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Giselle Minoli

Giselle Minoli 

I write literary nonfiction. I design fine jewelry.

Occupation: Writer... (Giselle Minoli)

Location: New York City

Followers: 41,330

Following: -

Views: 8,771,775

Cream of the Crop: 01/11/2012

Added to CircleCount.com: 08/21/2011That's the date, where Giselle Minoli has been indexed by CircleCount.com.
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  • Arts
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  • Blogs of August
  • Dancing
  • Philosophy
  • Poetry
  • Theater
  • Writers

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Giselle Minoli has been at 2 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Yifat Cohen85,655If you follow me and hear me talk, you know I'm all about engagement and I'm convinced that Hangouts will change the world and make it more personalized. (In a -good- great way). But it's almost impossible to do with over 35K followers (can't even imagine what people with over 100k or a million do..) *SO LET'S GET PERSONAL. I DARE YOU.* Let's just Hangout and get to know each other, shall we? *THE HANGOUT WILL BE INITIATED FROM THE @106909313027624222688 PAGE* You'll have to follow that page in order to be able to join us. So do it now, it takes 2 sec. RSVP and when this goes live you'll see a link to join the Hangout. *First come first serve*.  If the hangout is full, stick around and a spot might open for you.  *I'll Hangout for an hour with as many people who show up - just for fun* *THIS IS NOT AN ON-AIR HANGOUT* So no one will see you but the people in the Hangout. Meaning, if this is your first time, feel free to jump in and give it a try. *You can ask me anything you want if I can ask you anything I want* ;) We can talk G+tips, Hangouts questions, or just about us and stuff we like (Have you watched the last James Bond movie? I got a few things I have to say about that one...lol) *So RSVP now, and let's get to know each other - up close and personal* ---------- #gplusgotogal   #hangouts   #engagement   #howto   #googleplustips  Want to Hangout and not sure how? Give this a try.2012-11-29 18:00:0041  
Billy Wilson1,550,348It's now the 29th episode of my weekly on air G+ variety show @108595299975404341987 thank you guys for being so supportive! The show brings together some of the most interesting people you can find on G+ for a hangout! This week we'll have joining Caricature Artist @105046530334806680420; @103333429938529668020 who's quite known around G+ and is the host of @103052407716987048126; Geek, Writer, and Host @100035762233109552669; Tea Enthusiast and the person behind the Google+ Book Club @117665613028757061169 who's going to be talking to us about her new show called "Family By the Fireside"; Country Music Chat Host @105901258272269401150; and Special Musical Guest @101758878457837294885 ! You can talk with us and other people watching the show by commenting on this event once the show is live! Thank you so much for a lively thread last episode! The episode will be live on this event and the recording will be available immediately afterwards. You can watch previous episodes here: http://goo.gl/ceHtHTSBW #29: Caricatures, M Monica's New Show, Live Music and More! (On Air Hangout)2012-10-20 04:00:00143  

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Most comments: 105

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2016-02-15 16:02:12 (105 comments; 1 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

I admire Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's remembrance of her friend and sparring partner on the Supreme Court, Justice Antonin Scalia. I, too, disagreed with many of his opinions and wish that I had had the opportunity to know his apparently generous sense of humor and the personality he shared with his fellow Justices. Had I known him, would it have changed my mind about his opinions? I don't know.

His work was to interpret the law and the constitution of the United States of America, not to let us get to know him as a person. But in our private lives, knowing a person does influence how we perceive their opinions, views about life and their political and religious beliefs.

Knowing a person can make us either tolerant or intolerant (or something in between) of their views if they differ from ours.

But ought we be able to be tolerant of another's views even if we... more »

Most reshares: 8

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2016-02-29 16:37:45 (23 comments; 8 reshares; 52 +1s)Open 

John Oliver deconstructs the Serial Lies of the Litigious Serial Liar Donald Trump on this Super Tuesday Eve. And why not? It's Leap February in a Leap Year and there must be something the United States has done to deserve this wretched karma. There must be.

John Oliver for POTUS.  #MakeDonaldDrumptAgain . Watch the entire video from start to finish. It's worth it.

The problem is that even when you can demonstrably prove Donald Trump to be wrong, it never seems to matter. You can hold his feet to the fire, but he'll just stand there on the stumps bragging about his fireproof foot skin. And that's maybe because he has spent decades turning his own name into a brand synonymous with success and quality. And he's made himself the mascot for that brand. Like Ronald McDonald or Chef Boyardee, and that is who we have seen in The Apprentice or Wrestle Mania or HomeA... more »

Most plusones: 60

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2016-04-25 19:53:11 (26 comments; 1 reshares; 60 +1s)Open 

'Tis a frog.
Pretending to be a rock.
Praying no one sees him.
And hoping I will go away.

Perhaps he is pretending to be a Prince.
But...No...he knows there was only one of those.

#Prince   #GreyTreeFrogs  

The music of grey tree frogs:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zss4438ON2k

Latest 50 posts

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2016-05-05 22:21:27 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

The Art of Playing The Woman Card through music, songwriting, choreography, singing...and dance.

Joni Mitchell's A Case of You, choreographed by Judith Jamison, sung by Diana Krall, and danced by Hope Boykin...and Jamar Roberts.

To all talented women everywhere: Never apologize for playing The Woman Card.

#TheWomanCard   #AlvinAiley   #JoniMitchell   #HopeBoykin   #JamarRoberts   #PrinceACaseofYou  

The Art of Playing The Woman Card through music, songwriting, choreography, singing...and dance.

Joni Mitchell's A Case of You, choreographed by Judith Jamison, sung by Diana Krall, and danced by Hope Boykin...and Jamar Roberts.

To all talented women everywhere: Never apologize for playing The Woman Card.

#TheWomanCard   #AlvinAiley   #JoniMitchell   #HopeBoykin   #JamarRoberts   #PrinceACaseofYou  ___

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2016-05-01 23:56:47 (5 comments; 2 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

In honor of women who are the very definition of being The Woman Card, in this case, India Howell, who quit her job as CEO of a Boston-based company to live in Tanzania...and take in abandoned, abused and orphaned child after child after child. 

Watch The Children's Village, and learn about India Howell and Peter Leon Mmassy, her Tanzanian business partner, who exemplifies the most powerful way to play The Woman Card right along side one...

#60Minutes   #TheWomanCard   #TheChildrensVillage   #IndiaHowell  

In honor of women who are the very definition of being The Woman Card, in this case, India Howell, who quit her job as CEO of a Boston-based company to live in Tanzania...and take in abandoned, abused and orphaned child after child after child. 

Watch The Children's Village, and learn about India Howell and Peter Leon Mmassy, her Tanzanian business partner, who exemplifies the most powerful way to play The Woman Card right along side one...

#60Minutes   #TheWomanCard   #TheChildrensVillage   #IndiaHowell  ___

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2016-05-01 16:57:56 (17 comments; 1 reshares; 31 +1s)Open 

I love New York City. I have been walking the streets of this fabulous place since the day I moved here. Never getting tired of it. Feeling its history deep in my bones. Awed at the almost organic nature of its existence, in spite of the seeming control of technology and manmade everything.

New York just is. 

A city that welcomes everyone from no matter where in the world.
A city with endless park benches on which to pause.
A city with endless dog parks, in which our four-leggeds can pause.

A place to hitch your bike...
Take a cruise...
Have a snooze...
End your day with booze.

A place to find some relief,
Sail without wind,
And row without oars.

And all in the eternal Pursuit of Magic...

I took these photographs on April 11th on a Waterfront Photo Safari with my husband. We had the best time. Ended the day... more »

I love New York City. I have been walking the streets of this fabulous place since the day I moved here. Never getting tired of it. Feeling its history deep in my bones. Awed at the almost organic nature of its existence, in spite of the seeming control of technology and manmade everything.

New York just is. 

A city that welcomes everyone from no matter where in the world.
A city with endless park benches on which to pause.
A city with endless dog parks, in which our four-leggeds can pause.

A place to hitch your bike...
Take a cruise...
Have a snooze...
End your day with booze.

A place to find some relief,
Sail without wind,
And row without oars.

And all in the eternal Pursuit of Magic...

I took these photographs on April 11th on a Waterfront Photo Safari with my husband. We had the best time. Ended the day at La Sirena. We had pasta. Of course.

#ILoveNewYork   #TheWaterfront  ___

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2016-04-27 23:54:30 (18 comments; 2 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

Oh, The Woman Card. And who gets to play it.

A short list of famous men, some of whose careers were based on strategically playing The Woman Card - President Kennedy trotted out the divine Queen of Camelot, Jackie Kennedy, whenever he needed to make an impression on foreign leaders - and some of whose careers were elevated considerably by playing the particularly gorgeous Woman Card, as did the great American playwright Arthur Miller with the beauteous Marilyn Monroe.

Then there are those men whose use of The Woman Card helped make them artistically famous forever, as happened with Leonard da Vinci and his muse Lisa del Giocondo. I mean, The Mona Lisa, as she is popularly known, is hanging in a museum and the rest of us aren't. I wonder how much she was paid for his fame? Hmmmm....

And dare I mention the... more »

Oh, The Woman Card. And who gets to play it.

A short list of famous men, some of whose careers were based on strategically playing The Woman Card - President Kennedy trotted out the divine Queen of Camelot, Jackie Kennedy, whenever he needed to make an impression on foreign leaders - and some of whose careers were elevated considerably by playing the particularly gorgeous Woman Card, as did the great American playwright Arthur Miller with the beauteous Marilyn Monroe.

Then there are those men whose use of The Woman Card helped make them artistically famous forever, as happened with Leonard da Vinci and his muse Lisa del Giocondo. I mean, The Mona Lisa, as she is popularly known, is hanging in a museum and the rest of us aren't. I wonder how much she was paid for his fame? Hmmmm....

And dare I mention the questionably talented but clever Alberto Vargas? Probably shouldn't but I did anyway.

And let's not forget Pablo Picasso, who most certainly spent an artistic lifetime playing The Woman Card, although sometimes he put Marie-Therese Walter's ear on her ass and you couldn't necessarily tell she was a woman. But I digress...

And there are those men who play The Woman Card because without a sexy talented woman named Tina Turner they would be, let's see? Nothing? As in Ike Turner? I'll let you decide.

And let's not forget those men who play The Woman Card to make vast amounts of money, as in our darling Hugh Heffner and his bountiful basket of bunnies. What would the world be without him?

Or...those naughty Dallas Cowboys, who are so cheap they pay their Multiple Women Cards - the fabulous Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders - $150 per home game. Yep.

And last, but not least, there are those men who play The Woman Card simply to, well, make the woman, that would be Eliza Doolittle, better than she would be without him, that would be our dear Henry Higgins. I mean, every man needs a little Pygmalion action in his life, right? Right.

After all, Why can't a woman be more like a man?

And play The Woman Card herself?

Indeed she can.

And she is.

P.S. I am sure you have your own list of masterful plays of The Woman Card. Do tell!

#TheWomanCard   #POTUS   #HillaryClinton  ___

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2016-04-25 19:53:11 (26 comments; 1 reshares; 60 +1s)Open 

'Tis a frog.
Pretending to be a rock.
Praying no one sees him.
And hoping I will go away.

Perhaps he is pretending to be a Prince.
But...No...he knows there was only one of those.

#Prince   #GreyTreeFrogs  

The music of grey tree frogs:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zss4438ON2k

'Tis a frog.
Pretending to be a rock.
Praying no one sees him.
And hoping I will go away.

Perhaps he is pretending to be a Prince.
But...No...he knows there was only one of those.

#Prince   #GreyTreeFrogs  

The music of grey tree frogs:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zss4438ON2k___

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2016-04-22 02:42:13 (13 comments; 3 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

I wish this were a live performance of Prince's cover of Joni Mitchell's A Case of You. But listen to it anyway. His music anchors my XC driving playlists...I return to his songs over and over and over again.

Like so many, I loved the man's music, the entire talent of him. Yet, for reasons hard to explain, this cover of another songwriter's music says something about Prince as an admirer of others' talents...that goes beyond...for me...the performance of his own music...the generosity of it...the obvious love in it.

There was something so powerfully masculine about him, yet also so powerfully female. Those two energies were in everything about him - his lyrics, the use of his voice, the way he dressed, the way he danced, the way he spoke, the way he played his instruments, the way he expressed himself.

Prince...I could drink a case of you...... more »

I wish this were a live performance of Prince's cover of Joni Mitchell's A Case of You. But listen to it anyway. His music anchors my XC driving playlists...I return to his songs over and over and over again.

Like so many, I loved the man's music, the entire talent of him. Yet, for reasons hard to explain, this cover of another songwriter's music says something about Prince as an admirer of others' talents...that goes beyond...for me...the performance of his own music...the generosity of it...the obvious love in it.

There was something so powerfully masculine about him, yet also so powerfully female. Those two energies were in everything about him - his lyrics, the use of his voice, the way he dressed, the way he danced, the way he spoke, the way he played his instruments, the way he expressed himself.

Prince...I could drink a case of you...

From New York Magazine: Influences: Joni Mitchell:

But even when you were somewhat obscure, so many musicians were citing you as an influence or even name-checking you in songs. Of all the musicians and rappers who have cited you as an influence, whose work do you appreciate most?

Prince. Prince attended one of my concerts in Minnesota. I remember seeing him sitting in the front row when he was very young. He must have been about 15. He was in an aisle seat and he had unusually big eyes. He watched the whole show with his collar up, looking side to side. You couldn’t miss him—he was a little Prince-ling. [Laughs.] Prince used to write me fan mail with all of the U’s and hearts that way that he writes. And the office took it as mail from the lunatic fringe and just tossed it! [Laughs.]

http://nymag.com/nymetro/arts/music/pop/11888/

A Case Of U, Tribute to Joni Mitchell by Prince

I am a lonely painter
I live in a box of paints
I used 2 be frightened by the devil
And drawn 2 those who weren't afraid

Remember when u told me
That love was touching souls?
Well, surely u touched mine
Part of u pours out of me from time 2 time in these lines
U're in my blood like holy wine...u're so bitter and so sweet

I could drink a case of you darling
And still be on my feet...still be on my feet

A Case of You, by Joni Mitchell

Just before our love got lost you said
"I am as constant as a northern star" 
And I said "Constantly in the darkness 
Where's that at?
If you want me I'll be in the bar" 

On the back of a cartoon coaster 
In the blue TV screen light 
I drew a map of Canada 
Oh Canada 
With your face sketched on it twice 
Oh you're in my blood like holy wine 
You taste so bitter and so sweet 

Oh I could drink a case of you darling 
Still I'd be on my feet 
oh I would still be on my feet

Oh I am a lonely painter 
I live in a box of paints 
I'm frightened by the devil 
And I'm drawn to those ones that ain't afraid 

I remember that time you told me you said
"Love is touching souls" 
Surely you touched mine 
'Cause part of you pours out of me 
In these lines from time to time 
Oh, you're in my blood like holy wine 
You taste so bitter and so sweet 

Oh I could drink a case of you darling 
And I would still be on my feet 
I would still be on my feet

I met a woman 
She had a mouth like yours 
She knew your life 
She knew your devils and your deeds 
And she said 
"Go to him, stay with him if you can 
But be prepared to bleed" 

Oh but you are in my blood 
You're my holy wine 
You're so bitter, bitter and so sweet

Oh, I could drink a case of you darling 
Still I'd be on my feet 
I would still be on my feet
© 1970; Joni Mitchell

#Prince   #ACaseofYou   #JoniMitchell  ___

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2016-04-20 17:27:32 (8 comments; 1 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

Love...that Harriet Tubman is worth 'more' than Alexander Hamilton! 

'sbout time...

#HarrietTubman   #TwentyDollarBill   #WomensSuffrage  

Love...that Harriet Tubman is worth 'more' than Alexander Hamilton! 

'sbout time...

#HarrietTubman   #TwentyDollarBill   #WomensSuffrage  ___

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2016-04-19 12:58:09 (5 comments; 0 reshares; 19 +1s)Open 

Madison Square Park, early morning, Tuesday, April 19th.

I love early morning in New York, especially in Spring when one is not quite sure what to wear. Looking for an empty park bench, chasing away the squirrels, which are more than a little bit used to a French Fry or two, or three, from the Shake Shack, or perhaps a bite of croissant for breakfast, leftover from an Italian's foray into Eataly for an Espresso and brioche.

Tulips bold and upright, the day unsure whether 'tis to be cloudy, 'tis to be bright.

A quite moment, after voting...in a great city.

The clock tower sings 7:25am.

Time to stroll home.

And begin another day.

Madison Square Park, early morning, Tuesday, April 19th.

I love early morning in New York, especially in Spring when one is not quite sure what to wear. Looking for an empty park bench, chasing away the squirrels, which are more than a little bit used to a French Fry or two, or three, from the Shake Shack, or perhaps a bite of croissant for breakfast, leftover from an Italian's foray into Eataly for an Espresso and brioche.

Tulips bold and upright, the day unsure whether 'tis to be cloudy, 'tis to be bright.

A quite moment, after voting...in a great city.

The clock tower sings 7:25am.

Time to stroll home.

And begin another day.___

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2016-04-18 14:44:23 (12 comments; 0 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

Torture. Absolute, unmitigated torture. Being told when I was a teenager that I had to learn to 'speed' read because I was such a slow reader. I used to read out loud, loving the sounds of the words, repeating the more delicious ones over and over again, looking their meanings up in the dictionary if they were new to me, imaging them physically as much as possible.

Words were pictures, and they still are. Sentences and paragraphs are like paintings composed of colors and textures and brush strokes. Sentences and paragraphs and pages, to me, are most certainly not compilations of information and data.

When I see the word 'house' it is not a five letter word describing something in which a person lives. Rather, my mind immediately imagines dozens of possible shapes and sizes and kinds of houses. It is a free-association I cannot stop. It simply is. I would describe this... more »

Torture. Absolute, unmitigated torture. Being told when I was a teenager that I had to learn to 'speed' read because I was such a slow reader. I used to read out loud, loving the sounds of the words, repeating the more delicious ones over and over again, looking their meanings up in the dictionary if they were new to me, imaging them physically as much as possible.

Words were pictures, and they still are. Sentences and paragraphs are like paintings composed of colors and textures and brush strokes. Sentences and paragraphs and pages, to me, are most certainly not compilations of information and data.

When I see the word 'house' it is not a five letter word describing something in which a person lives. Rather, my mind immediately imagines dozens of possible shapes and sizes and kinds of houses. It is a free-association I cannot stop. It simply is. I would describe this free-association to  my teachers to explain why I read so slowly, and I was told that it was more important for me to read quickly than to imagine more. I was told that fast is the only thing that matters.

It was hell. Because I could not do it. I was a failure at speed reading. And I began to hate to read. I despised Evelyn Wood and didn't even know her. And I knew she was wrong about speed reading but no one would listen to me because I was, well, a teenager, and who listens to teenagers? No one.

Until finally I had a teacher who understood the way my brain worked and he told everyone at my experimental school for girls to leave me alone and to let me read in a way that would preserve my love of words rather than make me feel like a failure. The clever man pointed me to poetry, because, he felt, there were fewer 'words' for me to deal with and I could free-associate until my heart was content. And then, if I wanted to read fast - sometime in the future - it would be a choice, not something I was pressured to do in school.

Without Jim O'Leary I believe I would have hated reading and writing.

Speed reading. How supremely stupid.

Now there are only two things I love to do fast: fly and drive.

But reading? 

Sorry, I won't speed read.___

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2016-04-17 18:51:37 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

The ferocious Michelle Dorrance.

Get a Git in your Giddyup. 

Click them heels.

Tap them toes.

Clap dose hands.

Sing with your body.

Dance with your soul.

Get a groove on.

Shake a tail feather.

Leaannnnnn into it.

Put on a pair of big disc earrings...

...and channel some Michelle Dorrance...

For it's spring in beautiful New York City.

#MichelleDorranceDance   #MacArthurFellow   #Tap  

The ferocious Michelle Dorrance.

Get a Git in your Giddyup. 

Click them heels.

Tap them toes.

Clap dose hands.

Sing with your body.

Dance with your soul.

Get a groove on.

Shake a tail feather.

Leaannnnnn into it.

Put on a pair of big disc earrings...

...and channel some Michelle Dorrance...

For it's spring in beautiful New York City.

#MichelleDorranceDance   #MacArthurFellow   #Tap  ___

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2016-04-15 02:35:57 (5 comments; 1 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

Just one of the many reasons I have never felt the Bern. There is a debate going on between Clinton and Sanders as I write, in which he criticized Hillary Clinton for not speaking more about reaching out to the Palestinians when she spoke last month at AIPAC (American Israel Political Action Committee).

It infuriates me that he would criticize a speech he read, but had an opportunity to listen to in person because he, Hillary Clinton, John Kasich, Ted Cruz and Donald Trump were all invited to speak. However, Clinton, Kasich, Cruz and Trump took time out of their schedules to speak to this important group of Jews, Gentiles, African Americans, Hispanics and students from around the world about terrorism, among many other things. 

But...only ONE of the Presidential candidates didn't show up...and that was Bernie Sanders. I was there and heard every single speech - Clinton's,... more »

Just one of the many reasons I have never felt the Bern. There is a debate going on between Clinton and Sanders as I write, in which he criticized Hillary Clinton for not speaking more about reaching out to the Palestinians when she spoke last month at AIPAC (American Israel Political Action Committee).

It infuriates me that he would criticize a speech he read, but had an opportunity to listen to in person because he, Hillary Clinton, John Kasich, Ted Cruz and Donald Trump were all invited to speak. However, Clinton, Kasich, Cruz and Trump took time out of their schedules to speak to this important group of Jews, Gentiles, African Americans, Hispanics and students from around the world about terrorism, among many other things. 

But...only ONE of the Presidential candidates didn't show up...and that was Bernie Sanders. I was there and heard every single speech - Clinton's, Kasich's, Cruz's and Trumps (as well as Joe Biden's and Paul Ryan's). But Bernie the Burn was a no-show. 

Instead of speaking at AIPAC he wanted to go to Arizona to promote himself prior to that State's Primary. Which he then lost. He should have spoken at AIPAC. Because had he done so he could easily have spoken himself about reaching out to the Palestinians if that is such an important issue for him.

How convenient to read Hillary's speech and criticize it, when he didn't bother to get himself to Washington, D.C. and make one of his own. Which we could all then criticize. How safe and cowardly of him.

Bernie Sanders, The Armchair Quarterback. Better to criticize the job someone else has done than be on the battlefield himself.

Now he's in New York promoting himself in advance of our Primary next Tuesday. Much more important, in his view, than directly addressing terrorism. Trying very hard to convince everyone that he's a New Yorker, when he doesn't even know how to ride the subway anymore.

Sorry, but I don't, nor have I for one minute, bought a single word of it. Bernie is Jewish, but didn't show up at AIPAC. He says he's a Democrat, but joined the party a year ago so that he could run on the Democrat, rather than the Independent, or the Socialist ticket. And now he's trying to get everyone to believe he's more of a New Yorker than Hillary Clinton, who was our Senator for eight years.

It was Hillary who was here, post-9/11, pushing to take care of First Responders, not Bernie Sanders.

Learn how to ride the subway, Bernie, it's not that hard. In fact, I'll teach you myself. And if you want to criticize the speech that someone running against you for President gives, have the decency to show up and make one of your own.

P.S. As a footnote, I hired someone to help me do some work in my apartment today. A working class man, who offered, without my even bringing it up, that he's voting for Hillary...because Bernie doesn't deal with real life. 

#POTUS   #HillaryClinton   #BernieSanders   #NewYorkPrimary  ___

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2016-04-04 20:32:44 (4 comments; 7 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

Being original is not easy, but it's the best way to improve the world around us. - Adam Grant, TED Talk, The Surprising Habits of Original Thinkers

Did you know that FIREFOX and CHROME users significantly outperform Safari and Internet Explorer users????

Did you know that Original Thinkers PROCRASTINATE. That Original Thinkers DOUBT and have FEAR? That Original Thinkers have lots and lots of bad ideas?

For all of you late comers, nail biters, dreamers, To Do List-haters, contrarians, anti-productivity, pro-creativity freaks...here's a more than amusing TED Talk by Adam Grant on the surprising benefits of fear, doubt, bad ideas, and being a procrastinator...and how that dreaded characteristic...which our parents, school teachers, bosses and virtually everyone else would like to bake out of us...is actually a good thing...if timed right of... more »

Being original is not easy, but it's the best way to improve the world around us. - Adam Grant, TED Talk, The Surprising Habits of Original Thinkers

Did you know that FIREFOX and CHROME users significantly outperform Safari and Internet Explorer users????

Did you know that Original Thinkers PROCRASTINATE. That Original Thinkers DOUBT and have FEAR? That Original Thinkers have lots and lots of bad ideas?

For all of you late comers, nail biters, dreamers, To Do List-haters, contrarians, anti-productivity, pro-creativity freaks...here's a more than amusing TED Talk by Adam Grant on the surprising benefits of fear, doubt, bad ideas, and being a procrastinator...and how that dreaded characteristic...which our parents, school teachers, bosses and virtually everyone else would like to bake out of us...is actually a good thing...if timed right of course.

Get into the difference between productivity and creativity.
Get into the difference between self-doubt and idea-doubt.
Get into the difference between Deja Vu and Vuja De.

In case you don't know, Adam Grant is an Organizational Psychologist, teacher, writer and, in my view, a stand-up comedian. 

Last year Grant collaborated with Sheryl Sandberg on a series of articles in the New York Times about various issue women face in the workplace. I posted about all of those articles because, not only are they important, but because I was/am intrigued by whether or not issues that affect women are taken more seriously when men write about them and actively participate in bring them to wider attention, than they would if they were left to women to champion alone.

All that aside, the entertaining Grant takes on the issue of original thinking.

I think I should write more about this..

Tomorrow...

In the meantime, take 15 minutes of your time to watch this. You won't regret it. AND DON'T PROCRASTINATE!

*Why do we need so many studies to convince us (of what we have always known to be true?)...
https://plus.google.com/+GiselleMinoli/posts/3k1tWwRLw6n

#AdamGrant #TEDTalk___

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2016-04-01 23:06:38 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 22 +1s)Open 

Maybe...

It's a Purple Lilac Bud...
A Birdbath waiting for company
A Dogwood Tree full of buds
A Giant Fuchsia Magnolia Blossom
An Oak Leaf Hydrangea Bush
A cut back Forsythia frightened of the clippers
A Star Magnolia Tree windswept of its bounty
Ground cover daring to come out early
A Knockout Rose Bush hoping for a beetle-less summer

Maybe it's Spring...

Maybe...

It's a Purple Lilac Bud...
A Birdbath waiting for company
A Dogwood Tree full of buds
A Giant Fuchsia Magnolia Blossom
An Oak Leaf Hydrangea Bush
A cut back Forsythia frightened of the clippers
A Star Magnolia Tree windswept of its bounty
Ground cover daring to come out early
A Knockout Rose Bush hoping for a beetle-less summer

Maybe it's Spring...___

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2016-03-31 19:50:29 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

Ahhhhh Zaha Hadid. There are people in the world whose mission in life is to destroy anything and everything they can get their hands on.

Other people, like Zaha Hadid, spend their lives creating, building, constructing...making art, making beauty.

There are many people who do not believe that a person's gender has any impact or influence on their art. I am not one of those people. When I look at her work I am inspired. What I see in Hadid's work is quintessentially female - curvy, strong, bold and mercurial. I wish that there were more of her influence in our cities, work spaces, and places of respite.

The wonderful thing about architecture is that it can last a very long time. And if we let it, when we are in the presence of it, it can enter our hearts and souls like a song and stay there forever.

Take a look at the accompanying slide show, and... more »

Ahhhhh Zaha Hadid. There are people in the world whose mission in life is to destroy anything and everything they can get their hands on.

Other people, like Zaha Hadid, spend their lives creating, building, constructing...making art, making beauty.

There are many people who do not believe that a person's gender has any impact or influence on their art. I am not one of those people. When I look at her work I am inspired. What I see in Hadid's work is quintessentially female - curvy, strong, bold and mercurial. I wish that there were more of her influence in our cities, work spaces, and places of respite.

The wonderful thing about architecture is that it can last a very long time. And if we let it, when we are in the presence of it, it can enter our hearts and souls like a song and stay there forever.

Take a look at the accompanying slide show, and remember...

Any jackass can tear down a barn, but it takes a good carpenter to build one. - Sam Rayburn, Former Speaker of the House of Representatives

Seven of Zaha Hadid's Most Striking Designs:
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/04/01/arts/design/zaha-hadid-designs.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&version=Moth-Visible&moduleDetail=inside-nyt-region-1&module=inside-nyt-region&region=inside-nyt-region&WT.nav=inside-nyt-region

Zaha Hadid's Influence Reached Beyond Her Architectural Designs:
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/02/arts/design/zaha-hadids-influence-reached-beyond-her-architectural-designs.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=mini-moth&region=top-stories-below&WT.nav=top-stories-below

#ZahaHadid   #Architecture  ___

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2016-03-29 21:08:18 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

What does it really mean to be relevant?
New?
Hip?
Of the moment?
Au courant?
Visionary?
With it?
Edgy?
Young?
Nothing. None of these things means anything.

I say, don't give a damn about being young and hip and au courant and with it and edgy. Instead, grow old like Arthur Kern and just do your own thing.

“A lot of the things that are going on, and what will go on, are the very things I tried to escape from before. I’m 84 years old and I have never given a talk about my work.”  - Arthur Kern

What does it really mean to be relevant?
New?
Hip?
Of the moment?
Au courant?
Visionary?
With it?
Edgy?
Young?
Nothing. None of these things means anything.

I say, don't give a damn about being young and hip and au courant and with it and edgy. Instead, grow old like Arthur Kern and just do your own thing.

“A lot of the things that are going on, and what will go on, are the very things I tried to escape from before. I’m 84 years old and I have never given a talk about my work.”  - Arthur Kern___

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2016-03-27 14:34:39 (1 comments; 2 reshares; 40 +1s)Open 

Because it's overcast...

I love you more than you'll ever know
 
Lyrics by Al Kooper, founder of Blood, Sweat & Tears, covered by the great Amy Winehouse

If I ever leave you
You can say I told you so!
And if I ever hurt you baby
You know I hurt myself as well.

Is that any way for a man to carry on
Do you think I want my loved one gone
Said I love you
More than you'll ever know
More than you'll ever know

When I wasn't making much money
You know where my paycheck went
You know I brought it home to baby
And I never spent a red cent

Is that any way for a man to carry on
Do you think I want my loved one gone
Said I love you
More than you'll ever know
More than you'll ever know

I'm not trying to be
Just any kind of manmore »

Because it's overcast...

I love you more than you'll ever know
 
Lyrics by Al Kooper, founder of Blood, Sweat & Tears, covered by the great Amy Winehouse

If I ever leave you
You can say I told you so!
And if I ever hurt you baby
You know I hurt myself as well.

Is that any way for a man to carry on
Do you think I want my loved one gone
Said I love you
More than you'll ever know
More than you'll ever know

When I wasn't making much money
You know where my paycheck went
You know I brought it home to baby
And I never spent a red cent

Is that any way for a man to carry on
Do you think I want my loved one gone
Said I love you
More than you'll ever know
More than you'll ever know

I'm not trying to be
Just any kind of man
I'm just trying to be somebody
You can love, trust and understand
I know I know I know I can be
A part of you that no one else could see
Yeaaahhhh

But I've got to hear you say
I've got to hear you say
It's alright

I'm only flesh and blood
But I can be everything that you demand
I could be king of everything
Or just a tiny grain of sand

Now is that anyway for a man to carry on
Do you think I want my loved one gone
I said I love you more than you'll ever know
I don't want nobody else
I don't need nobody else

I love ya more than you'll ever know

#AmyWinehouse   #AlKooper   #BloodSweatandTears  ___

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2016-03-26 01:03:40 (23 comments; 1 reshares; 22 +1s)Open 

For some reason this week I have been singing Somewhere Over the Rainbow to myself. I wake up singing it. I go to bed singing it. I cook singing it. I drive singing it.

And I thought I'd share a special version of it with you all. It's sung by Eva Cassidy, one of my favorite singers, who died young, way, way, way too young. But Eva left a body of work, and a voice that pierces the heart and when I think of this song, popularized by Judy Garland, she of another great voice, I personally think of Eva.

But how can I leave out the late, great and sublime Israel "IZ" Kamakawiwo'ole's version? 'Twould be impossible.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_DKWlrA24k

Or Judy Garland's from The Wizard of Oz? Well, duh.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSZxmZmBfnU

Or Eric Clapton's?... more »

For some reason this week I have been singing Somewhere Over the Rainbow to myself. I wake up singing it. I go to bed singing it. I cook singing it. I drive singing it.

And I thought I'd share a special version of it with you all. It's sung by Eva Cassidy, one of my favorite singers, who died young, way, way, way too young. But Eva left a body of work, and a voice that pierces the heart and when I think of this song, popularized by Judy Garland, she of another great voice, I personally think of Eva.

But how can I leave out the late, great and sublime Israel "IZ" Kamakawiwo'ole's version? 'Twould be impossible.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_DKWlrA24k

Or Judy Garland's from The Wizard of Oz? Well, duh.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSZxmZmBfnU

Or Eric Clapton's? Never.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KvtbZzx1xs

Your own favorite version? Do tell.

Somewhere Over the Rainbow 
Lyrics by Yip Harburg, Music by Harold Arlen

Somewhere over the rainbow, way up high
There's a land that I've heard of once in a lullaby.
Somewhere over the rainbow, skies are blue
And the dreams that you dare to dream,
Really do come true.

Someday I'll wish upon a star
And wake up where the clouds are far behind me.
Where troubles melt like lemon drops,
Way above the chimney tops,
That's where you'll find me.

Somewhere over the rainbow, blue birds fly
Birds fly over the rainbow
Why then, oh why can't I?

Somewhere over the rainbow, blue birds fly
Birds fly over the rainbow
Why then, oh why can't I?

Published by
Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Somewhere Over the Rainbow, from the Jewish perspective:
http://www.mycentraljersey.com/story/life/faith/2014/12/10/somewhere-rainbow-jewish-perspective/20104523/___

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2016-03-23 15:41:46 (12 comments; 1 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

Give Peace a Chance

I spent the past four days in Washington, D.C. attending the AIPAC Policy Conference, a cross-cultural, multi-racial gathering of more than 18,700 people from around the world, and from every State in our Union.

It would be easy to say that the highlight of the conference was being able to hear Hillary Clinton, Joseph Biden, John Kasich, Ted Cruz and Donald Trump speak in person within 24 hours of one another, but for me, the most important, and far and away the most moving session I attended was the People-to-People Dialogue on Advancing Israeli-Palestinian Coexistence, at which Bassam Aramin, a former Palestinian 'terrorist' spoke about losing his 10 year old daughter in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and about his many years in an Israeli prison, where he learned about the conflict from the other side, confronted his own pain,... more »

Give Peace a Chance

I spent the past four days in Washington, D.C. attending the AIPAC Policy Conference, a cross-cultural, multi-racial gathering of more than 18,700 people from around the world, and from every State in our Union.

It would be easy to say that the highlight of the conference was being able to hear Hillary Clinton, Joseph Biden, John Kasich, Ted Cruz and Donald Trump speak in person within 24 hours of one another, but for me, the most important, and far and away the most moving session I attended was the People-to-People Dialogue on Advancing Israeli-Palestinian Coexistence, at which Bassam Aramin, a former Palestinian 'terrorist' spoke about losing his 10 year old daughter in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and about his many years in an Israeli prison, where he learned about the conflict from the other side, confronted his own pain, humanity and purpose in life, and emerged as a significant voice and presence for Peace and healing.

Mr. Aramin was joined in this talk by Ali Abu Awwad, a Palestinian man who also lost a loved one to the conflict - his brother, who meant everything to him - who also, within his deep personal sorrow, realized that there is no such thing as revenge, that retaliation is a dead end, that War will never be the answer, that hate must be healed and that the only way to heal hatred within oneself is to consciously banish it and make another choice.

I wished I could have listened to these two men talk for days, and I wished that there were a larger and more public platform on which to champion the efforts they are making to reach out to the other side.

And then...Brussels. The delegation sat together yesterday morning at the Convention center, noticeably quieter, numbed I would say, at the news that had spread around the world of yet another terrorist attack at the hands of men who call themselves 'brothers.' 

What is the difference between men like Bassam Aramin and Ali Abu Awwad, who have had the courage to confront the roots of their own hatred, anger and violence and turn it into a commitment to work for Peace and reconciliation, and the brothers who are responsible for killing 34 people and wounding more than 200 others in three separate attacks in Brussels yesterday?

Personal loss, Yes. 

But, beyond that, an inner light must at some point go off, in order to realize that Peace cannot be created by declaring War.

I cannot recount for you Bassam Aramin's comments at AIPAC on Tuesday, but I was happy to discover that NPR's Emily Harris has provided a way for each of you to hear his story on All Things Considered.

There is a picture of his lovely daughter, Amir, and a discussion of the work Bassam had to put into changing the mindset of his son, Araab, who wanted to avenge his sister's death.

It is worth listening to. Please try if you have the time. I have also included a variety of links to some interesting interviews, talks and articles...if you are interested.

Giving Peace a Chance is a choice, not an accident.

Peace is the only way.

Make Love, not War.

Thank you all...

The Making of Within the Eye of the Storm: An interview with Bassam Aramin and Rami Alhanan and Shelly Hermon:
http://fathomjournal.org/the-making-of-within-the-eye-of-the-storm-an-interview-with-bassam-aramin-rami-elhanan-and-shelley-hermon/

Transforming Trauma: With Bassam Aramin and Rami Elhanin:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-oV671t5onY

Bassam Aramin: Moving Beyond Violence:
http://www.movingbeyondviolence.org/bassam-aramin/

Bassam Aramin: The Love and Forgiveness Project:
http://blogs.shu.edu/diplomacyresearch/2014/01/20/bassam-aramin/

Why are men so angry that they kill children to get what they want?
http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/aug/03/men-kill-children-middle-east-israel-palestine

Combatants for Peace: There is another way:
http://cfpeace.org/

#AIPAC   #BassamAramin   #AliAbuAwwad     #Brussels   #Terrorism   #AllThingsConsidered   #EmilyHarris  ___

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2016-03-21 03:47:30 (7 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

What an incredible day at the AIPAC Conferenence in D.C. (American Israel Public Affairs Committee), described by one speaker as a bi-partisan, cross cultural, multi-racial movement, which is an accurate description of what I experienced between 9:30am this morning and 9:30 tonight.

Since I learn about the world through direct experience with the arts (it's the way my brain works), I chose to start my day at a screening of filmmaker Laura Bialis's Rock in the Red Zone, about the Israeli city of Sderot, rocked by continual rocket assault...and the musical passions of its citizens, whose ancestors came from Morocco, Ethiopia, Spain, Greece and many other places to settle in Israel in the early 50s.

The talents of Avi Vaknin, Micah Biton, Robby Elmaliah and Hagit Yaso (winner of Israel's version of American idol) are featured in Bialis's reflective documentary about... more »

What an incredible day at the AIPAC Conferenence in D.C. (American Israel Public Affairs Committee), described by one speaker as a bi-partisan, cross cultural, multi-racial movement, which is an accurate description of what I experienced between 9:30am this morning and 9:30 tonight.

Since I learn about the world through direct experience with the arts (it's the way my brain works), I chose to start my day at a screening of filmmaker Laura Bialis's Rock in the Red Zone, about the Israeli city of Sderot, rocked by continual rocket assault...and the musical passions of its citizens, whose ancestors came from Morocco, Ethiopia, Spain, Greece and many other places to settle in Israel in the early 50s.

The talents of Avi Vaknin, Micah Biton, Robby Elmaliah and Hagit Yaso (winner of Israel's version of American idol) are featured in Bialis's reflective documentary about how people live with and survive continual threat from airstrikes. The answer, the therapy, the necessity...is to make music, much of which honors the musical traditions of the countries of their ancestors. I will do a separate post about Rock in the Red Zone, because it was quite moving.

Then, I segued to a talk by Clifton Truman Daniel, the grandson of President Harry Truman, whose recognition of the State of Israel in 1948 set the bar for all future Presidents' support of the Jewish State. Daniel talked about what it was like to grow up a "Truman," and the impact his grandfather has had on his life, as a son, a father...a writer.

The day ended at the Verizon Center, among 18,700 people, hosts of speakers, presenters and musicians, one of whom was the young girl featured in the attached video, a beneficiary of Sulomat: Music for Social Change: a musical program for children at risk. This particular young musician was born without eyes and left abandoned. Through music, she believes she can now do anything.

The keynote speaker tonight was Vice President Joseph Biden, an Irishman who told the story of his own personal, long time commitment to the people of Israel - his own first trip there, his meeting with Golda Meir after he had become a Senator at age 29, who told him "We have no other place to go," and how it was a defining moment for him in his life.

Biden told how he took his children to Israel as he had been taken, and how he took the children of his recently deceased son, Beau, to Israel...all so that they could witness for themselves the power, the magic, the life-changing experience of being there and meeting people of such tremendous courage in the only Democracy in the Middle East.

Tomorrow Hillary Clinton speaks, as does Ted Cruz, John Kasich...and Donald Trump.

But in between, there will be another jam-packed day of events, talks and presentations by a gathering of Jews, Christians, Buddhists, African Americans, Hispanics, students, academic...people from every state in our Union and from every culture all over the world working for Peace in the Middle East.

In the meanwhile, I give you the lyrics to Somewhere, music by Leonard Bernstein, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, from the Broadway Musical West Side Story.

We all need a 'Somewhere,' don't we?

There's a place for us, 
Somewhere a place for us. 
Peace and quiet and open air 
Wait for us 
Somewhere. 

There's a time for us, 
Some day a time for us, 
Time together with time to spare, 
Time to learn, time to care, 
Some day! 

Somewhere. 
We'll find a new way of living, 
We'll find a way of forgiving 
Somewhere . . . 

There's a place for us, 
A time and place for us. 
Hold my hand and we're halfway there. 
Hold my hand and I'll take you there 
Somehow, 
Some day, 
Somewhere! 

Music by Leonard Bernstein, lyrics by Stephen Sondheim.
© 1956, 1957 Amberson Holdings LLC and Stephen Sondheim. 
Leonard Bernstein Music Publishing Company LLC, Publisher. 

#Sulamot   #AIPAC   #JoeBiden   #Somewhere   #CliftonTrumanDaniel  ___

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2016-03-20 03:54:37 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

In D.C. for a conference. The wet snow that was falling as I drove through the Shenandoah Valley turned to heavy rain as I got closer to the city.

It's cold. And foggy. But D.C. is beautiful and the cherry trees are in bloom. Earlier than in any Spring (?) when I've been here before.

Walked through the chill to a Spanish Tapas bistro for razor clams, brussels sprouts and a glass of Tempranillo. Came back to my hotel and worked out on my TRX while I watched CNN, which repeated the news about SeaWorld (finally) deciding that Orcas are better off left beloved and wild in the ocean, where they belong, then cavorting with humans in over-sized bathtubs in amusement parks.

On October 27, 2013 I wrote about the movie Blackfish, which was instrumental in convincing SeaWorld it has no business trafficking in killer whales as entertainment for children. And adults.... more »

In D.C. for a conference. The wet snow that was falling as I drove through the Shenandoah Valley turned to heavy rain as I got closer to the city.

It's cold. And foggy. But D.C. is beautiful and the cherry trees are in bloom. Earlier than in any Spring (?) when I've been here before.

Walked through the chill to a Spanish Tapas bistro for razor clams, brussels sprouts and a glass of Tempranillo. Came back to my hotel and worked out on my TRX while I watched CNN, which repeated the news about SeaWorld (finally) deciding that Orcas are better off left beloved and wild in the ocean, where they belong, then cavorting with humans in over-sized bathtubs in amusement parks.

On October 27, 2013 I wrote about the movie Blackfish, which was instrumental in convincing SeaWorld it has no business trafficking in killer whales as entertainment for children. And adults.

Why did it take SeaWorld so long to wake up and take action? Their addiction to the money they were making? That's an easy answer. Denial? A love of control? A need to believe whatever they want, in spite of the knowledge of animal behaviorists?

Maybe this sort of thing just don't bother us enough. Maybe we just think this stuff is okay. Maybe we just accept the unacceptable. Maybe we are numb. Maybe we can't tear ourselves away from that which we know, deep down inside, is repulsive, because we like entertainment, any kind of entertainment, and we make excuses for our addiction to it.

We tell ourselves...it's just a whale, it doesn't have feelings, it's not smart...look...it's happy. Free fish. Clapping humans.

We tell ourselves lots of things. That there is no such thing as climate change. Or racism. That there is nothing we can do about animal poaching. That there has always been violence. That guns don't kill people, people do.

That Trump is amusing. That he is just the will of the people. So was decades of Orca entertainment at SeaWorld and look how that turned out.

We accept madness. We are tolerant of the intolerable. We tell ourselves that part of being an adult is accepting what we cannot fix. Better to turn the other cheek. Don't stress. Don't fight it. Go with the flow.

And walk through the rainy city.

Past the Japanese Cherry Trees that are blooming five days earlier than usual this year.

After all, something beautiful can make us forget something unpleasant.

There is always a lovely walk through a city beckoning Spring on a foggy chilly night at the end of Winter...

Isn't there?

#FreeTilikum   #CherryBlossomFestival   #Blackfish  ___

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2016-03-18 15:49:08 (7 comments; 3 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

Behold the baby eagle cam. I wonder what it feels like to be hatched. Or, to hatch oneself. To have a beak with which to perform said action(s). To be fluffy. And then to fledge...

And take flight, free, like an eagle, and thermal with the winds.

Alas, I have to use metal airbird wings, but they'll do in the absence of my own feathers.

Behold the baby eagle cam. I wonder what it feels like to be hatched. Or, to hatch oneself. To have a beak with which to perform said action(s). To be fluffy. And then to fledge...

And take flight, free, like an eagle, and thermal with the winds.

Alas, I have to use metal airbird wings, but they'll do in the absence of my own feathers.___

2016-03-14 17:50:38 (15 comments; 1 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

To Apologize or Not to Apologize, 'tis the question of the moment (or second, or nanosecond...)

Recently...

Gloria Steinem has apologized
Madeleine Albright has apologized
Hillary Clinton has apologized
A snowmobile driver has apologized
Ben Affleck has apologized
SxSW has apologized
The Atlanta Falcons have apologized
Adam Eaton has apologized
Jesse Hughes has apologized
Carmelo Anthony has apologized
(lots and lots of sport folk seem to apologize)
Jeb Bush has apologized
Ted Cruz has apologized
Chris Christie has apologized
(lots and lots of politicians seem to apologize)

But...one of them...Trump...isn't fond of apologizing.

A few weeks ago, when the Internet got its knickers in a twist over Gloria Steinem's comment that young women support Bernie Sanders 'cause it's... more »

A chat with +Giselle Minoli following the uproar over comments made by two highly-respected women, Gloria Steinem and Madeleine Albright. Giselle has considerable experience both in the artistic and the corporate world.___To Apologize or Not to Apologize, 'tis the question of the moment (or second, or nanosecond...)

Recently...

Gloria Steinem has apologized
Madeleine Albright has apologized
Hillary Clinton has apologized
A snowmobile driver has apologized
Ben Affleck has apologized
SxSW has apologized
The Atlanta Falcons have apologized
Adam Eaton has apologized
Jesse Hughes has apologized
Carmelo Anthony has apologized
(lots and lots of sport folk seem to apologize)
Jeb Bush has apologized
Ted Cruz has apologized
Chris Christie has apologized
(lots and lots of politicians seem to apologize)

But...one of them...Trump...isn't fond of apologizing.

A few weeks ago, when the Internet got its knickers in a twist over Gloria Steinem's comment that young women support Bernie Sanders 'cause it's "Where the Boys Are...." (Connie Francis you naughty girl)..., and over Madeleine Albright's comment that "There's a special place in Hell for women who don't support other women..." (okay, shoot me, but I happen to agree with her)...I chatted with +Randy Resnick about what, exactly, Gloria and Madeleine felt they had to apologize for and whether 'tis a good thing, a relevant thing, or a well, um, absurd thing to apologize when the Internet gets its knickers in a twist.

Randy's in France. I'm in the States. The idea of hearing how things felt on the other side of the pond in the midst of this crazy bananas election year intrigued me.

Here's our chat. And apologies for taking so long to share it. OK...so one teensy-weensy little apology can't hurt, can it?

And just because she's so fabulous, I've included a link to Connie singing Where the Boys are...

Thank you +Randy Resnick...

"Where The Boys Are," Connie Francis

Where the boys are, someone waits for me
A smilin' face, a warm embrace, two arms to hold me tenderly

Where the boys are, my true love will be
He's walkin' down some street in town and I know he's lookin' there for me

In the crowd of a million people I'll find my valentine
And then I'll climb to the highest steeple and tell the world he's mine

Till he holds me I'll wait impatiently
Where the boys are, where the boys are
Where the boys are, someone waits for me

Till he holds me I'll wait impatiently
Where the boys are, where the boys are
Where the boys are, someone waits for me

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEbwvkowSKo

#Voices   #RandyResnick   #GloriaSteinem   #MadeleineAlbright   #WheretheBoysAre   #ConnieFrancis   

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2016-03-09 02:27:58 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

What an interesting photo...a Unitarian Universalist Church being used as a voting place in Michigan today. I wonder if anyone voted for Trump at that location. There isn't a shred of any of the following 'beliefs' of Unitarians that can be found in Trump, who won Michigan. Just free-associating from a photo...

"In Unitarian Universalism, you can bring your whole self: your full identity, your questioning mind, your expansive heart.

Together, we create a force more powerful than one person or one belief system. As Unitarian Universalists, we do not have to check our personal background and beliefs at the door: we join together on a journey that honors everywhere we’ve been before.

Our beliefs are diverse and inclusive. We have no shared creed. Our shared covenant (our seven Principles) supports “the free and responsible search for truth and meaning.”Thoug... more »

What an interesting photo...a Unitarian Universalist Church being used as a voting place in Michigan today. I wonder if anyone voted for Trump at that location. There isn't a shred of any of the following 'beliefs' of Unitarians that can be found in Trump, who won Michigan. Just free-associating from a photo...

"In Unitarian Universalism, you can bring your whole self: your full identity, your questioning mind, your expansive heart.

Together, we create a force more powerful than one person or one belief system. As Unitarian Universalists, we do not have to check our personal background and beliefs at the door: we join together on a journey that honors everywhere we’ve been before.

Our beliefs are diverse and inclusive. We have no shared creed. Our shared covenant (our seven Principles) supports “the free and responsible search for truth and meaning.” Though Unitarianism and Universalism were both liberal Christian traditions, this responsible search has led us to embrace diverse teachings from Eastern and Western religions and philosophies.

Unitarian Universalists believe more than one thing. We think for ourselves, and reflect together, about important questions:

The existence of a Higher Power
Life and Death
Sacred Texts
Inspiration and Guidance
Prayer and Spiritual Practices

We are united in our broad and inclusive outlook, and in our values, as expressed in our seven Principles. We are united in shared experience: our open and stirring worship services, religious education, and rites of passage; our work for social justice; our quest to include the marginalized; our expressions of love."___

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2016-03-08 15:11:10 (3 comments; 7 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

In honor of women everywhere today, International Women's Day, I share with you the link to Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Women and Economics: A Study of the Economic Relation Between Men and Women as a Factor in Social Evolution, published by Small, Maynard & Co., Boston, 1898. It is an essay that every woman and man should read.

In honor of mothers everywhere who gave each of us life, below is the 'Proem," that precedes it, followed by the online link to the entirety of Women and Economics.

PROEM

In dark and early ages, through the primal forests faring, 
Ere the soul came shining into prehistoric night, 
Twofold man was equal; they were comrades dear and daring, 
Living wild and free together in unreasoning delight.

Ere the soul was born and consciousness came slowly, 
Ere the soul was born,to m... more »

In honor of women everywhere today, International Women's Day, I share with you the link to Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Women and Economics: A Study of the Economic Relation Between Men and Women as a Factor in Social Evolution, published by Small, Maynard & Co., Boston, 1898. It is an essay that every woman and man should read.

In honor of mothers everywhere who gave each of us life, below is the 'Proem," that precedes it, followed by the online link to the entirety of Women and Economics.

PROEM

In dark and early ages, through the primal forests faring, 
Ere the soul came shining into prehistoric night, 
Twofold man was equal; they were comrades dear and daring, 
Living wild and free together in unreasoning delight.

Ere the soul was born and consciousness came slowly, 
Ere the soul was born, to man and woman, too,
Ere he found the Tree of Knowledge, that awful tree and holy, 
Ere he knew he felt, and knew he knew.

Then said he to Pain, "I am wise now, and I know you! 
No more will I suffer while power and wisdom last!" 
Then said he to Pleasure, "I am strong, and I will show you 
That the will of man can seize you,–aye, and hold you fast!"

Food he ate for pleasure, and wine he drank for gladness. 
And woman? Ah, the woman! the crown of all delight! 
His now,–he knew it! He was strong to madness 
In that early dawning after prehistoric night.

His,–his forever! That glory sweet and tender! 
Ah, but he would love her! And she should love but him! 
He would work and struggle for her, he would shelter and defend her,–
She should never leave him, never, till their eyes in death were dim.

Close, close he bound her, that she should leave him never; 
Weak still he kept her, lest she be strong to flee; 
And the fainting flame of passion he kept alive forever 
With all the arts and forces of earth and sky and sea.

And, ah, the long journey! The slow and awful ages 
They have labored up together, blind and crippled, all astray! 
Through what a mighty volume, with a million shameful pages, 
From the freedom of the forests to the prisons of to-day!

Food he ate for pleasure, and it slew him with diseases! 
Wine he drank for gladness, and it led the way to crime! 
And woman? He will hold her,–he will have her when he pleases–
And he never once hath seen her since the prehistoric time!

Gone the friend and comrade of the day when life was younger, 
She who rests and comforts, she who helps and saves. 
Still he seeks her vainly, with a never-dying hunger; 
Alone beneath his tyrants, alone above his slaves!

Toiler, bent and weary with the load of thine own making! 
Thou who art sad and lonely, though lonely all in vain! 
Who hast sought to conquer Pleasure and have her for the taking, 
And found that Pleasure only was another name for Pain–

Nature hath reclaimed thee, forgiving dispossession! 
God hath not forgotten, though man doth still forget! 
The woman-soul is rising, in despite of thy transgression–
Loose her now, and trust her! She will love thee yet!

Love thee? She will love thee as only freedom knoweth!
Love thee? She will love thee while Love itself doth live! 
Fear not the heart of woman! No bitterness it showeth!
The ages of her sorrow have but taught her to forgive!

PREFACE, by Charlotte Perkins Stetson

This book is written to offer a simple and natural explanation of one of the most common and most perplexing problems of human life,–a problem which presents itself to almost every individual for practical solution, and which demands the most serious attention of the moralist, the physician, and the sociologist.

To show how some of the worst evils under which we suffer, evils long supposed to be inherent and ineradicable in our natures, are but the result of certain arbitrary conditions of our own adoption, and how, by removing those conditions, we may remove the evil resultant.

To point out how far we have already gone in the path of improvement, and how irresistibly the social forces of to-day are compelling us further, even without our knowledge and against our violent opposition, an advance which may be greatly quickened by our recognition and assistance.

To reach in especial the thinking women of to-day, and urge upon them a new sense, not only of their social responsibility as individuals, but of their measureless racial importance as makers of men.

It is hoped also that the theory advanced will prove sufficiently suggestive to give rise to such further study and discussion as shall prove its error or establish its truth." 

http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/gilman/economics/economics.html

Note: This book has been put on-line as part of the BUILD-A-BOOK Initiative at the Celebration of Women Writers through the combined work of: Doug Levy, Jessie Hudgins, Liz Pysar, Luevinia Hicks, Marilyn Wharton, Miriam Schneidmill, Pat Buchanan, and Mary Mark Ockerbloom. This chapter is dedicated by Jessie Hudgins:
"With a little love and a little work... for my grandchildren." Editor: Mary Mark Ockerbloom

#CharlottePerkinsGilman   #InternationalWomensDay   #WomenandEconomics   #TheYellowWallPaper   #ThePoetryofCharlottePerkinsGilman      #CelebrationofWomenWriters   #BuildaBook  ___

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2016-03-08 15:02:30 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-03-06 14:38:18 (12 comments; 0 reshares; 28 +1s)Open 

Ana Padron and Diego Blanco at an Argentine Tango Milonga (Tango dance party).

I love the intimacy of these gatherings. The appreciation dancers have for one another's techniques, styles, steps. And of course the dresses and the shoes and the men's suits. There is something that happens when partners dress up for one another. It's respectful.

In the end, for me, it is all about the intimacy of this particular dance, the connection with a partner that doesn't let up for a second. While there are basic steps (the Boleo, the Sacada, front and back Ochos, the Grapevine, Planeos, leg wraps, sandwiches...Yes, Sandwiches!) it is highly improvisational.

And that kind of improv comes with trust, and requires risk tasking and feeling your way through it and of course skill.

But then it aways comes back to the intimacy. 

It's Sunday... more »

Ana Padron and Diego Blanco at an Argentine Tango Milonga (Tango dance party).

I love the intimacy of these gatherings. The appreciation dancers have for one another's techniques, styles, steps. And of course the dresses and the shoes and the men's suits. There is something that happens when partners dress up for one another. It's respectful.

In the end, for me, it is all about the intimacy of this particular dance, the connection with a partner that doesn't let up for a second. While there are basic steps (the Boleo, the Sacada, front and back Ochos, the Grapevine, Planeos, leg wraps, sandwiches...Yes, Sandwiches!) it is highly improvisational.

And that kind of improv comes with trust, and requires risk tasking and feeling your way through it and of course skill.

But then it aways comes back to the intimacy. 

It's Sunday morning.

Which is all about listening to music and watching dance videos, something that wasn't available when I was six and learning to dance.

The beautiful Argentine Tango.

Ah...YouTube...

#AnaPadronDiegoBlanco   #ArgentineTango   #Dance  ___

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2016-03-06 13:42:03 (4 comments; 1 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

On the profound sending of condolences, from poet and musician Benjamin Clementine.

‘‘It just goes to show it’s all about what you do in your life. Where you’re from shapes you, but you can actually do whatever you want.’’ - Benjamine Clementine

Condolence, Benjamin Clementine

I http://lyricstranslate.com/en/benjamin-clementine-condolence-lyrics.html#ixzz4289kFzaR

I swear that you've seen me
yes you've seen me here before, before
and so don't tell it
don't tell it otherwise
This voice, this particular voice
yes you've heard it before, before
and so don't you dare tell it
don't you dare tell it otherwise

No wonder why the road seems so long
'cause I have done it all before
and I won

You felt τhis feeling
tell me, don't be ashamedyou felt i... more »

On the profound sending of condolences, from poet and musician Benjamin Clementine.

‘‘It just goes to show it’s all about what you do in your life. Where you’re from shapes you, but you can actually do whatever you want.’’ - Benjamine Clementine

Condolence, Benjamin Clementine

I http://lyricstranslate.com/en/benjamin-clementine-condolence-lyrics.html#ixzz4289kFzaR

I swear that you've seen me
yes you've seen me here before, before
and so don't tell it
don't tell it otherwise
This voice, this particular voice
yes you've heard it before, before
and so don't you dare tell it
don't you dare tell it otherwise

No wonder why the road seems so long
'cause I have done it all before
and I won

You felt τhis feeling
tell me, don't be ashamed
you felt it before, before
and so don't tell me
don't tell me otherwise
I almost forgot, foolish me
I almost forgot, forgot
where I'm from you see the rain
before the rain even starts to rain

Before I was born there was a storm
before that storm there was fire
burning everywhere, everywhere
and everything became nothing again
then out of nothing
out of absolutely nothing
I Benjamin, I was born
so that when I become someone one day
I'll always remember I came from nothing

No wonder why you've been buggering me
'cause this walk it's a previous journey
and no wonder why the road seem so long
'cause I have done it all before
and I won

I'm sending my condolence
I'm sending my condolence to fear
I'm sending my condolence
I'm sending my condolence to insecurities
You should know by now
you should know by now that I just don't care
for what you might say
might bring someone downhill
I'm sending my condolence
I'm sending my condolence to fear

Unlocking the Mystery of Benjamin Clementine:
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/06/t-magazine/benjamin-clementine-musican-poet.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=mini-moth&region=top-stories-below&WT.nav=top-stories-below

#BenjamineClementine   #AtLeastForNow   #Poetry  ___

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2016-03-03 16:57:16 (17 comments; 3 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

If young men all over the world learned to dance, they wouldn't grow up wanting to kill one another. They wouldn't grow up accepting violence, thinking it has always been thus, therefore it will always be thus.

If young men all over the world learned to dance, with other men, with women, by themselves, they would appreciate what a miracle it is to be alive, what a gift, what a blessing.

If young men all over the world learned to dance, they would value life more than death, construction more than destruction, building rather than tearing down, unearthing rather than burying.

If young men all over the world learned to dance, they would make room for others, lend a hand, lift someone off the ground, save them from peril, from drowning, shelter them, help them to survive, keep them safe.

If young men all over the world learned to dance, there would be no room... more »

If young men all over the world learned to dance, they wouldn't grow up wanting to kill one another. They wouldn't grow up accepting violence, thinking it has always been thus, therefore it will always be thus.

If young men all over the world learned to dance, with other men, with women, by themselves, they would appreciate what a miracle it is to be alive, what a gift, what a blessing.

If young men all over the world learned to dance, they would value life more than death, construction more than destruction, building rather than tearing down, unearthing rather than burying.

If young men all over the world learned to dance, they would make room for others, lend a hand, lift someone off the ground, save them from peril, from drowning, shelter them, help them to survive, keep them safe.

If young men all over the world learned to dance, there would be no room for war, or hatred, or violence. There would instead be room for peace, room to feel, to empathize, to teach, to learn, to love, to breathe...

ensemble with everyone else in the Universe.

If only young men all over the world learned to dance...

#BalletBoyz   #YoungMenFilm   #Dance   #Ballet  ___

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2016-02-29 16:37:45 (23 comments; 8 reshares; 52 +1s)Open 

John Oliver deconstructs the Serial Lies of the Litigious Serial Liar Donald Trump on this Super Tuesday Eve. And why not? It's Leap February in a Leap Year and there must be something the United States has done to deserve this wretched karma. There must be.

John Oliver for POTUS.  #MakeDonaldDrumptAgain . Watch the entire video from start to finish. It's worth it.

The problem is that even when you can demonstrably prove Donald Trump to be wrong, it never seems to matter. You can hold his feet to the fire, but he'll just stand there on the stumps bragging about his fireproof foot skin. And that's maybe because he has spent decades turning his own name into a brand synonymous with success and quality. And he's made himself the mascot for that brand. Like Ronald McDonald or Chef Boyardee, and that is who we have seen in The Apprentice or Wrestle Mania or HomeA... more »

John Oliver deconstructs the Serial Lies of the Litigious Serial Liar Donald Trump on this Super Tuesday Eve. And why not? It's Leap February in a Leap Year and there must be something the United States has done to deserve this wretched karma. There must be.

John Oliver for POTUS.  #MakeDonaldDrumptAgain . Watch the entire video from start to finish. It's worth it.

The problem is that even when you can demonstrably prove Donald Trump to be wrong, it never seems to matter. You can hold his feet to the fire, but he'll just stand there on the stumps bragging about his fireproof foot skin. And that's maybe because he has spent decades turning his own name into a brand synonymous with success and quality. And he's made himself the mascot for that brand. Like Ronald McDonald or Chef Boyardee, and that is who we have seen in The Apprentice or Wrestle Mania or Home Alone II. But if he's actually going to be the Republican Nominee, it's time to stop thinking of the mascot and start thinking of the man. Because a candidate for President needs a coherent set of policies. Whatever you think about Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, at least you basically know where they stand. John Oliver

The other thing is that with the terrorists, you have to take out their families. They care about their lives, don't kid yourselves. They say they don't care, but you have to take out their families. Donald Trump, Republican front runner for the Presidential nomination publicly advocating a war crime

Hrumpfty Drumpfty sat on a wall....

#MakeDonaldDrumpfAgain   #POTUS   #JohnOliver  ___

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2016-02-25 20:06:46 (27 comments; 5 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

Really.

Really.___

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2016-02-24 16:21:33 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

What a shame that people who are jumping up and down about Trump aren't interested enough to do some research of their own and find out what the back story is...the back story that those of us who live in New York know. Which is that Donald Trump is mostly just a brand name.

But his influence on the citizens of New York? On its culture? On its day-to-day life? On its policies? Well, read on and discover what we New Yorkers know...

Note: Noam Chomsky suggests Donald Trump rides a wave of fear and aggression and anger over a dying 'white America."

Donald Trump Is Winning Because White America Is Dying:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/donald-trump-noam-chomsky-white-mortality_us_56cf8618e4b0bf0dab31838f

What a shame that people who are jumping up and down about Trump aren't interested enough to do some research of their own and find out what the back story is...the back story that those of us who live in New York know. Which is that Donald Trump is mostly just a brand name.

But his influence on the citizens of New York? On its culture? On its day-to-day life? On its policies? Well, read on and discover what we New Yorkers know...

Note: Noam Chomsky suggests Donald Trump rides a wave of fear and aggression and anger over a dying 'white America."

Donald Trump Is Winning Because White America Is Dying:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/donald-trump-noam-chomsky-white-mortality_us_56cf8618e4b0bf0dab31838f___

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2016-02-23 17:26:56 (57 comments; 4 reshares; 31 +1s)Open 

This is a compelling and beautiful photographic image. But the story it tells is not so beautiful.The unpaid work that women do is one of the most central and most profound issues facing women around the world today. We no longer live in a world where it can be argued that the work women do at home, if they choose to stay at home rather than enter the workplace, is theoretically and philosophically of the same value as their partner's salary-paid work outside the home.

Theory and philosophy and appreciation don't fatten a bank account. Women who lose their partners, either from divorce or death, and who have been out of the workforce cannot catch up financially to their paid partners. They and their children often tumble down into the cruel world of poverty and financial struggle. It becomes difficult to go back to school to make themselves competitive, let alone re-enter the workforcea... more »

This is a compelling and beautiful photographic image. But the story it tells is not so beautiful.The unpaid work that women do is one of the most central and most profound issues facing women around the world today. We no longer live in a world where it can be argued that the work women do at home, if they choose to stay at home rather than enter the workplace, is theoretically and philosophically of the same value as their partner's salary-paid work outside the home.

Theory and philosophy and appreciation don't fatten a bank account. Women who lose their partners, either from divorce or death, and who have been out of the workforce cannot catch up financially to their paid partners. They and their children often tumble down into the cruel world of poverty and financial struggle. It becomes difficult to go back to school to make themselves competitive, let alone re-enter the workforce at a decent salary.

It is one thing to say that the work women do at home is valuable. It is quite another to admit, realize and confront the financial inequity that results from women spending their entire lives doing work that does not provide them with financial security, that does not acknowledge that work is work, and that work should be remunerated, not just philosophically appreciated.

Even more disturbing, the skills - and they are skills - that women use at home to organize their partners' and their families' lives are not seen as valuable skills in the workforce, yet the application of those same skills are necessary to the smooth functioning of any business. Too often when these women re-enter the workforce it is in supporting roles, as assistants, PAs, secretaries, receptionists, the same perceived supporting roles they work in at home with their partners. They are perceived to be second chair, second string, rather than first chair, first string. 

I would like to see a poll of families where the working partner pays the stay at home partner for their work. How many do that? How many working partners take seriously the financial security of their mate? Or do they see the relationship as one of dominance and dependency? Do they truly value the 'work' done by the stay at home partner? And what does it mean to 'value' a partner.

I would like to see such a poll.

In the meanwhile, a few articles and the statistics on women, work, divorce, and the economic impact on children:

After Divorce 44% of Women Fell Into Poverty:
http://primacyofreason.blogspot.com/2011/05/in-depth-study-after-divorce-44-of_31.html

Marriage and Povery:
http://www.familyfacts.org/briefs/8/marriage-and-poverty

Children of Divorce More Likely to Live in Poverty:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/08/25/divorce-poverty-children-census_n_936896.html

After Divorce Women Rebound Faster But Stay in Poverty:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brendan-lyle/after-divorce-women-rebou_1_b_1970733.html

Children of Divorce More Likely to Be Poor:
http://blogs.wsj.com/economics/2011/08/25/children-of-divorce-more-likely-to-be-poor/

#WomenandWork  ___

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2016-02-22 21:14:45 (7 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

Seriously, Kentucky? First we have to endure Kim Davis. Then Mitch McConnell. Now the State's Governor, Matt Bevin, is suggesting that students be nudged away from the Humanities (No, whatever we do, let's not be human or humane...) and into job-friendly studies like that of Electrical Engineering, which falls under the STEM umbrella.

Umm...someone ought to tell this rapidly growing movement in these United States, that three out of the four fields in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fall squarely in the embrace of, Oh, No, Say It Isn't so...Yes, you got it...THE LIBERAL ARTS. And I would argue that Technology is at home among them, too.

What are the Liberal Arts? Literature. Languages. Art history. Music history. Philosophy. History. MATHEMATICS. Psychology. SCIENCE, including the Physical Sciences such as PHYSICS, Chemistry and Astronomy.
... more »

Seriously, Kentucky? First we have to endure Kim Davis. Then Mitch McConnell. Now the State's Governor, Matt Bevin, is suggesting that students be nudged away from the Humanities (No, whatever we do, let's not be human or humane...) and into job-friendly studies like that of Electrical Engineering, which falls under the STEM umbrella.

Umm...someone ought to tell this rapidly growing movement in these United States, that three out of the four fields in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fall squarely in the embrace of, Oh, No, Say It Isn't so...Yes, you got it...THE LIBERAL ARTS. And I would argue that Technology is at home among them, too.

What are the Liberal Arts? Literature. Languages. Art history. Music history. Philosophy. History. MATHEMATICS. Psychology. SCIENCE, including the Physical Sciences such as PHYSICS, Chemistry and Astronomy.

“All the people in the world who want to study French literature can do so; they’re just not going to be subsidized by the taxpayers like engineers will be, for example,” says Mr. Bevin, a Republican (sigh), who peculiarly went to a Liberal Arts college himself and got an undergraduate degree in Japanese and East Asian studies."_

So, now we're discriminating because someone is good at language and not math? Or wants to be a musician and not an engineer? Is musical engineer OK?

What does it mean to have studied the dreaded, much aligned and feared Liberal Arts, that field of study that some would say shall doom you to a life of poverty and misery? I should know. I studied them. At St. John's College, the third oldest college in the United States. Our curriculum required four years of Math (Euclid. Remember him?), four years of Laboratory Science, four years of Language (oh, Yes, French. And Ancient Greek.), one year of Music and four years of seminar/preceptorial study of Astronomy, Philosophy, Literature, Poetry, History, Politics...you know...The Iliad, The Odyssey...the Bible....). The curriculum is the study of The Great Books.

Oh, I'm sorry. I forgot. Students are not supposed to be able to read, or appreciate music or art or poetry, or understand history, or be able to look up into the sky and ponder the heavens, the universe, the planets and the miracle, magic, splendor, wonderment of being alive...and having brains with which to be curious, to think...to learn, to grow.

"The Republican presidential candidate Senator Marco Rubio, for example, has called for more welders and fewer philosophers. Gov. Rick Scott of Florida criticized anthropologists, and Mr. McCrory belittled gender studies."

Now, now, now. Marco. The only reason you don't want students to study philosophy is that by doing so they would realize what a sophist you are and how full of BS. All the better to keep you out of office. Far better to have students be narrow-minded. Like you.

"Or, as Gov. Patrick McCrory of North Carolina once put it, higher-education funding should not be “based on butts in seats, but on how many of those butts can get jobs."

And as for you dear Mr. McCrory, I have been employed my entire adult life. Never had a problem getting my butt out of a seat and into a job. 

Somewhere within my Liberal Arts education I learned how to smell a rat. The rat being money.

"New engineers, for example, are expected to earn nearly $65,000 a year. While, the average salary for new graduates who majored in humanities — including French literature — is projected to increase slightly from last year to $46,065, up from $45,042."

"Research by The Association of American Colleges and Universities shows that employers are not as focused on individual majors as they are on the kind of broad-based analytic, communications and problem-solving skills that a humanities education specializes in."

“A lot of the feedback we get from employers is not only about the necessity of technical skills, but the soft skills as well — the ability to think creatively, to work in groups, things that you traditionally get in the liberal arts. It’s not as simple as STEM is valued and worthy of incentives and everything else is not.”

Right. Unless you are a politician hell bent on shrinking students minds and making it impossible for them to fully use their brains, explore the world and become well-rounded, well-educated, well-read, well....humane human beings.

Remember when it was hip to be a human being?

I do. And I remember when being educated included, but was not limited to or defined by, how much one would earn as a result of a course of study.

#Education   #TheLiberalArts   #STEM  ___

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2016-02-16 14:11:03 (58 comments; 3 reshares; 38 +1s)Open 

All hail Mary Lou Marzian who, in response to a new Kentucky abortion law that requires a woman to have a medical consultation 24 hours before having an abortion, has proposed a bill that states a man who wants Viagra "would be required to have two doctor visits, a signed-and-dated letter from his spouse providing consent and a sworn statement—delivered with his hand on a Bible—that he would use the drugs only to have sex with his spouse."

“I have found that men are very touchy about their sexual lives, and they think that is very personal. So I wanted to hit a chord that men could understand how it feels to have a politician say, ‘Well, you really don’t know enough; you really need some education about this because you just don’t know enough about your body; and we need to insert ourselves into your private life.’" Mary Lou Marzian, StateRepresentativ... more »

All hail Mary Lou Marzian who, in response to a new Kentucky abortion law that requires a woman to have a medical consultation 24 hours before having an abortion, has proposed a bill that states a man who wants Viagra "would be required to have two doctor visits, a signed-and-dated letter from his spouse providing consent and a sworn statement—delivered with his hand on a Bible—that he would use the drugs only to have sex with his spouse."

“I have found that men are very touchy about their sexual lives, and they think that is very personal. So I wanted to hit a chord that men could understand how it feels to have a politician say, ‘Well, you really don’t know enough; you really need some education about this because you just don’t know enough about your body; and we need to insert ourselves into your private life.’" Mary Lou Marzian, State Representative, Kentucky

Yes, the Grand Old Party hates government involvement in any form, unless it is to prevent women from being in complete control of their bodies.

All Hail Mary Lou Marzian.___

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2016-02-15 16:02:12 (105 comments; 1 reshares; 34 +1s)Open 

I admire Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's remembrance of her friend and sparring partner on the Supreme Court, Justice Antonin Scalia. I, too, disagreed with many of his opinions and wish that I had had the opportunity to know his apparently generous sense of humor and the personality he shared with his fellow Justices. Had I known him, would it have changed my mind about his opinions? I don't know.

His work was to interpret the law and the constitution of the United States of America, not to let us get to know him as a person. But in our private lives, knowing a person does influence how we perceive their opinions, views about life and their political and religious beliefs.

Knowing a person can make us either tolerant or intolerant (or something in between) of their views if they differ from ours.

But ought we be able to be tolerant of another's views even if we... more »

I admire Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's remembrance of her friend and sparring partner on the Supreme Court, Justice Antonin Scalia. I, too, disagreed with many of his opinions and wish that I had had the opportunity to know his apparently generous sense of humor and the personality he shared with his fellow Justices. Had I known him, would it have changed my mind about his opinions? I don't know.

His work was to interpret the law and the constitution of the United States of America, not to let us get to know him as a person. But in our private lives, knowing a person does influence how we perceive their opinions, views about life and their political and religious beliefs.

Knowing a person can make us either tolerant or intolerant (or something in between) of their views if they differ from ours.

But ought we be able to be tolerant of another's views even if we don't know them, as Ginsburg knew Scalia? Ought we strive to embrace completely opposite views to our own? Ought we practice that as a spiritual, ethical, intellectual endeavor?

And what would the dreaded "debates" be like if that were the candidates' intent, rather than to slam, trash, destroy, humiliate, belittle and demean?

Understanding. Intent. Conversation. Forward movement.

I'm glad there is so much extensive coverage about Scalia's death and what his long history as a Justice has meant, what his influence has been, and how respectful the discussion has been of who he was on that bench as a member of that team.

Now...would that the discussion about his replacement were as respectful as the friendship between Scalia, a Conservative, and Ginsburg, a Liberal.

Let us take our cue from them.

#SCOTUS   #AntoninScalia   #RuthBaderGinsburg  ___

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2016-02-15 14:07:49 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 26 +1s)Open 

Come Even Closer Part II of yesterday's post about communicating with the intention of a dancer...

There is much to be learned from communicating without speaking, using movement, music and the body to reach another. Last night I 'watched' the movie Casablanca by 'listening' to it instead of actually watching it. I was exercising on the floor in a part of the room where I could not see the television. I heard and understood lines of dialogue and nuance in conversation between characters as though I was 'watching' the movie for the first time, even though it would be safe to say I have probably seen the move two dozen times.

And then I noticed that as I lay on the floor, exercising and listening to the movie, I was able to remember visuals from each scene, what the characters looked like, what they were doing, where they were standing, sitting, what... more »

Come Even Closer Part II of yesterday's post about communicating with the intention of a dancer...

There is much to be learned from communicating without speaking, using movement, music and the body to reach another. Last night I 'watched' the movie Casablanca by 'listening' to it instead of actually watching it. I was exercising on the floor in a part of the room where I could not see the television. I heard and understood lines of dialogue and nuance in conversation between characters as though I was 'watching' the movie for the first time, even though it would be safe to say I have probably seen the move two dozen times.

And then I noticed that as I lay on the floor, exercising and listening to the movie, I was able to remember visuals from each scene, what the characters looked like, what they were doing, where they were standing, sitting, what was going on in the background, the lighting, whether it was day or night.

Watching the movie, it's beautiful visuals splashed across the screen, I don't have to imagine anything. All I have to do is absorb what is there. But when I couldn't see the screen, I had to work harder to picture what was going on. It reminded me of my instrument training as a pilot, scanning the instruments to understand where I am in space, what the plane is doing - is it banking right or left, descending or ascending, speeding up or slowing down...

When I was studying acting we would put bags over our heads so as not to be distracted by any visual whatsoever when we were working on a scene. Listen. Just listen. And remain as still as possible until something propels you to move.

When I first began to learn to dance, when I was six, Elizabeth Waters would make us close our eyes as we moved, instructing us to move as slowly as possible. Not being able to see who was close by forced us to sense movement around us and our movements became therefore much more precise, much more specific...in order not to bump into or step on another dancer.

When I watch Mark and Monica move together, I think about my early acting and dancing training and how it can be applied to everything in life.

Ah, to begin each day dancing...

Ballett Dortmund
Dancers: Mark Radjapov and Monica Fotescu-Uta
Music: Philip Glass
Choreography: Benjamin Millepied

#BenjaminMillepied   #BallettDortmund   #Dance   #PhilipGlass  ___

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2016-02-14 17:49:14 (11 comments; 6 reshares; 32 +1s)Open 

Closer. Come closer. What if we were to speak to one another with such precision and intention? Such expression and tenderness? Such energy and gentleness?

What could we create?
What would our world be like?
How would it change our lives?
Individually? And with those we love? 

Ballet Dortmund
Dancers:  Mark Radjapov and Monica Fotescu-Uta
Choreography: Benjamin Millepied
Music: Philip Glass

#BenjaminMillepied   #BalletDortmund    #PhilipGlass   #Closer1   #Dance  

Closer. Come closer. What if we were to speak to one another with such precision and intention? Such expression and tenderness? Such energy and gentleness?

What could we create?
What would our world be like?
How would it change our lives?
Individually? And with those we love? 

Ballet Dortmund
Dancers:  Mark Radjapov and Monica Fotescu-Uta
Choreography: Benjamin Millepied
Music: Philip Glass

#BenjaminMillepied   #BalletDortmund    #PhilipGlass   #Closer1   #Dance  ___

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2016-02-13 15:16:21 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 14 +1s)Open 

I 'met' Madeleine Albright once. In a elevator. I was already in it, by myself, and when it stopped at a floor she got on with two other people. She backed up against the wall opposite me, glowing with that direct energy she always had. I blurted out "Oh my. You're Madeleine Albright. Hello." And she said, "Yes. I am. Hello." And then the elevator stopped again and she got out, and I said, "Goodbye," and she raised her hand and waved. My Madeleine Albright diplomatic moment.

#MadeleineAlbright  

I 'met' Madeleine Albright once. In a elevator. I was already in it, by myself, and when it stopped at a floor she got on with two other people. She backed up against the wall opposite me, glowing with that direct energy she always had. I blurted out "Oh my. You're Madeleine Albright. Hello." And she said, "Yes. I am. Hello." And then the elevator stopped again and she got out, and I said, "Goodbye," and she raised her hand and waved. My Madeleine Albright diplomatic moment.

#MadeleineAlbright  ___

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2016-02-11 14:55:51 (23 comments; 4 reshares; 24 +1s)Open 

When the Gloria Steinem brouhaha hit several days ago I was flabbergasted. It was before the GOP in the state of New Hampshire would hoist to the top of the pedestal a man known for choosing to insult people (he seems to have a particular fondness for calling women fat, ugly and stupid, and complaining when they aren't 'nice' to him, but he goes after men with similar relish) and for thoroughly enjoying the madness that ensues.

Never apologetic he, but championed for being politically incorrect and not giving a damn what the repercussions are, he's up, he's down, he's soaring with Eagles. But apologize? Never. Not on his life. The more egregious he is, the more his fans like it, cheering and guffawing and crowing that it's about time we had a leader who lets it fly on a regular basis, and let it fly he does, not an apology in sight.

Why doesn't he have... more »

When the Gloria Steinem brouhaha hit several days ago I was flabbergasted. It was before the GOP in the state of New Hampshire would hoist to the top of the pedestal a man known for choosing to insult people (he seems to have a particular fondness for calling women fat, ugly and stupid, and complaining when they aren't 'nice' to him, but he goes after men with similar relish) and for thoroughly enjoying the madness that ensues.

Never apologetic he, but championed for being politically incorrect and not giving a damn what the repercussions are, he's up, he's down, he's soaring with Eagles. But apologize? Never. Not on his life. The more egregious he is, the more his fans like it, cheering and guffawing and crowing that it's about time we had a leader who lets it fly on a regular basis, and let it fly he does, not an apology in sight.

Why doesn't he have to apologize? 'Cause he's a rich dude and rich dudes don't apologize? What's the reason?

Cut to an appearance by Gloria Steinem, a woman who has spent her entire life championing the rights of women of all ages, of all races, of all religions, on the Bill Maher Show - it's Real Time with Bill Maher, so, let's be clear...it's all about reality...or is it? - and she 'misspeaks' or chooses words that don't please the masses and suggests that perhaps young women are attracted to Bernie Sanders because that's where the boys are and what happens? All hell breaks loose.

Seemingly hours later Steinem is having to apologize and explain herself because, Heaven forbid, she is not allowed to misspeak or choose her words poorly such that they piss off the masses. She was subsequently trashed and hit with a flurry of tired and untrue bromides - she's an aging feminist (men don't age, by the way), she's old (men don't get old), she's foolish (men are never foolish), she's angry (men never get angry), you know, like that.

The incident itself highlights one of the main themes of the feminist movement itself, which is that women have been silenced for centuries, cannot speak their minds, have to weigh every single word that comes out of their mouths, be careful about their 'tone' and be careful never to offend anyone ever. Not ever. Lest she not be liked.

Oh No! Not liked! A woman not liked? Run! Take cover! Head for the hills!

Earlier in the week, in the comment thread of one of my own posts I said that there are people walking around on Planet Earth who are truly evil, truly dangerous, truly destructive, not just to our planet but to its peoples, its cultures, its forward progression and that Gloria Steinem is not one of those people. This woman has spent her entire life championing women, and men, and in my view did not, does not, deserve what she got as a result of one sentence that some people found offensive.

By way of contrast, disgraced 33-year old Martin Skreli comes to mind as someone who is consciously destructive. Skrekli was arrested by the FBI and is awaiting trial for having raised the price of an AIDS drug, Daraprim, by 5,556%. Charming.

I also wrote that Gloria's biggest mistake was to have appeared on the Bill Maher Real Time show in the first place. Maher has made a fortune skewering people. He says whatever he wants and the more outrageous the better. Like Trump. He insults everyone and anyone, but because it's under the guise of 'humor' it's OK. Weirdly it falls into the Trumpster (dumpster) where all the wickedly funny politically incorrect slings and arrows go. It's funny. He gets laughs. It's therefore OK.

But if you're talking about something serious and you're on Real Time, watch out. Had it been Anderson Cooper, or Charlie Rose or Bill Moyers or Leslie Stahl or Erin Burnett or Katie Couric, I could have seen the entire thing going an entirely different direction. I could have seen any one of those journalist/reporters saying, 'Hey, Gloria, wait a minute, that's sounds weird, can you explain what you mean by that? I can't believe you mean that the way it came out...' and we could have been off and running into a much more meaningful discussion about this issue.

But, No...let's not do that. Let's dismantle, destroy, deconstruct and take down. 'Cause that's what we do here on the internet. 'Cause it's fun to watch someone crash and burn, isn't it?

On that same thread of mine earlier in the week, I further wrote that I wasn't going to join in on the public hanging of this amazing, brilliant woman, without whom women would still be getting coat-hanger abortions.

I started writing about this issue, and then Sheila Weller's excellent essay, In Defense of Gloria Steinem (Who Really Needs No Defending) in the Observer came into my field of vision and I didn't need to. Weller goes into Steinem's extensive background fighting for women's rights for those who don't know it, and deconstructs and dismantles the criticism, as well she should have.

Thank you Shiela.

And thank you Gloria for spending your life caring about women and children and men all over the world.

I don't think we need to forgive Gloria.

I think we need to forgive ourselves for having become so unrelentingly bloodthirsty. Seems nothing can slake our taste for the stuff.

#GloriaSteinem   #Feminism   #SheilaWeller   #TheObserver  ___

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2016-02-10 15:18:40 (17 comments; 0 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 

How well do we know our parents? Where we came from? How well do we understand the circumstances and situations that swirled around them at the time of our conception? And not just our individual conception, but the conception of our siblings, the creation of our families?

How many of us have ever sat down and told our parents we want to listen to it all, however long it takes...to the stories of their lives, their own birth families, the joys and pressures of their childhoods, how they came to be who they are in the world.

Do we know how and why our fathers chose their lines of work? Did they feel free, or constrained in some way, pressured, perhaps, by war, economic circumstances, a domineering father, an insistent mother? Or did our fathers go their own way, carve out their own paths, free in their hearts and souls, the red wildflowers in the center of fields of mostly yellow and... more »

How well do we know our parents? Where we came from? How well do we understand the circumstances and situations that swirled around them at the time of our conception? And not just our individual conception, but the conception of our siblings, the creation of our families?

How many of us have ever sat down and told our parents we want to listen to it all, however long it takes...to the stories of their lives, their own birth families, the joys and pressures of their childhoods, how they came to be who they are in the world.

Do we know how and why our fathers chose their lines of work? Did they feel free, or constrained in some way, pressured, perhaps, by war, economic circumstances, a domineering father, an insistent mother? Or did our fathers go their own way, carve out their own paths, free in their hearts and souls, the red wildflowers in the center of fields of mostly yellow and and purple and white?

And our mothers? What were their dreams and aspirations for themselves? Did they get the education they wanted? Did they do what they wanted to do with their lives? Do they have any regrets, any unmet desires, any wishes, wants and hopes to which they have never given voice? Did their lives turn out the way they wanted? Was there a trimmed path through the forest, or did they have to bring a machete, clearing a step for each foot as they went?

Do we know how and where and when our parents fell in love? Did they choose one another, or was it an arranged or an expected marriage? Was it love at first sight, or did it smolder slowly? Was it expected, commanded, natural or cast in ambivalence? Was it destiny or fate, a choice, or simply the thing everyone does....eventually...like a clock ticking onto the next second, minute, hour?

Did they meet when they were young, or find one another long after they'd begun their lives' journeys?

Do they have secrets they have never shared with anyone...ever?

Do they share the same religious and political beliefs, the same pastimes and hobbies? Do they crave one another's company, or do they lead independent lives, yet remain deeply entwined, like the ivy climbing up the lattice work to the side of the house?

Do they laugh, or are they on automatic pilot? Are they partners, enemies, competitors, lovers, friends or strangers? Is life a joy or a hardship or many indescribable things in between? Are they funny, witty, dry humored, meant to be together, a mistake?

Are we like them, or different? Do we understand our own personalities and lives...our souls...or do we simply accept it all as DNA, as genetic, as something unquestioned, unexpressed, unexamined.

Many years ago I took this photo of an elderly woman in Cornolo, Italy, one of the tiny hamlets in the mountains outside of Parma where I have ancestral roots. There was a fabulous airplane weathervane across the street from her home and I pulled my car over to take some pictures.

She came outside, glowing with charm, wearing a bright periwinkle sweater and she asked me if I would join her for a cup of tea. We sat at the table in her kitchen and talked about my father's family...about her family...and she told me what it was like to live in that physically beautiful place, a place that was so remote and so hard to get to in Winter that during the War a letter could take six months to arrive from Parma.

Chickens and roosters pecked at the grass growing outside her door, wind chimes tinkled on the porch and homemade weathervanes spun atop the mailboxes.

She talked about the harshness of the times, the lack of food, sitting around the wood burning stoves for warmth, waiting for Spring and the roads to thaw and for life to begin again, and I asked, "Was there no where else you could have gone?" and she replied, "Life was not about choice, it was about surviving."

And so my memory of sitting with this lovely and kind woman, who was almost 90 when I met her...survives...and I am grateful that I made the choice that day to pull over and take pictures.

How well do we know the lives of our parents? Our grandparents? 

How we came to be who we are today?

The trajectory and stories of our lives...connecting the past to the present...___

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2016-02-09 17:50:07 (11 comments; 4 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Too bad it takes a study to 'prove' what many people have known all along - that having women in senior management increases a company's profitability. But I'll happily take it. The entire Abstract from Peterson Institute for International Economics appears below and is worth reading, but I have pulled a few quotes from the Times review to pique your interest:

Is Gender Diversity Profitable? Evidence From a Global Survey:
http://www.iie.com/publications/wp/wp16-3.pdf

Almost 60 percent of the companies reviewed had no female board members, and more than 50 percent had no female executives. Just under 5 percent had a female chief executive.

But the data was clear about women in top management positions. An increase in the share of women from zero to 30 percent would be associated with a 15 percent rise in profitability. more »

Too bad it takes a study to 'prove' what many people have known all along - that having women in senior management increases a company's profitability. But I'll happily take it. The entire Abstract from Peterson Institute for International Economics appears below and is worth reading, but I have pulled a few quotes from the Times review to pique your interest:

Is Gender Diversity Profitable? Evidence From a Global Survey:
http://www.iie.com/publications/wp/wp16-3.pdf

Almost 60 percent of the companies reviewed had no female board members, and more than 50 percent had no female executives. Just under 5 percent had a female chief executive.

But the data was clear about women in top management positions. An increase in the share of women from zero to 30 percent would be associated with a 15 percent rise in profitability. 

Four in 10 survey respondents attributed the gender gap in leadership positions to women having to do more to prove themselves than their male counterparts.

The study found that mandated maternity leave was not correlated with more female leadership, but stronger paternity leave policies were. Mr. Noland said that could be because the policies spread the burden of child care more evenly, freeing women to return to work and ease back into their professional roles.

#WomenandWork   #PEWResearchCenter  ___

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2016-02-07 15:08:56 (52 comments; 1 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

When did The Youth Vote start competing with The Baby Boomer Vote, or any other vote for that matter? The Youth Vote and The Baby Boomer Vote are not two opposing political parties, like the Democrats and Republicans, or two antagonistic countries, like China and Tibet, who don't see eye-to-eye on anything and have two essentially different view points of what it means to be alive, what it means to be human.

I'm disturbed by the way the issue is being discussed, reported and presented, not only as a media discussion leading up to caucuses and primaries, but up the general election as well.

Youth in our country have genuine concerns about the cost of getting the education they want. Student debt is a serious problem. But so is the cost of their Boomer parents' mortgages, particularly if they were interest-bombed after the 2008 financial crisis and may be... more »

When did The Youth Vote start competing with The Baby Boomer Vote, or any other vote for that matter? The Youth Vote and The Baby Boomer Vote are not two opposing political parties, like the Democrats and Republicans, or two antagonistic countries, like China and Tibet, who don't see eye-to-eye on anything and have two essentially different view points of what it means to be alive, what it means to be human.

I'm disturbed by the way the issue is being discussed, reported and presented, not only as a media discussion leading up to caucuses and primaries, but up the general election as well.

Youth in our country have genuine concerns about the cost of getting the education they want. Student debt is a serious problem. But so is the cost of their Boomer parents' mortgages, particularly if they were interest-bombed after the 2008 financial crisis and may be either upside down on their home or unable to refinance at a lower interest rate. 

Youth in our country have legitimate concerns about long-term employment opportunities, as so many jobs have been shipped abroad, so many companies are only offering limited contract employment with long hours, low pay and no benefits. Not everyone  is entrepreneur-minded and can start their own business. But so do Boomers have exactly the same concerns, many of whom are being let go prematurely from their jobs, well before retirement age, many of whom (particularly women over the age of 50) cannot find even temporary employment once they have left the work force, and, if they are able to find a job, it is offered under the same terms and conditions as those being offered to their younger Americans - low pay, long hours, no benefits. These older Americans have exactly the same concerns as their younger counterparts. They want to contribute, to make a difference, to be productive, to remain vital. And their ongoing continuing education should they need to retrain for the job market comes at a financial price that is often unaffordable at an older age.

Youth in our country have understandable concerns about what is happening to Mother Earth, wondering if they are going to have a livable planet and what their long term survival and health issues are going to be. But so do Boomers, many of whom have a deep love of and commitment to Mother Earth in an agricultural spirit - as farmers, gardeners, artisanal food producers, who have homes to protect from floods, the ravages of an increasing number of tornados, storms, hurricanes...tempests. The horrid Zika Virus comes to the United States, affecting parents....and children alike.

Youth in our country have on-going concerns about the quality of their medical care, worries that even if they have their own coverage outside of a job that provides benefits, what will happen to them if they become seriously ill and have no disability insurance. So, too, their aging Boomer parents, whose lives can be turned upside down as a result of long-term cancer treatment, a serious surgery, a fall down a flight of stairs, or, heaven forbid, a detour from life down the Long Road to Alzheimer's, from which one never escapes.

Youth in our country are frightened of on-going wars around the world, of terrorism, of ISIS, of the increasing lack of a sense of safety and security, of guns and getting shot while walking from the student center to the gym on campus, or going to the movies, or, heaven forbid, just sitting at one's desk at work and, well...working. So, too, Boomers, who don't want to get the call, ever, that their child has been shot on campus, or or at the movies, or while they were innocently sitting at their desks at work and, well...working.

Youth in America are concerned about transparency issues regarding mental health, sexual orientation, the ability to be freely expressed and not discriminated against as a result of being fully oneself. Yet many Boomers did not grow up themselves in an era when there was such acceptance and freedom as there currently is, and lived much of their lives in the shadows for fear of discrimination, or the victims of outright discrimination should they choose not to live in the shadows.

Youth in America are frightened of gun violence, police violence, racial discrimination and profiling - a hoodie on a black youth at night can signal the accusation of impending criminal activity, while a hoodie on a white youth is an expression of fashion hipness. But...So...Too...Baby Boomers who marched with their black brothers and sisters in the Civil Rights Movement arm in arm, hand in hand.

The issues that face Youth in America are the same, to one degree or another, as the issues that face Boomers and the aging population. The phase or stage of that issue may differ, but the issues are the same - a concern for Mother Earth, a need for employment, a dream to have a life that includes a place to live, a social network, the ability to afford to work out, to play, to progress and contribute, a desire for our country to be safe, to get along with countries around the world, to stop this seemingly never-ending cycle of war, strife, nuclear threat and destruction.

I don't know any parents and grandparents who aren't deeply concerned about the futures of their children and grandchildren. Yet recently, in all that has been written about this issue and plenty has been, I often wonder whether younger voters are thinking about the issues that face their aging parents, their older colleagues, their grandparents, homeless older men and women. Yes...it is heartbreaking to see homeless children and young people living on the street, but they are often there in the company of their Boomer parents, or living in a car or a house with several other families.

I'm concerned that history is being forgotten and that some younger voters (women) have forgotten how long it took the Women's Suffrage Movement to win them the Right to Rock the Vote, that some young voters (women) have forgotten how long it took their aging sisters (not their aging brothers or fathers or grandfathers) to fight for the right to control their bodies, a right that Republicans want to take away from them every single election cycle, that some young voters have forgotten the closeted lives their older gay, lesbian and transgendered sisters and brothers lived in order to bring us to the more inclusive and accepting place that we are all in now.

And while I write "America," in fact these issues that Americans face are felt all over the world.

We are all one. And when we vote we need to vote as much to heal the wounds of others, as much to positively affect the lives of others, as much to solve the problems that other people have, even if it isn't a problem in our own lives.

For we are all one, and we need to walk this road, arm-in-arm, hand-in-hand, for one another, not against one another.

#POTUS     #RockTheVote   #Boomers   #HillaryforPresident   #FeelTheBern  ___

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2016-01-31 13:47:40 (22 comments; 0 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

A thoughtful review on which of the Republicans candidates could most likely shift the conversation in that party in a non-extremist, non-nasty and non-brutish direction heading up to the election.

As a veteran of partisan fights and bipartisan deals during nearly two decades in the House, he has been capable of compromise and believes in the ability of government to improve lives. He favors a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, and he speaks of government’s duty to protect the poor, the mentally ill and others “in the shadows.” While Republicans in Congress tried more than 60 times to kill Obamacare, Mr. Kasich did an end-run around Ohio’s Republican Legislature to secure a $13 billion Medicaid expansion to cover more people in his state.

#POTUS     #JohnKasich  

A thoughtful review on which of the Republicans candidates could most likely shift the conversation in that party in a non-extremist, non-nasty and non-brutish direction heading up to the election.

As a veteran of partisan fights and bipartisan deals during nearly two decades in the House, he has been capable of compromise and believes in the ability of government to improve lives. He favors a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, and he speaks of government’s duty to protect the poor, the mentally ill and others “in the shadows.” While Republicans in Congress tried more than 60 times to kill Obamacare, Mr. Kasich did an end-run around Ohio’s Republican Legislature to secure a $13 billion Medicaid expansion to cover more people in his state.

#POTUS     #JohnKasich  ___

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2016-01-30 18:11:36 (28 comments; 2 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

A thoughtful, balanced, critical analysis of why the NY Times has endorsed Hillary Clinton for President over Bernie Sanders. It is respectful of all three candidates, while also questioning certain policies with which the Times Editorial Board disagrees. The conclusion:

Hillary Clinton is the right choice for the Democrats to present a vision for America that is radically different from the one that leading Republican candidates offer — a vision in which middle-class Americans have a real shot at prosperity, women’s rights are enhanced, undocumented immigrants are given a chance at legitimacy, international alliances are nurtured and the country is kept safe.

#POTUS #HillaryClinton

A thoughtful, balanced, critical analysis of why the NY Times has endorsed Hillary Clinton for President over Bernie Sanders. It is respectful of all three candidates, while also questioning certain policies with which the Times Editorial Board disagrees. The conclusion:

Hillary Clinton is the right choice for the Democrats to present a vision for America that is radically different from the one that leading Republican candidates offer — a vision in which middle-class Americans have a real shot at prosperity, women’s rights are enhanced, undocumented immigrants are given a chance at legitimacy, international alliances are nurtured and the country is kept safe.

#POTUS #HillaryClinton___

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2016-01-26 16:28:46 (23 comments; 4 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

How many times will this be featured on G+ today?

How many times will this be featured on G+ today?___

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2016-01-23 15:39:53 (43 comments; 3 reshares; 22 +1s)Open 

This would be a decided game-changer for Trump. Bloomberg was the three-time Mayor New York City. He actually cared about the city, unlike Trump. If he decides to enter the race on a Third-Party ticket, I venture to say all bets are off. All those disgruntled GOPers who don't like Donald, and there are untold scores of them, will flock to Bloomberg.

A life-long Democrat, he left the party to run for Mayor of NYC as a Republican...then he left the Republican Party and changed his status to Independent. A true non-partisan politician. 

The Donald wouldn't have a chance against Bloomberg.

Not even a sliver.

He'd have to find another way of building a Trump Wall between the States and Mexico...because he would not be able to do it as POTUS.

#POTUS   #Bloomberg  

This would be a decided game-changer for Trump. Bloomberg was the three-time Mayor New York City. He actually cared about the city, unlike Trump. If he decides to enter the race on a Third-Party ticket, I venture to say all bets are off. All those disgruntled GOPers who don't like Donald, and there are untold scores of them, will flock to Bloomberg.

A life-long Democrat, he left the party to run for Mayor of NYC as a Republican...then he left the Republican Party and changed his status to Independent. A true non-partisan politician. 

The Donald wouldn't have a chance against Bloomberg.

Not even a sliver.

He'd have to find another way of building a Trump Wall between the States and Mexico...because he would not be able to do it as POTUS.

#POTUS   #Bloomberg  ___

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2016-01-19 19:28:12 (4 comments; 1 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

Get a ticket for an After Hours Tour of the Picasso Sculpture Exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art, Sunday, January 24th

Make Art, not War. This is a philosophy that I grew up with. My parents were surrounded by artists, artists who worked obscurely at their crafts in the deserts of Northern New Mexico, artists who took a long time to make names for themselves, because things taking a long time is rather part and parcel of working in obscurity.

It was not my destiny to become a fine artist, but it was my destiny to make sure that my life was filled with its various forms - dance, music, theatre, photography, graphic design, writing, fine art, to name only a few.

In order to be sure I could fill my life with the energy of art, I aspired, conspired, schemed and planned to move to New York so that I could have endless choices of what to see, what to read, what to be... more »

Get a ticket for an After Hours Tour of the Picasso Sculpture Exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art, Sunday, January 24th

Make Art, not War. This is a philosophy that I grew up with. My parents were surrounded by artists, artists who worked obscurely at their crafts in the deserts of Northern New Mexico, artists who took a long time to make names for themselves, because things taking a long time is rather part and parcel of working in obscurity.

It was not my destiny to become a fine artist, but it was my destiny to make sure that my life was filled with its various forms - dance, music, theatre, photography, graphic design, writing, fine art, to name only a few.

In order to be sure I could fill my life with the energy of art, I aspired, conspired, schemed and planned to move to New York so that I could have endless choices of what to see, what to read, what to be influenced by.

I have met people who think that participating in the arts is a luxury, why does one need it after all? Aren't our basic needs food, shelter, water, clothing, a way to make a living? Maybe Yes. Maybe No.

I would say that education is also a basic need, and having access to the arts is part of that education. Reading a book can make us think about something we either hadn't thought of before, or don't want to think about now, but may nonetheless be important for our growth.

A dance performance can enhance our sense of space, expand our sense of human interaction, give physical expression to emotions we feel but don't have the physical graces to put into movement. Maybe we have two left feet. Maybe we're a wee tad klutzy.

Music can express what we experience, but don't have the lyrics or the voice to express in song ourselves.

And fine art can make us see the world, think about the world in ways we haven't considered, can make us look at something we see every day in a completely new light. How does this impact us? If it does, is it a direct impact? Do we use this impact, absorb it, incorporate it into our lives? Does it filter in and make us better, more observant, more feelingful...perhaps better at our jobs, our relationships? 

Only if we let it. Only if we nourish it. Only if we encourage it and coax it out of its hiding place.

Such is how I have always felt about the work of Pablo Picasso, his habit of 'rearranging' the human body (frequently women), his habit of taking a bull, for instance, or a goat, or a chicken, and making you see the bull, the goat, the chicken in a way you'd never seen it before. Picasso disrupts our perception, shakes up of what we know, what we think we see or are used to seeing.

So...get a ticket for After Hours Access to the Picasso Sculpture Exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, lead by a museum curator and organized by Peer Platform for Art, which was formed in October 2014. This Sunday, January 24th, from 5:15-6:30, the Museum of Modern Art will close to the public and offer a private tour to Peer Platform participants.

When I saw the Picasso Sculpture show in December people were sitting around on the benches in the exhibition rooms listening to a talk about the exhibit on their headsets, and using the printed brochure as a guide to the works of art featured.

You can do the same or join up with Peer Platform and have an entirely different experience of Picasso. This is what Peer Platform does...every month at a museum, gallery, artist's studio, or private institution and/or private collection. It costs a bit more money than just standing in line and getting a regular/student/senior ticket, but it's worth it.

And you can take photographs. And post them. And share the experience with your friends. Museums are loosening up and sharing the love, which is important because so many people do not live in cities where they can experience something like this themselves. But there is the Internet. And social media...and, well, um...posting your favorite art shots.

Here is the Peer Platform FB page for more information:
https://www.facebook.com/peerplatform/?fref=nf

And here is a video of the group's tour of the Jeff Koons' show at the Whitney Museum:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Coc_1hkWK-I

And here is the link to MoMA:
http://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/1505

If you are in New York this Sunday, go. Do something you haven't done before. Be inspired by something out of the normal. See this mind-blowing exhibition and the She-Goat, about which Picasso himself said:

"She's more like a goat than a real goat, don't you think?"

But...may I ask...what is real anyway?

#PicassoSculpture   #MuseumofModernArt   #PeerPlatformforArt  ___

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2016-01-16 23:00:06 (11 comments; 2 reshares; 40 +1s)Open 

The Revanant is stunning. It reminded me of the filmmaking of the late great Akira Kurosawa, particularly his film Dersu Uzala, which was seen by so few people (at least that I have met) that I wish I could shut down Google+ for 6 hours and play Dersu and The Revenant back-to-back, forcing you all to watch them so that you can tell me what you think.

I love the filmmaking of Director Alelandro Iñárritu, because he works in that magic realism sort of way that, well, American directors seem to be unfamiliar with. Maybe American directors don't dream...or think people should float or levitate or fight with tigers in dreamlike sequences in the movies. No matter...I'm awful glad that these two filmmakers do.

The first time I learned of Iñárritu's work was when I saw 21 Grams (can't think of a single American Director who would havetak... more »

The Revanant is stunning. It reminded me of the filmmaking of the late great Akira Kurosawa, particularly his film Dersu Uzala, which was seen by so few people (at least that I have met) that I wish I could shut down Google+ for 6 hours and play Dersu and The Revenant back-to-back, forcing you all to watch them so that you can tell me what you think.

I love the filmmaking of Director Alelandro Iñárritu, because he works in that magic realism sort of way that, well, American directors seem to be unfamiliar with. Maybe American directors don't dream...or think people should float or levitate or fight with tigers in dreamlike sequences in the movies. No matter...I'm awful glad that these two filmmakers do.

The first time I learned of Iñárritu's work was when I saw 21 Grams (can't think of a single American Director who would have taken that subject on) and then I was completely hooked with Birdman. 

I would love to ask Iñárritu if he was a fan of Kurosawa and particularly of Dersu Uzala. If anyone has a direct line to him would you ask him for me? I've got money down that I'm right.

But, alas, I can't shut G+ down for 6 hours, so you'll just have to watch these three videos of Dersu that I found, which comprise the entire film, and then you'll have to get yourselves to the the-ah-tah to see The Revenant.  

I've never watched films posted on Daily Motion before, so I hope this works (incrocio le dita!) Ping me if it doesn't and I'll see what I can do. Or there's Netflix. Or Movies on Demand. Or the dreaded Amazon. Take your pick!

Derzu Uzala Part I:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xzmn4n_dersu-uzala-1975-pt-1_creation

Derzu Uzala Part II:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xznana_dersu-uzala-1975-pt-2_creation

Derzu Uzala Part III:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xzmbh6_dersu-uzala-1975-pt-3_creation

Let's go to...the movies....tra la la....la lahhhhhhhh!___

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2016-01-06 16:03:59 (8 comments; 0 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

Morning Ladies, Single or Partnered, Wives, Mothers, Stepmothers, Entrepreneurs, Enchantresses and Sorceresses, 

The many labels of me chronicles reflections on my life as an owner of more than a few of the above 'titles' that from time-to-time, if not every day, apply to women.

In case it should resonate, I thought I would share it with the women of Google+, who I am sure wear many assorted hats of different colors throughout their own days.

Thank you for reading, as always,

Giselle

Morning Ladies, Single or Partnered, Wives, Mothers, Stepmothers, Entrepreneurs, Enchantresses and Sorceresses, 

The many labels of me chronicles reflections on my life as an owner of more than a few of the above 'titles' that from time-to-time, if not every day, apply to women.

In case it should resonate, I thought I would share it with the women of Google+, who I am sure wear many assorted hats of different colors throughout their own days.

Thank you for reading, as always,

Giselle___

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2016-01-05 12:54:27 (30 comments; 1 reshares; 60 +1s)Open 

Ummmm....So no, the Eagles have not played like they were wearing tutus. If they had, Chip Kelly would still be a head coach and we'd all be looking forward to the playoffs. Happy New Year!" - The Pennsylvania Ballet (Thank you very much.)

Compelled to share the full text, in case there's anybody out there who doubts the athleticism, grace under fire, and sheer physical awesomeness of ballerinas:

A Facebook user recently commented that the Eagles had "played like they were wearing tutus!!!" (No one on G+ would dare say anything that ignorant and arrogant, right? Right? Right!)

Our response:

*"With all due respect to the Eagles, let's take a minute to look at what our tutu wearing women have done this month:
By tomorrow afternoon, the ballerinas that wear tutus at Pennsylvania Ballet will have performed The Nutcracker 27... more »

Ummmm....So no, the Eagles have not played like they were wearing tutus. If they had, Chip Kelly would still be a head coach and we'd all be looking forward to the playoffs. Happy New Year!" - The Pennsylvania Ballet (Thank you very much.)

Compelled to share the full text, in case there's anybody out there who doubts the athleticism, grace under fire, and sheer physical awesomeness of ballerinas:

A Facebook user recently commented that the Eagles had "played like they were wearing tutus!!!" (No one on G+ would dare say anything that ignorant and arrogant, right? Right? Right!)

Our response:

*"With all due respect to the Eagles, let's take a minute to look at what our tutu wearing women have done this month:
By tomorrow afternoon, the ballerinas that wear tutus at Pennsylvania Ballet will have performed The Nutcracker 27 times in 21 days. Some of those women have performed the Snow scene and the Waltz of the Flowers without an understudy or second cast. No 'second string' to come in and spell them when they needed a break. When they have been sick they have come to the theater, put on make up and costume, smiled and performed. When they have felt an injury in the middle of a show there have been no injury timeouts. They have kept smiling, finished their job, bowed, left the stage, and then dealt with what hurts. Some of these tutu wearers have been tossed into a new position with only a moments notice. That's like a cornerback being told at halftime that they're going to play wide receiver for the second half, but they need to make sure that no one can tell they've never played wide receiver before. They have done all of this with such artistry and grace that audience after audience has clapped and cheered (no Boo Birds at the Academy) and the Philadelphia Inquirer has said this production looks "better than ever".*

So no, the Eagles have not played like they were wearing tutus. If they had, Chip Kelly would still be a head coach and we'd all be looking forward to the playoffs."

Happy New Year! - The Philadelphia Ballet

GET THINE OWN SELF TO THE BALLET IN 2016. Give a shout out to a woman in a tutu. Football players ain't got nothin' on these babes!

Indeed. Happy New Year...again.

#PennsylvaniaBallet   #WomeninTutus   #Ballet   #Dance   #GoogleCulturalInstitute   ___

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