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Shared Circles including Neuroscience

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 22

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2012-10-05 10:35:48 (22 comments, 1 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

Tell us why you love Neuroscience... the best comments will be posted on our Twitter page [@neuroscience] and you will win a copy of Building Brains! http://goo.gl/a3LsM

Most reshares: 33

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2012-10-01 10:41:23 (9 comments, 33 reshares, 55 +1s)Open 

The Power of Your Amazing Brain
[Provided by: www.twitter,com/neuroscience]

Most plusones: 63

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2013-10-10 07:36:58 (5 comments, 24 reshares, 63 +1s)Open 

Alzheimer’s breakthrough: A turning point in the history of the disease http://goo.gl/Z0vOQH

The discovery of the first chemical to prevent the death of brain tissue in a neurodegenerative disease has been hailed as an exciting and historic moment in medical research. (#alzheimer’s #neuroscience)

Latest 50 posts

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2013-10-10 07:36:58 (5 comments, 24 reshares, 63 +1s)Open 

Alzheimer’s breakthrough: A turning point in the history of the disease http://goo.gl/Z0vOQH

The discovery of the first chemical to prevent the death of brain tissue in a neurodegenerative disease has been hailed as an exciting and historic moment in medical research. (#alzheimer’s #neuroscience)

Alzheimer’s breakthrough: A turning point in the history of the disease http://goo.gl/Z0vOQH

The discovery of the first chemical to prevent the death of brain tissue in a neurodegenerative disease has been hailed as an exciting and historic moment in medical research. (#alzheimer’s #neuroscience)___

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2013-07-04 13:31:22 (9 comments, 17 reshares, 52 +1s)Open 

Neuroscientist says human head transplant is possible http://goo.gl/19GeR

Doctors may be able to cure current diseases such as cancer by performing human head transplants, an Italian neuroscientist has claimed. Dr Sergio Canavero, a member of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group, believes not only that this procedure will be possible in the future but that it can be performed with the technology currently on offer.

#neuroscience

Neuroscientist says human head transplant is possible http://goo.gl/19GeR

Doctors may be able to cure current diseases such as cancer by performing human head transplants, an Italian neuroscientist has claimed. Dr Sergio Canavero, a member of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group, believes not only that this procedure will be possible in the future but that it can be performed with the technology currently on offer.

#neuroscience___

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2013-06-07 07:35:22 (0 comments, 12 reshares, 46 +1s)Open 

Clues to what causes compulsive behavior could improve #OCD treatments http://goo.gl/5pseZ

By activating a brain circuit that controls compulsive behavior, MIT #neuroscientists have shown that they can block a compulsive behavior in mice -- a result that could help researchers develop new treatments for diseases such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome.

#neuroscience  

Clues to what causes compulsive behavior could improve #OCD treatments http://goo.gl/5pseZ

By activating a brain circuit that controls compulsive behavior, MIT #neuroscientists have shown that they can block a compulsive behavior in mice -- a result that could help researchers develop new treatments for diseases such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome.

#neuroscience  ___

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2013-05-09 13:16:32 (0 comments, 10 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

Mental stress elicits sustained increases in skin sympathetic nerve activity http://goo.gl/sQk9K

Mental #stress (MS) is a known trigger of myocardial infarction and sudden death. By activating the sympathetic #nervous system, MS may have deleterious effect on the #cardiovascular system but this process is not completely understood. The primary aim of this study was to quantify the effect of MS on skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA). 

Read the full article in Physiological Reports: http://goo.gl/sQk9K

Mental stress elicits sustained increases in skin sympathetic nerve activity http://goo.gl/sQk9K

Mental #stress (MS) is a known trigger of myocardial infarction and sudden death. By activating the sympathetic #nervous system, MS may have deleterious effect on the #cardiovascular system but this process is not completely understood. The primary aim of this study was to quantify the effect of MS on skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA). 

Read the full article in Physiological Reports: http://goo.gl/sQk9K___

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2013-02-26 16:53:21 (5 comments, 21 reshares, 46 +1s)Open 

Blueprint for an artificial brain: Scientists experiment with memristors that imitate natural nerves http://goo.gl/nlp8u

Scientists have long been dreaming about building a computer that would work like a brain. This is because a brain is far more energy-saving than a computer, it can learn by itself, and it doesn't need any programming. Privatdozent [senior lecturer] Dr. Andy Thomas from Bielefeld University's Faculty of Physics is experimenting with memristors -- electronic microcomponents that imitate natural nerves.

Thomas and his colleagues have demonstrated that they could do this a year ago. They constructed a memristor that is capable of learning. Andy Thomas is now using his memristors as key components in a blueprint for an artificial brain.

#neuroscience

Blueprint for an artificial brain: Scientists experiment with memristors that imitate natural nerves http://goo.gl/nlp8u

Scientists have long been dreaming about building a computer that would work like a brain. This is because a brain is far more energy-saving than a computer, it can learn by itself, and it doesn't need any programming. Privatdozent [senior lecturer] Dr. Andy Thomas from Bielefeld University's Faculty of Physics is experimenting with memristors -- electronic microcomponents that imitate natural nerves.

Thomas and his colleagues have demonstrated that they could do this a year ago. They constructed a memristor that is capable of learning. Andy Thomas is now using his memristors as key components in a blueprint for an artificial brain.

#neuroscience___

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2013-02-05 11:06:53 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

2013 Wiley prize awarded for the discovery of the molecular mechanisms governing circadian rhythms http://bit.ly/HobgMm

Since 2002, the annual Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences, awarded by the Wiley Foundation, has recognized breakthrough research in pure or applied life science research. We seek to honor research that is distinguished by its excellence, originality and impact on our understanding of biological systems and processes. 

The twelfth annual #Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences has been awarded to Dr. Michael Young, Dr. Jeffrey Hall, and Dr. Michael Rosbash for the discovery of the molecular mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Learn more about the Wiley Prize and this year’s winners at: http://bit.ly/HobgMm

#circadianrhythms

2013 Wiley prize awarded for the discovery of the molecular mechanisms governing circadian rhythms http://bit.ly/HobgMm

Since 2002, the annual Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences, awarded by the Wiley Foundation, has recognized breakthrough research in pure or applied life science research. We seek to honor research that is distinguished by its excellence, originality and impact on our understanding of biological systems and processes. 

The twelfth annual #Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences has been awarded to Dr. Michael Young, Dr. Jeffrey Hall, and Dr. Michael Rosbash for the discovery of the molecular mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Learn more about the Wiley Prize and this year’s winners at: http://bit.ly/HobgMm

#circadianrhythms___

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2013-01-07 14:37:37 (2 comments, 7 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Physicians in China treat addictions by destroying the brain’s pleasure center http://goo.gl/Kca6e [article] #neuroscience

Drug addiction in China is highly stigmatized. And now, some doctors are trying to cure it with a radical procedure known as as a "stereotactic ablation." More simply, it's the practice of destroying parts of the brain's "pleasure centers" (the nucleus accumbens) in heroin addicts and alcoholics as a way to stop drug cravings. At the same time, however, damage to this region could also impair a person's ability to experience natural longings and other emotions, including joy.

Physicians in China treat addictions by destroying the brain’s pleasure center http://goo.gl/Kca6e [article] #neuroscience

Drug addiction in China is highly stigmatized. And now, some doctors are trying to cure it with a radical procedure known as as a "stereotactic ablation." More simply, it's the practice of destroying parts of the brain's "pleasure centers" (the nucleus accumbens) in heroin addicts and alcoholics as a way to stop drug cravings. At the same time, however, damage to this region could also impair a person's ability to experience natural longings and other emotions, including joy.___

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2012-12-17 09:15:00 (1 comments, 10 reshares, 30 +1s)Open 

Chemotherapy disrupts learning, neurogenesis and theta activity in the adult brain http://goo.gl/VvZ9t [article] #neuroscience

Chemotherapy, especially if prolonged, disrupts attention, working memory and speed of processing in humans. Most cancer drugs that cross the blood–brain barrier also decrease adult neurogenesis...

Chemotherapy disrupts learning, neurogenesis and theta activity in the adult brain http://goo.gl/VvZ9t [article] #neuroscience

Chemotherapy, especially if prolonged, disrupts attention, working memory and speed of processing in humans. Most cancer drugs that cross the blood–brain barrier also decrease adult neurogenesis...___

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2012-12-10 15:36:53 (0 comments, 22 reshares, 43 +1s)Open 

Children exposed to music at home have enhanced development of auditory abilities http://goo.gl/lmnFX [article] #neuroscience  

The relation between informal musical activities at home and electrophysiological indices of neural auditory change detection was investigated in 2–3-year-old children. Auditory event-related potentials were recorded in a multi-feature paradigm that included frequency, duration, intensity, direction, gap deviants and attention-catching novel sounds.

Children exposed to music at home have enhanced development of auditory abilities http://goo.gl/lmnFX [article] #neuroscience  

The relation between informal musical activities at home and electrophysiological indices of neural auditory change detection was investigated in 2–3-year-old children. Auditory event-related potentials were recorded in a multi-feature paradigm that included frequency, duration, intensity, direction, gap deviants and attention-catching novel sounds.___

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2012-11-29 22:33:26 (2 comments, 14 reshares, 46 +1s)Open 

Body language, not facial expressions, broadcasts what's happening to us http://goo.gl/th63J [article] #neuroscience

Expressions numbered 1,4,6 show tennis player's face on losing a point; expressions numbered 2,3,5 show a player after winning a point). Tests show that those looking at facial expressions alone cannot determine what the true emotion is.

If you think that you can judge by examining someone's facial expressions if he has just hit the jackpot in the lottery or lost everything in the stock market -- think again. Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at New York University and Princeton University have discovered that -- despite what leading theoretical models and conventional wisdom might indicate -- it just doesn't work that way.

Body language, not facial expressions, broadcasts what's happening to us http://goo.gl/th63J [article] #neuroscience

Expressions numbered 1,4,6 show tennis player's face on losing a point; expressions numbered 2,3,5 show a player after winning a point). Tests show that those looking at facial expressions alone cannot determine what the true emotion is.

If you think that you can judge by examining someone's facial expressions if he has just hit the jackpot in the lottery or lost everything in the stock market -- think again. Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at New York University and Princeton University have discovered that -- despite what leading theoretical models and conventional wisdom might indicate -- it just doesn't work that way.___

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2012-11-26 14:28:01 (2 comments, 5 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

Researching microglia? Read the free special issue from Glia online http://goo.gl/7edtD [research] #neuroscience

Microglia are a type of glial cell that are the resident macrophages of the brain and spinal cord, and thus act as the first and main form of active immune defense in the central nervous system. Read the latest microglia research online http://goo.gl/7edtD

Researching microglia? Read the free special issue from Glia online http://goo.gl/7edtD [research] #neuroscience

Microglia are a type of glial cell that are the resident macrophages of the brain and spinal cord, and thus act as the first and main form of active immune defense in the central nervous system. Read the latest microglia research online http://goo.gl/7edtD___

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2012-11-06 16:33:48 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

Corridors of the Mind: Could neuroscientists be the next great architects? http://goo.gl/PMzxH [article] #neuroscience

Architects have been talking for years about “biophilic” design, “evidence based” design, design informed by the work of psychologists. But last May, at the profession’s annual convention, John Zeisel and fellow panelists were trying to explain neuroscience to a packed ballroom.

www.twitter.com/neuroscience

Corridors of the Mind: Could neuroscientists be the next great architects? http://goo.gl/PMzxH [article] #neuroscience

Architects have been talking for years about “biophilic” design, “evidence based” design, design informed by the work of psychologists. But last May, at the profession’s annual convention, John Zeisel and fellow panelists were trying to explain neuroscience to a packed ballroom.

www.twitter.com/neuroscience___

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2012-10-31 12:11:24 (1 comments, 8 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

Thinking up a world ruled by neuroscience http://goo.gl/8l8DH [article] #neuroscience  

Kathleen Taylor raises questions about the impact of advances in neuroscience in The Brain Supremacy, but provides few answers.

In the totalitarian state imagined by George Orwell in his dystopian novel, 1984, Big Brother is always watching. In her new book, The Brain Supremacy, University of Oxford research scientist Kathleen Taylor suggests that Orwell's take may not be far off the mark - and that instead of observing our behaviours through telescreens and carefully placed spies, governments will one day monitor our thoughts directly using brain scanners.

www.twitter.com/neuroscience
~

Thinking up a world ruled by neuroscience http://goo.gl/8l8DH [article] #neuroscience  

Kathleen Taylor raises questions about the impact of advances in neuroscience in The Brain Supremacy, but provides few answers.

In the totalitarian state imagined by George Orwell in his dystopian novel, 1984, Big Brother is always watching. In her new book, The Brain Supremacy, University of Oxford research scientist Kathleen Taylor suggests that Orwell's take may not be far off the mark - and that instead of observing our behaviours through telescreens and carefully placed spies, governments will one day monitor our thoughts directly using brain scanners.

www.twitter.com/neuroscience
~___

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2012-10-19 10:34:13 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Memory test record attempt puts students brains to test http://goo.gl/kkY2L [VIDEO] #BBC @BBCBreakfast

Preliminary results are in from a huge online experiment designed to test a flaw in the way the brain stores memories.

Among the most surprising discoveries about memory has been the realisation that remembering a past event is not like picking a DVD off the shelf and playing it back. Remembering involves a process of reconstruction. We store assorted features of an event as representations that are distributed around the brain.

Watch the full video online: http://goo.gl/kkY2L -Professor Bruce Hood

Memory test record attempt puts students brains to test http://goo.gl/kkY2L [VIDEO] #BBC @BBCBreakfast

Preliminary results are in from a huge online experiment designed to test a flaw in the way the brain stores memories.

Among the most surprising discoveries about memory has been the realisation that remembering a past event is not like picking a DVD off the shelf and playing it back. Remembering involves a process of reconstruction. We store assorted features of an event as representations that are distributed around the brain.

Watch the full video online: http://goo.gl/kkY2L -Professor Bruce Hood___

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2012-10-19 09:10:55 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Science students... save 20% on your textbooks this term with Wiley http://goo.gl/Hq9HG [book voucher] #neuroscience  

Science students... save 20% on your textbooks this term with Wiley http://goo.gl/Hq9HG [book voucher] #neuroscience  ___

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2012-10-17 08:23:08 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

Brain and Behavior has appointed Maryann Martone as co-Editor-in-Chief http://bit.ly/Q0OkHT [article] #neuroscience #openaccess

We are delighted to announce that Maryann Martone is joining us as a co-Editor-in-Chief of Brain and Behavior. Dr. Martone is a neuroscientist at the University of California at San Diego and a leader in the field of neuroinformatics, and she will complement the expertise Andrei Alexandrov brings to the journal as a practicing neurologist. http://bit.ly/Kubsx6

Brain and Behavior has appointed Maryann Martone as co-Editor-in-Chief http://bit.ly/Q0OkHT [article] #neuroscience #openaccess

We are delighted to announce that Maryann Martone is joining us as a co-Editor-in-Chief of Brain and Behavior. Dr. Martone is a neuroscientist at the University of California at San Diego and a leader in the field of neuroinformatics, and she will complement the expertise Andrei Alexandrov brings to the journal as a practicing neurologist. http://bit.ly/Kubsx6___

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2012-10-15 13:51:42 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

The worst noises in the world: Why we recoil at unpleasant sounds http://goo.gl/AR55Q [article] #neuroscience #SfN12

Heightened activity between the emotional and auditory parts of the brain explains why the sound of chalk on a blackboard or a knife on a bottle is so unpleasant.

In a study published today in the Journal of Neuroscience and funded by the Wellcome Trust, Newcastle University scientists reveal the interaction between the region of the brain that processes sound, the auditory cortex, and the amygdala, which is active in the processing of negative emotions when we hear unpleasant sounds. 

www.twitter.com/neuroscience
~

The worst noises in the world: Why we recoil at unpleasant sounds http://goo.gl/AR55Q [article] #neuroscience #SfN12

Heightened activity between the emotional and auditory parts of the brain explains why the sound of chalk on a blackboard or a knife on a bottle is so unpleasant.

In a study published today in the Journal of Neuroscience and funded by the Wellcome Trust, Newcastle University scientists reveal the interaction between the region of the brain that processes sound, the auditory cortex, and the amygdala, which is active in the processing of negative emotions when we hear unpleasant sounds. 

www.twitter.com/neuroscience
~___

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2012-10-05 10:35:48 (22 comments, 1 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

Tell us why you love Neuroscience... the best comments will be posted on our Twitter page [@neuroscience] and you will win a copy of Building Brains! http://goo.gl/a3LsM

Tell us why you love Neuroscience... the best comments will be posted on our Twitter page [@neuroscience] and you will win a copy of Building Brains! http://goo.gl/a3LsM___

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2012-10-03 10:36:30 (1 comments, 7 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

Immune system can boost nerve regrowth http://goo.gl/ZNdUs

Modulating immune response to injury could accelerate the regeneration of severed peripheral nerves, a new study in an animal model has found. By altering activity of the macrophage cells that respond to injuries, researchers dramatically increased the rate at which nerve processes regrew.

www.twitter.com/neuroscience
~

Immune system can boost nerve regrowth http://goo.gl/ZNdUs

Modulating immune response to injury could accelerate the regeneration of severed peripheral nerves, a new study in an animal model has found. By altering activity of the macrophage cells that respond to injuries, researchers dramatically increased the rate at which nerve processes regrew.

www.twitter.com/neuroscience
~___

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2012-10-01 10:41:23 (9 comments, 33 reshares, 55 +1s)Open 

The Power of Your Amazing Brain
[Provided by: www.twitter,com/neuroscience]

The Power of Your Amazing Brain
[Provided by: www.twitter,com/neuroscience]___

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2012-09-25 16:45:08 (0 comments, 6 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

PODCAST: The Neuroscience of Love http://goo.gl/fho1U

Larry Young, professor of psychiatry at Emory University, director of its Center for Translational Social Neuroscience, and science journalist Brian Alexander, discuss their search for a "grand unified theory" of love.

www.twitter.com/neuroscience
~

PODCAST: The Neuroscience of Love http://goo.gl/fho1U

Larry Young, professor of psychiatry at Emory University, director of its Center for Translational Social Neuroscience, and science journalist Brian Alexander, discuss their search for a "grand unified theory" of love.

www.twitter.com/neuroscience
~___

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2012-09-18 07:34:55 (0 comments, 6 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

What the brain draws from: Art and neuroscience http://goo.gl/TJI9V

The human brain is wired in such a way that we can make sense of lines, colors and patterns on a flat canvas. Artists throughout human history have figured out ways to create illusions such as depth and brightness that aren't actually there but make works of art seem somehow more real.

www.twitter.com/neuroscience
~

What the brain draws from: Art and neuroscience http://goo.gl/TJI9V

The human brain is wired in such a way that we can make sense of lines, colors and patterns on a flat canvas. Artists throughout human history have figured out ways to create illusions such as depth and brightness that aren't actually there but make works of art seem somehow more real.

www.twitter.com/neuroscience
~___

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2012-09-13 09:08:22 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

Genetic test predicts risk for autism spectrum disorder http://goo.gl/02CyD

A team of Australian researchers, led by University of Melbourne has developed a genetic test that is able to predict the risk of developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Lead researcher Professor Stan Skafidas, Director of the Centre for Neural Engineering at the University of Melbourne said the test could be used to assess the risk for developing the disorder. "This test could assist in the early detection of the condition in babies and children and help in the early management of those who become diagnosed," he said. "It would be particularly relevant for families who have a history of autism or related conditions such as Asperger's syndrome," he said.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~

Genetic test predicts risk for autism spectrum disorder http://goo.gl/02CyD

A team of Australian researchers, led by University of Melbourne has developed a genetic test that is able to predict the risk of developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Lead researcher Professor Stan Skafidas, Director of the Centre for Neural Engineering at the University of Melbourne said the test could be used to assess the risk for developing the disorder. "This test could assist in the early detection of the condition in babies and children and help in the early management of those who become diagnosed," he said. "It would be particularly relevant for families who have a history of autism or related conditions such as Asperger's syndrome," he said.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~___

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2012-09-13 08:58:20 (0 comments, 15 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

Scientists discover how the brain ages http://goo.gl/9Hu6r

Researchers at Newcastle University have revealed the mechanism by which neurons, the nerve cells in the brain and other parts of the body, age.

The research, published September 12 in Aging Cell, opens up new avenues of understanding for conditions where the aging of neurons are known to be responsible, such as dementia and Parkinson's disease.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~

Scientists discover how the brain ages http://goo.gl/9Hu6r

Researchers at Newcastle University have revealed the mechanism by which neurons, the nerve cells in the brain and other parts of the body, age.

The research, published September 12 in Aging Cell, opens up new avenues of understanding for conditions where the aging of neurons are known to be responsible, such as dementia and Parkinson's disease.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~___

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2012-09-13 08:54:00 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Fasting makes brain tumors more vulnerable to radiation therapy http://goo.gl/5XXM6

A new study from USC researchers is the first to show that controlled fasting improves the effectiveness of radiation therapy in cancer treatments, extending life expectancy in mice with aggressive brain tumors.

Prior work by USC professor of gerontology and biological sciences Valter Longo, corresponding author on the study and director of the Longevity Institute at the USC Davis School of Gerontology, has shown that short-term fasting protects healthy cells while leaving cancer cells vulnerable to the toxic effects of chemotherapy.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~

Fasting makes brain tumors more vulnerable to radiation therapy http://goo.gl/5XXM6

A new study from USC researchers is the first to show that controlled fasting improves the effectiveness of radiation therapy in cancer treatments, extending life expectancy in mice with aggressive brain tumors.

Prior work by USC professor of gerontology and biological sciences Valter Longo, corresponding author on the study and director of the Longevity Institute at the USC Davis School of Gerontology, has shown that short-term fasting protects healthy cells while leaving cancer cells vulnerable to the toxic effects of chemotherapy.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~___

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2012-09-12 12:04:05 (3 comments, 12 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

Scientists create artificial memory in brain tissue, in vitro for the first time http://goo.gl/VQtyU [article] #neuroscience

Researchers in Ohio have have discovered how to store diverse forms of artificial short-term memories in brain tissue, isolated from a living organism. This is the first time anyone has found a way to store information over seconds about both temporal sequences and stimulus patterns directly in brain tissue.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~

Scientists create artificial memory in brain tissue, in vitro for the first time http://goo.gl/VQtyU [article] #neuroscience

Researchers in Ohio have have discovered how to store diverse forms of artificial short-term memories in brain tissue, isolated from a living organism. This is the first time anyone has found a way to store information over seconds about both temporal sequences and stimulus patterns directly in brain tissue.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~___

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2012-08-28 16:06:49 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

The same video as below, using a 16-color filter. Video depicting the flow of transport vesicles containing NgCAM, using a 16-color filter. Here, the intensity of the pixels (and thus protein concentration) varies from white (very high) to purple (very low). (Courtesy of Don Arnold and Sarmad Al-Bassam)

Al-Bassam and his colleagues solved this issue by developing a new technique that involves damming up a single pathway, which creates a backlog of transport vesicles (little bubbles that travel up and down neurons carrying membrane protein cargo) impregnated with the illuminated proteins. They then use a small-molecule drug to release the backlog all at once in a bright pulse.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~

The same video as below, using a 16-color filter. Video depicting the flow of transport vesicles containing NgCAM, using a 16-color filter. Here, the intensity of the pixels (and thus protein concentration) varies from white (very high) to purple (very low). (Courtesy of Don Arnold and Sarmad Al-Bassam)

Al-Bassam and his colleagues solved this issue by developing a new technique that involves damming up a single pathway, which creates a backlog of transport vesicles (little bubbles that travel up and down neurons carrying membrane protein cargo) impregnated with the illuminated proteins. They then use a small-molecule drug to release the backlog all at once in a bright pulse.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~___

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2012-08-28 16:04:59 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Looking at the traffic inside a brain cell http://goo.gl/nEu7l

Using bioluminescent proteins from a jellyfish, a team of scientists has lit up the inside of a neuron, capturing spectacular video footage that shows the movement of proteins throughout the cell.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~

Looking at the traffic inside a brain cell http://goo.gl/nEu7l

Using bioluminescent proteins from a jellyfish, a team of scientists has lit up the inside of a neuron, capturing spectacular video footage that shows the movement of proteins throughout the cell.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~___

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2012-08-13 08:22:53 (1 comments, 8 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

Why living in the moment is impossible http://goo.gl/VwUjH

The sought-after equanimity of "living in the moment" may be impossible, according to neuroscientists who've pinpointed a brain area responsible for using past decisions and outcomes to guide future behavior.

The study is the first of its kind to analyze signals associated with metacognition -- a person's ability to monitor and control cognition (a term cleverly described by researchers as "thinking about thinking.")

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~

Why living in the moment is impossible http://goo.gl/VwUjH

The sought-after equanimity of "living in the moment" may be impossible, according to neuroscientists who've pinpointed a brain area responsible for using past decisions and outcomes to guide future behavior.

The study is the first of its kind to analyze signals associated with metacognition -- a person's ability to monitor and control cognition (a term cleverly described by researchers as "thinking about thinking.")

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~___

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2012-07-31 11:02:29 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

Brains are different in people with highly superior autobiographical memory http://goo.gl/7K17I

UC Irvine scientists have discovered intriguing differences in the brains and mental processes of an extraordinary group of people who can effortlessly recall every moment of their lives since about age 10.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~

Brains are different in people with highly superior autobiographical memory http://goo.gl/7K17I

UC Irvine scientists have discovered intriguing differences in the brains and mental processes of an extraordinary group of people who can effortlessly recall every moment of their lives since about age 10.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
~___

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2012-07-30 13:14:59 (1 comments, 6 reshares, 23 +1s)Open 

Neuroscience and Moral Responsibility: Did Your Brain Make You Do It? http://goo.gl/Zsny7

Are you responsible for your behavior if your brain “made you do it”? Often we think not. For example, research now suggests that the brain’s frontal lobes, which are crucial for self-control, are not yet mature in adolescents.

This finding has helped shape attitudes about whether young people are fully responsible for their actions. In 2005, when the Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty for juveniles was unconstitutional, its decision explicitly took into consideration that “parts of the brain involved in behavior control continue to mature through late adolescence.”

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Neuroscience and Moral Responsibility: Did Your Brain Make You Do It? http://goo.gl/Zsny7

Are you responsible for your behavior if your brain “made you do it”? Often we think not. For example, research now suggests that the brain’s frontal lobes, which are crucial for self-control, are not yet mature in adolescents.

This finding has helped shape attitudes about whether young people are fully responsible for their actions. In 2005, when the Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty for juveniles was unconstitutional, its decision explicitly took into consideration that “parts of the brain involved in behavior control continue to mature through late adolescence.”

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
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2012-07-30 08:18:25 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Translating animal models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to the clinic http://bit.ly/QJyGTB

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most studied neurotrophin involved in synaptic plasticity processes that are required for long-term learning and memory. Specifically, BDNF gene expression and activation of its high-affinity tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor are necessary in the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex for the formation of emotional memories, including fear memories...

Read the virtual issue online from Genes, Brain and Behavior.

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Translating animal models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to the clinic http://bit.ly/QJyGTB

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most studied neurotrophin involved in synaptic plasticity processes that are required for long-term learning and memory. Specifically, BDNF gene expression and activation of its high-affinity tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor are necessary in the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex for the formation of emotional memories, including fear memories...

Read the virtual issue online from Genes, Brain and Behavior.

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2012-07-26 10:49:41 (3 comments, 8 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

Robot avatar body controlled by thought alone http://goo.gl/JSlTS

For the first time, a person lying in an fMRI machine has controlled a robot hundreds of kilometers away using thought alone.

“The ultimate goal is to create a surrogate, like in Avatar, although that’s a long way off yet,” says Abderrahmane Kheddar, director of the joint robotics laboratory at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Tsukuba, Japan.

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Robot avatar body controlled by thought alone http://goo.gl/JSlTS

For the first time, a person lying in an fMRI machine has controlled a robot hundreds of kilometers away using thought alone.

“The ultimate goal is to create a surrogate, like in Avatar, although that’s a long way off yet,” says Abderrahmane Kheddar, director of the joint robotics laboratory at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Tsukuba, Japan.

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2012-07-24 13:40:35 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

Social deprivation has a measurable effect on brain growth http://goo.gl/eGQGQ

Severe psychological and physical neglect produces measurable changes in children's brains, finds a study led by Boston Children's Hospital. But the study also suggests that positive interventions can partially reverse these changes.

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Social deprivation has a measurable effect on brain growth http://goo.gl/eGQGQ

Severe psychological and physical neglect produces measurable changes in children's brains, finds a study led by Boston Children's Hospital. But the study also suggests that positive interventions can partially reverse these changes.

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2012-07-18 09:03:49 (2 comments, 12 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

How Muscles Are Paralyzed During Sleep http://goo.gl/BIXdy

Two powerful brain chemical systems work together to paralyze skeletal muscles during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, according to new research. The finding may help scientists better understand and treat sleep disorders, including narcolepsy, tooth grinding, and REM sleep behavior disorder.

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How Muscles Are Paralyzed During Sleep http://goo.gl/BIXdy

Two powerful brain chemical systems work together to paralyze skeletal muscles during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, according to new research. The finding may help scientists better understand and treat sleep disorders, including narcolepsy, tooth grinding, and REM sleep behavior disorder.

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2012-07-17 07:39:24 (2 comments, 4 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

Low-cal diet's effects seen in fly brain http://goo.gl/CqCF3 [article] #neuroscience

A novel technique for measuring tiny, rapid-fire secretions in the brains and mouthparts of fruit flies (drosophila) is providing insights into the beneficial effects of eating less -- information that ultimately could help people suffering from neuromuscular disorders.

Fruit flies are informing scientists about neuromuscular disorders and the possible impact of eating less on brain chemistry and motor behavior. These flies are from the laboratory of Dr. Benjamin Eaton, assistant professor of physiology in the School of Medicine at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio.

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Low-cal diet's effects seen in fly brain http://goo.gl/CqCF3 [article] #neuroscience

A novel technique for measuring tiny, rapid-fire secretions in the brains and mouthparts of fruit flies (drosophila) is providing insights into the beneficial effects of eating less -- information that ultimately could help people suffering from neuromuscular disorders.

Fruit flies are informing scientists about neuromuscular disorders and the possible impact of eating less on brain chemistry and motor behavior. These flies are from the laboratory of Dr. Benjamin Eaton, assistant professor of physiology in the School of Medicine at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio.

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2012-07-11 19:54:12 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Two Proteins Offer a 'Clearer' Way to Treat Huntington’s Disease http://goo.gl/wg640

Researchers have identified two key regulatory proteins critical to clearing away misfolded proteins that accumulate and cause the progressive, deadly neurodegeneration of Huntington's disease.

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Two Proteins Offer a 'Clearer' Way to Treat Huntington’s Disease http://goo.gl/wg640

Researchers have identified two key regulatory proteins critical to clearing away misfolded proteins that accumulate and cause the progressive, deadly neurodegeneration of Huntington's disease.

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2012-07-09 12:01:28 (2 comments, 7 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

Diabetes drug makes brain cells grow http://goo.gl/DuAEB

The widely used diabetes drug metformin comes with a rather unexpected and alluring side effect: it encourages the growth of new neurons in the brain. The study reported in the July 6th issue of Cell Stem Cell, a Cell Press publication, also finds that those neural effects of the drug also make mice smarter.

Read the full research paper online http://goo.gl/bdL8q [PDF format]

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Diabetes drug makes brain cells grow http://goo.gl/DuAEB

The widely used diabetes drug metformin comes with a rather unexpected and alluring side effect: it encourages the growth of new neurons in the brain. The study reported in the July 6th issue of Cell Stem Cell, a Cell Press publication, also finds that those neural effects of the drug also make mice smarter.

Read the full research paper online http://goo.gl/bdL8q [PDF format]

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2012-07-04 08:44:51 (5 comments, 11 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

Is day dreaming good for you? http://goo.gl/IQjkI

As each day passes, the pace of life seems to accelerate -- demands on productivity continue ever upward and there is hardly ever a moment when we aren't, in some way, in touch with our family, friends, or coworkers. While moments for reflection may be hard to come by, a new article suggests that the long-lost art of introspection -- even daydreaming -- may be an increasingly valuable part of life.

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Is day dreaming good for you? http://goo.gl/IQjkI

As each day passes, the pace of life seems to accelerate -- demands on productivity continue ever upward and there is hardly ever a moment when we aren't, in some way, in touch with our family, friends, or coworkers. While moments for reflection may be hard to come by, a new article suggests that the long-lost art of introspection -- even daydreaming -- may be an increasingly valuable part of life.

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2012-07-03 09:58:36 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Translational behaviour-genetic studies of alcohol: are we there yet? http://bit.ly/LZ23ey

The new virtual issue from Genes, Brain and Behavior brings together a selection of papers from G2B related to the topic of a recent review paper 'Translational behaviour-genetic studies of alcohol: are we there yet?' by J. C. Crabbe.

In biomedical research, one key stage of translating basic science knowledge to clinical practice is the reconciliation of phenotypes employed for laboratory animal studies with those important for the clinical condition.

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Translational behaviour-genetic studies of alcohol: are we there yet? http://bit.ly/LZ23ey

The new virtual issue from Genes, Brain and Behavior brings together a selection of papers from G2B related to the topic of a recent review paper 'Translational behaviour-genetic studies of alcohol: are we there yet?' by J. C. Crabbe.

In biomedical research, one key stage of translating basic science knowledge to clinical practice is the reconciliation of phenotypes employed for laboratory animal studies with those important for the clinical condition.

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2012-06-21 07:54:18 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Early brain repair and protection http://bit.ly/MK3e0B

Read the special issue of EJN for the 2012 FENS Forum in Barcelona. This Special Issue addresses a ‘riskier’ theme than the traditional focus of such issues, which centered on a particular research topic or approach.

Motivated by the widespread debate about the limited translational successes of the neurosciences, we hope to engage in a discussion of research strategies that may enhance our understanding of neuronal disease processes and contribute to the identification of novel therapeutic approaches.

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Early brain repair and protection http://bit.ly/MK3e0B

Read the special issue of EJN for the 2012 FENS Forum in Barcelona. This Special Issue addresses a ‘riskier’ theme than the traditional focus of such issues, which centered on a particular research topic or approach.

Motivated by the widespread debate about the limited translational successes of the neurosciences, we hope to engage in a discussion of research strategies that may enhance our understanding of neuronal disease processes and contribute to the identification of novel therapeutic approaches.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
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2012-06-18 12:34:54 (3 comments, 5 reshares, 28 +1s)Open 

The Mind Reader: Using brain scans to communicate with people http://goo.gl/LxoBK

Adrian Owen has found a way to use brain scans to communicate with people previously written off as unreachable. Now, he is fighting to take his methods to the clinic.

Owen still gets animated when he talks about patient 23. The patient was only 24 years old when his life was devastated by a car accident. Alive but unresponsive, he had been languishing in what neurologists refer to as a vegetative state for five years, when Owen, a neuro-scientist then at the University of Cambridge, UK, and his colleagues at the University of Liège in Belgium, put him into a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machine and started asking him questions.

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The Mind Reader: Using brain scans to communicate with people http://goo.gl/LxoBK

Adrian Owen has found a way to use brain scans to communicate with people previously written off as unreachable. Now, he is fighting to take his methods to the clinic.

Owen still gets animated when he talks about patient 23. The patient was only 24 years old when his life was devastated by a car accident. Alive but unresponsive, he had been languishing in what neurologists refer to as a vegetative state for five years, when Owen, a neuro-scientist then at the University of Cambridge, UK, and his colleagues at the University of Liège in Belgium, put him into a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) machine and started asking him questions.

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2012-06-18 12:32:56 (2 comments, 3 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Science writer Rita Carter tells the story of how modern neuroscience has revealed that reading, something most of us take for granted, unlocks remarkable powers. Carter explains how the classic novel Wuthering Heights allows us to step inside other minds and understand the world from different points of view, and she wonders whether the new digital revolution could threaten the values of classic reading.

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Science writer Rita Carter tells the story of how modern neuroscience has revealed that reading, something most of us take for granted, unlocks remarkable powers. Carter explains how the classic novel Wuthering Heights allows us to step inside other minds and understand the world from different points of view, and she wonders whether the new digital revolution could threaten the values of classic reading.

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2012-06-15 11:40:06 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Novel biochemical manipulation of brain serotonin reveals a role of serotonin in the circadian rhythm of sleep–wake cycles http://bit.ly/L1Nxp7

Read and cite the free research paper online http://bit.ly/L1Nxp7 and read the accompanying commentary - Serotonin and sleep: breaking the cycle http://bit.ly/LFINqn

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Novel biochemical manipulation of brain serotonin reveals a role of serotonin in the circadian rhythm of sleep–wake cycles http://bit.ly/L1Nxp7

Read and cite the free research paper online http://bit.ly/L1Nxp7 and read the accompanying commentary - Serotonin and sleep: breaking the cycle http://bit.ly/LFINqn

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2012-06-14 07:33:44 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

What the McLean brain bank malfunction means for autism research http://goo.gl/hOZfn

This week, the freezer at the Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital broke down, with the loss of about 150 brain samples from people who had died and who had had conditions such as autism, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or schizophrenia. This is bad news for at least five different communities.

Losing a tissue collection because of freezer failure is a serious setback to neuroscience – and distressing to donors' families.

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What the McLean brain bank malfunction means for autism research http://goo.gl/hOZfn

This week, the freezer at the Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital broke down, with the loss of about 150 brain samples from people who had died and who had had conditions such as autism, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or schizophrenia. This is bad news for at least five different communities.

Losing a tissue collection because of freezer failure is a serious setback to neuroscience – and distressing to donors' families.

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2012-06-08 14:59:16 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Brain training 'helps treat depression' http://goo.gl/66HKZ

A brain training technique which helps people control activity in a specific part of the brain could help treat depression, a study suggests. Cardiff University researchers used MRI scanners to show eight people how their brains reacted to positive imagery.

After four sessions of the therapy the participants had seen significant improvements in their depression. Another eight who were asked to think positively but did not see brain images as they did so showed no change.

The researchers said they believed the MRI scans allowed participants to work out, through trial and error, which sort of positive emotional imagery was most effective.

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Brain training 'helps treat depression' http://goo.gl/66HKZ

A brain training technique which helps people control activity in a specific part of the brain could help treat depression, a study suggests. Cardiff University researchers used MRI scanners to show eight people how their brains reacted to positive imagery.

After four sessions of the therapy the participants had seen significant improvements in their depression. Another eight who were asked to think positively but did not see brain images as they did so showed no change.

The researchers said they believed the MRI scans allowed participants to work out, through trial and error, which sort of positive emotional imagery was most effective.

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2012-06-07 08:50:32 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

What do mirror neurons look like? http://goo.gl/dJmPb

You have probably heard about mirror neurons, but I bet you don’t know what they look like. While we know exactly what Von Economo neurons look like, but know nothing about their activity patterns, the only thing we know about Mirror Neurons is their activity pattern.

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What do mirror neurons look like? http://goo.gl/dJmPb

You have probably heard about mirror neurons, but I bet you don’t know what they look like. While we know exactly what Von Economo neurons look like, but know nothing about their activity patterns, the only thing we know about Mirror Neurons is their activity pattern.

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2012-06-01 08:18:57 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Could Conjoined Twins Share a Mind? http://goo.gl/JMj8L

Krista and Tatiana Hogan are craniopagus conjoined twins — joined at the head, they share a neural bridge. The Wiley Life Science Blog [WiSci] takes a deeper look into the lives of Krista and Tatiana Hogan.

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Could Conjoined Twins Share a Mind? http://goo.gl/JMj8L

Krista and Tatiana Hogan are craniopagus conjoined twins — joined at the head, they share a neural bridge. The Wiley Life Science Blog [WiSci] takes a deeper look into the lives of Krista and Tatiana Hogan.

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2012-05-31 08:04:22 (2 comments, 5 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

The trouble with brain scans: Vaughan Bell explores flawed methods http://goo.gl/RhPbC

Neuroscientists have long been banging their heads on their desks over exaggerated reports of brain scanning studies. Media stories illustrated with coloured scans, supposedly showing how the brain works, are now a standard part of the science pages and some people find them so convincing that they are touted as ways of designing education for our children, evaluating the effectiveness of marketing campaigns and testing potential recruits.

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The trouble with brain scans: Vaughan Bell explores flawed methods http://goo.gl/RhPbC

Neuroscientists have long been banging their heads on their desks over exaggerated reports of brain scanning studies. Media stories illustrated with coloured scans, supposedly showing how the brain works, are now a standard part of the science pages and some people find them so convincing that they are touted as ways of designing education for our children, evaluating the effectiveness of marketing campaigns and testing potential recruits.

www.facebook.com/neurosciences
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2012-05-29 08:18:03 (4 comments, 4 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

Why Do We Get Brain Freeze? AKA Sphenopalatine Ganglioneuralgia http://goo.gl/jrDha

Have you ever wondered why you get "brain freeze" when you eat something cold such as ice cream or a milkshake? That sudden pain in your forehead is known in medicine as sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia.

It is caused by having something cold touch the roof of the mouth (palate), or the total immersion in water that is generally below 15°C (or 10°C or even 5°C for some acclimated open water swimmers).

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Why Do We Get Brain Freeze? AKA Sphenopalatine Ganglioneuralgia http://goo.gl/jrDha

Have you ever wondered why you get "brain freeze" when you eat something cold such as ice cream or a milkshake? That sudden pain in your forehead is known in medicine as sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia.

It is caused by having something cold touch the roof of the mouth (palate), or the total immersion in water that is generally below 15°C (or 10°C or even 5°C for some acclimated open water swimmers).

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