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Finn Krogstad has been at 1 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Christopher Cantwell34,989At midnight, the United States Federal Government will run out of cash. It's agents have taken to the airwaves to tell us how horrible a place the world will become, without our national parks and other "non-essential" personnel, but we're pretty sure we can do without them. So let's celebrate the beginning of the end, for our enemy, the State! "As politicians and main stream media outlets scramble to convince Americans that the sky is indeed falling, others are making hors d'oeuvres, chilling champagne, and preparing playlists. They plan to party like it's 1776." http://www.christophercantwell.com/2013/09/28/americans-celebrate-possibility-of-government-shutdown/Countdown to a Government Shutdown, Party!2013-10-01 01:00:00153  

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Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

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comments per post
1
reshares per post
5
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536
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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 23

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2015-07-17 14:50:51 (23 comments, 11 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Most reshares: 11

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2015-07-17 14:50:51 (23 comments, 11 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Most plusones: 20

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2015-07-23 14:06:51 (3 comments, 7 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

#SandraBland

Latest 50 posts

2015-07-29 21:02:58 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Why would they go to all the trouble to fake a suicide? It seems like a lot of work just to avoid a paid vacation.

Why would they go to all the trouble to fake a suicide? It seems like a lot of work just to avoid a paid vacation.___

2015-07-27 16:18:58 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Government anti-poverty programs are a classic case of the therapeutic state setting out to treat disorders created by the state itself. Urban poverty as we know it is, in fact, exclusively a creature of state intervention in consensual economic dealings. This claim may seem bold, even to most libertarians. But a lot turns on the phrase “as we know it.” Even if absolute laissez faire reigned beginning tomorrow, there would still be people in big cities who are living paycheck to paycheck, heavily in debt, homeless, jobless, or otherwise at the bottom rungs of the socioeconomic ladder. These conditions may be persistent social problems, and it may be that free people in a free society will still have to come up with voluntary institutions and practices for addressing them. But in the state-regimented market that dominates today, the material predicament that poor people find themselves in—and thearran... more »

Government anti-poverty programs are a classic case of the therapeutic state setting out to treat disorders created by the state itself. Urban poverty as we know it is, in fact, exclusively a creature of state intervention in consensual economic dealings. This claim may seem bold, even to most libertarians. But a lot turns on the phrase “as we know it.” Even if absolute laissez faire reigned beginning tomorrow, there would still be people in big cities who are living paycheck to paycheck, heavily in debt, homeless, jobless, or otherwise at the bottom rungs of the socioeconomic ladder. These conditions may be persistent social problems, and it may be that free people in a free society will still have to come up with voluntary institutions and practices for addressing them. But in the state-regimented market that dominates today, the material predicament that poor people find themselves in—and the arrangements they must make within that predicament—are battered into their familiar shape, as if by an invisible fist, through the diffuse effects of pervasive, interlocking interventions.___

2015-07-27 14:53:44 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Suicide By Cop:
If you didn't move to Somalia, then you chose to live where they could kill you.  

Suicide By Cop:
If you didn't move to Somalia, then you chose to live where they could kill you.  ___

2015-07-26 19:55:15 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Innocence is no protection. Abject subservience to their every whim no longer provides any protection. They will do whatever they want because the can do whatever they want.  

Innocence is no protection. Abject subservience to their every whim no longer provides any protection. They will do whatever they want because the can do whatever they want.  ___

2015-07-26 15:24:00 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

A badge isn't just a licence to do whatever you want. Your kids can do whatever they want too.

A badge isn't just a licence to do whatever you want. Your kids can do whatever they want too.___

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2015-07-25 14:26:25 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Long after everyone has forgotten Benghazi, this will be the treason that Obama is remembered for. 

He was sentenced to life in prison in 1987.  Israel granted Pollard citizenship retroactively in 1995, while in prison, and Israeli governments have repeatedly sought his release. The Netanyahu government has picked up the pace on this, trying to “trade” concessions on the stalled peace process with the Palestinians for Pollard, something the US has repeatedly spurned.


http://news.antiwar.com/2015/07/24/us-set-to-release-israel-spy-pollard-to-placate-netanyahu-on-iran/___Long after everyone has forgotten Benghazi, this will be the treason that Obama is remembered for. 

2015-07-25 13:27:48 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

We have thoroughly investigated ourselves and determined that we did nothing wrong.  

So now people are reading the autopsy report on the young lady who died in jail, and it seems that it was indeed suicide.

Was there any doubt? Why would you not believe the police?

And if you didn't believe the police, why would you believe the autopsy report?

It seems people get satisfied pretty easily, as a single followup is enough to settle it.

Whenever an 'authority' 'allegedly' does something heinous, the 'authorities' determine that there was no wrongdoing and this is good enough for many or even most people.

Of course there could be an investigation of the autopsy, and then another one on that investigation, but it doesn't matter. It's all in the hands of the guys who collect the tax dollars, and everyone involved is motivated to come to the same conclusion.

But it's ridiculous to think that there is some big widespread conspiracy to cover up an event like this. Not everyone is corrupt.

But you don't need everyone to be corrupt. You just need the corrupt people in the right places.

Now I have no idea whether the autopsy report is on the level or not. But I know enough not to trust it. Which gets me what? Nothing.

But many people will get the satisfaction that the case is closed and the 'authorities' did not do anything wrong and happy happy life can go on because the system works.

These are the people who will be beside themselves in shock and outrage when the system gets around to screwing them into the ground, and they will be naive enough to walk right into it.

If I try hard enough, I can almost feel sorry for them.___We have thoroughly investigated ourselves and determined that we did nothing wrong.  

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2015-07-24 22:59:12 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

...

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2015-07-24 05:53:48 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Since Sandra Bland was killed in police custody, a number of theories have arisen regarding how she died and why. Few believe that she committed suicide, and the investigation into her death has now shifted gears from a suicide investigation, to a homicide.
But one of the most intriguing theories that is starting to circulate on Black Twitter is whether or not Sandra Bland was actually dead already when her mugshots were taken.
While the evidence is far from conclusive, these are definitely questions worth asking.
Some of the question that people have posed about the mugshot image include:
Why does Sandra already have an orange jumpsuit on in a mugshot supposedly taken during in-processing?
Why are the locks of her hair descending backwards, as though she is laying down, rather than standing up? If she was standing up, her locks should be hanging straight down, as they are inev... more »

Since Sandra Bland was killed in police custody, a number of theories have arisen regarding how she died and why. Few believe that she committed suicide, and the investigation into her death has now shifted gears from a suicide investigation, to a homicide.
But one of the most intriguing theories that is starting to circulate on Black Twitter is whether or not Sandra Bland was actually dead already when her mugshots were taken.
While the evidence is far from conclusive, these are definitely questions worth asking.
Some of the question that people have posed about the mugshot image include:
Why does Sandra already have an orange jumpsuit on in a mugshot supposedly taken during in-processing?
Why are the locks of her hair descending backwards, as though she is laying down, rather than standing up? If she was standing up, her locks should be hanging straight down, as they are in every other image of her we have where she has locks. 
Her eyes seem focused on nothing. 
The shadow to our right indicates to some that she is laying down.
Her face, collagen, fat, loose musculature, is all seeming to fall backwards, rather than down. This too would seem to indicate that she is laying down.
On the right side of the image, we can see the left side of her face (our right), drooping lower than the opposite side. Some have suggested this indicates effects of oxygen depletion to the brain.___

2015-07-24 05:14:28 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Were police traffic stops always a near-death experience?  Has anyone figured out your odds of surviving a traffic stop?  Is it safer than an airline flight to Baghdad?  

Were police traffic stops always a near-death experience?  Has anyone figured out your odds of surviving a traffic stop?  Is it safer than an airline flight to Baghdad?  ___

2015-07-24 04:49:40 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Gun grabbers keep talking about the bloodbath of bystanders that would happen if victims had guns and could have defended themselves.  Could we please have one of those, because I am really getting sick of hearing about defenseless victims waiting to be slaughtered.  

Gun grabbers keep talking about the bloodbath of bystanders that would happen if victims had guns and could have defended themselves.  Could we please have one of those, because I am really getting sick of hearing about defenseless victims waiting to be slaughtered.  ___

2015-07-23 23:03:57 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

For those of you who think you will 'flex your rights', remember that will be your next of kin doing it.

For those of you who think you will 'flex your rights', remember that will be your next of kin doing it.___

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2015-07-23 14:06:51 (3 comments, 7 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

#SandraBland

#SandraBland___

2015-07-23 13:56:42 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Uh oh, if Huffington Post can understand this basic notion, then soon every liberal will get it.

Uh oh, if Huffington Post can understand this basic notion, then soon every liberal will get it.___

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2015-07-22 21:35:38 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

#politics #greenparty #votegreen #civilrights #activism #feminism

#politics #greenparty #votegreen #civilrights #activism #feminism___

2015-07-22 15:49:09 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

You really can't make this shit up.

You really can't make this shit up.___

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2015-07-22 15:43:07 (8 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

#antifa

#antifa___

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2015-07-22 00:26:58 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

A government rating is as sound as the dollar....remember, it only took 5 inches of rain to do this.  

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/07/20/collapsed--10-bridge-given-rating-just-last-year/30428515/

A government rating is as sound as the dollar....remember, it only took 5 inches of rain to do this.  

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/07/20/collapsed--10-bridge-given-rating-just-last-year/30428515/___

2015-07-21 22:30:14 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Harsanyi frames American politics as “a debate that pits the theories of 18th-century liberalism—the kind that brought us the Constitution and limited government—against ideas first embraced in 19th-century Marxism.” When I see a grownup claim to believe something like that, I can’t help but wonder if he thinks pro wrestling is real.

Harsanyi frames American politics as “a debate that pits the theories of 18th-century liberalism—the kind that brought us the Constitution and limited government—against ideas first embraced in 19th-century Marxism.” When I see a grownup claim to believe something like that, I can’t help but wonder if he thinks pro wrestling is real.___

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2015-07-21 20:48:39 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

___

2015-07-21 20:12:59 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Don't get involved with women who might date cops. It's not worth the risk.  

Don't get involved with women who might date cops. It's not worth the risk.  ___

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2015-07-21 19:53:47 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

at least none of the main characters were married.

at least none of the main characters were married.___

2015-07-21 19:26:45 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

I wonder how many Americans are in prison just to prevent them from testifying against a cop.  

I wonder how many Americans are in prison just to prevent them from testifying against a cop.  ___

2015-07-21 18:48:16 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

_Facebook  Twitter  Reddit  More
#Government Intervention#Free Markets#Subsidies#Special Interests
This article won the 2011 Beth A. Hoffman Memorial Prize for Economic Writing.

Although critics on the left are very astute in describing the evils of present-day society, they usually fail to understand either the root of those problems (government intervention) or their solution (the operation of a freed market). In Progressive commentary on energy, pollution, and so on—otherwise often quite insightful—calls for government intervention are quite common. George Monbiot, for instance, has written that “[t]he only rational response to both the impending end of the Oil Age and the menace of global warming is to redesign our cities, our farming and our lives. But this cannot happen without massive political pressure.”

But this is precisely backward. Existing problems ofexcess ene... more »

_Facebook  Twitter  Reddit  More
#Government Intervention#Free Markets#Subsidies#Special Interests
This article won the 2011 Beth A. Hoffman Memorial Prize for Economic Writing.

Although critics on the left are very astute in describing the evils of present-day society, they usually fail to understand either the root of those problems (government intervention) or their solution (the operation of a freed market). In Progressive commentary on energy, pollution, and so on—otherwise often quite insightful—calls for government intervention are quite common. George Monbiot, for instance, has written that “[t]he only rational response to both the impending end of the Oil Age and the menace of global warming is to redesign our cities, our farming and our lives. But this cannot happen without massive political pressure.”

But this is precisely backward. Existing problems of excess energy consumption, pollution, big-box stores, the car culture, and suburban sprawl result from the “massive political pressure” that has already been applied, over the past several decades, to “redesign our cities, our farming, and our lives.” The root of all the problems Monbiot finds so objectionable is State intervention in the marketplace.

In particular, subsidies to transportation have probably done more than any other factor (with the possible exception of intellectual property law) to determine the present shape of the American corporate economy. Currently predominating firm sizes and market areas are the result of government subsidies to transportation.

Adam Smith argued over 200 years ago that the fairest way of funding transportation infrastructure was user fees rather than general revenues: “When the carriages which pass over a highway or a bridge, and the lighters which sail upon a navigable canal, pay toll in proportion to their weight or their tonnage, they pay for the maintenance of those public works exactly in proportion to the wear and tear which they occasion of them.”

This is not, however, how things were actually done. Powerful business interests have used their political influence since the beginning of American history to secure government funding for “internal improvements.” The real turning point was the government’s role in creating the railroad system from the mid-nineteenth century on. The national railroad system as we know it was almost entirely a creature of the State.

The federal railroad land grants included not only the rights-of-way for the actual railroads, but extended 15-mile tracts on both sides. As the lines were completed, this adjoining land became prime real estate and skyrocketed in value. As new communities sprang up along the routes, every house and business in town was built on land acquired from the railroads. The tracts also frequently included valuable timberland. The railroads, according to Matthew Josephson (The Robber Barons), were “land companies” whose directors “did a rushing land business in farm lands and town sites at rising prices.” For example, under the terms of the Pacific Railroad bill, the Union Pacific (which built from the Mississippi westward) was granted 12 million acres of land and $27 million worth of 30-year government bonds. The Central Pacific (built from the West Coast eastward) received nine million acres and $24 million worth of bonds. The total land grants to the railroads amounted to about six times the area of France.

Theodore Judah, chief engineer for what became the Central Pacific, assured potential investors “that it could be done—if government aid were obtained. For the cost would be terrible.” Collis Huntington, the leading promoter for the project, engaged in a sordid combination of strategically placed bribes and appeals to communities’ fears of being bypassed in order to extort grants of “rights of way, terminal and harbor sites, and . . . stock or bond subscriptions ranging from $150,000 to $1,000,000” from a long string of local governments that included San Francisco, Stockton, and Sacramento.

Government also revised tort and contract law to ease the carriers’ way—for example, by exempting common carriers from liability for many kinds of physical damage caused by their operation.

Had railroad ventures been forced to bear their own initial capital outlays—securing rights of way, preparing roadbeds, and laying track, without land grants and government purchases of their bonds—the railroads would likely have developed instead along the initial lines on which Lewis Mumford speculated in The City in History: many local rail networks linking communities into local industrial economies. The regional and national interlinkages of local networks, when they did occur, would have been far fewer and far smaller in capacity. The comparative costs of local and national distribution, accordingly, would have been quite different. In a nation of hundreds of local industrial economies, with long-distance rail transport much more costly than at present, the natural pattern of industrialization would have been to integrate small-scale power machinery into flexible manufacturing for local markets.

Alfred Chandler, in The Visible Hand, argued that the creation of the national railroad system made possible, first, national wholesale and retail markets, and then large manufacturing firms serving the national market. The existence of unified national markets served by large-scale manufacturers depended on a reliable, high-volume distribution system operating on a national level. The railroad and telegraph, “so essential to high-volume production and distribution,” were in Chandler’s view what made possible this steady flow of goods through the distribution pipeline: “The revolution in the processes of distribution and production rested in large part on the new transportation and communications infrastructure. Modern mass production and mass distribution depend on the speed, volume, and regularity in the movement of goods and messages made possible by the coming of the railroad, telegraph and steamship.”

The Tipping Point

The creation of a single national market, unified by a high-volume distribution system, was probably the tipping point between two possible industrial systems. As Mumford argued in Technics and Civilization, the main economic reason for large-scale production in the factory system was the need to economize on power from prime movers. Factories were filled with long rows of machines, all connected by belts to drive shafts from a single steam engine. The invention of the electric motor changed all this: A prime mover, appropriately scaled, could be built into each individual machine. As a result, it was possible to scale machinery to the flow of production and situate it close to the point of consumption.

With the introduction of electrical power, as described by Charles Sabel and Michael Piore in The Second Industrial Divide, there were two alternative possibilities for organizing production around the new electrical machinery: decentralized production for local markets, integrating general-purpose machinery into craft production and governed on a demand-pull basis with short production runs and frequent shifts between product lines; or centralized production using expensive, product-specific machinery in large batches on a supply-push basis. The first alternative was the one most naturally suited to the new possibilities offered by electrical power. But in fact what was chosen was the second alternative. The role of the State in creating a single national market, with artificially low distribution costs, was almost certainly what tipped the balance between them.

The railroads, themselves largely creatures of the State, in turn actively promoted the concentration of industry through their rate policies. Sabel and Piore argue that “the railroads’ policy of favoring their largest customers, through rebates” was a central factor in the rise of the large corporation. Once in place, the railroads—being a high fixed-cost industry—had “a tremendous incentive to use their capacity in a continuous, stable way. This incentive meant, in turn, that they had an interest in stabilizing the output of their principal customers—an interest that extended to protecting their customers from competitors who were served by other railroads. It is therefore not surprising that the railroads promoted merger schemes that had this effect, nor that they favored the resulting corporations or trusts with rebates.”

Reprising the Role

As new forms of transportation emerged, the government reprised its role, subsidizing both the national highway and civil aviation systems.

From its beginning the American automotive industry formed a “complex” with the petroleum industry and government highway projects. The “most powerful pressure group in Washington” (as a PBS documentary called it) began in June 1932, when GM president Alfred P. Sloan created the National Highway Users Conference, inviting oil and rubber firms to help GM bankroll a propaganda and lobbying effort that continues to this day.

Whatever the political motivation behind it, the economic effect of the interstate system should hardly be controversial. Virtually 100 percent of roadbed damage to highways is caused by heavy trucks. After repeated liberalization of maximum weight restrictions, far beyond the heaviest conceivable weight the interstate roadbeds were originally designed to support, fuel taxes fail miserably at capturing from big-rig operators the cost of pavement damage caused by higher axle loads. And truckers have been successful at scrapping weight-distance user charges in all but a few western states, where the push for repeal continues. So only about half the revenue of the highway trust fund comes from fees or fuel taxes on the trucking industry, and the rest is externalized on private automobiles.

This doesn’t even count the 20 percent of highway funding that’s still subsidized by general revenues, or the role of eminent domain in lowering the transaction costs involved in building new highways or expanding existing ones.

As for the civil aviation system, from the beginning it was a creature of the State. Its original physical infrastructure was built entirely with federal grants and tax-free municipal bonds. Professor Stephen Paul Dempsey of the University of Denver in 1992 estimated the replacement value of this infrastructure at $1 trillion. The federal government didn’t even start collecting user fees from airline passengers and freight shippers until 1971. Even with such user fees paid into the Airport and Airways Trust Fund, the system still required taxpayer subsidies of $3 billion to maintain the Federal Aviation Administration’s network of control towers, air traffic control centers, and tens of thousands of air traffic controllers.

Eminent domain also remains central to the building of new airports and expansion of existing airports, as it does with highways.

Subsidies to airport and air traffic control infrastructure are only part of the picture. Equally important was the direct role of the State in creating the heavy aircraft industry, whose jumbo jets revolutionized civil aviation after World War II. In Harry Truman and the War Scare of 1948, Frank Kofsky described the aircraft industry as spiraling into red ink after the end of the war and on the verge of bankruptcy when it was rescued by the Cold War (and more specifically Truman’s heavy bomber program). David Noble, in America by Design, made a convincing case that civilian jumbo jets were only profitable thanks to the government’s heavy bomber contracts; the production runs for the civilian market alone were too small to pay for the complex and expensive machinery. The 747 is essentially a spinoff of military production. The civil aviation system is, many times over, a creature of the State.

The State and the Corporation

It’s hard to avoid the conclusion that the dominant business model in the American economy, and the size of the prevailing corporate business unit, are direct results of such policies. A subsidy to any factor of production amounts to a subsidy of those firms whose business models rely most heavily on that factor, at the expense of those who depend on it the least. Subsidies to transportation, by keeping the cost of distribution artificially low, tend to lengthen supply and distribution chains. They make large corporations operating over wide market areas artificially competitive against smaller firms producing for local markets—not to mention big-box retailers with their warehouses-on-wheels distribution model.

Some consequentialists treat this as a justification for transportation subsidies: Subsidies are good because they make possible mass-production industry and large-scale distribution, which are (it is claimed) inherently more efficient (because of those magically unlimited “economies of scale,” of course).

Tibor Machan argued just the opposite in the February 1999 Freeman:

Some people will say that stringent protection of rights [against eminent domain] would lead to small airports, at best, and many constraints on construction. Of course—but what’s so wrong with that?

Perhaps the worst thing about modern industrial life has been the power of political authorities to grant special privileges to some enterprises to violate the rights of third parties whose permission would be too expensive to obtain. The need to obtain that permission would indeed seriously impede what most environmentalists see as rampant—indeed reckless—industrialization.

The system of private property rights . . . is the greatest moderator of human aspirations. . . . In short, people may reach goals they aren’t able to reach with their own resources only by convincing others, through arguments and fair exchanges, to cooperate.

In any case, the “efficiencies” resulting from subsidized centralization are entirely spurious. If the efficiencies of large-scale production were sufficient to compensate for increased distribution costs, it would not be necessary to shift a major portion of the latter to taxpayers to make the former profitable. If an economic activity is only profitable when a portion of the cost side of the ledger is concealed, and will not be undertaken when all costs are fully internalized by an economic actor, then it’s not really efficient. And when total distribution costs (including those currently shifted to the taxpayer) exceed mass-production industry’s ostensible savings in unit cost of production, the “efficiencies” of large-scale production are illusory.____

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2015-07-21 16:35:38 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

___

2015-07-21 16:09:50 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

___

2015-07-21 15:57:58 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Any wall that can keep others out can keep you in.  

Any wall that can keep others out can keep you in.  ___

2015-07-21 15:48:13 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Well some of us are finished with trying to save you, we’ve wasted enough effort trying to convince you that you should be free, all you ever do is spout back what your masters have taught you, that being free only leads to chaos and destruction, while being obedient and subservient leads to peace and prosperity.

Well some of us are finished with trying to save you, we’ve wasted enough effort trying to convince you that you should be free, all you ever do is spout back what your masters have taught you, that being free only leads to chaos and destruction, while being obedient and subservient leads to peace and prosperity.___

2015-07-20 16:38:14 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

___

2015-07-20 16:33:50 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

After a blowback shooting, when people complain that the government’s troops are kept unarmed, no one ever seems to ask why. The answer: the government fears its own troops. And that’s OK with me, since more hordes of heavily armed occupation forces wouldn’t exactly equate to safety.

After a blowback shooting, when people complain that the government’s troops are kept unarmed, no one ever seems to ask why. The answer: the government fears its own troops. And that’s OK with me, since more hordes of heavily armed occupation forces wouldn’t exactly equate to safety.___

2015-07-20 16:31:23 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Is anybody else visualizing Charlie Brown, Lucy, and a football?

Is anybody else visualizing Charlie Brown, Lucy, and a football?___

2015-07-20 14:47:09 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Is it really possible that the simple no-change forecast of 21st Century temperatures is better than the IPCC projections from expensive and complex computer models?

Yes, it is. That conclusion is consistent with the evidence Scott Armstrong and I present in our recently published review of evidence on the effect of complexity on forecasting. We found that using complex methods increases forecast errors relative to the forecasts from simple methods that decision makers could understand by 27% on average. We expect that the results of The Climate Bet will increase that average.

Is it really possible that the simple no-change forecast of 21st Century temperatures is better than the IPCC projections from expensive and complex computer models?

Yes, it is. That conclusion is consistent with the evidence Scott Armstrong and I present in our recently published review of evidence on the effect of complexity on forecasting. We found that using complex methods increases forecast errors relative to the forecasts from simple methods that decision makers could understand by 27% on average. We expect that the results of The Climate Bet will increase that average.___

2015-07-20 08:43:29 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Love your smack?
Thank a vet.

Love your smack?
Thank a vet.___

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2015-07-20 07:40:03 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

___

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2015-07-20 06:05:52 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Happy Sunday
What a wonderful and rare sleep in :)

Happy Sunday
What a wonderful and rare sleep in :)___

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2015-07-20 05:58:05 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

#atheist #atheism #godless
Via google images

#atheist #atheism #godless
Via google images___

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2015-07-19 22:59:11 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Basic fact check here:  Every decade for the past century, we have increased spending on jobs and education, and we have also put more people in prisons.  More spending on jobs/education always means more people in prison. Maybe if we spent less money on jobs/education, we would end up with fewer people in prison.  

___Basic fact check here:  Every decade for the past century, we have increased spending on jobs and education, and we have also put more people in prisons.  More spending on jobs/education always means more people in prison. Maybe if we spent less money on jobs/education, we would end up with fewer people in prison.  

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2015-07-19 22:24:38 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

This is phenomenal

This is phenomenal___

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2015-07-19 22:22:54 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

In police state America, a traffic stop might just end in your death at the hands of police. ‪#‎SandraBland‬

Police Brutality Activist Mysteriously Dies In Jail After Being Pulled Over for Improper Lane Change: http://bit.ly/1Ka0wos

In police state America, a traffic stop might just end in your death at the hands of police. ‪#‎SandraBland‬

Police Brutality Activist Mysteriously Dies In Jail After Being Pulled Over for Improper Lane Change: http://bit.ly/1Ka0wos___

2015-07-19 10:03:45 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

What political objective cannot be furthered by holding seniors' Social Security hostage?  Are seniors driving too much?  What do retirees need to drive for anyway?  Should everyone else have to pay so they can destroy the climate?  Maybe Social Security needs to to be withheld until they give up their drivers licences.  We can already take social security to pay student debts, and we can hold up welfare benefits to advance the drug war.  So what policies can't we use social security to advance?

What political objective cannot be furthered by holding seniors' Social Security hostage?  Are seniors driving too much?  What do retirees need to drive for anyway?  Should everyone else have to pay so they can destroy the climate?  Maybe Social Security needs to to be withheld until they give up their drivers licences.  We can already take social security to pay student debts, and we can hold up welfare benefits to advance the drug war.  So what policies can't we use social security to advance?___

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2015-07-18 23:04:40 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

thanks +Joey Johannsen 

thanks +Joey Johannsen ___

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2015-07-18 05:02:51 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

When you will never be punished, you can do whatever you want to.

Cop who smashed 18-year-old woman's face on ground remains on regular duty. http://boingboing.net/2015/07/17/cop-who-smashed-18-year-old-wo.html___When you will never be punished, you can do whatever you want to.

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2015-07-17 16:06:03 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

So say we all!

So say we all!___

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2015-07-17 16:02:07 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

You will be assimilated.

You will be assimilated.___

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2015-07-17 14:50:51 (23 comments, 11 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

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2015-07-17 13:22:12 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

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2015-07-17 11:49:46 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

h/t Muh Borders ...

h/t Muh Borders ...___

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2015-07-17 11:48:22 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Whenever I hear how I need to leave the US, I find a new story of how it's worse somewhere else.  

Whenever I hear how I need to leave the US, I find a new story of how it's worse somewhere else.  ___

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2015-07-15 17:55:53 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

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