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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 1

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2015-09-01 16:12:06 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"The unique properties found in the stunning iridescent wings of a tropical blue butterfly could hold the key to developing new highly selective gas detection sensors".

Most reshares: 5

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2015-08-29 16:31:16 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

"Scientists think that massive volcanic eruptions killed off more than 90% of ocean species and 75% of land species almost 252 million years ago. But they didn’t know when these eruptions occurred. Now, researchers have solved the mystery—using radioactive dating techniques to determine the ages of hundreds of uranium-bearing crystals taken from ancient volcanic rocks collected from sites scattered across a 2.5-million-square-kilometer region of central Russia. Some crystals came from material that had explosively erupted from Earth’s surface and then accumulated in layers hundreds of meters thick (such as those near the Angara River, shown), and others came from similarly voluminous magma that had remained underground but had infiltrated and heated carbon-rich material near the surface, creating carbon dioxide. The earliest phases of the volcanism began about 300,000 years before the onset ofthe e... more »

Most plusones: 11

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2015-08-27 18:40:55 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Evidence suggests subatomic particles could defy the standard model

Latest 50 posts

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2015-09-01 16:31:45 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"When nocturnal insects make their high-flying journeys through the darkness of night, they may have more than an internal compass to guide them on their way. Researchers now show that Silver Y moths (Autographa gamma) also rely on turbulence cues to keep themselves from drifting off course in the wind".

"When nocturnal insects make their high-flying journeys through the darkness of night, they may have more than an internal compass to guide them on their way. Researchers now show that Silver Y moths (Autographa gamma) also rely on turbulence cues to keep themselves from drifting off course in the wind".___

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2015-09-01 16:17:17 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Thousands of new species are identified every year, and new and efficient methods are needed to document this diversity and to make information about new species available to other scientists and to the interested public. New research is literally adding a new dimension to the task".

"Thousands of new species are identified every year, and new and efficient methods are needed to document this diversity and to make information about new species available to other scientists and to the interested public. New research is literally adding a new dimension to the task".___

posted image

2015-09-01 16:12:06 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"The unique properties found in the stunning iridescent wings of a tropical blue butterfly could hold the key to developing new highly selective gas detection sensors".

"The unique properties found in the stunning iridescent wings of a tropical blue butterfly could hold the key to developing new highly selective gas detection sensors".___

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2015-09-01 15:55:47 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"The careful examination of fossil fragments from Panama has led Smithsonian scientists and colleagues to the discovery of a new genus and species of river dolphin that has been long extinct. The team named it Isthminia panamensis. The specimen not only revealed a new species to science, but also shed new light onto the evolution of today's freshwater river dolphin species".

"The careful examination of fossil fragments from Panama has led Smithsonian scientists and colleagues to the discovery of a new genus and species of river dolphin that has been long extinct. The team named it Isthminia panamensis. The specimen not only revealed a new species to science, but also shed new light onto the evolution of today's freshwater river dolphin species".___

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2015-09-01 15:53:27 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"You don't name a sea creature after an ancient Greek warship unless it's built like a predator. That's certainly true of Pentecopterus, a giant sea scorpion with the features of a penteconter, one of the first Greek galley ships. Researchers say Pentecopterus lived 467 million years ago and could grow to nearly six feet. It is the oldest described eurypterid -- a group of aquatic arthropods that are ancestors of modern spiders and ticks".

"You don't name a sea creature after an ancient Greek warship unless it's built like a predator. That's certainly true of Pentecopterus, a giant sea scorpion with the features of a penteconter, one of the first Greek galley ships. Researchers say Pentecopterus lived 467 million years ago and could grow to nearly six feet. It is the oldest described eurypterid -- a group of aquatic arthropods that are ancestors of modern spiders and ticks".___

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2015-09-01 15:47:11 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Among birds, the line between species is often blurry. Some closely related species interbreed where their ranges overlap, producing hybrid offspring. In the coastal marshes of New England, this has been happening between the Saltmarsh Sparrow and Nelson's Sparrow. Research finds that appearance alone is not enough to identify these hybrid zone birds".

"Among birds, the line between species is often blurry. Some closely related species interbreed where their ranges overlap, producing hybrid offspring. In the coastal marshes of New England, this has been happening between the Saltmarsh Sparrow and Nelson's Sparrow. Research finds that appearance alone is not enough to identify these hybrid zone birds".___

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2015-09-01 15:05:00 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"Ancient rocks harbored microbial life deep below the seafloor, reports scientists. This first-time evidence was contained in drilled rock samples of Earth's mantle -- thrust by tectonic forces to the seafloor during the Early Cretaceous period. The discovery confirms a long-standing hypothesis that interactions between mantle rocks and seawater can create potential for life even in hard rocks deep below the ocean floor".

"Ancient rocks harbored microbial life deep below the seafloor, reports scientists. This first-time evidence was contained in drilled rock samples of Earth's mantle -- thrust by tectonic forces to the seafloor during the Early Cretaceous period. The discovery confirms a long-standing hypothesis that interactions between mantle rocks and seawater can create potential for life even in hard rocks deep below the ocean floor".___

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2015-09-01 15:03:29 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

"Researchers from CSIRO and Imperial College London have assessed how widespread the threat of plastic is for the world's seabirds, including albatrosses, shearwaters and penguins, and found the majority of seabird species have plastic in their gut".

"Researchers from CSIRO and Imperial College London have assessed how widespread the threat of plastic is for the world's seabirds, including albatrosses, shearwaters and penguins, and found the majority of seabird species have plastic in their gut".___

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2015-08-31 16:33:59 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

"A closer look at how honey bee colonies determine which larvae will serve as workers and which will become queens reveals that a plant chemical, p-coumaric acid, plays a key role in the bees' developmental fate".

"A closer look at how honey bee colonies determine which larvae will serve as workers and which will become queens reveals that a plant chemical, p-coumaric acid, plays a key role in the bees' developmental fate".___

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2015-08-31 16:28:40 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"As global population rises and finite resources dwindle, farmers need new, more sustainable ways to control pests. Now, ecologists have found a safe, sustainable and cost-effective new pest control. But rather than a high-tech compound or genetic technology, it's a tiny, low-tech organism: the ant".

"As global population rises and finite resources dwindle, farmers need new, more sustainable ways to control pests. Now, ecologists have found a safe, sustainable and cost-effective new pest control. But rather than a high-tech compound or genetic technology, it's a tiny, low-tech organism: the ant".___

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2015-08-31 16:20:24 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"White-tailed eagles detect and avoid the ingestion of large metal particles (larger than 8 mm) but ignore smaller metal particles whilst feeding on shot mammalian carcasses. Lead-based bullets split into numerous small metal fragments when penetrating an animal's body, whereas lead-free rifle bullets either deform without leaving any particles in the tissue or fragment into larger particles. Thus, the use of lead-free bullets may prevent lead poisoning of scavengers, say authors of a new study".

"White-tailed eagles detect and avoid the ingestion of large metal particles (larger than 8 mm) but ignore smaller metal particles whilst feeding on shot mammalian carcasses. Lead-based bullets split into numerous small metal fragments when penetrating an animal's body, whereas lead-free rifle bullets either deform without leaving any particles in the tissue or fragment into larger particles. Thus, the use of lead-free bullets may prevent lead poisoning of scavengers, say authors of a new study".___

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2015-08-31 16:16:47 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

"Extremely water-repellant surfaces were fabricated that can withstand pressures that are 10 times greater than the average pressure a surface would experience resting in a room. The surfaces resist the infiltration of liquid into the nanoscale pockets, staying drier than similar coatings".

"Extremely water-repellant surfaces were fabricated that can withstand pressures that are 10 times greater than the average pressure a surface would experience resting in a room. The surfaces resist the infiltration of liquid into the nanoscale pockets, staying drier than similar coatings".___

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2015-08-31 16:14:15 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"Scientists have discovered what may well be the oldest known case of leukemia. By means of high-resolution computer tomography, they were able to detect indications of the cancer in an approximately 7000 year old skeleton of a woman who died between 30 and 40 years of age. Any other, similar pathologies could be ruled out".

"Scientists have discovered what may well be the oldest known case of leukemia. By means of high-resolution computer tomography, they were able to detect indications of the cancer in an approximately 7000 year old skeleton of a woman who died between 30 and 40 years of age. Any other, similar pathologies could be ruled out".___

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2015-08-31 16:04:43 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"Many volcanoes are located in densely settled areas. Every time one of these becomes active, large populations are put at risk. Hence, one of the primary goals of the current generation of volcanologists is to develop tools that can accurately predict when volcanoes will erupt. In the case of an impending eruption, these tools are of key importance to those charged with making decisions about what action to take and when".

"Many volcanoes are located in densely settled areas. Every time one of these becomes active, large populations are put at risk. Hence, one of the primary goals of the current generation of volcanologists is to develop tools that can accurately predict when volcanoes will erupt. In the case of an impending eruption, these tools are of key importance to those charged with making decisions about what action to take and when".___

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2015-08-31 16:02:23 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"A new species of giant file clam from Atlantic Canadian waters has been described by Canadian scientists. The 'cryptic' clam, which lives in deepwater canyons, was first found off the coast of Newfoundland 30 years ago, but was thought to be the known European species. More recent collections off the coast of Nova Scotia, and subsequent DNA analysis coupled with detailed morphological studies established its identity as a distinct species -- Acesta cryptadelphe".

"A new species of giant file clam from Atlantic Canadian waters has been described by Canadian scientists. The 'cryptic' clam, which lives in deepwater canyons, was first found off the coast of Newfoundland 30 years ago, but was thought to be the known European species. More recent collections off the coast of Nova Scotia, and subsequent DNA analysis coupled with detailed morphological studies established its identity as a distinct species -- Acesta cryptadelphe".___

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2015-08-31 15:59:49 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Life on an island isn't always easy. To make the most of the little there is to eat on many Greek islands, the digestive system of Balkan green lizards has evolved considerably compared to family members on the mainland. Surprisingly, many of these insect-eating lizards even have special valves that help to digest plants".

"Life on an island isn't always easy. To make the most of the little there is to eat on many Greek islands, the digestive system of Balkan green lizards has evolved considerably compared to family members on the mainland. Surprisingly, many of these insect-eating lizards even have special valves that help to digest plants".___

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2015-08-31 15:55:06 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"How did the ankylosaur get its tail club? According to research that traces the evolution of the ankylosaur's distinctive tail, the handle arrived first on the scene, and the knot at the end of the tail followed".

"How did the ankylosaur get its tail club? According to research that traces the evolution of the ankylosaur's distinctive tail, the handle arrived first on the scene, and the knot at the end of the tail followed".___

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2015-08-30 14:45:47 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"The historic September 2013 storm that triggered widespread flooding across Colorado's Front Range eroded the equivalent of hundreds, or even as much as 1,000 years worth of accumulated sediment from the foothills west of Boulder, researchers have discovered".

"The historic September 2013 storm that triggered widespread flooding across Colorado's Front Range eroded the equivalent of hundreds, or even as much as 1,000 years worth of accumulated sediment from the foothills west of Boulder, researchers have discovered".___

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2015-08-30 14:40:16 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

"Researchers have developed the first nano/micro-textured highly slippery surfaces able to outperform lotus leaf-inspired liquid repellent coatings, particularly in situations where the water is in the form of vapor or tiny droplets".

"Researchers have developed the first nano/micro-textured highly slippery surfaces able to outperform lotus leaf-inspired liquid repellent coatings, particularly in situations where the water is in the form of vapor or tiny droplets".___

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2015-08-29 16:31:16 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

"Scientists think that massive volcanic eruptions killed off more than 90% of ocean species and 75% of land species almost 252 million years ago. But they didn’t know when these eruptions occurred. Now, researchers have solved the mystery—using radioactive dating techniques to determine the ages of hundreds of uranium-bearing crystals taken from ancient volcanic rocks collected from sites scattered across a 2.5-million-square-kilometer region of central Russia. Some crystals came from material that had explosively erupted from Earth’s surface and then accumulated in layers hundreds of meters thick (such as those near the Angara River, shown), and others came from similarly voluminous magma that had remained underground but had infiltrated and heated carbon-rich material near the surface, creating carbon dioxide. The earliest phases of the volcanism began about 300,000 years before the onset ofthe e... more »

"Scientists think that massive volcanic eruptions killed off more than 90% of ocean species and 75% of land species almost 252 million years ago. But they didn’t know when these eruptions occurred. Now, researchers have solved the mystery—using radioactive dating techniques to determine the ages of hundreds of uranium-bearing crystals taken from ancient volcanic rocks collected from sites scattered across a 2.5-million-square-kilometer region of central Russia. Some crystals came from material that had explosively erupted from Earth’s surface and then accumulated in layers hundreds of meters thick (such as those near the Angara River, shown), and others came from similarly voluminous magma that had remained underground but had infiltrated and heated carbon-rich material near the surface, creating carbon dioxide. The earliest phases of the volcanism began about 300,000 years before the onset of the end-of-Permian extinctions, the team reports online today in Science Advances. All told, an estimated 4 million cubic kilometers of molten material emanated from Siberian peaks and fissures over the course of about 800,000 years, with about two-thirds of that spilling forth before and during the mass extinction. Paleontologists estimate that Earth’s ecosystems didn’t robustly recover from the die-offs for as many as 5 million to 10 million years". ___

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2015-08-29 16:28:54 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

"For decades, scientists have marveled at the towering mounds some termites construct and wondered how they work. Although it’s now widely believed the 1- to 2-meter-high structures (seen above) help with ventilation—exchanging stale air for fresh in the insect’s hidden nest—the mechanics behind such a system have remained a puzzle. Now, by using thermal imagery and installing tiny air-flow sensors in about two dozen termite (Odontotermes obesus) mounds, scientists think they have solved the mystery. Their investigation revealed that the mounds act like an “external lung,” harnessing the change in temperature as day becomes night to drive ventilation. Here’s how it works: Inside the hill is a large central chimney connected to a system of conduits located in the mound’s thin, flutelike buttresses. During the day, the air in the thin buttresses warms more quickly than the air in theinsulated chimn... more »

"For decades, scientists have marveled at the towering mounds some termites construct and wondered how they work. Although it’s now widely believed the 1- to 2-meter-high structures (seen above) help with ventilation—exchanging stale air for fresh in the insect’s hidden nest—the mechanics behind such a system have remained a puzzle. Now, by using thermal imagery and installing tiny air-flow sensors in about two dozen termite (Odontotermes obesus) mounds, scientists think they have solved the mystery. Their investigation revealed that the mounds act like an “external lung,” harnessing the change in temperature as day becomes night to drive ventilation. Here’s how it works: Inside the hill is a large central chimney connected to a system of conduits located in the mound’s thin, flutelike buttresses. During the day, the air in the thin buttresses warms more quickly than the air in the insulated chimney. As a result, the warm air rises, whereas the cooler, chimney air sinks—creating a closed convection cell that drives circulation, not external pressure from wind as had been hypothesized. At night, however, the ventilation system reverses, as the air in the buttresses cools quickly, falling to a temperature below that of the central chimney. The reversal in air flow, in turn, expels the carbon dioxide–rich air—a result of the termites’ metabolism—that builds up in the subterranean nest over the course of the day, the researchers report online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Although the scientists only examined one termite species, the ventilation system is likely the same in others with similar mounds. Such insight could inspire developments in passive architecture, which seeks to eliminate the need for active heating and cooling systems in buildings using strategies such as natural ventilation and efficient insulation, the scientists say". ___

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2015-08-28 16:25:17 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"Scientists have identified chemosensory proteins (CSPs) that play important roles in communications between worker ants. CSPs may represent a starting point for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms involved in the sophisticated system of communication that supports ants' complex societies, and the evolution of these mechanisms".

"Scientists have identified chemosensory proteins (CSPs) that play important roles in communications between worker ants. CSPs may represent a starting point for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms involved in the sophisticated system of communication that supports ants' complex societies, and the evolution of these mechanisms".___

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2015-08-28 16:20:44 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Although flightless in air, penguins have a number of adaptations which allow them glide effortlessly through the water. And some of these adaptations are in an unlikely part of their anatomy -- their brains. Recent finds of fossil penguins from 35-million-year-old sediments in Antarctica have begun to shed light on the changes in penguin brains that accompanied their transition to water".

"Although flightless in air, penguins have a number of adaptations which allow them glide effortlessly through the water. And some of these adaptations are in an unlikely part of their anatomy -- their brains. Recent finds of fossil penguins from 35-million-year-old sediments in Antarctica have begun to shed light on the changes in penguin brains that accompanied their transition to water".___

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2015-08-28 16:17:27 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"Researchers are turning to an unusual source -- otoliths, the inner ear bones of fish -- to identify the nursery grounds of winter flounder, the protected estuaries where the potato chip-sized juveniles grow to adolescence. The research could aid the effort to restore plummeting winter flounder populations along the East Coast of the US".

"Researchers are turning to an unusual source -- otoliths, the inner ear bones of fish -- to identify the nursery grounds of winter flounder, the protected estuaries where the potato chip-sized juveniles grow to adolescence. The research could aid the effort to restore plummeting winter flounder populations along the East Coast of the US".___

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2015-08-28 15:59:49 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Collisions with wind turbines kill about 100 golden eagles a year in some locations, but a new study that maps both potential wind-power sites and nesting patterns of the birds reveals sweet spots, where potential for wind power is greatest with a lower threat to nesting eagles".

"Collisions with wind turbines kill about 100 golden eagles a year in some locations, but a new study that maps both potential wind-power sites and nesting patterns of the birds reveals sweet spots, where potential for wind power is greatest with a lower threat to nesting eagles".___

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2015-08-28 15:57:08 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"The team surveyed cases of green turtle fibropapillomatosis disease, which creates unsightly pink tumors on the turtles' flesh. Although benign, they can impede turtles' vision and movement, as well as feeding, swimming and organ function. The virus is not thought to be dangerous to humans. Over two years, around 13 percent of green turtles found in waters had the disease. In contrast, fishermen did not land any diseased turtles during this period, even though they were fishing in areas where diseased animals were prevalent".

"The team surveyed cases of green turtle fibropapillomatosis disease, which creates unsightly pink tumors on the turtles' flesh. Although benign, they can impede turtles' vision and movement, as well as feeding, swimming and organ function. The virus is not thought to be dangerous to humans. Over two years, around 13 percent of green turtles found in waters had the disease. In contrast, fishermen did not land any diseased turtles during this period, even though they were fishing in areas where diseased animals were prevalent".___

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2015-08-27 18:40:55 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Evidence suggests subatomic particles could defy the standard model

Evidence suggests subatomic particles could defy the standard model___

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2015-08-27 16:34:03 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Crown of thorns starfish don't just sniff out coral — they look for it too.
That thankfully short-lived tone is the sound of a crown of thorns starfish seeing a bright light. It's not squealing from the glare, that's the electrical signal generated by photoreceptors in one of its eyes.
Eyes? Yep. Starfish have got eyes — one on the tip of every arm. Like compound eyes in insects they're light sensitive, but don't have any lenses.
Apparently scientists have known about the eyes for a couple of hundred years. But it was only very recently discovered that they can use their eyes to find their way around.
"Everybody thought starfish only used smell for orientation", says researcher Dr Ronald Petie from the University of Copenhagen.
"But now we know this is not true for the crown of thorns starfish and one more species," says Petie.N... more »

"Crown of thorns starfish don't just sniff out coral — they look for it too.
That thankfully short-lived tone is the sound of a crown of thorns starfish seeing a bright light. It's not squealing from the glare, that's the electrical signal generated by photoreceptors in one of its eyes.
Eyes? Yep. Starfish have got eyes — one on the tip of every arm. Like compound eyes in insects they're light sensitive, but don't have any lenses.
Apparently scientists have known about the eyes for a couple of hundred years. But it was only very recently discovered that they can use their eyes to find their way around.
"Everybody thought starfish only used smell for orientation", says researcher Dr Ronald Petie from the University of Copenhagen.
"But now we know this is not true for the crown of thorns starfish and one more species," says Petie.
Normally the crown of thorns starfish walk straight towards a reef, but with their eyes removed, Petie found they walked in random directions.
"This shows that vision and not smell is the cue they use for detecting reefs at short distance," he says.
To find out what colour light the starfish were most sensitive to, he used microelectrodes to measure the electrical response of neurons in the eye to different colours of light. (It's that signal converted to an audible tone that you can hear above).
Not surprisingly for a reef-based creature, the crown of thorns was most sensitive to blue light, so the coral boulders they feed on would appear as a dark patch on a bright background.
Petie is currently on Lizard Island testing the animals' response to colour in the wild.
"I've done experiments where I attracted animals to a black sheet in the middle of a sand flat and got animals to walk away from a reef when I covered it with a white sheet".
Before this work, and earlier work on the blue star by his colleague Anders Garm, it was thought that starfish vision was limited to phototaxis — allowing them to move towards or away from light".___

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2015-08-27 16:30:48 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

"An invasive caterpillar that feeds on hedges is starting to spread from its established base in London across the UK, experts warn.
The box tree caterpillar is the larval stage of a moth native to the Far East and India.
An infestation can reduce the glossy green leaves of a box hedge to a faded skeleton within a few days of hatching.
The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) says it is now receiving three or four reports of infestations a day.
There have been more than 150 reports already this year, compared with 20 last year, and just three in 2011.
Initially limited to a small area of south west London, there have now been reports of the box tree caterpillar (Diaphania perspectalis) in areas outside the M25 and in Essex.
Dr Hayley Jones, an entomologist with the RHS, said: "The key thing is that it is established - it has survived throughout the winter and is... more »

"An invasive caterpillar that feeds on hedges is starting to spread from its established base in London across the UK, experts warn.
The box tree caterpillar is the larval stage of a moth native to the Far East and India.
An infestation can reduce the glossy green leaves of a box hedge to a faded skeleton within a few days of hatching.
The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) says it is now receiving three or four reports of infestations a day.
There have been more than 150 reports already this year, compared with 20 last year, and just three in 2011.
Initially limited to a small area of south west London, there have now been reports of the box tree caterpillar (Diaphania perspectalis) in areas outside the M25 and in Essex.
Dr Hayley Jones, an entomologist with the RHS, said: "The key thing is that it is established - it has survived throughout the winter and is breeding. It has a foot in the door and is now building up in numbers."
The moth first became established in Europe in 2007 and was first reported in the UK in 2008. By the end of 2014 it became apparent that it had established itself in some parts of London.
Experts believe that it originated in China and either flew across the English Channel or stowed away in containers of imported plants".___

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2015-08-27 16:23:13 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"New research predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos".

"New research predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos".___

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2015-08-27 16:19:02 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

"Granada, Spain's climate and layout is like that of many cities in the Mediterranean area, which has the highest occurrence of pollen allergies in the world. The researchers hope their efforts will lead to fantastic urban green spaces that don't cause allergic reactions for 30 percent of the city's population".

"Granada, Spain's climate and layout is like that of many cities in the Mediterranean area, which has the highest occurrence of pollen allergies in the world. The researchers hope their efforts will lead to fantastic urban green spaces that don't cause allergic reactions for 30 percent of the city's population".___

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2015-08-27 16:15:36 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

"An American coral reef scientist found a small shrimp-like crustacean with a greatly enlarged appendage reminiscent of the Elton John character in the movie 'Tommy.' Discovered while working in the remote coral reefs of Raja Ampat, Indonesia, Dr. Thomas said about the species: 'When I first saw this amazing amphipod I immediately thought of Elton John as the Pinball Wizard in the movie".

"An American coral reef scientist found a small shrimp-like crustacean with a greatly enlarged appendage reminiscent of the Elton John character in the movie 'Tommy.' Discovered while working in the remote coral reefs of Raja Ampat, Indonesia, Dr. Thomas said about the species: 'When I first saw this amazing amphipod I immediately thought of Elton John as the Pinball Wizard in the movie".___

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2015-08-27 16:03:02 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

"Physicists have found a radical new way confine electromagnetic energy without it leaking away, akin to throwing a pebble into a pond with no splash.The theory could have broad ranging applications from explaining dark matter to combating energy losses in future technologies".

"Physicists have found a radical new way confine electromagnetic energy without it leaking away, akin to throwing a pebble into a pond with no splash.The theory could have broad ranging applications from explaining dark matter to combating energy losses in future technologies".___

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2015-08-27 15:52:10 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

"An international team of researchers has found direct chemical evidence that the fossilized remains of a bird-like dinosaur still harbor melanosomes and the pigment they produced. Their study reinforces the idea that scientists can discern the coloration of long-lost animals".

"An international team of researchers has found direct chemical evidence that the fossilized remains of a bird-like dinosaur still harbor melanosomes and the pigment they produced. Their study reinforces the idea that scientists can discern the coloration of long-lost animals".___

2015-08-26 16:05:09 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"Tahiti is a popular tourist destination, but one unwanted visitor has decided to make its home there: the brown widow spider (Latrodectus geometricus). A new article has reported the discovery of the spider for the first time on Tahiti and also on four of the Cook Islands".

"Tahiti is a popular tourist destination, but one unwanted visitor has decided to make its home there: the brown widow spider (Latrodectus geometricus). A new article has reported the discovery of the spider for the first time on Tahiti and also on four of the Cook Islands".___

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2015-08-26 16:01:59 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"In early August, a biologist returned from the South Pacific with news that he encountered an old friend, one he hadn't seen in over three decades. The professor had seen what he considers one of the world's rarest animals, a remote encounter that may become even more infrequent if illegal fishing practices continue".

"In early August, a biologist returned from the South Pacific with news that he encountered an old friend, one he hadn't seen in over three decades. The professor had seen what he considers one of the world's rarest animals, a remote encounter that may become even more infrequent if illegal fishing practices continue".___

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2015-08-26 15:59:41 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

"Several Palaeozoic mass extinction events during the Ordovician and Silurian periods (ca. 485 to 420 to million years ago) shaped the evolution of life on our planet. Although some of these short-lived, periodic events were responsible for eradication of up to 85 percent of marine species, the exact kill-mechanism responsible for these crises remains poorly understood".

"Several Palaeozoic mass extinction events during the Ordovician and Silurian periods (ca. 485 to 420 to million years ago) shaped the evolution of life on our planet. Although some of these short-lived, periodic events were responsible for eradication of up to 85 percent of marine species, the exact kill-mechanism responsible for these crises remains poorly understood".___

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2015-08-26 15:55:44 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"On the coral reef, knowing who's your friend and who's your enemy can sometimes be a little complicated. Take seaweed, for instance. Normally it's the enemy of coral, secreting toxic chemicals, blocking the sunlight, and damaging coral with its rough surfaces. But when hordes of hungry crown-of-thorns sea stars invade the reef, everything changes, reports a new study".

"On the coral reef, knowing who's your friend and who's your enemy can sometimes be a little complicated. Take seaweed, for instance. Normally it's the enemy of coral, secreting toxic chemicals, blocking the sunlight, and damaging coral with its rough surfaces. But when hordes of hungry crown-of-thorns sea stars invade the reef, everything changes, reports a new study".___

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2015-08-26 15:45:54 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

"The shimmering colours visible in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image show off the remarkable complexity of the Twin Jet Nebula. The new image highlights the nebula's shells and its knots of expanding gas in striking detail. Two iridescent lobes of material stretch outwards from a central star system. Within these lobes two huge jets of gas are streaming from the star system at speeds in excess of one million kilometers per hour".

"The shimmering colours visible in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image show off the remarkable complexity of the Twin Jet Nebula. The new image highlights the nebula's shells and its knots of expanding gas in striking detail. Two iridescent lobes of material stretch outwards from a central star system. Within these lobes two huge jets of gas are streaming from the star system at speeds in excess of one million kilometers per hour".___

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2015-08-26 15:42:54 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

"Paleontologists have discovered a new species of lizard, named Gueragama sulamericana, in the municipality of Cruzeiro do Oeste in Southern Brazil in the rock outcrops of a Late Cretaceous desert, dated approximately 80 million years ago".

"Paleontologists have discovered a new species of lizard, named Gueragama sulamericana, in the municipality of Cruzeiro do Oeste in Southern Brazil in the rock outcrops of a Late Cretaceous desert, dated approximately 80 million years ago".___

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2015-08-26 15:40:53 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

"The dust in our homes contains an average of 9,000 different species of microbes, a study suggests.
Researchers from the University of Colorado at Boulder analysed the dust found in 1,200 households across the United States.
They discovered that the types of bacteria and fungi varied depending on where the home was located, who lived there and whether pets were present.
The research is published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
Dr Noah Fierer, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, who carried out the study, said: "This is really basic natural history we are investigating here.
(We have known for a long time that microbes live in our homes. What we are doing is now is old-fashioned science, to see how they vary across space)."

"The dust in our homes contains an average of 9,000 different species of microbes, a study suggests.
Researchers from the University of Colorado at Boulder analysed the dust found in 1,200 households across the United States.
They discovered that the types of bacteria and fungi varied depending on where the home was located, who lived there and whether pets were present.
The research is published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
Dr Noah Fierer, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, who carried out the study, said: "This is really basic natural history we are investigating here.
(We have known for a long time that microbes live in our homes. What we are doing is now is old-fashioned science, to see how they vary across space)."___

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2015-08-25 16:13:12 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

"Volcanic 'fire fountains' erupting from the lunar surface, similar to what occurs in Iceland today, most likely were fuelled by carbon monoxide gas, a new study shows.
Taking advantage of new analysis techniques, US scientists re-analysed the contents of green and orange glass beads discovered in soil samples brought back from the moon by the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 missions, which took place in the early 1970s.
"The lunar volcanic glasses are thought to be the product of fire-fountain eruptions, in which a jet of basaltic lava erupts through a vent, spattering droplets of lava that cool quickly to form glass," writes Bruno Scaillet of the University of Orleans in France in a commentary on the research that appears in the journal Nature Geoscience .
The process is similar to shaking a can of soda and taking off the cap.
On Earth, the gas that triggers fire... more »

"Volcanic 'fire fountains' erupting from the lunar surface, similar to what occurs in Iceland today, most likely were fuelled by carbon monoxide gas, a new study shows.
Taking advantage of new analysis techniques, US scientists re-analysed the contents of green and orange glass beads discovered in soil samples brought back from the moon by the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 missions, which took place in the early 1970s.
"The lunar volcanic glasses are thought to be the product of fire-fountain eruptions, in which a jet of basaltic lava erupts through a vent, spattering droplets of lava that cool quickly to form glass," writes Bruno Scaillet of the University of Orleans in France in a commentary on the research that appears in the journal Nature Geoscience .
The process is similar to shaking a can of soda and taking off the cap.
On Earth, the gas that triggers fire fountains is typically carbon dioxide or water".___

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2015-08-25 15:59:37 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Two methods for aging the endangered Carnaby's cockatoo nestlings have been researched and assessed by an Australian team of scientists. Their multi-year observation included over two separate populations of the endemic to southwestern Australia species".

"Two methods for aging the endangered Carnaby's cockatoo nestlings have been researched and assessed by an Australian team of scientists. Their multi-year observation included over two separate populations of the endemic to southwestern Australia species".___

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2015-08-25 15:57:55 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Transmission lines that funnel power from hydroelectric dams and wind turbines across Eastern Washington affect greater sage grouse habitat by isolating fragile populations and limiting movement, a new study finds".

"Transmission lines that funnel power from hydroelectric dams and wind turbines across Eastern Washington affect greater sage grouse habitat by isolating fragile populations and limiting movement, a new study finds".___

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2015-08-25 15:55:00 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"A chimpanzee population in Uganda has been found to be three times larger than previously estimated, according to new research. The study suggests that chimpanzees may adapt to degraded habitats better than expected, but also highlights the importance of new and more focused conservation strategies".

"A chimpanzee population in Uganda has been found to be three times larger than previously estimated, according to new research. The study suggests that chimpanzees may adapt to degraded habitats better than expected, but also highlights the importance of new and more focused conservation strategies".___

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2015-08-25 15:43:37 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Scientists have described precisely how a plant can sense a pathogen, bringing an unprecedented level of detail to a fundamental hypothesis in plant immunity of relevance to tackling disease in crops".

"Scientists have described precisely how a plant can sense a pathogen, bringing an unprecedented level of detail to a fundamental hypothesis in plant immunity of relevance to tackling disease in crops".___

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2015-08-25 15:35:09 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

"Root bacteria are known to form symbiotic relationships with plants by improving the plants' supply of nutrients. Yet as scientists found recently, the bacteria actually play a much more profound role. During field experiments in Utah, in the western USA, researchers discovered that the right mixture of soil microbiota directly influences the survival of Nicotiana attenuata, a species of wild tobacco".

"Root bacteria are known to form symbiotic relationships with plants by improving the plants' supply of nutrients. Yet as scientists found recently, the bacteria actually play a much more profound role. During field experiments in Utah, in the western USA, researchers discovered that the right mixture of soil microbiota directly influences the survival of Nicotiana attenuata, a species of wild tobacco".___

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2015-08-25 15:31:14 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"Ice Age paleontologist recorded the maximum geographic distribution of the woolly mammoth during the last Ice Age and published the most accurate global map in this regard. The ice-age pachyderms populated a total area of 33,301,000 square kilometers and may thus be called the most successful large mammals of this era. The study determined that the distribution was limited by a number of climate-driven as well as climate-independent factors".

"Ice Age paleontologist recorded the maximum geographic distribution of the woolly mammoth during the last Ice Age and published the most accurate global map in this regard. The ice-age pachyderms populated a total area of 33,301,000 square kilometers and may thus be called the most successful large mammals of this era. The study determined that the distribution was limited by a number of climate-driven as well as climate-independent factors".___

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2015-08-25 03:54:28 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

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2015-08-24 18:30:39 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

A "robber frog" with beady, gold-rimmed eyes and a bizarre bat with a record-long tongue are among the menagerie of species discovered during an expedition in Bolivia.

A "robber frog" with beady, gold-rimmed eyes and a bizarre bat with a record-long tongue are among the menagerie of species discovered during an expedition in Bolivia.___

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