22 01:25:53 (1 comments; 7 reshares; 32 +1s; )Open 

Google touts GPU-based instances for Google Compute Engine and TensorFlow

Google is touting a new beta service for its cloud that lets customers rent Nvidia Corp. GPUs running in its data centers for machine learning and other heavy compute workloads. The program, which was launched yesterday, allows Google cloud customers in its us-east1, asia-east1, and europe-west1 regions to spin up GPU-based instances on Google Compute Engine via the command-line tool. Users need to request access to the GPUs first, however, the company said. “If your project has an established billing history, it will receive [GPU] quota automatically after you submit the request,” Google Product Manager John Barrus said in a blog post.

Google touts GPU-based instances for Google Compute Engine and TensorFlow

Google is touting a new beta service for its cloud that lets customers rent Nvidia Corp. GPUs running in its data centers for machine learning and other heavy compute workloads. The program, which was launched yesterday, allows Google cloud customers in its us-east1, asia-east1, and europe-west1 regions to spin up GPU-based instances on Google Compute Engine via the command-line tool. Users need to request access to the GPUs first, however, the company said. “If your project has an established billing history, it will receive [GPU] quota automatically after you submit the request,” Google Product Manager John Barrus said in a blog post.___

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2017-02-22 01:05:08 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 14 +1s; )Open 

Google’s latest research aims to make mixed reality videos a little less alien

Game publishers like Owlchemy Labs and Radial Games have done some of the most extensive work on mixed reality setups and have shared their findings with the greater VR game dev community. Many of the issues of reckoning a human avatar in a digital world have been accounted for in these efforts but today, Google revealed in a blog post that its been working on a strange little project to go the last mile in making these MR videos even more realistic by bringing the user’s face back into these videos.

Google’s latest research aims to make mixed reality videos a little less alien

Game publishers like Owlchemy Labs and Radial Games have done some of the most extensive work on mixed reality setups and have shared their findings with the greater VR game dev community. Many of the issues of reckoning a human avatar in a digital world have been accounted for in these efforts but today, Google revealed in a blog post that its been working on a strange little project to go the last mile in making these MR videos even more realistic by bringing the user’s face back into these videos.___

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2017-02-21 19:44:16 (0 comments; 8 reshares; 34 +1s; )Open 

'AI brain scans' reveal what happens inside machine learning

Bristol-based Graphcore has used its AI processing units and software to create maps of what happens during a machine learning process.

'AI brain scans' reveal what happens inside machine learning

Bristol-based Graphcore has used its AI processing units and software to create maps of what happens during a machine learning process.___

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2017-02-21 19:26:51 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 49 +1s; )Open 

Mongolia's nomads warm to solar power

Dotted across the steppes, glints of light can be seen as the sun bounces off the solar panels that have been installed on the sides of gers made of felt and yak's wool. At the start of this millennium, Mongolia's herders and nomads had little or no access to modern electric power and its potential benefits. But as of 2013, thanks to a concerted push by the Mongolian government, almost 70 percent of nomadic people have access to electricity. Bor, a herder who mainly travels around western Mongolia's Arkhangai province, is one of the people whose family benefits from portable solar home systems (SHS).



Mongolia's nomads warm to solar power

Dotted across the steppes, glints of light can be seen as the sun bounces off the solar panels that have been installed on the sides of gers made of felt and yak's wool. At the start of this millennium, Mongolia's herders and nomads had little or no access to modern electric power and its potential benefits. But as of 2013, thanks to a concerted push by the Mongolian government, almost 70 percent of nomadic people have access to electricity. Bor, a herder who mainly travels around western Mongolia's Arkhangai province, is one of the people whose family benefits from portable solar home systems (SHS).

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2017-02-21 16:33:19 (2 comments; 11 reshares; 23 +1s; )Open 

An AI Hedge Fund Created a New Currency to Make Wall Street Work Like Open Source

WALL STREET IS a competition, a Darwinian battle for the almighty dollar. Gordon Gekko said that greed is good, that it captures “the essence of the evolutionary spirit.” A hedge fund hunts for an edge and then maniacally guards it, locking down its trading data and barring its traders from joining the company next door. The big bucks lie in finding market inefficiencies no one else can, succeeding at the expense of others. But Richard Craib wants to change that. He wants to transform Wall Street from a cutthroat competition into a harmonious collaboration. This morning, the 29-year-old South African technologist and his unorthodox hedge fund, Numerai, started issuing a new digital currency—kind of. Craib’s idea is so weird, so unlike anything else that has preceded it, that naming it becomes anexercis... more »

An AI Hedge Fund Created a New Currency to Make Wall Street Work Like Open Source

WALL STREET IS a competition, a Darwinian battle for the almighty dollar. Gordon Gekko said that greed is good, that it captures “the essence of the evolutionary spirit.” A hedge fund hunts for an edge and then maniacally guards it, locking down its trading data and barring its traders from joining the company next door. The big bucks lie in finding market inefficiencies no one else can, succeeding at the expense of others. But Richard Craib wants to change that. He wants to transform Wall Street from a cutthroat competition into a harmonious collaboration. This morning, the 29-year-old South African technologist and his unorthodox hedge fund, Numerai, started issuing a new digital currency—kind of. Craib’s idea is so weird, so unlike anything else that has preceded it, that naming it becomes an exercise in approximation. Inspired by the same tech that underpins bitcoin, his creation joins a growing wave of what people in the world of crypto-finance call “digital tokens,” internet-based assets that enable the crowdsourcing of everything from venture capital to computing power. Craib hopes his particular token can turn Wall Street into a place where everyone’s on the same team. It’s a strange, complicated, and potentially powerful creation that builds on an already audacious arrangement, a new configuration of technology and money that calls into question the market’s most cherished premise. Greed is still good, but it’s better when people are working together.

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2017-02-21 16:15:35 (0 comments; 17 reshares; 55 +1s; )Open 

'Late-life' genes activated by biological clock to help protect against stress, aging

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered that a subset of genes involved in daily circadian rhythms, or the "biological clock," only become active late in life or during periods of intense stress when they are most needed to help protect critical life functions. The findings, made in research done with fruit flies and published today in Nature Communications, are part of a unique stress response mechanism that was previously unknown. These genes may help to combat serious stresses associated with age, disease or environmental challenges, and help explain why aging is often accelerated when the biological clock is disrupted. This group of genes, whose rhythmic activity late in life had not previously been understood, were named "late-life cyclers," or LLCs, by... more »

'Late-life' genes activated by biological clock to help protect against stress, aging

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered that a subset of genes involved in daily circadian rhythms, or the "biological clock," only become active late in life or during periods of intense stress when they are most needed to help protect critical life functions. The findings, made in research done with fruit flies and published today in Nature Communications, are part of a unique stress response mechanism that was previously unknown. These genes may help to combat serious stresses associated with age, disease or environmental challenges, and help explain why aging is often accelerated when the biological clock is disrupted. This group of genes, whose rhythmic activity late in life had not previously been understood, were named "late-life cyclers," or LLCs, by former OSU graduate student and lead author of the study, Rachael Kuintzle. At least 25 such genes become rhythmic with age, and the function of some of them remains unclear. "This class of LLC genes appear to become active and respond to some of the stresses most common in aging, such as cellular and molecular damage, oxidative stress, or even some disease states," said Jadwiga Giebultowicz, a professor in the OSU College of Science, co-senior author on the study and international expert on the mechanisms and function of the biological clock. "Aging is associated with neural degeneration, loss of memory and other problems, which are exacerbated if clock function is experimentally disrupted. The LLC genes are part of the natural response to that, and do what they can to help protect the nervous system."___

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2017-02-21 16:11:40 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 9 +1s; )Open 

World of Warcraft's gold rush has upended Blizzard’s economy

There has been an economic panic in World of Warcraft. On Feb. 6, Blizzard changed the rules, allowing players to exchange WoW Tokens for Battle.net balance. That means that gold you earn or buy in World of Warcraft can now be used in any Blizzard property. This has caused wild fluctuations in the value of the tokens, the value of WoW gold and, by extension, the time WoW players spend earning that gold.



World of Warcraft's gold rush has upended Blizzard’s economy

There has been an economic panic in World of Warcraft. On Feb. 6, Blizzard changed the rules, allowing players to exchange WoW Tokens for Battle.net balance. That means that gold you earn or buy in World of Warcraft can now be used in any Blizzard property. This has caused wild fluctuations in the value of the tokens, the value of WoW gold and, by extension, the time WoW players spend earning that gold.

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2017-02-21 15:47:24 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 10 +1s; )Open 

VRCameraman Turns Your HTC Vive Into A Virtual Film Camera

Developing with a VR headset doesn’t necessarily mean you’re developing a VR app; the HTC Vive is finding unexpected use as a camera for virtual worlds, too. UK-based Abyssal Arts and GSProductions want to capitalize on that with the release of VRCamerman, a Unity extension that allows creators to use the Vive to shoot footage and trailers as if they were really camera men inside their software. It allows developers to create multiple shots within a scene with intuitive controls, and then hit record to film gameplay or cutscenes in a cinematic fashion. You can have static angles or even set cameras to follow a set path.

VRCameraman Turns Your HTC Vive Into A Virtual Film Camera

Developing with a VR headset doesn’t necessarily mean you’re developing a VR app; the HTC Vive is finding unexpected use as a camera for virtual worlds, too. UK-based Abyssal Arts and GSProductions want to capitalize on that with the release of VRCamerman, a Unity extension that allows creators to use the Vive to shoot footage and trailers as if they were really camera men inside their software. It allows developers to create multiple shots within a scene with intuitive controls, and then hit record to film gameplay or cutscenes in a cinematic fashion. You can have static angles or even set cameras to follow a set path.___

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2017-02-21 15:30:21 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

Longevity-promoting superstar gets revealed in Caenorhabditis reproducibility project

The amyloid dye Thioflavin T emerged as the superstar when age researchers in three independent laboratories tested ten already-promising pro-longevity chemicals across a range of distinctive strains and species of tiny nematode worms known as Caenorhabditis. The project, dubbed the Caenorhabditis Intervention Testing Program (CITP), also tackled reproducibility, which has been a lingering problem in age research. Initial results from the project are published in Nature Communications. "The goal of the CITP is to identify pro-longevity chemicals that are effective across diverse genetic distances making them excellent candidates for trials in more complex animals, including mammals," said Gordon Lithgow, PhD, a professor at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and a senior author of the... more »

Longevity-promoting superstar gets revealed in Caenorhabditis reproducibility project

The amyloid dye Thioflavin T emerged as the superstar when age researchers in three independent laboratories tested ten already-promising pro-longevity chemicals across a range of distinctive strains and species of tiny nematode worms known as Caenorhabditis. The project, dubbed the Caenorhabditis Intervention Testing Program (CITP), also tackled reproducibility, which has been a lingering problem in age research. Initial results from the project are published in Nature Communications. "The goal of the CITP is to identify pro-longevity chemicals that are effective across diverse genetic distances making them excellent candidates for trials in more complex animals, including mammals," said Gordon Lithgow, PhD, a professor at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and a senior author of the paper. Lithgow runs the Buck lab that in 2011 showed that Thioflavin T extended lifespan in healthy nematode worms by more than 50 percent and slowed the disease process in worms engineered to mimic aspects of Alzheimer's disease. "Running experiments in three discrete laboratories allowed us to demonstrate the reproducibility of our study with Thioflavin T," he said. "But it's important to note that some of our other compounds did not pass this stringent test - getting feedback on the 'fails' also furthers the larger effort." CITP researchers from the Buck, Rutgers University and the University of Oregon characterized the lifespans of 22 Caenorhabditis strains spanning three species. Thioflavin T was found to be the most robust pro-longevity chemical, as it extended the lifespan of all strains tested. In addition, researchers found that six out of the ten pro-longevity chemicals significantly extended lifespan in at least one strain of Caenorhabditis. Three dietary restriction mimetics were mainly effective across strains of C. elegans but showed more variable responses in other species. "Nearly 100,000 worms were individually monitored during this initial project," said Mark Lucanic, PhD, a postdoc in the Lithgow lab and first author of the paper. "We hope that the scope and focus of this project will give confidence that our consortium can identify promising compounds for further testing on aging."___

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2017-02-21 01:35:46 (17 comments; 18 reshares; 107 +1s; )Open 

Researchers identify human brain processes critical to short-term memory

"This study is the first clear demonstration of precisely how human brain cells work to create and recall short-term memories," said Ueli Rutishauser, PhD, associate professor of Neurosurgery in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery and the study's senior author. "Confirmation of this process and the specific brain regions involved is a critical step in developing meaningful treatments for memory disorders that affect millions of Americans." The study's findings, published online Feb. 20 and in the April print edition of Nature Neuroscience, involve a type of brain cell, called a persistently active neuron, that is vital for supporting short-term memory. Results indicate that this specific type of neurons remain active for several seconds when a person is required to memorize an... more »

Researchers identify human brain processes critical to short-term memory

"This study is the first clear demonstration of precisely how human brain cells work to create and recall short-term memories," said Ueli Rutishauser, PhD, associate professor of Neurosurgery in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery and the study's senior author. "Confirmation of this process and the specific brain regions involved is a critical step in developing meaningful treatments for memory disorders that affect millions of Americans." The study's findings, published online Feb. 20 and in the April print edition of Nature Neuroscience, involve a type of brain cell, called a persistently active neuron, that is vital for supporting short-term memory. Results indicate that this specific type of neurons remain active for several seconds when a person is required to memorize an object or image and recall it at a later time. The findings reveal critical new information on how the human brain stores and maintains short-term memories - the ability to remember ideas, thoughts, images and objects during a time frame of seconds to minutes. Short-term memory is essential for making decisions and mental calculations. "Because impaired short-term memory severely weakens someone's ability to complete everyday tasks, it is essential to develop a better understanding of this process so new treatments for memory disorders can be developed," said Jan Kaminski, PhD, a neuroscientist at Cedars-Sinai and lead author of the study.___

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2017-02-20 21:56:41 (1 comments; 5 reshares; 22 +1s; )Open 

Drones are what's next for plant breeders

Crop breeders grow thousands of potential varieties at a time; until now, observations of key traits were made by hand. In a new study, unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, were used successfully to remotely evaluate and predict soybean maturity timing in tests of potential varieties. The use of drones for this purpose could substantially reduce the man-hours needed to evaluate new crops.

Drones are what's next for plant breeders

Crop breeders grow thousands of potential varieties at a time; until now, observations of key traits were made by hand. In a new study, unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, were used successfully to remotely evaluate and predict soybean maturity timing in tests of potential varieties. The use of drones for this purpose could substantially reduce the man-hours needed to evaluate new crops.___

2017-02-20 16:56:49 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s; )Open 

Why Ethereum?

AVC regular William Mougayar gave this presentation at the European Ethereum Developers Conference, Edcon, in Paris a few days ago. In his talk, William argues that Ethereum, unlike Bitcoin, is developing into a rich environment with many different services coming together to provide developers a wide platform to build on top of. I am increasingly viewing Bitcoin and Ethereum as complimentary, not competitive, and see both of them as important public blockchains that will grow in significance in the coming years. But regardless of that, William’s take on Ethereum is correct and there is a lot of developer momentum and enthusiasm around it.



Why Ethereum?

AVC regular William Mougayar gave this presentation at the European Ethereum Developers Conference, Edcon, in Paris a few days ago. In his talk, William argues that Ethereum, unlike Bitcoin, is developing into a rich environment with many different services coming together to provide developers a wide platform to build on top of. I am increasingly viewing Bitcoin and Ethereum as complimentary, not competitive, and see both of them as important public blockchains that will grow in significance in the coming years. But regardless of that, William’s take on Ethereum is correct and there is a lot of developer momentum and enthusiasm around it.

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2017-02-20 16:55:37 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 13 +1s; )Open 

Microsoft’s HoloLens successor reportedly arriving in 2019

Microsoft first unveiled its HoloLens headset more than two years ago at a special Windows 10 event. While the company didn’t start shipping units to developers until last year, anyone is currently free to purchase a HoloLens developer device for $3,000. Many had expected Microsoft to start selling a retail version of the headset soon, but it appears that the company has pushed back its plans. A report from Thurrott.com suggests that Microsoft has decided to sideline its plans for a second version of HoloLens in favor of a third version it has also been preparing. The report suggests that Microsoft can focus on bigger changes to HoloLens as a result, and that a lack of competition has enabled the company to make such a decision. The successor to HoloLens will reportedly arrive in 2019, three years after the headset startedshi... more »

Microsoft’s HoloLens successor reportedly arriving in 2019

Microsoft first unveiled its HoloLens headset more than two years ago at a special Windows 10 event. While the company didn’t start shipping units to developers until last year, anyone is currently free to purchase a HoloLens developer device for $3,000. Many had expected Microsoft to start selling a retail version of the headset soon, but it appears that the company has pushed back its plans. A report from Thurrott.com suggests that Microsoft has decided to sideline its plans for a second version of HoloLens in favor of a third version it has also been preparing. The report suggests that Microsoft can focus on bigger changes to HoloLens as a result, and that a lack of competition has enabled the company to make such a decision. The successor to HoloLens will reportedly arrive in 2019, three years after the headset started shipping to developers. It’s not clear what Microsoft has planned for HoloLens, but it’s reasonable to assume the company will shrink the headset’s size and improve things like battery life, processing power, and maybe even the field of view.___

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2017-02-20 16:47:33 (7 comments; 14 reshares; 87 +1s; )Open 

Vitamin D protects against colds and flu, finds major global study

Vitamin D supplements protect against acute respiratory infections including colds and flu, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The study provides the most robust evidence yet that vitamin D has benefits beyond bone and muscle health, and could have major implications for public health policy, including the fortification of foods with vitamin D to tackle high levels of deficiency in the UK. The results, published in the BMJ, are based on a new analysis of raw data from around 11,000 participants in 25 clinical trials conducted in 14 countries including the UK, USA, Japan, India, Afghanistan, Belgium, Italy, Australia and Canada. Individually, these trials yielded conflicting results, with some reporting that vitamin D protected against respiratory infections, and others showing no effect.... more »

Vitamin D protects against colds and flu, finds major global study

Vitamin D supplements protect against acute respiratory infections including colds and flu, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The study provides the most robust evidence yet that vitamin D has benefits beyond bone and muscle health, and could have major implications for public health policy, including the fortification of foods with vitamin D to tackle high levels of deficiency in the UK. The results, published in the BMJ, are based on a new analysis of raw data from around 11,000 participants in 25 clinical trials conducted in 14 countries including the UK, USA, Japan, India, Afghanistan, Belgium, Italy, Australia and Canada. Individually, these trials yielded conflicting results, with some reporting that vitamin D protected against respiratory infections, and others showing no effect. Lead researcher Professor Adrian Martineau from QMUL said: "This major collaborative research effort has yielded the first definitive evidence that vitamin D really does protect against respiratory infections. Our analysis of pooled raw data from each of the 10,933 trial participants allowed us to address the thorny question of why vitamin D 'worked' in some trials, but not in others. "The bottom line is that the protective effects of vitamin D supplementation are strongest in those who have the lowest vitamin D levels, and when supplementation is given daily or weekly rather than in more widely spaced doses.___

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2017-02-20 02:41:21 (6 comments; 12 reshares; 64 +1s; )Open 

Advances in imaging could deepen knowledge of brain

Obama's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative promised a multidisciplinary approach, with a budget of $434 million for 2017, aimed at unlocking the mysteries of the brain
New imaging techniques enable exploration of the brain in much more detail than ever before, opening the door to greater understanding of neurological problems and possibly new treatments, researchers say. Showcased this week at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting, the research and innovations are the product of three US scientists involved in a project launched by former president Barack Obama in 2013 to unlock the inner workings of the brain. One of the technologies developed as part of the initiative, called Scape, enables scientists to see brain structures at a microscopic level.... more »

Advances in imaging could deepen knowledge of brain

Obama's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative promised a multidisciplinary approach, with a budget of $434 million for 2017, aimed at unlocking the mysteries of the brain
New imaging techniques enable exploration of the brain in much more detail than ever before, opening the door to greater understanding of neurological problems and possibly new treatments, researchers say. Showcased this week at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting, the research and innovations are the product of three US scientists involved in a project launched by former president Barack Obama in 2013 to unlock the inner workings of the brain. One of the technologies developed as part of the initiative, called Scape, enables scientists to see brain structures at a microscopic level. Scape permits the three-dimensional observation of individual neurons in the brain of a fruit fly as the insect is in flight, searching for food or suddenly afraid for its life, said Elisabeth Hillman, professor of biomedical engineering at Columbia University. "You can see actually flashing green as the brain is telling the body to move," she told the conference. "We can image every single neuron in the entire brain of these organisms, which was never possible to do before." The new tool opens up multiple paths for research, including deciphering the signals currently seen in magnetic resonance imagery (MRI). "We are hoping to leverage this new technique to better understand diseases," she said.

Portable MRI: Another new technology, the recently patented portable MRI, also promises advances for mobile diagnosis, said Julie Brefczynski-Lewis, assistant professor of research at West Virginia University. The size of an American football helmet, the advanced, miniature technology is worn on the head and does not interfere with patients' ability to move freely. The new device can peer deeply into the brain's structures as opposed to older MRI scans, which only scan the brain's surface. "A lot of important things that are going on with emotion, memory, behavior are way deep in the center of the brain... areas we can reach with our technology," Brefczynski-Lewis said. "So you can get the instructions in the brain that are important for walking, for balance and eventually we will be covering the entire brain from top to bottom," she added. The device can be used for scanning patients suffering strokes, epilepsy, or from injuries sustained during accidents or on the battlefield. "With this technique, you can study someone in the ER (emergency room) with a stroke and find out different treatment options that may be more appropriate," Brefczynski-Lewis said. "It is personal medicine."___

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2017-02-19 21:12:07 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 14 +1s; )Open 

AltspaceVR Expands Cross-Platform Support to Google Daydream and Android

In an email to UploadVR, AltspaceVR announced that it will be releasing a “new version of its software” that consists of a “mobile app that fully supports Google Daydream View and also provides access into AltspaceVR for compatible Android phones even without a virtual reality (VR) headset.” AltspaceVR is a social, virtual reality experience in which you and your friends can meet, speak, play games and otherwise interact inside virtual reality. In the app, you are represented as one of a handful of different avatars. Your avatar’s head moves in response to yours and, depending on what hardware you have, you can even bring your hands into the experience as well to communicate using gestures and body language.

AltspaceVR Expands Cross-Platform Support to Google Daydream and Android

In an email to UploadVR, AltspaceVR announced that it will be releasing a “new version of its software” that consists of a “mobile app that fully supports Google Daydream View and also provides access into AltspaceVR for compatible Android phones even without a virtual reality (VR) headset.” AltspaceVR is a social, virtual reality experience in which you and your friends can meet, speak, play games and otherwise interact inside virtual reality. In the app, you are represented as one of a handful of different avatars. Your avatar’s head moves in response to yours and, depending on what hardware you have, you can even bring your hands into the experience as well to communicate using gestures and body language.___

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2017-02-19 19:40:25 (4 comments; 3 reshares; 18 +1s; )Open 

Lab grown meat prices have dropped 30,000 times in less than four years and are about 3-4 times more expensive than regular ground beef

Lab-grown meat could be on your plate within the next five years. For the past few years, the barrier to getting test-tube meat into the hands of consumers has been the cost of production. In 2013, it was around $325,000 to make this stuff in a lab, but the process has been refined, and the cost now is just $11.36.

Lab grown meat prices have dropped 30,000 times in less than four years and are about 3-4 times more expensive than regular ground beef

Lab-grown meat could be on your plate within the next five years. For the past few years, the barrier to getting test-tube meat into the hands of consumers has been the cost of production. In 2013, it was around $325,000 to make this stuff in a lab, but the process has been refined, and the cost now is just $11.36.___

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2017-02-19 17:17:21 (7 comments; 18 reshares; 78 +1s; )Open 

Scientifically-designed 'fasting-like' diet lowers risks for major diseases

What if you could lose weight and reduce your risk of life-threatening disease without any changes in what you eat—other than a five-day special diet once every few months? That's what happened for 71 adults who were placed on three cycles of a low-calorie, "fasting-mimicking" diet. The phase II trial, conducted by researchers at the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, demonstrated a host of benefits from the regimen. The diet reduced cardiovascular risk factors including blood pressure, signs of inflammation (measured by C-reactive protein levels), as well as fasting glucose and reduced levels of IGF-1, a hormone that affects metabolism. It also shrank waistlines and resulted in weight loss, both in total body fat and trunk fat, but not in muscle mass. In effect, the diet reduced thes... more »

Scientifically-designed 'fasting-like' diet lowers risks for major diseases

What if you could lose weight and reduce your risk of life-threatening disease without any changes in what you eat—other than a five-day special diet once every few months? That's what happened for 71 adults who were placed on three cycles of a low-calorie, "fasting-mimicking" diet. The phase II trial, conducted by researchers at the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, demonstrated a host of benefits from the regimen. The diet reduced cardiovascular risk factors including blood pressure, signs of inflammation (measured by C-reactive protein levels), as well as fasting glucose and reduced levels of IGF-1, a hormone that affects metabolism. It also shrank waistlines and resulted in weight loss, both in total body fat and trunk fat, but not in muscle mass. In effect, the diet reduced the study participants' risks for cancer, diabetes, heart disease and other age-related diseases, according to the findings published Feb. 15 in Science Translational Medicine. "This study provides evidence that people can experience significant health benefits through a periodic, fasting-mimicking diet that is designed to act on the aging process," said Valter Longo, director of the USC Longevity Institute and a professor of biological sciences for USC Davis and Dornsife. "Prior studies have indicated a range of health benefits in mice, but this is the first randomized clinical trial with enough participants to demonstrate that the diet is feasible, effective and safe for humans.
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2017-02-19 17:10:41 (30 comments; 24 reshares; 224 +1s; )Open 

Beautifully Designed Cliff House

link: http://www.ifitshipitshere.com/wild-cliffside-home-with-zinc-roof-by-gilbartolome-architects/

Beautifully Designed Cliff House

link: http://www.ifitshipitshere.com/wild-cliffside-home-with-zinc-roof-by-gilbartolome-architects/___

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2017-02-19 17:00:49 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 15 +1s; )Open 


6 Reasons Why China is Leading VR Growth Worldwide

There are hundreds of Chinese hardware and software companies. When I’ve visited incubators like MadNet, as much as 10% of their startup batch was about VR. Two out of the four HTC Vive X accelerators in the world are located in China, in Beijing and Shenzhen. This is partially explained by the absence of Western actors like Google and Oculus, which has triggered an upsurge of players wanting to fill the void, seen in the countless of Cardboard and other headset variants, facilitated by the manufacturing power of China, especially Shenzhen. As an illustration, just one brand, Baofeng, has sold more than one million of their half-dozen type of headsets in just 3 months, and there are numerous stakeholders like that.


6 Reasons Why China is Leading VR Growth Worldwide

There are hundreds of Chinese hardware and software companies. When I’ve visited incubators like MadNet, as much as 10% of their startup batch was about VR. Two out of the four HTC Vive X accelerators in the world are located in China, in Beijing and Shenzhen. This is partially explained by the absence of Western actors like Google and Oculus, which has triggered an upsurge of players wanting to fill the void, seen in the countless of Cardboard and other headset variants, facilitated by the manufacturing power of China, especially Shenzhen. As an illustration, just one brand, Baofeng, has sold more than one million of their half-dozen type of headsets in just 3 months, and there are numerous stakeholders like that.___

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2017-02-19 16:57:20 (2 comments; 13 reshares; 60 +1s; )Open 

The Two Paths from Natural Language Processing to Artificial Intelligence

Why isn’t Siri smarter? AI has accelerated in recent years, especially with deep learning, but current chatbots are an embarrassment. Computers still can’t read or converse intelligently. Their deficiency is disappointing because we want to interact with our world using natural language, and we want computers to read all of those documents out there so they can retrieve the best ones, answer our questions, and summarize what is new. To understand our language, computers need to know our world. They need to be able to answer questions like “Why does it only rain outside?” and “If a book is on a table, and you push the table, what happens?” We humans understand language in a way that is grounded in sensation and action. When someone says the word “chicken,” we map that to our experience with chickens,and we can talk... more »

The Two Paths from Natural Language Processing to Artificial Intelligence

Why isn’t Siri smarter? AI has accelerated in recent years, especially with deep learning, but current chatbots are an embarrassment. Computers still can’t read or converse intelligently. Their deficiency is disappointing because we want to interact with our world using natural language, and we want computers to read all of those documents out there so they can retrieve the best ones, answer our questions, and summarize what is new. To understand our language, computers need to know our world. They need to be able to answer questions like “Why does it only rain outside?” and “If a book is on a table, and you push the table, what happens?” We humans understand language in a way that is grounded in sensation and action. When someone says the word “chicken,” we map that to our experience with chickens, and we can talk to each other because we have had similar experiences with chickens. This is how computers need to understand language. There are two paths to building computers with this kind of understanding. The first path is a symbolic one that is traversed by hard-coding our world into computers. To follow the symbolic path, we segment text into meaningless tokens that correspond to words and punctuation. We then manually create representations that assign meanings to these tokens by putting them into groups and creating relationships between the groups. With those representations, we build a model of how the world works, and we ground that model in the manually created representations. The second path is sub-symbolic, which we initially follow by having computers learn from text. This path is synonymous with neural networks (also called deep learning), and it begins with representing words as vectors. It then progresses to representing whole sentences with vectors, and then to using vectors to answer arbitrary questions. To complete this path, we must create algorithms that allow computers to learn from rich sensory experience that is similar to our own.___

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2017-02-19 01:44:23 (2 comments; 9 reshares; 36 +1s; )Open 

Perovskite mixed into solar ink can print 20.1% efficient solar onto glass or plastic

A U of T Engineering innovation could make printing solar cells as easy and inexpensive as printing a newspaper. Dr. Hairen Tan and his team have cleared a critical manufacturing hurdle in the development of a relatively new class of solar devices called perovskite solar cells. This alternative solar technology could lead to low-cost, printable solar panels capable of turning nearly any surface into a power generator. “Economies of scale have greatly reduced the cost of silicon manufacturing,” says University Professor Ted Sargent (ECE), an expert in emerging solar technologies and the Canada Research Chair in Nanotechnology and senior author on the paper. “Perovskite solar cells can enable us to use techniques already established in the printing industry to produce solar cells at very low cost.Poten... more »

Perovskite mixed into solar ink can print 20.1% efficient solar onto glass or plastic

A U of T Engineering innovation could make printing solar cells as easy and inexpensive as printing a newspaper. Dr. Hairen Tan and his team have cleared a critical manufacturing hurdle in the development of a relatively new class of solar devices called perovskite solar cells. This alternative solar technology could lead to low-cost, printable solar panels capable of turning nearly any surface into a power generator. “Economies of scale have greatly reduced the cost of silicon manufacturing,” says University Professor Ted Sargent (ECE), an expert in emerging solar technologies and the Canada Research Chair in Nanotechnology and senior author on the paper. “Perovskite solar cells can enable us to use techniques already established in the printing industry to produce solar cells at very low cost. Potentially, perovskites and silicon cells can be married to improve efficiency further, but only with advances in low-temperature processes.” Today, virtually all commercial solar cells are made from thin slices of crystalline silicon which must be processed to a very high purity. It’s an energy-intensive process, requiring temperatures higher than 1,000 degrees Celsius and large amounts of hazardous solvents. In contrast, perovskite solar cells depend on a layer of tiny crystals — each about 1,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair — made of low-cost, light-sensitive materials. Because the perovskite raw materials can be mixed into a liquid to form a kind of ‘solar ink’, they could be printed onto glass, plastic or other materials using a simple inkjet process.___

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2017-02-19 01:14:04 (9 comments; 12 reshares; 116 +1s; )Open 

How humans bond: The brain chemistry revealed

In a new study, researchers found for the first time that the neurotransmitter dopamine is involved in human bonding, bringing the brain's reward system into our understanding of how we form human attachments. The results, based on a study with 19 mother-infant pairs, have important implications for therapies addressing postpartum depression as well as disorders of the dopamine system such as Parkinson's disease, addiction, and social dysfunction.

How humans bond: The brain chemistry revealed

In a new study, researchers found for the first time that the neurotransmitter dopamine is involved in human bonding, bringing the brain's reward system into our understanding of how we form human attachments. The results, based on a study with 19 mother-infant pairs, have important implications for therapies addressing postpartum depression as well as disorders of the dopamine system such as Parkinson's disease, addiction, and social dysfunction.___

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2017-02-18 20:09:15 (0 comments; 6 reshares; 26 +1s; )Open 

How to Make an Image Classifier - Intro to Deep Learning #6

We're going to make our own Image Classifier for cats & dogs in 40 lines of Python! First we'll go over the history of image classification, then we'll dive into the concepts behind convolutional networks and why they are so amazing.

How to Make an Image Classifier - Intro to Deep Learning #6

We're going to make our own Image Classifier for cats & dogs in 40 lines of Python! First we'll go over the history of image classification, then we'll dive into the concepts behind convolutional networks and why they are so amazing.___

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2017-02-18 19:13:08 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 6 +1s; )Open 

China counting on high speed rail to drive domestic tourism to about 10% of GDP

Faster trains with efficient services can expand and improve the Chinese tourism industry, which saw a year-on-year growth of 15.9 percent, totaling 423.3 billion yuan ($61.78 billion) during the recently ended Spring Festival holiday week. Plus, the high-speed railway has opened up hitherto remote places to tourists, expanding business opportunities. In 2016, the domestic tourism sector's revenue reached 3.9 trillion yuan, equivalent to more than 5 percent of the country's GDP. And in South China's Guangdong province, the tourism revenue was equivalent to nearly 15 percent of the provincial GDP.China's economic development has always had a geographical dimension....China’s tourism industry will emerge as an economic powerhouse contributing 10.5 per cent to the GDP by 2020, according to ar... more »

China counting on high speed rail to drive domestic tourism to about 10% of GDP

Faster trains with efficient services can expand and improve the Chinese tourism industry, which saw a year-on-year growth of 15.9 percent, totaling 423.3 billion yuan ($61.78 billion) during the recently ended Spring Festival holiday week. Plus, the high-speed railway has opened up hitherto remote places to tourists, expanding business opportunities. In 2016, the domestic tourism sector's revenue reached 3.9 trillion yuan, equivalent to more than 5 percent of the country's GDP. And in South China's Guangdong province, the tourism revenue was equivalent to nearly 15 percent of the provincial GDP.China's economic development has always had a geographical dimension....China’s tourism industry will emerge as an economic powerhouse contributing 10.5 per cent to the GDP by 2020, according to a report released by China national tourism administration in mid-2016. Tourists spending will rise to a colossal US$1.22 trillion from about $500 billion in just five years, it said....Global Business Travel Association (GBTA) reported that China’s business travel market has overtaken the United States as the world’s biggest. Chinese spending in this segment came to $291.2bn, just topping US spending of $290.2bn in 2015. "China surpassing the United States in business travel spending marks a major inflection point and truly demonstrates the global nature of today’s economy," said Michael McCormick, the GBTA executive director.____

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2017-02-18 17:46:52 (3 comments; 17 reshares; 67 +1s; )Open 

Migration to America took long enough for evolution to happen on the way

The Bering land bridge plays a central role in our picture of how humans reached the Americas. When much more of the world’s water was locked up in ice, and the land between Asia and North America was exposed, people followed the bridge to migrate out of Asia, into Alaska, and from there into the rest of the Americas. This picture tends to portray the bridge as purely a route to the new continents. In fact, the word ‘bridge’ definitely conjures up the wrong image. It was a geographic region, often called Beringia, and people lived there for so long that it probably would have been ludicrous to them that we could think of their home as transient. Current estimates suggest that people lived there for between 5,000 and 8,000 years, starting about 23,000 years ago. That is a long enough time for natural selection tohave ... more »

Migration to America took long enough for evolution to happen on the way

The Bering land bridge plays a central role in our picture of how humans reached the Americas. When much more of the world’s water was locked up in ice, and the land between Asia and North America was exposed, people followed the bridge to migrate out of Asia, into Alaska, and from there into the rest of the Americas. This picture tends to portray the bridge as purely a route to the new continents. In fact, the word ‘bridge’ definitely conjures up the wrong image. It was a geographic region, often called Beringia, and people lived there for so long that it probably would have been ludicrous to them that we could think of their home as transient. Current estimates suggest that people lived there for between 5,000 and 8,000 years, starting about 23,000 years ago. That is a long enough time for natural selection to have had an effect on the genome of people who lived there, according to a paper in PNAS this week. The Beringians would have faced distinct diseases, food constraints, and climate conditions, and natural selection would have helped those with the right genetic adaptations to thrive in that environment. According to the new paper, we can see evidence of that natural selection in modern Native American populations.___

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2017-02-18 17:32:54 (7 comments; 3 reshares; 83 +1s; )Open 

Hamburg Concert Hall

link: http://www.archdaily.com/801593/fly-through-herzog-and-de-meurons-hamburg-elbphilharmonie-at-2-different-speeds

Hamburg Concert Hall

link: http://www.archdaily.com/801593/fly-through-herzog-and-de-meurons-hamburg-elbphilharmonie-at-2-different-speeds___

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