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Xabier Ostale has been at 1 events

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Shaun Burks (Stryse)619Good food.  Good peeps.  My birthday.   Birthday Brunch with Stryse2014-03-09 11:30:002  

Shared Circles including Xabier Ostale

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Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

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815
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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 26

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2015-07-04 04:59:51 (26 comments, 0 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

Independence day? Tomfoolery! Oh my naughty subjects, you make me giggle. Comb yourselves and come back to your Queen, you wayward elfin children of the Empire
Her Majesty your Queen Elizabeth II
July 4th, 2015

Most reshares: 4

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2015-07-28 16:36:59 (4 comments, 4 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

The corrupt Spanish government is also supporting fracking.
Energy Storage Is The Real Target Of Spain's New Tax On The Sun
"To add insult to injury, the proposed legislation also says that anyone who violates the self-consumption rules would be subject to fines of as much as $68 million. To put this in perspective, the $68 million fine is double the size of the maximum fine allowed for leaking radioactive nuclear waste, according to an analysis by PV Tech."
"For the past five years, the Spanish government has aggressively rolled back subsidies for renewable energy technologies. The impact has been especially adverse for the solar power industry."

Most plusones: 25

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2015-07-04 04:59:51 (26 comments, 0 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

Independence day? Tomfoolery! Oh my naughty subjects, you make me giggle. Comb yourselves and come back to your Queen, you wayward elfin children of the Empire
Her Majesty your Queen Elizabeth II
July 4th, 2015

Latest 50 posts

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2015-07-31 04:28:26 (8 comments, 0 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Another dark chapter in the very dark history of the popes.
The Avignon Papacy (1309 - 1378 AD)
"The majority of the men that Clement V appointed as cardinals were French; and since the cardinals elected the pope, this meant that future popes were likely to be French, as well. All seven of the Avignonese popes and 111 of the 134 cardinals created during the Avignon papacy were French. Although the Avignonese popes were able to maintain a measure of independence, the French kings did exert some influence from time to time, and the appearance of French influence on the papacy, whether real or not, was undeniable."


The Avignonese Popes:

1305-1314: Clement V
1316-1334: John XXII
1334-1342: Benedict XII
1342-1352: Clement VI
1352-1362: Innocent VI
1362-1370: Urban V
1370-1378: Gregory XI

Another dark chapter in the very dark history of the popes.
The Avignon Papacy (1309 - 1378 AD)
"The majority of the men that Clement V appointed as cardinals were French; and since the cardinals elected the pope, this meant that future popes were likely to be French, as well. All seven of the Avignonese popes and 111 of the 134 cardinals created during the Avignon papacy were French. Although the Avignonese popes were able to maintain a measure of independence, the French kings did exert some influence from time to time, and the appearance of French influence on the papacy, whether real or not, was undeniable."


The Avignonese Popes:

1305-1314: Clement V
1316-1334: John XXII
1334-1342: Benedict XII
1342-1352: Clement VI
1352-1362: Innocent VI
1362-1370: Urban V
1370-1378: Gregory XI___

2015-07-30 21:20:22 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

We all need to take stock now and then.

Nighty night x

We all need to take stock now and then.

Nighty night x___

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2015-07-29 06:23:56 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

The Significance of the Messenian War(s) (c. 740 - c. 720 BC and c. 670 - c. 650 BC)
"Arguably, nothing was more important to the evolution of Sparta into a city-state with a highly unusual and unique constitution than the Spartan conquest of Messenia. W.G. Forrest argues, for example, that the conquest of its agriculturally rich neighbor reduced the need for distant colonies and so the interest in the wider world, while the agricultural basis of Spartan wealth reduced Sparta’s interest in industry and trade. Others argue that the conquest of such a vast territory and the subjugation of an entire people resulted in permanent fear of revolt that in turn created the need for a militaristic state. Sparta as we know it – with its unique institutions from the agoge to citizens permanently under arms – is a function of its conflict with Messenia."

The Significance of the Messenian War(s) (c. 740 - c. 720 BC and c. 670 - c. 650 BC)
"Arguably, nothing was more important to the evolution of Sparta into a city-state with a highly unusual and unique constitution than the Spartan conquest of Messenia. W.G. Forrest argues, for example, that the conquest of its agriculturally rich neighbor reduced the need for distant colonies and so the interest in the wider world, while the agricultural basis of Spartan wealth reduced Sparta’s interest in industry and trade. Others argue that the conquest of such a vast territory and the subjugation of an entire people resulted in permanent fear of revolt that in turn created the need for a militaristic state. Sparta as we know it – with its unique institutions from the agoge to citizens permanently under arms – is a function of its conflict with Messenia."___

2015-07-28 20:17:42 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

I'll give you something to cry about, you little shit.

Nighty night x

I'll give you something to cry about, you little shit.

Nighty night x___

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2015-07-28 16:36:59 (4 comments, 4 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

The corrupt Spanish government is also supporting fracking.
Energy Storage Is The Real Target Of Spain's New Tax On The Sun
"To add insult to injury, the proposed legislation also says that anyone who violates the self-consumption rules would be subject to fines of as much as $68 million. To put this in perspective, the $68 million fine is double the size of the maximum fine allowed for leaking radioactive nuclear waste, according to an analysis by PV Tech."
"For the past five years, the Spanish government has aggressively rolled back subsidies for renewable energy technologies. The impact has been especially adverse for the solar power industry."

The corrupt Spanish government is also supporting fracking.
Energy Storage Is The Real Target Of Spain's New Tax On The Sun
"To add insult to injury, the proposed legislation also says that anyone who violates the self-consumption rules would be subject to fines of as much as $68 million. To put this in perspective, the $68 million fine is double the size of the maximum fine allowed for leaking radioactive nuclear waste, according to an analysis by PV Tech."
"For the past five years, the Spanish government has aggressively rolled back subsidies for renewable energy technologies. The impact has been especially adverse for the solar power industry."___

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2015-07-28 04:58:37 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 14 +1s)Open 

Via +Ancient History Encyclopedia 
DNA Study Pinpoints When The Ancient Greeks Colonized Sicily And Italy
"Archaeologists have long known of Greek colonization of Magna Graecia, the name given to the coastal areas of Southern Italy and Sicily, thanks to artifacts and historical records. Somewhere around the 8th century BC, Greeks came in droves to settle Magna Graecia, bringing with them traces of a civilization that heavily influenced ancient Rome."
"New DNA research, though, purports to have solved the mystery: an influx of a few thousand men and a few hundred women in the Archaic period may have been enough to effect Hellenic colonization of Magna Graecia."
"Previous DNA analyses have been interpreted to bolster various hypotheses as well. Tofanelli and colleagues find fault with these studies of Greek colonization primarily because those studies used... more »

Via +Ancient History Encyclopedia 
DNA Study Pinpoints When The Ancient Greeks Colonized Sicily And Italy
"Archaeologists have long known of Greek colonization of Magna Graecia, the name given to the coastal areas of Southern Italy and Sicily, thanks to artifacts and historical records. Somewhere around the 8th century BC, Greeks came in droves to settle Magna Graecia, bringing with them traces of a civilization that heavily influenced ancient Rome."
"New DNA research, though, purports to have solved the mystery: an influx of a few thousand men and a few hundred women in the Archaic period may have been enough to effect Hellenic colonization of Magna Graecia."
"Previous DNA analyses have been interpreted to bolster various hypotheses as well. Tofanelli and colleagues find fault with these studies of Greek colonization primarily because those studies used specific lineages or haplotypes as markers of colonization, and these contemporary genomes may not accurately reflect the genes that were present in ancient populations.  To counter this, Tofanelli and colleagues used both Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA analysis and created demographic models to simulate genetic change over time. In particular, they looked for robust gene signatures for Greek contributions to Italy and Sicily, they tested alternative models, and they looked at the relative contributions of males versus females to find out more about the colonizing population."___

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2015-07-27 16:40:10 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

In the current prevailing atmosphere of cynicism, where the electorate have been betrayed time after time, authentic people of principle are more electable than those who adjust themselves according to opinion polls. We have become much better at spotting the difference between cheap veneers and real wood. I would prefer a leader carved out of a solid block of the right qualities, even if not completely to my liking, rather than one trying to fill a brittle, hollow leader-suit designed by a focus group with hot air.

Another piece from Alex worth reading.

It takes epic levels of stupidity to turn 150,000 new activists, paying money to join your party inspired by one of the leadership candidates, into some sort of crisis because they're the wrong sort of leftie. There is not a party in the world that wouldn't be cheering. It also takes an astounding lack of political antennae to be blind to the fact that, by acting with such naked hostility towards them, you precipitate a split whatever the result.___In the current prevailing atmosphere of cynicism, where the electorate have been betrayed time after time, authentic people of principle are more electable than those who adjust themselves according to opinion polls. We have become much better at spotting the difference between cheap veneers and real wood. I would prefer a leader carved out of a solid block of the right qualities, even if not completely to my liking, rather than one trying to fill a brittle, hollow leader-suit designed by a focus group with hot air.

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2015-07-26 13:33:06 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

Pavlopetri. A Bronze Age port city.
[Wikipedia]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pavlopetri

"The city of Pavlopetri (Greek: Παυλοπέτρι), underwater off the coast of southern Laconia in Peloponnese, Greece, is about 5,000 years old, and is the oldest submerged archeological town site."
"Originally, the ruins were dated to the Mycenaean period, 1600–1100 BC but later studies showed an older occupation date starting no later than 2800 BC, so it also includes early Bronze Age middle Minoan and transitional material. It is now believed that the town was submerged around 1000 BC by the first of three earthquakes that the area suffered. The area never re-emerged, so it was neither built-over nor disrupted by agriculture."

Pavlopetri: A window on to Bronze Age suburban life
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-15191614
"Semi... more »

Pavlopetri. A Bronze Age port city.
[Wikipedia]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pavlopetri

"The city of Pavlopetri (Greek: Παυλοπέτρι), underwater off the coast of southern Laconia in Peloponnese, Greece, is about 5,000 years old, and is the oldest submerged archeological town site."
"Originally, the ruins were dated to the Mycenaean period, 1600–1100 BC but later studies showed an older occupation date starting no later than 2800 BC, so it also includes early Bronze Age middle Minoan and transitional material. It is now believed that the town was submerged around 1000 BC by the first of three earthquakes that the area suffered. The area never re-emerged, so it was neither built-over nor disrupted by agriculture."

Pavlopetri: A window on to Bronze Age suburban life
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-15191614

"Semi-detached houses with gardens, clothes drying in the courtyards, walls and well-made streets - Pavlopetri epitomises the suburban way of life. Except that it's a Bronze Age port, submerged for millennia off the south-east coast of Greece."___

2015-07-25 18:35:54 (17 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Our present policy is heading straight for disaster.

Our present policy is heading straight for disaster.___

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2015-07-24 07:44:04 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

After the Battle of Leuctra, Thebes succeeded Sparta in the supremacy in Greece (371 - 362 BC)
The sacred band of Thebes entirely made up of male lovers
"Most histories credit Gorgidas, the chief officer of Boeotia, with the founding of the Sacred Band in 378 B.C., at about the time the Boeotians expelled the Spartans from the Theban citadel."
"Many believe that Gorgidas hand picked the Band’s couples, each comprised of an erastes (the older man, called “lover”) and eromenos (the younger male, called “beloved.”). Although each pair had an older and a younger, it seems that there was not that great of an age discrepancy between the two: according to one scholar, males in the battalion were only made full members after they reached age 20 or 21, and that after age 30, veterans were mustered out."
"At the Battle of Leuctra in 371 B.C., the SacredBand help... more »

After the Battle of Leuctra, Thebes succeeded Sparta in the supremacy in Greece (371 - 362 BC)
The sacred band of Thebes entirely made up of male lovers
"Most histories credit Gorgidas, the chief officer of Boeotia, with the founding of the Sacred Band in 378 B.C., at about the time the Boeotians expelled the Spartans from the Theban citadel."
"Many believe that Gorgidas hand picked the Band’s couples, each comprised of an erastes (the older man, called “lover”) and eromenos (the younger male, called “beloved.”). Although each pair had an older and a younger, it seems that there was not that great of an age discrepancy between the two: according to one scholar, males in the battalion were only made full members after they reached age 20 or 21, and that after age 30, veterans were mustered out."
"At the Battle of Leuctra in 371 B.C., the Sacred Band helped Thebes end Spartan domination of the region."
"The end of the Sacred Band corresponded with Philip II of Macedonia’s defeat of the Greek city-states in 338 BC."___

2015-07-22 21:40:23 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

We have to pull out all the stops to avert disaster.

Also, we have to pick up the clothes from the clothesline, lest there is a storm.

Nighty night x

We have to pull out all the stops to avert disaster.

Also, we have to pick up the clothes from the clothesline, lest there is a storm.

Nighty night x___

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2015-07-22 08:10:08 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Russians, Poles, impostors, murders, power struggles, Catholics vs Orthodox
The Time of Troubles (1598 - 1613)
From the death of the last Tsar of the Rurik dynasty to the beginning of the Romanovs.

Russians, Poles, impostors, murders, power struggles, Catholics vs Orthodox
The Time of Troubles (1598 - 1613)
From the death of the last Tsar of the Rurik dynasty to the beginning of the Romanovs.___

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2015-07-22 05:52:49 (10 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

#TsiprasTheTraitor   #TsiprasTheClown  
Tsipras' smile is wonderful
I think Tsipras has sold his soul to the banks and that it has been a defeat for the real left, which should stand up to the "too big to fail" bastards.
At the end, no matter how much they want the euro, they are going to come a cropper, and fall in an alarming black hole.
From my point of view, Tsipras has committed suicide, not of himself, but of the Greeks.
The staunchest enemy of austerity has brought home three fold austerity measures. I think the left in Europe should immediately condemn to infamy this traitor to the most basic political principles of equality and social justice.
Is it not clear that he has to pass the legislation imposed by the banksters with the support of the opposition (right wing opposition), isn't that symptomatic of something very wrong withh... more »

#TsiprasTheTraitor   #TsiprasTheClown  
Tsipras' smile is wonderful
I think Tsipras has sold his soul to the banks and that it has been a defeat for the real left, which should stand up to the "too big to fail" bastards.
At the end, no matter how much they want the euro, they are going to come a cropper, and fall in an alarming black hole.
From my point of view, Tsipras has committed suicide, not of himself, but of the Greeks.
The staunchest enemy of austerity has brought home three fold austerity measures. I think the left in Europe should immediately condemn to infamy this traitor to the most basic political principles of equality and social justice.
Is it not clear that he has to pass the legislation imposed by the banksters with the support of the opposition (right wing opposition), isn't that symptomatic of something very wrong with him?
Because in the end, his policies are going to increase the power of banksters over the people. That is what counts, not that he looks kind and nice, but the real consequences of his mandate, and the tricky policies he is now imposing in order to get the IMF and the banksters' approval.
We are not getting rid of the greedy bastards allowing them to increase debt, submission and more austerity. There is a dire need of a more energetic response and not letting the bastards win.
What is left to the left in this state of money lenders and toxic derivatives Europe has become?

Via +Andres Soolo:
The Firesale Begins: Tsipras Agrees To Sell Greek Assets
http://beforeitsnews.com/alternative/2015/07/the-firesale-begins-tsipras-agrees-to-sell-greek-assets-3187848.html

Many, after the unbelievable negotiations, talked about the treaty of Versailles and things like that. However the first image that came to my mind was this:___

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2015-07-22 04:34:57 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Sooner or later, bad harvests would entail not paying the debt and their body rights being evicted.
Hektemoroi
"The hektemoroi were dependent farmers who cultivated the land of the privileged on condition that they would yield 1/6 of the produce instead of a rent. Aristotle informs us that the hektemoroi or the legally dependent could be sold as slaves, should they not pay the agreed proportion."

Sooner or later, bad harvests would entail not paying the debt and their body rights being evicted.
Hektemoroi
"The hektemoroi were dependent farmers who cultivated the land of the privileged on condition that they would yield 1/6 of the produce instead of a rent. Aristotle informs us that the hektemoroi or the legally dependent could be sold as slaves, should they not pay the agreed proportion."___

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2015-07-21 14:47:01 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

The Cascadia quake
"Ian Madin, who directs the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI), estimates that seventy-five per cent of all structures in the state are not designed to withstand a major Cascadia quake. FEMA calculates that, across the region, something on the order of a million buildings—more than three thousand of them schools—will collapse or be compromised in the earthquake. So will half of all highway bridges, fifteen of the seventeen bridges spanning Portland’s two rivers, and two-thirds of railways and airports; also, one-third of all fire stations, half of all police stations, and two-thirds of all hospitals."
"Certain disasters stem from many small problems conspiring to cause one very large problem. For want of a nail, the war was lost; for fifteen independently insignificant errors, the jetliner was lost. Subduction-zoneearth... more »

Bye +Timquavion Washington.___The Cascadia quake
"Ian Madin, who directs the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI), estimates that seventy-five per cent of all structures in the state are not designed to withstand a major Cascadia quake. FEMA calculates that, across the region, something on the order of a million buildings—more than three thousand of them schools—will collapse or be compromised in the earthquake. So will half of all highway bridges, fifteen of the seventeen bridges spanning Portland’s two rivers, and two-thirds of railways and airports; also, one-third of all fire stations, half of all police stations, and two-thirds of all hospitals."
"Certain disasters stem from many small problems conspiring to cause one very large problem. For want of a nail, the war was lost; for fifteen independently insignificant errors, the jetliner was lost. Subduction-zone earthquakes operate on the opposite principle: one enormous problem causes many other enormous problems. The shaking from the Cascadia quake will set off landslides throughout the region—up to thirty thousand of them in Seattle alone, the city’s emergency-management office estimates. It will also induce a process called liquefaction, whereby seemingly solid ground starts behaving like a liquid, to the detriment of anything on top of it. Fifteen per cent of Seattle is built on liquefiable land, including seventeen day-care centers and the homes of some thirty-four thousand five hundred people. So is Oregon’s critical energy-infrastructure hub, a six-mile stretch of Portland through which flows ninety per cent of the state’s liquid fuel and which houses everything from electrical substations to natural-gas terminals. Together, the sloshing, sliding, and shaking will trigger fires, flooding, pipe failures, dam breaches, and hazardous-material spills. Any one of these second-order disasters could swamp the original earthquake in terms of cost, damage, or casualties—and one of them definitely will. Four to six minutes after the dogs start barking, the shaking will subside. For another few minutes, the region, upended, will continue to fall apart on its own. Then the wave will arrive, and the real destruction will begin."

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2015-07-21 05:48:03 (15 comments, 2 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Congealed fat clogging the sewers...
Beneath London, There's A Revolting Battle To Keep The Sewers Free Of 'Fatbergs'
"Every day beneath the streets of London, sewer technicians are fighting a grim war against giant 'fatbergs' which clog the system and threaten to regurgitate putrid waste back into people's homes."
"The problem gets worse at Christmas, when two extra Olympic-sized swimming pools of turkey fat are poured down Londoners' sinks."
"It's about the nastiest stuff you can get. The diarrhoea stuff is a pleasure compared to this," he added, tapping a spade on the thick fat layer engulfing his thighs.
"Fungi grow on the crust, which looks like solidified vomit. Walking through it leaves a wake like an icebreaker ship."

An exemple:
10-tonne fatberg removed from west London sewer

Congealed fat clogging the sewers...
Beneath London, There's A Revolting Battle To Keep The Sewers Free Of 'Fatbergs'
"Every day beneath the streets of London, sewer technicians are fighting a grim war against giant 'fatbergs' which clog the system and threaten to regurgitate putrid waste back into people's homes."
"The problem gets worse at Christmas, when two extra Olympic-sized swimming pools of turkey fat are poured down Londoners' sinks."
"It's about the nastiest stuff you can get. The diarrhoea stuff is a pleasure compared to this," he added, tapping a spade on the thick fat layer engulfing his thighs.
"Fungi grow on the crust, which looks like solidified vomit. Walking through it leaves a wake like an icebreaker ship."

An exemple:
10-tonne fatberg removed from west London sewer___

2015-07-20 20:35:25 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

Every underground labyrinth has its monster.

Nighty night x

Every underground labyrinth has its monster.

Nighty night x___

posted image

2015-07-20 06:00:10 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Coins in ancient Greece
"Ever wonder why our coins today look the way they do? How the basis for the decoration of coins developed? Today, most bills and coins alike share the common pattern of depicting the profile or bust of a ruler on the obverse, while the reverse bears the image of an important civic symbol - be it a building or an animal. This tradition began with the ancient Greeks."
"The poleis were fiercely independent, even when they were ruled by tyrants or dominated by Hellenistic kings, and their coins are eloquent testimony to their autonomy. Almost from their earliest appearance Greek coins used a combination of figures, symbols, and inscriptions to emphasize the independence and individuality of the poleis, depicting their patron deities and heroes, products, and even visual puns on the cities' names."
·The earliest coins appeared simultaneously... more »

Coins in ancient Greece
"Ever wonder why our coins today look the way they do? How the basis for the decoration of coins developed? Today, most bills and coins alike share the common pattern of depicting the profile or bust of a ruler on the obverse, while the reverse bears the image of an important civic symbol - be it a building or an animal. This tradition began with the ancient Greeks."
"The poleis were fiercely independent, even when they were ruled by tyrants or dominated by Hellenistic kings, and their coins are eloquent testimony to their autonomy. Almost from their earliest appearance Greek coins used a combination of figures, symbols, and inscriptions to emphasize the independence and individuality of the poleis, depicting their patron deities and heroes, products, and even visual puns on the cities' names."
·The earliest coins appeared simultaneously in two places; China and western Asia Minor in the late seventh century B.C. Whether they were invented by the Ionian Greeks or by the neighbouring Lydians will probably never be known, but it was the Greeks who spread coinage throughout the Mediterranean, introducing it to many non-Greek peoples with whom they came in contact."
"At first, Greek coins were stamped with designs, which numismatists call "types," only on the front or obverse, and the reverse carried the impression of the punch used to stamp the metal into the obverse die. By the end of the sixth century the punch also carried a die for the reverse, and from this point onward most Greek coins had types on both sides."
"The first silver coins, whose shapes were either elongated or round, were minted on the island of Aegina by order of the benevolent tyrant of Argos, Pheidon. He was the Head of the Amphyctiony (the confederation of the 7 Doric Greek city-States that included Aegina) and the first to determine weights and measures for both liquids and dry goods. The inhabitants of Aegina were famous as merchants and seafarers; they carried on a lively trade with the Ionians and since the Ionian coins facilitated trade remarkably, the Aegians soon adopted coinage. The motif on the coins of Aegina was a sea turtle - the island was a major sea power, and the turtle seemed to be an appropriate symbol. The turtle-coins of Aegina were widely used and very popular. They were commonly known as "turtles" - a slang expression still used in German language, today meaning "a few bucks", or "peanuts.""
"In about 510 BC Athens began producing a fine silver tetradrachm (four drachm) coin. The Athenians of the pre-numismatic era employed the obol as a currency, which was nothing more than a small iron rod. About six obols could fit into the average adult grasp, and therefore six obols became the drachma by a rule of grammar. The word derives quite logically from the Greek verb dratto - to grasp. Thus drachma in old Greek really means "the graspable" (or a handful). The tetradrachm, with the owl's head stamped on it, was the first great trade coin in the world circulating from 510 to 38 BC."___

posted image

2015-07-20 04:55:37 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Ghostly Faces and Invisible Verse Found in Medieval Text
"The Black Book of Carmarthen," dating to 1250, contains texts from the ninth through 12th centuries, including some of the earliest references to Arthur and Merlin.

Ghostly Faces and Invisible Verse Found in Medieval Text
"The Black Book of Carmarthen," dating to 1250, contains texts from the ninth through 12th centuries, including some of the earliest references to Arthur and Merlin.___

posted image

2015-07-19 20:16:06 (19 comments, 1 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

I'm watching Ex Machina
Everybody seems to love that movie. However I think I'm just gonna despise it. I'm already in the middle of the movie, I think that - for ethical critique - I will watch it to the end, no matter how cringing, revolting, uninteresting and annoying this bad movie is.
As I understand it, Jay, the "genius" is a member of the Islamic State doing his prick things, and besides being an arshole he creates a disgusting machine pretending to be feminine enough to attract the dumbass Caleb who finds himself trapped in his most stupid sexual fantasies.
I hope that in the end, Caleb kills Jay and commits suicide, and the AVA annoying machine ends up crushed some way or another, Kyoko leaves after setting fire to that ugly hyper hipster modern nasty complex/mansion and starts learning English, and that I can say that I watched this crappy movie to the... more »

I'm watching Ex Machina
Everybody seems to love that movie. However I think I'm just gonna despise it. I'm already in the middle of the movie, I think that - for ethical critique - I will watch it to the end, no matter how cringing, revolting, uninteresting and annoying this bad movie is.
As I understand it, Jay, the "genius" is a member of the Islamic State doing his prick things, and besides being an arshole he creates a disgusting machine pretending to be feminine enough to attract the dumbass Caleb who finds himself trapped in his most stupid sexual fantasies.
I hope that in the end, Caleb kills Jay and commits suicide, and the AVA annoying machine ends up crushed some way or another, Kyoko leaves after setting fire to that ugly hyper hipster modern nasty complex/mansion and starts learning English, and that I can say that I watched this crappy movie to the end, even if I think it's smelly sh*t.

P.S: With some twists and turns the movie goes from bad to worse to an unexpected disappointing end.
I give it a 2 out of 10.___

posted image

2015-07-19 07:30:01 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Salamanders & Newts
"They have no scales, claws or external ear openings, and they lay eggs that are surrounded by clear jelly. The larva are sometimes confused with the frog tadpoles, but their heads do not get as large as the tadpole's heads. Salamanders have 4 toes on their front feet where lizards have five."

Salamanders & Newts
"They have no scales, claws or external ear openings, and they lay eggs that are surrounded by clear jelly. The larva are sometimes confused with the frog tadpoles, but their heads do not get as large as the tadpole's heads. Salamanders have 4 toes on their front feet where lizards have five."___

2015-07-18 22:30:22 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

I don't intend to wait on you hand and foot.

Nighty night x

I don't intend to wait on you hand and foot.

Nighty night x___

2015-07-17 22:44:11 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Space junk.

Nighty night x

Space junk.

Nighty night x___

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2015-07-17 09:26:59 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Carthaginian Hanno The Navigator (6th - 5th century BC)
"In the annals of great explorers, there is one name that is often overlooked – that of the Carthanginian Periplus of Hanno – later known to the Greeks as Hanno the Navigator . Neither a Greek nor a Roman, but a free man of Carthage and perhaps one of the great unheralded navigators the world has ever known."
"Hanno left Carthage with a fleet of sixty rowing ships for the purpose of colonizing the unknown territories of Northern and Western Africa."
"Passing through the Pillars of Hercules (between modern day Gibraltar and Tangiers, Morocco) the fleet set out into the Atlantic Ocean and turned south."
"They founded a city called Thumiaterion at approximately modern day Safi, Morocco. From there, having left a number of settlers, he continued Southward to the isle of Cerne."&... more »

Carthaginian Hanno The Navigator (6th - 5th century BC)
"In the annals of great explorers, there is one name that is often overlooked – that of the Carthanginian Periplus of Hanno – later known to the Greeks as Hanno the Navigator . Neither a Greek nor a Roman, but a free man of Carthage and perhaps one of the great unheralded navigators the world has ever known."
"Hanno left Carthage with a fleet of sixty rowing ships for the purpose of colonizing the unknown territories of Northern and Western Africa."
"Passing through the Pillars of Hercules (between modern day Gibraltar and Tangiers, Morocco) the fleet set out into the Atlantic Ocean and turned south."
"They founded a city called Thumiaterion at approximately modern day Safi, Morocco. From there, having left a number of settlers, he continued Southward to the isle of Cerne."
"From Cerne, Hanno sailed back to the mainland and found a large river. Judging by the descriptions of the animals and landscape, we can assume that he was in modern day Senegal or perhaps The Gambia.  He encountered not only elephants, reed filled lakes, crocodiles, and hippopotomai, but also hostile natives that drove he and his settlers back to Cerne."
"This is as far as Hanno reached before returning to Carthage with Atlas lions and stories of wonder. He left seven colonies behind (all in modern day Morocco) and presumably returned with much lighter ships. It is no wonder that Hanno became king of the Carthaginians. History knows him as Hanno II of Carthage."___

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2015-07-15 20:37:02 (12 comments, 1 reshares, 18 +1s)Open 

From around 400 BC or later.
Bog bodies are kings sacrificed by Celts says expert
Cutting the nipples was more than torture, the aim was to dethrone the king. "Sucking a king’s nipples was a gesture of submission in ancient Ireland," says Kelly. "Cutting them would have made him incapable of kingship in this world or the next."

From around 400 BC or later.
Bog bodies are kings sacrificed by Celts says expert
Cutting the nipples was more than torture, the aim was to dethrone the king. "Sucking a king’s nipples was a gesture of submission in ancient Ireland," says Kelly. "Cutting them would have made him incapable of kingship in this world or the next."___

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2015-07-15 14:31:16 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Legend has it that a parrot who talked all the swearing and cussing learnt from the seamen never spoke again.
The bombardment of Scarborough 1914
Under the cover of darkness a powerful German naval battle group negotiated the hazardous minefields of the North Sea, its target was the still slumbering north-east coastal towns of Scarborough and Hartlepool.
"That fateful morning 18 people fell victim to the German attack, either killed instantly, as in the case of the 14-month-old baby boy John Shields Ryalls, or who died later as a result of their wounds like shoemaker Henry Harland."

Legend has it that a parrot who talked all the swearing and cussing learnt from the seamen never spoke again.
The bombardment of Scarborough 1914
Under the cover of darkness a powerful German naval battle group negotiated the hazardous minefields of the North Sea, its target was the still slumbering north-east coastal towns of Scarborough and Hartlepool.
"That fateful morning 18 people fell victim to the German attack, either killed instantly, as in the case of the 14-month-old baby boy John Shields Ryalls, or who died later as a result of their wounds like shoemaker Henry Harland."___

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2015-07-15 04:26:42 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

The Peace of Callias (c. 449 BC or never)
http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/History/PeaceOfCallias.html
"The Peace of Callias was established around 449 BC between the Delian League (led by Athens) and Persia, ending the Persian Wars."
"It is possible that the treaty never officially existed. Thucydides did not mention it, and Plutarch thought it had either been signed after the Battle of the Eurymedon in 466 BC, or that it had never been signed at all."

The Peace of Callias (c. 449 BC or never)
http://www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/History/PeaceOfCallias.html
"The Peace of Callias was established around 449 BC between the Delian League (led by Athens) and Persia, ending the Persian Wars."
"It is possible that the treaty never officially existed. Thucydides did not mention it, and Plutarch thought it had either been signed after the Battle of the Eurymedon in 466 BC, or that it had never been signed at all."___

2015-07-14 14:35:28 (13 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

After seeing the image, I can definitely say that I hate Pluto. A lot. 
http://www.theverge.com/2015/7/14/8958079/nasa-new-horizons-pluto-color-image

After seeing the image, I can definitely say that I hate Pluto. A lot. 
http://www.theverge.com/2015/7/14/8958079/nasa-new-horizons-pluto-color-image___

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2015-07-14 06:27:08 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

A bridge story.
The Medieval Exe Bridge (Exeter, South West England)
"Along with the cathedral, castle and the city walls, the medieval Exe Bridge is one of Exeter's major monuments of the Middle Ages. It's likely that there was a wooden Roman bridge spanning the river at the important civitas of Isca Dumnoniorum. It's now believed that Roman influence extended much further west of Exeter than had previously been thought. Excavations in 2011 at Ipplepen, 16 miles west of Exeter, revealed a previously unknown large Romano-British settlement made up of roundhouses and the remains of a Roman road. This settlement was populated by the native Britons who probably traded with the newly-arrived Romans following the establishment of the fortress at Exeter c. 55 AD."
"Work on the medieval stone bridge was probably in progress by 1190."
"The river at... more »

A bridge story.
The Medieval Exe Bridge (Exeter, South West England)
"Along with the cathedral, castle and the city walls, the medieval Exe Bridge is one of Exeter's major monuments of the Middle Ages. It's likely that there was a wooden Roman bridge spanning the river at the important civitas of Isca Dumnoniorum. It's now believed that Roman influence extended much further west of Exeter than had previously been thought. Excavations in 2011 at Ipplepen, 16 miles west of Exeter, revealed a previously unknown large Romano-British settlement made up of roundhouses and the remains of a Roman road. This settlement was populated by the native Britons who probably traded with the newly-arrived Romans following the establishment of the fortress at Exeter c. 55 AD."
"Work on the medieval stone bridge was probably in progress by 1190."
"The river at Exeter has changed so much over the last thousand years that it's difficult to imagine what it was like in the 12th century but it was once much wider and much shallower than it is today with marshes on either side. It was also a tidal river and at certain times of the day in summer the decreased flow of the water would've exposed glistening mudflats."
"The dangers described by Hooker probably came from trying to ford the river in carts and on horseback as well as the frequent destruction of the wooden footbridge by violent winter floods."
"The construction of the stone bridge probably took about 50 years to complete with work ending c. 1238."
"Almost from the moment of its construction the bridge was subjected to numerous floods."
"The idea of a medieval bridge covered in properties is one we usually associate with the old London Bridge and it seems strange that such a thing might've existed at Exeter, especially given that the maximum width of the medieval bridge was only just over five metres with a carriageway of only 3.5 metres. But these houses certainly were built and a number of them survived until end of the 19th century."___

2015-07-13 22:27:41 (15 comments, 0 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Airway, breathing, circulation.
I'm going to bed.

Nighty night x

Airway, breathing, circulation.
I'm going to bed.

Nighty night x___

2015-07-13 13:18:36 (11 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

A ticking German bomb. 67 trillion euros... Deutsche bank...
Eurozone is ready to explode, but probably not for the reasons you think
"Only Deutsche Bank, the largest bank in Germany, is significantly exposed, holding dubious financial products known as "derivatives", worth 67 trillion euros. This amount is similar to the GDP of the entire world and 20 times greater than the GDP of Germany. Any comparison with the situation of the bank Lehman Brothers in 2008 would not be irrelevant. Just when Lehman Brothers went bankrupt, had available derivatives of only 31.5 trillion. The crisis of 2008 confirmed the concise definition of derivatives as proposed by the American tycoon Warren Buffet: «financial weapons of mass destruction."
But perhaps the intensive efforts of the German leadership, highlighting the crisis of the European periphery economies (Greece, Spain... more »

German Scheiße on the way...

"Wolfgang Schäuble and the German leadership of the eurozone have good reasons to worry, maintaining an uncompromising attitude in the negotiations with Greece. But the repayment of Greek debt, which amounts to EUR 317 billion, is not one of the most important ones. The Greek debt is insignificant in comparison with the financial dynamite of the German (and other) banks, which in recent months gives more daily ignition signs.

Only Deutsche Bank, the largest bank in Germany, is significantly exposed, holding dubious financial products known as "derivatives", worth 67 trillion euros. This amount is similar to the GDP of the entire world and 20 times greater than the GDP of Germany. Any comparison with the situation of the bank Lehman Brothers in 2008 would not be irrelevant. Just when Lehman Brothers went bankrupt, had available derivatives of only 31.5 trillion. The crisis of 2008 confirmed the concise definition of derivatives as proposed by the American tycoon Warren Buffet: «financial weapons of mass destruction."

2008 may now be a past, but recent developments are particularly bleak for Deutsche Bank. The competent authorities of the US and Britain imposed on the bank in April a fine record (which, together with a previous fine, are EUR 2.2 billion in total) for fraudulent interbank rates. In early June, two co-CEOs suddenly resigned. Four former bank executives had been prosecuted by the German judicial authorities for false statements and misleading testimonies. A few days later, prosecutors raided the bank's offices in Frankfurt to collect customer data."___A ticking German bomb. 67 trillion euros... Deutsche bank...
Eurozone is ready to explode, but probably not for the reasons you think
"Only Deutsche Bank, the largest bank in Germany, is significantly exposed, holding dubious financial products known as "derivatives", worth 67 trillion euros. This amount is similar to the GDP of the entire world and 20 times greater than the GDP of Germany. Any comparison with the situation of the bank Lehman Brothers in 2008 would not be irrelevant. Just when Lehman Brothers went bankrupt, had available derivatives of only 31.5 trillion. The crisis of 2008 confirmed the concise definition of derivatives as proposed by the American tycoon Warren Buffet: «financial weapons of mass destruction."
But perhaps the intensive efforts of the German leadership, highlighting the crisis of the European periphery economies (Greece, Spain etc.), as the main problem of the eurozone, are simply a smokescreen to cover the inherent instability of the financial system. Because as the developments have shown so far, the primary objective of European leaders is to protect banks.

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2015-07-13 09:23:37 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Solon's invention: Seisachtheia (594 BC)
[Wikipedia]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seisachtheia
The seisachtheia laws immediately cancelled all outstanding debts, retroactively emancipated all previously enslaved debtors, reinstated all confiscated serf property to the hektemoroi, and forbade the use of personal freedom as collateral in all future debts.
Seisachtheia (Greek: σεισάχθεια, from σείειν seiein, to shake, and ἄχθος achthos, burden, i.e. the relief of burdens) was a set of laws instituted by the Athenian lawmaker Solon (c. 638 BC–558 BC) in order to rectify the widespread serfdom and slavery that had run rampant in Athens by the 6th century BC, by debt relief.
"Under the pre-existing legal status, according to the account of the Constitution of the Athenians attributed to Aristotle, debtors unable to repay their creditorswould surrender their l... more »

Solon's invention: Seisachtheia (594 BC)
[Wikipedia]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seisachtheia
The seisachtheia laws immediately cancelled all outstanding debts, retroactively emancipated all previously enslaved debtors, reinstated all confiscated serf property to the hektemoroi, and forbade the use of personal freedom as collateral in all future debts.
Seisachtheia (Greek: σεισάχθεια, from σείειν seiein, to shake, and ἄχθος achthos, burden, i.e. the relief of burdens) was a set of laws instituted by the Athenian lawmaker Solon (c. 638 BC–558 BC) in order to rectify the widespread serfdom and slavery that had run rampant in Athens by the 6th century BC, by debt relief.
"Under the pre-existing legal status, according to the account of the Constitution of the Athenians attributed to Aristotle, debtors unable to repay their creditors would surrender their land to them, then becoming hektemoroi, i.e. serfs who cultivated what used to be their own land and gave one sixth of produce to their creditors."
"Should the debt exceed the perceived value of debtor's total assets, then the debtor and his family would become the creditor's slaves as well. The same would result if a man defaulted on a debt whose collateral was the debtor's personal freedom."


Pic: Solon supporting justice (1672) by Noel Coype.___

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2015-07-13 08:44:56 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

This is stupid sarcasm, but still...
I bet the NO (OXI) would win by 61.31 %
I couldn't help laughing while making this ridiculous meme.

This is stupid sarcasm, but still...
I bet the NO (OXI) would win by 61.31 %
I couldn't help laughing while making this ridiculous meme.___

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2015-07-13 06:17:25 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

He fought a cow.
In the Footsteps of Ivarr the Boneless (AD 794 - 873)
"Most of the information that exists about Ivarr inn beinlausi - Ivarr the Boneless - comes from the Scandinavian saga tradition. In particular it comes from Ragnar's saga - the tale that recounts the exploits of his father, the Danish king Ragnarr Lothbrok ('Leather or Hairy Breeches'), a famous Viking hero who led the sack of Paris in AD 845."
"At the same time as describing Ivarr's physical disability, the Norse sagas emphasise his extraordinary wisdom. Whereas his brother Ubbi is identified as having great physical strength and courage, Ivarr's mental dexterity is always stressed: 'It is doubtful if anyone has ever been wiser than he.' He is also credited with extraordinary cunning, and is described as a master of strategy and tactics in battle. The more powerful his... more »

He fought a cow.
In the Footsteps of Ivarr the Boneless (AD 794 - 873)
"Most of the information that exists about Ivarr inn beinlausi - Ivarr the Boneless - comes from the Scandinavian saga tradition. In particular it comes from Ragnar's saga - the tale that recounts the exploits of his father, the Danish king Ragnarr Lothbrok ('Leather or Hairy Breeches'), a famous Viking hero who led the sack of Paris in AD 845."
"At the same time as describing Ivarr's physical disability, the Norse sagas emphasise his extraordinary wisdom. Whereas his brother Ubbi is identified as having great physical strength and courage, Ivarr's mental dexterity is always stressed: 'It is doubtful if anyone has ever been wiser than he.' He is also credited with extraordinary cunning, and is described as a master of strategy and tactics in battle. The more powerful his mind was thought to be, the more his physical weakness was emphasised."
"However, Ivarr's disability does not seem to have prevented him from fighting. Indeed, Ragnars saga emphasises his extreme upper-body strength, suggesting an almost superhuman might and alluding to powers of sorcery. In a battle against King Eysteinn of Sweden, Ivarr is said to have secured victory by defeating a bewitched cow named Sibilja. In the saga, he orders his men to carry him towards the terrible beast; he then blinds it by firing two arrows from a longbow as large as a tree trunk, which he drew back 'as if it were only a weak elm twig'."___

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2015-07-12 06:08:48 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Hippias

Hippias___

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2015-07-11 15:18:59 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

9-foot tall Ivar the Boneless' skeleton was never found, but the other findings are impressive.
Viking Repton (9th century AD)
"250 year-old reports of a mass burial discovered around 1686 by a labourer named Thomas Walker who was seeking stone in a close west of the church. The original account seemed so fantastical as to be beyond belief, but it stated that Walker found a two-roomed subterranean structure some 15 ft square, originally roofed by 'decayed wooden joyces'.  Inside, the astonished rustic found a stone coffin, containing 'a Skeleton of a Humane Body Nine Foot long.'"

9-foot tall Ivar the Boneless' skeleton was never found, but the other findings are impressive.
Viking Repton (9th century AD)
"250 year-old reports of a mass burial discovered around 1686 by a labourer named Thomas Walker who was seeking stone in a close west of the church. The original account seemed so fantastical as to be beyond belief, but it stated that Walker found a two-roomed subterranean structure some 15 ft square, originally roofed by 'decayed wooden joyces'.  Inside, the astonished rustic found a stone coffin, containing 'a Skeleton of a Humane Body Nine Foot long.'"___

2015-07-10 10:36:00 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Rub the cotton bud up and down in the inside of your cheek, five times in each cheek.

Rub the cotton bud up and down in the inside of your cheek, five times in each cheek.___

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2015-07-10 05:53:26 (19 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Thomas Piketty: ‘Germany Has Never Repaid its Debts. It Has No Right to Lecture Greece’
"What struck me while I was writing is that Germany is really the single best example of a country that, throughout its history, has never repaid its external debt. Neither after the First nor the Second World War. However, it has frequently made other nations pay up, such as after the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, when it demanded massive reparations from France and indeed received them. The French state suffered for decades under this debt. The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice."

Modern Europe was built upon debt forgiveness.

Piketty: When I hear the Germans say that they maintain a very moral stance about debt and strongly believe that debts must be repaid, then I think: what a huge joke! Germany is the country that has never repaid its debts. It has no standing to lecture other nations. […]

ZEIT: Many Germans believe that the Greeks still have not recognized their mistakes and want to continue their free-spending ways.

Piketty: If we had told you Germans in the 1950s that you have not properly recognized your failures, you would still be repaying your debts. Luckily, we were more intelligent than that.___Thomas Piketty: ‘Germany Has Never Repaid its Debts. It Has No Right to Lecture Greece’
"What struck me while I was writing is that Germany is really the single best example of a country that, throughout its history, has never repaid its external debt. Neither after the First nor the Second World War. However, it has frequently made other nations pay up, such as after the Franco-Prussian War of 1870, when it demanded massive reparations from France and indeed received them. The French state suffered for decades under this debt. The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice."

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2015-07-09 06:05:23 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

A wanna-be tyrant.
Cylon Tries and Fails to Take Over Athens (632 BC)
"One of the disgruntled nobles was a man by the name of Cylon. Cylon was one of the Athenian nobles who took issue with the change in political system. Not only was he of the upper class, but he was well known in Athens as he was a winner of the Olympic Games."
"Cylon was inspired by his father-in-law Theagenes for his actions in taking control of Megara, so much in fact that he enlisted Theagenes’ help to take over Athens."
"Cylon was inspired by his father-in-law Theagenes for his actions in taking control of Megara, so much in fact that he enlisted Theagenes’ help to take over Athens."
"The magistrates stopped Cylon and forced him and his followers to retreat, who then ran to take cover in the Temple of Athena on the Acropolis."
"After being held upin ... more »

A wanna-be tyrant.
Cylon Tries and Fails to Take Over Athens (632 BC)
"One of the disgruntled nobles was a man by the name of Cylon. Cylon was one of the Athenian nobles who took issue with the change in political system. Not only was he of the upper class, but he was well known in Athens as he was a winner of the Olympic Games."
"Cylon was inspired by his father-in-law Theagenes for his actions in taking control of Megara, so much in fact that he enlisted Theagenes’ help to take over Athens."
"Cylon was inspired by his father-in-law Theagenes for his actions in taking control of Megara, so much in fact that he enlisted Theagenes’ help to take over Athens."
"The magistrates stopped Cylon and forced him and his followers to retreat, who then ran to take cover in the Temple of Athena on the Acropolis."
"After being held up in Athena’s temple, Cylon and his followers were persuaded by the Archons of Athens to leave the temple and stand trial. Cylon was promised his life would be spared if he appeared in court. However, shortly after Cylon and his men left the temple, they were stoned to death."___

2015-07-08 21:33:24 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

Loose lips sink ships.

Nighty night x

Loose lips sink ships.

Nighty night x___

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2015-07-08 05:17:48 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

He flaunted his genitals.
Hippocleides Doesn't Care
http://branemrys.blogspot.com.es/2007/02/hippocleides-doesnt-care.html
The tyrant Cleisthenes of Sycion (c. 600 - 560 BC) wasn't very impressed:
We are told by Herodotus that Cleisthenes of Sikyon had a daughter named Agariste, and, having won the chariot race in the Olympic Games, he sent out a proclamation telling all those who thought themselves fit to be a son-in-low to the great Cleisthenes to come by the sixtieth day to Sikyon. All the potential suitors of all the noble Hellenic families came. One of the Greeks from Athens, Hippocleides, the son of Tisander, was far and away the most promising suitor, being extremely wealthy and handsome and of good family. For an entire year Cleisthenes feasted them and tested them to see if they truly were worthy. When it came to the day the announcement of the victor was to be... more »

He flaunted his genitals.
Hippocleides Doesn't Care
http://branemrys.blogspot.com.es/2007/02/hippocleides-doesnt-care.html
The tyrant Cleisthenes of Sycion (c. 600 - 560 BC) wasn't very impressed:
We are told by Herodotus that Cleisthenes of Sikyon had a daughter named Agariste, and, having won the chariot race in the Olympic Games, he sent out a proclamation telling all those who thought themselves fit to be a son-in-low to the great Cleisthenes to come by the sixtieth day to Sikyon. All the potential suitors of all the noble Hellenic families came. One of the Greeks from Athens, Hippocleides, the son of Tisander, was far and away the most promising suitor, being extremely wealthy and handsome and of good family. For an entire year Cleisthenes feasted them and tested them to see if they truly were worthy. When it came to the day the announcement of the victor was to be made, Hippocleides was, we would say, far in the lead, and throughout the feast that day he was the star of the show.

At one point, however, he decided he would dance to the flute, and he did, to his great enjoyment. Cleisthenes, it is said, looked a bit doubtful at it. But Hippocleides was enjoying himself, and had a table brought in, so that he could dance on the table. Which he did, dancing now in one style, now in another, until finally he stood on his head and began dancing that way, gesticulating his legs wildly. Up to that point, Cleisthenes was merely annoyed that Hippocleides would be his son-in-law; but, apparently, the sight of the young man dancing on his head was too much, and he exclaimed, "You have danced away your marriage, son of Tisander!" To which Hippocleides replied, "Hippocleides doesn't care!" This passed into a proverb; and (largely through the influence of Herodotus) it's still a saying indicating indifference even to something major.

Of course, to get the full force of the story you have to remember that standing on your head is a bit more shocking if you are wearing the garb of ancient Greece than if you are wearing the sort of thing we wear today. They, after all, did not have pants. And I am told that there's usually thought to be a pun in the story based on this since the word Cleisthenes uses for 'dance' has a verbal similarity to the word for 'testicle'.


Pic:
Otto Steinmayer: Classic Ground. Feast of funnies from the ancients, New Straits Times, 1 April 1992 ___

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2015-07-07 05:53:00 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Coinage (6th - 5th centuries BC,  Asia Minor - Greece)
"Coins were introduced as a method of payment around the 6th or 5th century BC. The invention of coins is still shrouded in mystery: According to Herdotous (I, 94), coins were first minted by the Lydians, while Aristotle claims that the first coins were minted by Demodike of Kyrme, the wife of King Midas of Phrygia. Numismatists consider that the first coins were minted on the Greek island of Aegina, either by the local rulers or by king Pheidon of Argos."

Coinage (6th - 5th centuries BC,  Asia Minor - Greece)
"Coins were introduced as a method of payment around the 6th or 5th century BC. The invention of coins is still shrouded in mystery: According to Herdotous (I, 94), coins were first minted by the Lydians, while Aristotle claims that the first coins were minted by Demodike of Kyrme, the wife of King Midas of Phrygia. Numismatists consider that the first coins were minted on the Greek island of Aegina, either by the local rulers or by king Pheidon of Argos."___

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2015-07-06 04:08:08 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Cypselus, Periander, and Psammetichus.
Tyranny at Corinth (656 - 583 BC)
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0009%3Achapter%3D6%3Asection%3D17

"The Bacchiads became unpopular despite the city's prosperity because they ruled violently. Cypselus, himself an aristocrat whose mother was a Bacchiad, readied himself to take over by becoming popular with the masses."
"Corinth added to its economic strength during Cypselus' rule by exporting large quantities of fine pottery, especially to markets in Italy and Sicily."
"When Cypselus died in 625 BC., his son Periander succeeded him."
Periander "pursued commercial contacts with Egypt, an interest commemorated in the Egyptian name Psammetichus he gave to one of his sons."

In the pic: Corinthian Black Figure Olpe Adorned with Animals... more »

Cypselus, Periander, and Psammetichus.
Tyranny at Corinth (656 - 583 BC)
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0009%3Achapter%3D6%3Asection%3D17

"The Bacchiads became unpopular despite the city's prosperity because they ruled violently. Cypselus, himself an aristocrat whose mother was a Bacchiad, readied himself to take over by becoming popular with the masses."
"Corinth added to its economic strength during Cypselus' rule by exporting large quantities of fine pottery, especially to markets in Italy and Sicily."
"When Cypselus died in 625 BC., his son Periander succeeded him."
Periander "pursued commercial contacts with Egypt, an interest commemorated in the Egyptian name Psammetichus he gave to one of his sons."

In the pic: Corinthian Black Figure Olpe Adorned with Animals (c.620 BC)___

2015-07-05 21:50:10 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Boredom indicates a lack of inner resources.

Nighty night x

Boredom indicates a lack of inner resources.

Nighty night x___

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2015-07-05 19:30:47 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

A clarifying article published before the Greek referendum
Europe’s Attack on Greek Democracy
"Of course, the economics behind the program that the “troika” (the European Commission, the European Central Bank, and the International Monetary Fund) foisted on Greece five years ago has been abysmal, resulting in a 25% decline in the country’s GDP. I can think of no depression, ever, that has been so deliberate and had such catastrophic consequences: Greece’s rate of youth unemployment, for example, now exceeds 60%."
"It is startling that the troika has refused to accept responsibility for any of this or admit how bad its forecasts and models have been. But what is even more surprising is that Europe’s leaders have not even learned."
"We should be clear: almost none of the huge amount of money loaned to Greece has actually gone there. It has goneto pay out ... more »

A clarifying article published before the Greek referendum
Europe’s Attack on Greek Democracy
"Of course, the economics behind the program that the “troika” (the European Commission, the European Central Bank, and the International Monetary Fund) foisted on Greece five years ago has been abysmal, resulting in a 25% decline in the country’s GDP. I can think of no depression, ever, that has been so deliberate and had such catastrophic consequences: Greece’s rate of youth unemployment, for example, now exceeds 60%."
"It is startling that the troika has refused to accept responsibility for any of this or admit how bad its forecasts and models have been. But what is even more surprising is that Europe’s leaders have not even learned."
"We should be clear: almost none of the huge amount of money loaned to Greece has actually gone there. It has gone to pay out private-sector creditors – including German and French banks. Greece has gotten but a pittance, but it has paid a high price to preserve these countries’ banking systems. The IMF and the other “official” creditors do not need the money that is being demanded. Under a business-as-usual scenario, the money received would most likely just be lent out again to Greece."
"But, again, it’s not about the money. It’s about using “deadlines” to force Greece to knuckle under, and to accept the unacceptable – not only austerity measures, but other regressive and punitive policies."
"And, sure enough, what we are seeing now, 16 years after the eurozone institutionalized those relationships, is the antithesis of democracy: Many European leaders want to see the end of Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’s leftist government. After all, it is extremely inconvenient to have in Greece a government that is so opposed to the types of policies that have done so much to increase inequality in so many advanced countries, and that is so committed to curbing the unbridled power of wealth. They seem to believe that they can eventually bring down the Greek government by bullying it into accepting an agreement that contravenes its mandate."
Joseph E. Stiglitz, a Nobel laureate in economics and University Professor at Columbia University, was Chairman of President Bill Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers and served as Senior Vice President and Chief Economist of the World Bank.___

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2015-07-04 09:56:21 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Benedict Arnold (1741 - 1801)
Benedict Arnold was an American Revolutionary War general best known for his defection from the Continental Army to the British side of the conflict in 1780.
"After the British withdrawal from Philadelphia in the spring of 1778, Washington appointed Arnold military commander of the city. There, Arnold met and married Peggy Shippen, the daughter of a Loyalist sympathizer. Peggy had met British Major John André during the British occupation, and had developed ways of maintaining contact with British soldiers across the battle lines. Arnold and André began a correspondence, sometimes using Peggy as an intermediary. By the following summer, Arnold was providing the British with troop locations, as well as the locations of supply depots."
"Arnold gained access to even more sensitive information when he assumed command of West Point, in Augusto... more »

Benedict Arnold (1741 - 1801)
Benedict Arnold was an American Revolutionary War general best known for his defection from the Continental Army to the British side of the conflict in 1780.
"After the British withdrawal from Philadelphia in the spring of 1778, Washington appointed Arnold military commander of the city. There, Arnold met and married Peggy Shippen, the daughter of a Loyalist sympathizer. Peggy had met British Major John André during the British occupation, and had developed ways of maintaining contact with British soldiers across the battle lines. Arnold and André began a correspondence, sometimes using Peggy as an intermediary. By the following summer, Arnold was providing the British with troop locations, as well as the locations of supply depots."
"Arnold gained access to even more sensitive information when he assumed command of West Point, in August of 1780. He began systematically weakening the fort’s defenses, refusing to order necessary repairs and draining its supplies. At the same time, Arnold began transferring his assets from Connecticut to England."
"In 1785, Arnold and his son Richard moved to New Brunswick, Canada, where they established a West Indies trade. Following a series of business dealings that resulted in a crowd burning Arnold in effigy, the family returned to London. Arnold continued to trade with the West Indies during the French Revolution, and was imprisoned by French authorities for a short time on suspicion of spying."___

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2015-07-04 06:57:18 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 15 +1s)Open 

The Sweet History of Chocolate
"Chocolate may be the “food of the gods,” but for most of its 4,000-year history, it was actually consumed as a bitter beverage rather than as a sweet edible treat."
"Spain managed to keep chocolate a savory secret for nearly a century, but when the daughter of Spanish King Philip III wed French King Louis XIII in 1615, she brought her love of chocolate with her to France."

The Sweet History of Chocolate
"Chocolate may be the “food of the gods,” but for most of its 4,000-year history, it was actually consumed as a bitter beverage rather than as a sweet edible treat."
"Spain managed to keep chocolate a savory secret for nearly a century, but when the daughter of Spanish King Philip III wed French King Louis XIII in 1615, she brought her love of chocolate with her to France."___

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2015-07-04 04:59:51 (26 comments, 0 reshares, 25 +1s)Open 

Independence day? Tomfoolery! Oh my naughty subjects, you make me giggle. Comb yourselves and come back to your Queen, you wayward elfin children of the Empire
Her Majesty your Queen Elizabeth II
July 4th, 2015

Independence day? Tomfoolery! Oh my naughty subjects, you make me giggle. Comb yourselves and come back to your Queen, you wayward elfin children of the Empire
Her Majesty your Queen Elizabeth II
July 4th, 2015___

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2015-07-03 08:52:36 (6 comments, 0 reshares, 20 +1s)Open 

This is the actual Gotz von Berlichingen's iron hand, made in Nuremberg around 1510, +李麟. It doesn't look rusty, but maybe it's because of the curator's work...

This is the actual Gotz von Berlichingen's iron hand, made in Nuremberg around 1510, +李麟. It doesn't look rusty, but maybe it's because of the curator's work...___

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2015-07-03 04:07:19 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

The crazy life and crazier death of Tycho Brahe, history's strangest astronomer (1546 - 1601)
As a pet, Brahe had an elk, who, after drinking a lot of beer, fell down the stairs and died.

The crazy life and crazier death of Tycho Brahe, history's strangest astronomer (1546 - 1601)
As a pet, Brahe had an elk, who, after drinking a lot of beer, fell down the stairs and died.___

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