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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 2

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2015-07-25 15:18:47 (2 comments, 5 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

"Pluto would appear to have glaciers of nitrogen ice, the latest pictures from the New Horizons probe suggest.
Scientists believe they see evidence of surface material having flowed around mountains and even ponding in craters.
The activity is certainly recent, they say, and may even be current.
But the mission team cautions that it has received only 4-5% of the data gathered during 14 July's historic flyby of the dwarf planet, and any interpretations must carry caveats.
"Pluto has a very complicated story to tell; Pluto has a very interesting history, and there is a lot of work we need to do to understand this very complicated place," said Alan Stern, the New Horizons principal investigator.
In a briefing at the US space agency's HQ in Washington DC, he and colleagues then outlined a number of new analyses based on the limited data-set in their... more »

Most reshares: 15

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2015-07-28 15:02:51 (1 comments, 15 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

"A community of lizards from the Caribbean, preserved for 20 million years in amber, have been found to be identical to their modern cousins, say researchers.
This suggests the different niches inhabited by the lizards have - incredibly - changed little over the past 20 million-year, report the team, in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
"These fossils were really surprising because of how much detail they contained, allowing us to see how these lizards would have looked in real life," says the study's lead author Dr Emma Sherratt of the University of New England in Australia.
Sherratt says amber fossils are usually just a hollow impression, but the new fossils of anolis lizards from the island of Hispaniola, provide phenomenal detail - including the colour of the lizard, what it was last doing, and whether its eyes were open or shut.... more »

Most plusones: 19

posted image

2015-07-28 15:02:51 (1 comments, 15 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

"A community of lizards from the Caribbean, preserved for 20 million years in amber, have been found to be identical to their modern cousins, say researchers.
This suggests the different niches inhabited by the lizards have - incredibly - changed little over the past 20 million-year, report the team, in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
"These fossils were really surprising because of how much detail they contained, allowing us to see how these lizards would have looked in real life," says the study's lead author Dr Emma Sherratt of the University of New England in Australia.
Sherratt says amber fossils are usually just a hollow impression, but the new fossils of anolis lizards from the island of Hispaniola, provide phenomenal detail - including the colour of the lizard, what it was last doing, and whether its eyes were open or shut.... more »

Latest 50 posts

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2015-07-28 15:57:09 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"A previously unknown species of insect living has been discovered living within reach of Australian suburbia. A researcher investigated the insect responsible for bush coconuts in South East Queensland, stating that until recently there were only two known species of the insect Cystococcus that lived inside these galls".

"A previously unknown species of insect living has been discovered living within reach of Australian suburbia. A researcher investigated the insect responsible for bush coconuts in South East Queensland, stating that until recently there were only two known species of the insect Cystococcus that lived inside these galls".___

2015-07-28 15:52:26 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"A model to help land managers protect the threatened piping plover, a tiny shorebird, against habitat damage and predation has been created by a scientist. The bird's neighborhood preference has resulted in this once common shorebird being on the federal threatened species list since 1986".

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/07/150728092400.htm

"A model to help land managers protect the threatened piping plover, a tiny shorebird, against habitat damage and predation has been created by a scientist. The bird's neighborhood preference has resulted in this once common shorebird being on the federal threatened species list since 1986".

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/07/150728092400.htm___

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2015-07-28 15:50:27 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

"Researchers have found they can get a good idea of a grizzly bear's diet over several months by looking at a single hair. The technique, which measures residues of trace metals, can be a major tool in determining if the threatened animals are getting enough of the right foods to eat".

"Researchers have found they can get a good idea of a grizzly bear's diet over several months by looking at a single hair. The technique, which measures residues of trace metals, can be a major tool in determining if the threatened animals are getting enough of the right foods to eat".___

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2015-07-28 15:45:05 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"If you haven't heard of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, thank geography, NGOs, and government agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization (WHO) for keeping the new disease in check. In camels, which act as a reservoir for the causative coronavirus, the illness causes a runny nose; in humans, it causes a cough, fever, and, in 36 percent of cases, death, according to the WHO".

"If you haven't heard of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, thank geography, NGOs, and government agencies like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization (WHO) for keeping the new disease in check. In camels, which act as a reservoir for the causative coronavirus, the illness causes a runny nose; in humans, it causes a cough, fever, and, in 36 percent of cases, death, according to the WHO".___

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2015-07-28 15:35:16 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"The discovery of a previously unknown type of metal deformation -- sinuous flow -- and a method to suppress it could lead to more efficient machining and other manufacturing advances by reducing the force and energy required to process metals".

"The discovery of a previously unknown type of metal deformation -- sinuous flow -- and a method to suppress it could lead to more efficient machining and other manufacturing advances by reducing the force and energy required to process metals".___

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2015-07-28 15:32:55 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"A logging company has agreed to begin dismantling abandoned logging roads currently being used by poachers to access prime Amur (Siberian) tiger habitat in the Russian Far East".

"A logging company has agreed to begin dismantling abandoned logging roads currently being used by poachers to access prime Amur (Siberian) tiger habitat in the Russian Far East".___

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2015-07-28 15:24:30 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"At the end of the Pleistocene period, approximately 12,800 years ago­ — give or take a few centuries — a cosmic impact triggered an abrupt cooling episode that earth scientists refer to as the Younger Dryas. New research has narrowed the date to a 100-year range, sometime between 12,835 and 12,735 years ago".

"At the end of the Pleistocene period, approximately 12,800 years ago­ — give or take a few centuries — a cosmic impact triggered an abrupt cooling episode that earth scientists refer to as the Younger Dryas. New research has narrowed the date to a 100-year range, sometime between 12,835 and 12,735 years ago".___

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2015-07-28 15:12:00 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"The Tyrannosaurus rex and its fellow theropod dinosaurs that rampage across the screen in movies like Jurassic World were successful predators partly due to a unique, deeply serrated tooth structure that allowed them to easily tear through the flesh and bone of other dinosaurs, says new research".

"The Tyrannosaurus rex and its fellow theropod dinosaurs that rampage across the screen in movies like Jurassic World were successful predators partly due to a unique, deeply serrated tooth structure that allowed them to easily tear through the flesh and bone of other dinosaurs, says new research".___

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2015-07-28 15:09:03 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"The light-sensing molecules that tell plants whether to germinate, when to flower and which direction to grow to seek more sunlight were inherited millions of years ago from ancient algae, finds a new study. The findings are some of the strongest evidence yet against the prevailing idea that the ancestors of early plants got the red light sensors that helped them move from water to land by engulfing bacteria, the researchers say".

"The light-sensing molecules that tell plants whether to germinate, when to flower and which direction to grow to seek more sunlight were inherited millions of years ago from ancient algae, finds a new study. The findings are some of the strongest evidence yet against the prevailing idea that the ancestors of early plants got the red light sensors that helped them move from water to land by engulfing bacteria, the researchers say".___

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2015-07-28 15:06:26 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"City folk have a reputation for being less friendly than their rural counterparts, and the same appears to be true for garden birds. Urban song sparrows (Melospiza melodia, pictured) are more aggressive toward their neighbors than are sparrows out in the country, researchers report this month in Behavioral Ecology. But whereras the temperament of human city-dwellers is often attributed to the sheer density of people, this isn’t the case for sparrows. The team measured birds’ responses to recordings of another male’s song, noting how often males approached or attacked the speakers, and found that aggression depended not on the density of sparrows, but on the availability of food in the environment. Counterintuitively, male sparrows responded more aggressively in the city, where there tends to be more food, and rural birds became more aggressive when provided with food supplements. The authorsexpla... more »

"City folk have a reputation for being less friendly than their rural counterparts, and the same appears to be true for garden birds. Urban song sparrows (Melospiza melodia, pictured) are more aggressive toward their neighbors than are sparrows out in the country, researchers report this month in Behavioral Ecology. But whereras the temperament of human city-dwellers is often attributed to the sheer density of people, this isn’t the case for sparrows. The team measured birds’ responses to recordings of another male’s song, noting how often males approached or attacked the speakers, and found that aggression depended not on the density of sparrows, but on the availability of food in the environment. Counterintuitively, male sparrows responded more aggressively in the city, where there tends to be more food, and rural birds became more aggressive when provided with food supplements. The authors explain that the sparrows defend food-rich, high-quality territories more aggressively, but it isn’t clear whether this is an offensive or a defensive strategy; city birds may be more aggressive because a territory with more food is more valuable to them, or because their abundant resources attract more thieves". ___

posted image

2015-07-28 15:02:51 (1 comments, 15 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

"A community of lizards from the Caribbean, preserved for 20 million years in amber, have been found to be identical to their modern cousins, say researchers.
This suggests the different niches inhabited by the lizards have - incredibly - changed little over the past 20 million-year, report the team, in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
"These fossils were really surprising because of how much detail they contained, allowing us to see how these lizards would have looked in real life," says the study's lead author Dr Emma Sherratt of the University of New England in Australia.
Sherratt says amber fossils are usually just a hollow impression, but the new fossils of anolis lizards from the island of Hispaniola, provide phenomenal detail - including the colour of the lizard, what it was last doing, and whether its eyes were open or shut.... more »

"A community of lizards from the Caribbean, preserved for 20 million years in amber, have been found to be identical to their modern cousins, say researchers.
This suggests the different niches inhabited by the lizards have - incredibly - changed little over the past 20 million-year, report the team, in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
"These fossils were really surprising because of how much detail they contained, allowing us to see how these lizards would have looked in real life," says the study's lead author Dr Emma Sherratt of the University of New England in Australia.
Sherratt says amber fossils are usually just a hollow impression, but the new fossils of anolis lizards from the island of Hispaniola, provide phenomenal detail - including the colour of the lizard, what it was last doing, and whether its eyes were open or shut.
"Most of ours had full skeletons, and details of the skin were impressed on the amber, providing very detailed images of tiny scales on the body and on the sticky toe pads," she adds.
"You could have taken a lizard today, embedded it resin and it would have looked like one of these creatures. That's how realistic and modern they look."
Another impressive aspect to the study is the large number of amber fossils analysed.
While previous research has mostly looked at individual specimens, this study involved 38 lizards fossils from various locations on Hispaniola.
Obtain from museums and private collections - one was even a pendant in a necklace - the community of fossils represent the largest group of vertebrates encased in amber.
"Nothing like this has ever been described before," says Sherratt".___

posted image

2015-07-28 14:52:31 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

4 new species of torrent-frogs have been identified from West Africa!

Four new species of tooth-frog have been identified in West Africa, over 100 years after initially being identified as one single species Odontobatrachus natator.

Tooth-frogs are named so because of their unique jawbones that have tusk-like appendages on the lower jaw and curved upper teeth.

O. natator was discovered in 1905 and because the frogs were identical, they were all assigned to this one species.

However, Michael F Barej and his colleagues suggested the existence of a complex of cryptic species (that are structurally identical) and using morphological analyses on more than 150 adult specimens, scientists found an unexpectedly high molecular variation.

Published in the journal Zoosystematics And Evolution, the scientists from the Museum für Naturkunde in... more »

4 new species of torrent-frogs have been identified from West Africa!

Four new species of tooth-frog have been identified in West Africa, over 100 years after initially being identified as one single species Odontobatrachus natator.

Tooth-frogs are named so because of their unique jawbones that have tusk-like appendages on the lower jaw and curved upper teeth.

O. natator was discovered in 1905 and because the frogs were identical, they were all assigned to this one species.

However, Michael F Barej and his colleagues suggested the existence of a complex of cryptic species (that are structurally identical) and using morphological analyses on more than 150 adult specimens, scientists found an unexpectedly high molecular variation.

Published in the journal Zoosystematics And Evolution, the scientists from the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin found there to be at least five species belonging to the Odontobatrachus genus – four of which are new to science.

All are considered highly endangered because of their small distribution ranges and habitat loss in the Upper Guinean biodiversity hot spot.

The descriptions of the new species are based on combinative analysis of genetics and the morphological characters.

The four new species are named as followed:
Odontobatrachus arndti, O. fouta, O. smithi and O. ziama___

posted image

2015-07-27 15:35:57 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"Those who wish to renovate their houses and make them more energy-efficient often use the well-known yellow to blue thermal images to visually identify weak spots applying infra-red measurements. Thermographic imaging is also used in industry for materials testing. Depending on the material, however, the method can result in large measurement errors. Scientists have now developed a technology that visually identifies the slightest temperature differences with high spatial resolution, whatever the material".

"Those who wish to renovate their houses and make them more energy-efficient often use the well-known yellow to blue thermal images to visually identify weak spots applying infra-red measurements. Thermographic imaging is also used in industry for materials testing. Depending on the material, however, the method can result in large measurement errors. Scientists have now developed a technology that visually identifies the slightest temperature differences with high spatial resolution, whatever the material".___

posted image

2015-07-27 15:33:05 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"For the first time, scientists have reconstructed part of the male chromosome in polar bears. The scientists were able to assign 1.9 million base pairs specifically to the polar bear Y chromosome.They now show that more than 100,000 years ago, the male polar bear lineages split and developed in two separate genetic groups".

"For the first time, scientists have reconstructed part of the male chromosome in polar bears. The scientists were able to assign 1.9 million base pairs specifically to the polar bear Y chromosome.They now show that more than 100,000 years ago, the male polar bear lineages split and developed in two separate genetic groups".___

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2015-07-27 15:27:15 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"A new study gives a vivid example of unusual chemical reactivity found in the reactions with organogold complexes. Using the complex of modern physical methods joined with computational studies, the authors proposed reaction mechanism, where a molecule of acetic acid serves as a proton shuttle, transferring the hydrogen atom between the reaction centers".

"A new study gives a vivid example of unusual chemical reactivity found in the reactions with organogold complexes. Using the complex of modern physical methods joined with computational studies, the authors proposed reaction mechanism, where a molecule of acetic acid serves as a proton shuttle, transferring the hydrogen atom between the reaction centers".___

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2015-07-26 15:16:07 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

California to become the first state with an official state lichen: the lace lichen (Ramalina menziesii)


California to become the first state with an official state lichen: the lace lichen (Ramalina menziesii)
___

posted image

2015-07-26 14:51:24 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

"A citizen science project to study when and where orchids bloom around the UK has already revealed 200 new flowering locations for particular species.
Members of the public are submitting and identifying orchid photos, and also annotating historical specimens.
Called Orchid Observers, the initiative aims to measure the effect of warming, and other environmental changes, on the distribution of 29 different orchids.
Reports have already been received from more than 1,500 locations.
"We're really, really happy about the number of people who've got involved," said Kath Castillo, a researcher at the Natural History Museum in London.
She said the 200 new locations were a pleasant surprise.
(People have actually photographed, and uploaded their field record, for locations where the BSBI [Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland] had previously not had a record.... more »

"A citizen science project to study when and where orchids bloom around the UK has already revealed 200 new flowering locations for particular species.
Members of the public are submitting and identifying orchid photos, and also annotating historical specimens.
Called Orchid Observers, the initiative aims to measure the effect of warming, and other environmental changes, on the distribution of 29 different orchids.
Reports have already been received from more than 1,500 locations.
"We're really, really happy about the number of people who've got involved," said Kath Castillo, a researcher at the Natural History Museum in London.
She said the 200 new locations were a pleasant surprise.
(People have actually photographed, and uploaded their field record, for locations where the BSBI [Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland] had previously not had a record. That's potentially quite interesting)."___

posted image

2015-07-25 15:18:47 (2 comments, 5 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

"Pluto would appear to have glaciers of nitrogen ice, the latest pictures from the New Horizons probe suggest.
Scientists believe they see evidence of surface material having flowed around mountains and even ponding in craters.
The activity is certainly recent, they say, and may even be current.
But the mission team cautions that it has received only 4-5% of the data gathered during 14 July's historic flyby of the dwarf planet, and any interpretations must carry caveats.
"Pluto has a very complicated story to tell; Pluto has a very interesting history, and there is a lot of work we need to do to understand this very complicated place," said Alan Stern, the New Horizons principal investigator.
In a briefing at the US space agency's HQ in Washington DC, he and colleagues then outlined a number of new analyses based on the limited data-set in their... more »

"Pluto would appear to have glaciers of nitrogen ice, the latest pictures from the New Horizons probe suggest.
Scientists believe they see evidence of surface material having flowed around mountains and even ponding in craters.
The activity is certainly recent, they say, and may even be current.
But the mission team cautions that it has received only 4-5% of the data gathered during 14 July's historic flyby of the dwarf planet, and any interpretations must carry caveats.
"Pluto has a very complicated story to tell; Pluto has a very interesting history, and there is a lot of work we need to do to understand this very complicated place," said Alan Stern, the New Horizons principal investigator.
In a briefing at the US space agency's HQ in Washington DC, he and colleagues then outlined a number of new analyses based on the limited data-set in their possession".___

posted image

2015-07-25 15:13:19 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

"More than 70 percent of pollen and honey samples collected from foraging bees in Massachusetts contain at least one neonicotinoid, a class of pesticide that has been implicated in Colony Collapse Disorder, in which adult bees abandon their hives during winter".

"More than 70 percent of pollen and honey samples collected from foraging bees in Massachusetts contain at least one neonicotinoid, a class of pesticide that has been implicated in Colony Collapse Disorder, in which adult bees abandon their hives during winter".___

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2015-07-25 15:00:31 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"The health of Colorado's bighorn sheep population remains as precarious as the steep alpine terrain the animals inhabit, but a new study has found that inbreeding -- a common hypothesis for a recent decline -- likely isn't to blame".

"The health of Colorado's bighorn sheep population remains as precarious as the steep alpine terrain the animals inhabit, but a new study has found that inbreeding -- a common hypothesis for a recent decline -- likely isn't to blame".___

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2015-07-24 14:09:18 (0 comments, 5 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

"Stink bug mothers will lay darker or lighter eggs depending on how much light is reflecting off of a surface. The newly discovered adaptation is likely related to how some species of stink bugs are able to deposit their eggs on top of leaves, as the darker-colored eggs are better protected from UV radiation. Surprisingly, the eggs are not darkened by melanin, but by a previously unknown pigment".

"Stink bug mothers will lay darker or lighter eggs depending on how much light is reflecting off of a surface. The newly discovered adaptation is likely related to how some species of stink bugs are able to deposit their eggs on top of leaves, as the darker-colored eggs are better protected from UV radiation. Surprisingly, the eggs are not darkened by melanin, but by a previously unknown pigment".___

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2015-07-24 13:57:41 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

"You don't need a magnetic material to create spin current from insulators, researchers say. This work has important implications for the field of spintronics and the development of high-speed, low-power electronics that use electron spin rather than charge to carry information".

"You don't need a magnetic material to create spin current from insulators, researchers say. This work has important implications for the field of spintronics and the development of high-speed, low-power electronics that use electron spin rather than charge to carry information".___

posted image

2015-07-24 13:54:49 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

"New research reveals that some of the earliest civilizations in the Middle East and the Fertile Crescent may have been affected by abrupt climate change. These findings show that while socio-economic factors were traditionally considered to shape ancient human societies in this region, the influence of abrupt climate change should not be underestimated".

"New research reveals that some of the earliest civilizations in the Middle East and the Fertile Crescent may have been affected by abrupt climate change. These findings show that while socio-economic factors were traditionally considered to shape ancient human societies in this region, the influence of abrupt climate change should not be underestimated".___

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2015-07-24 13:51:47 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

"New research has revealed abrupt warming, that closely resembles the rapid man-made warming occurring today, has repeatedly played a key role in mass extinction events of large animals, the megafauna, in Earth's past".

"New research has revealed abrupt warming, that closely resembles the rapid man-made warming occurring today, has repeatedly played a key role in mass extinction events of large animals, the megafauna, in Earth's past".___

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2015-07-24 02:45:39 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Via +steve cooksey​

First fossil of a four-limbed snake specimen uncovered in Brazil!

The first four-legged fossil snake ever found is forcing scientists to rethink how snakes evolved from lizards.

Although it has four legs, Tetrapodophis amplectus has other features that clearly mark it as a snake, says Nick Longrich, a palaeontologist at the University of Bath, UK, and one of the authors of a paper describing the animal in Science1.

The creature’s limbs were probably not used for locomotion, the researchers say, but rather for grasping prey, or perhaps for holding on to mating partners. Such speculation inspired the snake’s name, which loosely translates as ‘four-legged hugging snake’.

Tetrapodophis was originally found in the fossil-rich Crato Formation in northeastern Brazil several decades ago. But its legs can be difficult to see at first glance, and it languished in a private collection after its discovery, assumed to be unremarkable...

Scientists have long argued over whether snakes evolved from land or marine animals. Tetrapodophis lacks adaptations for marine life, such as a tail useful for swimming. But its skull and body proportions are consistent with adaptations for burrowing. Longrich says that the finding unequivocally shows that snakes originated in the Southern Hemisphere and strongly supports a terrestrial origin.

Another striking feature of the fossil is its relative length. Tetrapodophis has 272 vertebrae, 160 of which are in its main body, not its tail. This number is more than twice the limit that researchers thought elongated bodies could reach before starting to lose their limbs...

Martin Cohn, an evolutionary developmental biologist at the University of Florida, Gainesville, says that the animal’s limbs must have been repurposed by evolution instead of simply dwindling away as its body became longer. This insight contradicts some assumptions about snake evolution. As Cohn explains, the paradigm about elongation of the trunk leading to limb loss now has to be adjusted. "This fossil shows that the two processes can be decoupled,” he says.___Via +steve cooksey​

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2015-07-23 15:55:10 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Land managers may use fungi to ensure health of planting and reforestation efforts, researchers report. A team of scientists is studying pinyon pine trees and their susceptibility to severe drought conditions. While many tree species become vulnerable to insects during drought conditions, the team discovered a twist: the pinyons that were insect-resistant were not surviving the drought".

"Land managers may use fungi to ensure health of planting and reforestation efforts, researchers report. A team of scientists is studying pinyon pine trees and their susceptibility to severe drought conditions. While many tree species become vulnerable to insects during drought conditions, the team discovered a twist: the pinyons that were insect-resistant were not surviving the drought".___

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2015-07-23 15:49:12 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

"Researchers have devised a simple way to predict a river delta's shape, given two competing factors: its river's force in depositing sediment into the ocean, and ocean waves' strength in pushing that sediment back along the coast. Depending on the balance of the two, the coastline of a river delta may take on a smooth 'cuspate' shape, or a more pointed 'crenulated' outline, resembling a bird's foot".

"Researchers have devised a simple way to predict a river delta's shape, given two competing factors: its river's force in depositing sediment into the ocean, and ocean waves' strength in pushing that sediment back along the coast. Depending on the balance of the two, the coastline of a river delta may take on a smooth 'cuspate' shape, or a more pointed 'crenulated' outline, resembling a bird's foot".___

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2015-07-23 15:30:45 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"The assumption that Lake Tahoe's blueness is tied to clarity has driven advocacy and management efforts in the Lake Tahoe Basin for decades. But the report's findings show that at times of the year when clarity increases, blueness decreases, and vice versa".

"The assumption that Lake Tahoe's blueness is tied to clarity has driven advocacy and management efforts in the Lake Tahoe Basin for decades. But the report's findings show that at times of the year when clarity increases, blueness decreases, and vice versa".___

posted image

2015-07-23 15:24:43 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"A new material that mimics coral could help remove toxic heavy metals like mercury from the ocean, according to a new study. The researchers say their new material could provide inspiration for other approaches to removing pollutants".

"A new material that mimics coral could help remove toxic heavy metals like mercury from the ocean, according to a new study. The researchers say their new material could provide inspiration for other approaches to removing pollutants".___

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2015-07-23 15:18:56 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

"Its unusual biological characteristics make the flightless kiwi a unique kind of bird. Researchers have now sequenced the genetic code of this endangered species and have identified several sequence changes that underlie the kiwi's adaptation to a nocturnal lifestyle: They found several genes involved in color vision to be inactivated and the diversity of odorant receptors to be higher than in other birds -- suggesting an increased reliance on their sense of smell rather than vision for foraging".

"Its unusual biological characteristics make the flightless kiwi a unique kind of bird. Researchers have now sequenced the genetic code of this endangered species and have identified several sequence changes that underlie the kiwi's adaptation to a nocturnal lifestyle: They found several genes involved in color vision to be inactivated and the diversity of odorant receptors to be higher than in other birds -- suggesting an increased reliance on their sense of smell rather than vision for foraging".___

posted image

2015-07-22 16:27:03 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

"Two new DNA studies shed light on the migration of ancient people into the Americas, including 'surprising' links to present day Australo-Melanesians.
The first study, published in Science, reveals that Native American ancestors reached the New World in a single, initial migration from Siberia at most 23,000 years ago, only later differentiating into today's distinct groups.
The study settles a long-standing debate about when the ancestors of Native Americans crossed the Bering land bridge.
An international team, led by researchers at the Centre for GeoGenetics at the University of Copenhagen, sequenced the genomes of 31 living Native Americans, Siberians and people from around the Pacific Ocean, and the genomes of 23 ancient individuals from North and South America, spanning a time between 200 and 6,000 years ago.
They found the ancestral pool split into two main... more »

"Two new DNA studies shed light on the migration of ancient people into the Americas, including 'surprising' links to present day Australo-Melanesians.
The first study, published in Science, reveals that Native American ancestors reached the New World in a single, initial migration from Siberia at most 23,000 years ago, only later differentiating into today's distinct groups.
The study settles a long-standing debate about when the ancestors of Native Americans crossed the Bering land bridge.
An international team, led by researchers at the Centre for GeoGenetics at the University of Copenhagen, sequenced the genomes of 31 living Native Americans, Siberians and people from around the Pacific Ocean, and the genomes of 23 ancient individuals from North and South America, spanning a time between 200 and 6,000 years ago.
They found the ancestral pool split into two main branches about 13,000 years ago, coinciding with glacier melt and the opening of routes into the North American interior.
These became the groups which anthropologists refer to as Amerindians (American Indians) and Athabascans (a native Alaskan people).
Previous research had suggested that Amerindian and Athabascan ancestors had crossed the strait independently.
"Our study presents the most comprehensive picture of the genetic prehistory of the Americas to date," says Maanasa Raghavan, one of the study's lead authors from the Centre for GeoGenetics.
"We show that all Native Americans, including the major sub-groups of Amerindians and Athabascans, descend from the same migration wave into the Americas."
This was distinct from later waves which gave rise to the Paleo-Eskimo and Inuit populations, she adds.
Given that the earliest evidence for the presence of humans in the Americas dates to 15,000 years ago, the first ancestors may have remained in Beringia for about 8000 years before their final push into the New World, the team say".___

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2015-07-22 16:21:19 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"Having been long-mistaken for one of its relatives, a new bat species, L. inexpectata, has been now discovered. With their unusually pale fur, peculiar skull shape and tooth morphology, the specimens had spent long years in some of the most reputed nature museums behind the wrong sign, expert say".

"Having been long-mistaken for one of its relatives, a new bat species, L. inexpectata, has been now discovered. With their unusually pale fur, peculiar skull shape and tooth morphology, the specimens had spent long years in some of the most reputed nature museums behind the wrong sign, expert say".___

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2015-07-22 16:18:12 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"Two new tropical plants species from the large and complex genus Hoya were found in Borneo. H. ruthiae is characterized by its lack of colored milk-like fluid and H. bakoensis -- with its strict preference for rooting inside ant nests. Its seedlings sprout from the openings of small ant nests localized inside hollow tree trunks".

"Two new tropical plants species from the large and complex genus Hoya were found in Borneo. H. ruthiae is characterized by its lack of colored milk-like fluid and H. bakoensis -- with its strict preference for rooting inside ant nests. Its seedlings sprout from the openings of small ant nests localized inside hollow tree trunks".___

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2015-07-22 16:11:16 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"A microbe found in caves produces a compound that inhibits Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats, researchers report. The finding could lead to treatments that kill the fungus while minimizing disruption to cave ecosystems, the researchers say".

"A microbe found in caves produces a compound that inhibits Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats, researchers report. The finding could lead to treatments that kill the fungus while minimizing disruption to cave ecosystems, the researchers say".___

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2015-07-22 15:59:46 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

"Hidden secrets about life in Somerset 190 million years ago have been revealed in a new study of some remarkable fossils. Thanks to exceptional conditions of preservation, a whole marine ecosystem has been uncovered -- and yet it was already known 150 years ago".

"Hidden secrets about life in Somerset 190 million years ago have been revealed in a new study of some remarkable fossils. Thanks to exceptional conditions of preservation, a whole marine ecosystem has been uncovered -- and yet it was already known 150 years ago".___

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2015-07-22 15:54:10 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

"63 years since the discovery of the tomb of Mayan King Pakal located inside the Temple of Inscriptions in Palenque, Chiapas (southern state of Mexico), researchers have deciphered the T514 glyph meaning YEJ: (sharp edge)".

"63 years since the discovery of the tomb of Mayan King Pakal located inside the Temple of Inscriptions in Palenque, Chiapas (southern state of Mexico), researchers have deciphered the T514 glyph meaning YEJ: (sharp edge)".___

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2015-07-22 15:44:42 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

"Researchers discovered a threatened coral species that lives in deeper waters off the US Virgin Islands is more fertile than its shallow-water counterparts. The new study showed that mountainous star corals (Orbicella faveolata) located at nearly 140 feet deep may produce one trillion more eggs per square kilometer than those on shallow reefs".

"Researchers discovered a threatened coral species that lives in deeper waters off the US Virgin Islands is more fertile than its shallow-water counterparts. The new study showed that mountainous star corals (Orbicella faveolata) located at nearly 140 feet deep may produce one trillion more eggs per square kilometer than those on shallow reefs".___

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2015-07-22 15:36:47 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Researchers have discovered fragments of a new female figurine from Hohle Fels Cave".

"Researchers have discovered fragments of a new female figurine from Hohle Fels Cave".___

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2015-07-22 15:34:53 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"Hair ice -- a type of ice shaped like fine, silky hairs that resembles white cotton candy -- grows on the rotten branches of certain trees when the weather conditions are just right, usually during humid winter nights when the air temperature drops slightly below the freezing point. Now scientists have identified the missing ingredient, a fungus, that gives hair ice its peculiar shape".

"Hair ice -- a type of ice shaped like fine, silky hairs that resembles white cotton candy -- grows on the rotten branches of certain trees when the weather conditions are just right, usually during humid winter nights when the air temperature drops slightly below the freezing point. Now scientists have identified the missing ingredient, a fungus, that gives hair ice its peculiar shape".___

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2015-07-22 15:32:21 (1 comments, 5 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"Scientists used the Mira supercomputer to identify and improve a new mechanism for eliminating friction, which fed into the development of a hybrid material that exhibited superlubricity at the macroscale for the first time. Researchers helped enable the groundbreaking simulations by overcoming a performance bottleneck that doubled the speed of the team's code".

"Scientists used the Mira supercomputer to identify and improve a new mechanism for eliminating friction, which fed into the development of a hybrid material that exhibited superlubricity at the macroscale for the first time. Researchers helped enable the groundbreaking simulations by overcoming a performance bottleneck that doubled the speed of the team's code".___

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2015-07-21 15:57:16 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

"The first worldwide study of animals and the seeds they eat has overturned a long-held assumption -- that large animals mainly eat large seeds. The finding shows that a wider variety of plants than is often thought could be at risk if large animals go extinct and do not disperse their seeds. The study covers 13,000 animal-seed interactions and includes all vertebrate species -- fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals -- from areas ranging from the Arctic tundra to tropical rainforests".

"The first worldwide study of animals and the seeds they eat has overturned a long-held assumption -- that large animals mainly eat large seeds. The finding shows that a wider variety of plants than is often thought could be at risk if large animals go extinct and do not disperse their seeds. The study covers 13,000 animal-seed interactions and includes all vertebrate species -- fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals -- from areas ranging from the Arctic tundra to tropical rainforests".___

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2015-07-21 15:43:42 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Believe it or not: X-ray works a lot better on rocks than on paper. This has been a problem for conservators trying to save historical books and letters. They frankly did not know what they were up against once fungi started to spot the surface of their documents. Now an imaging specialist has managed to get a first look at how fungus goes about infesting paper".

"Believe it or not: X-ray works a lot better on rocks than on paper. This has been a problem for conservators trying to save historical books and letters. They frankly did not know what they were up against once fungi started to spot the surface of their documents. Now an imaging specialist has managed to get a first look at how fungus goes about infesting paper".___

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2015-07-21 15:37:35 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"Between 8,000 and 12,000 years ago, in a transitional event known as the Neolithic Revolution, humans began to create and tend domestic ecosystems in various locations around the world, and agriculture was born. Recent research by a team of archaeologists sheds new light on the variables that might have affected the human shift from hunting and gathering to food production".

"Between 8,000 and 12,000 years ago, in a transitional event known as the Neolithic Revolution, humans began to create and tend domestic ecosystems in various locations around the world, and agriculture was born. Recent research by a team of archaeologists sheds new light on the variables that might have affected the human shift from hunting and gathering to food production".___

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2015-07-21 15:34:30 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Gravity data captured by satellite has allowed researchers to take a closer look at the geology deep beneath the Tibetan Plateau".

"Gravity data captured by satellite has allowed researchers to take a closer look at the geology deep beneath the Tibetan Plateau".___

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2015-07-21 15:32:00 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

"Fossil fuel emissions could soon make it impossible for radiocarbon dating to distinguish new materials from artefacts that are hundreds of years old".

"Fossil fuel emissions could soon make it impossible for radiocarbon dating to distinguish new materials from artefacts that are hundreds of years old".___

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2015-07-20 17:37:58 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Weird, "hybridized" animal skeletons, including a cow-horse and a six-legged sheep litter the bottom of storage pits in an Iron Age site in England, archaeologists have found.

Weird, "hybridized" animal skeletons, including a cow-horse and a six-legged sheep litter the bottom of storage pits in an Iron Age site in England, archaeologists have found.___

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2015-07-20 17:33:42 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

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2015-07-20 17:28:13 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

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2015-07-20 14:27:46 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

"Tiny plastic pellets called microbeads have gotten a lot of attention as a major water pollutant, but less-discussed microplastics are equally concerning, according to new research being done in Canada.
"In recent years, they've been detected in a growing number of lakes and rivers worldwide. They're everywhere, and often in alarming levels," said Anthony Ricciardi, a professor at the McGill School of the Environment, who is working on a study about microplastics".

"Tiny plastic pellets called microbeads have gotten a lot of attention as a major water pollutant, but less-discussed microplastics are equally concerning, according to new research being done in Canada.
"In recent years, they've been detected in a growing number of lakes and rivers worldwide. They're everywhere, and often in alarming levels," said Anthony Ricciardi, a professor at the McGill School of the Environment, who is working on a study about microplastics".___

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2015-07-20 14:19:26 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

This is a 'must' and interesting read.   Short too. :) 

" Hatshepsut’s mummy is that of an obese, diabetic 50 year old woman with bad teeth. All the conditions that nutritionists today would have us believe would be prevented by Hatshepsut’s diet."

" ...most Egyptian mummies show the same disorders, especially the bad teeth. The skeletal remains of Paleolithic man, who consumed a meat-based diet, showed strong, perfect teeth. Bad teeth are the hallmark of carbohydrate consumption."

https://proteinpower.com/drmike/2007/07/01/obesity-in-ancient-egypt/

This is a 'must' and interesting read.   Short too. :) 

" Hatshepsut’s mummy is that of an obese, diabetic 50 year old woman with bad teeth. All the conditions that nutritionists today would have us believe would be prevented by Hatshepsut’s diet."

" ...most Egyptian mummies show the same disorders, especially the bad teeth. The skeletal remains of Paleolithic man, who consumed a meat-based diet, showed strong, perfect teeth. Bad teeth are the hallmark of carbohydrate consumption."

https://proteinpower.com/drmike/2007/07/01/obesity-in-ancient-egypt/___

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