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Giselle Minoli has been at 2 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Yifat Cohen85,438If you follow me and hear me talk, you know I'm all about engagement and I'm convinced that Hangouts will change the world and make it more personalized. (In a -good- great way). But it's almost impossible to do with over 35K followers (can't even imagine what people with over 100k or a million do..) *SO LET'S GET PERSONAL. I DARE YOU.* Let's just Hangout and get to know each other, shall we? *THE HANGOUT WILL BE INITIATED FROM THE @106909313027624222688 PAGE* You'll have to follow that page in order to be able to join us. So do it now, it takes 2 sec. RSVP and when this goes live you'll see a link to join the Hangout. *First come first serve*.  If the hangout is full, stick around and a spot might open for you.  *I'll Hangout for an hour with as many people who show up - just for fun* *THIS IS NOT AN ON-AIR HANGOUT* So no one will see you but the people in the Hangout. Meaning, if this is your first time, feel free to jump in and give it a try. *You can ask me anything you want if I can ask you anything I want* ;) We can talk G+tips, Hangouts questions, or just about us and stuff we like (Have you watched the last James Bond movie? I got a few things I have to say about that one...lol) *So RSVP now, and let's get to know each other - up close and personal* ---------- #gplusgotogal   #hangouts   #engagement   #howto   #googleplustips  Want to Hangout and not sure how? Give this a try.2012-11-29 18:00:0041  
Billy Wilson1,547,129It's now the 29th episode of my weekly on air G+ variety show @108595299975404341987 thank you guys for being so supportive! The show brings together some of the most interesting people you can find on G+ for a hangout! This week we'll have joining Caricature Artist @105046530334806680420; @103333429938529668020 who's quite known around G+ and is the host of @103052407716987048126; Geek, Writer, and Host @100035762233109552669; Tea Enthusiast and the person behind the Google+ Book Club @117665613028757061169 who's going to be talking to us about her new show called "Family By the Fireside"; Country Music Chat Host @105901258272269401150; and Special Musical Guest @101758878457837294885 ! You can talk with us and other people watching the show by commenting on this event once the show is live! Thank you so much for a lively thread last episode! The episode will be live on this event and the recording will be available immediately afterwards. You can watch previous episodes here: http://goo.gl/ceHtHTSBW #29: Caricatures, M Monica's New Show, Live Music and More! (On Air Hangout)2012-10-20 04:00:00143  

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Most comments: 113

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2015-11-25 20:30:04 (113 comments; 0 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

So. Yet another inconvenient truth comes out. Which is that "half of the attacks since 2001 were committed by men born in the United States." And that "Since 2001 hardly any foreign-born have committed (or tried to commit) terrorism in (or on the way to) the U.S."  (John Mueller, political scientist at Ohio State and the Cato Institute who tracks terrorism in the United States)

On the eve of Thanksgiving in the United States, where we have so much to be thankful for, some people want our country (and its citizens) to turn its back on refugees who are escaping political brutality in their homelands because somehow we have convinced ourselves that "terrorism" is not an American problem, is not an American issue.

"Since then (9/11), most of the attackers in the United States claiming or appearing to be motivated by extremist Islam were... more »

Most reshares: 20

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2015-12-10 01:12:02 (9 comments; 20 reshares; 43 +1s)Open 

A Shout Out to all of the Photographers on Google+ - Might one of you be the next Ansel Adams?

If you think you might be, the National Park Service is accepting applications for the position of parks photographer, a post once held by the legendary Adams. You've got to be proficient in B&W and large format, and Okay, landscape photography would be good, too.

If interested, you have another week to apply as the Deadline for applications is December 15th. Job is based in D.C. and understandably involves quite a bit of travel. But traveling our glorious land...who could complain about that????

Since G+ is a photog's medium perhaps more than anything else, I thought I'd give a shout out to the community of photographers here.

Apply!

What have you got to lose?

$100,000 a year is all.

And the possibility of landing... more »

Most plusones: 63

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2015-10-08 12:50:29 (5 comments; 11 reshares; 63 +1s)Open 

Fang-Yi Sheu" rehearsing *All Will Be Still. Every muscle, cell, sinew, tendon, ligament, vein, digit in motion.

The dance floor a canvas on which she paints movement.
Composes a paen to the human body in motion.
Creates the wind, waves...

All will be still...

#FangYiSheu   #AllWillBeStill  

Latest 50 posts

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2016-02-10 15:18:40 (9 comments; 0 reshares; 25 +1s)Open 

How well do we know our parents? Where we came from? How well do we understand the circumstances and situations that swirled around them at the time of our conception? And not just our individual conception, but the conception of our siblings, the creation of our families?

How many of us have ever sat down and told our parents we want to listen to it all, however long it takes...to the stories of their lives, their own birth families, the joys and pressures of their childhoods, how they came to be who they are in the world.

Do we know how and why our fathers chose their lines of work? Did they feel free, or constrained in some way, pressured, perhaps, by war, economic circumstances, a domineering father, an insistent mother? Or did our fathers go their own way, carve out their own paths, free in their hearts and souls, the red wildflowers in the center of fields of mostly yellow and... more »

How well do we know our parents? Where we came from? How well do we understand the circumstances and situations that swirled around them at the time of our conception? And not just our individual conception, but the conception of our siblings, the creation of our families?

How many of us have ever sat down and told our parents we want to listen to it all, however long it takes...to the stories of their lives, their own birth families, the joys and pressures of their childhoods, how they came to be who they are in the world.

Do we know how and why our fathers chose their lines of work? Did they feel free, or constrained in some way, pressured, perhaps, by war, economic circumstances, a domineering father, an insistent mother? Or did our fathers go their own way, carve out their own paths, free in their hearts and souls, the red wildflowers in the center of fields of mostly yellow and and purple and white?

And our mothers? What were their dreams and aspirations for themselves? Did they get the education they wanted? Did they do what they wanted to do with their lives? Do they have any regrets, any unmet desires, any wishes, wants and hopes to which they have never given voice? Did their lives turn out the way they wanted? Was there a trimmed path through the forest, or did they have to bring a machete, clearing a step for each foot as they went?

Do we know how and where and when our parents fell in love? Did they choose one another, or was it an arranged or an expected marriage? Was it love at first sight, or did it smolder slowly? Was it expected, commanded, natural or cast in ambivalence? Was it destiny or fate, a choice, or simply the thing everyone does....eventually...like a clock ticking onto the next second, minute, hour?

Did they meet when they were young, or find one another long after they'd begun their lives' journeys?

Do they have secrets they have never shared with anyone...ever?

Do they share the same religious and political beliefs, the same pastimes and hobbies? Do they crave one another's company, or do they lead independent lives, yet remain deeply entwined, like the ivy climbing up the lattice work to the side of the house?

Do they laugh, or are they on automatic pilot? Are they partners, enemies, competitors, lovers, friends or strangers? Is life a joy or a hardship or many indescribable things in between? Are they funny, witty, dry humored, meant to be together, a mistake?

Are we like them, or different? Do we understand our own personalities and lives...our souls...or do we simply accept it all as DNA, as genetic, as something unquestioned, unexpressed, unexamined.

Many years ago I took this photo of an elderly woman in Cornolo, Italy, one of the tiny hamlets in the mountains outside of Parma where I have ancestral roots. There was a fabulous airplane weathervane across the street from her home and I pulled my car over to take some pictures.

She came outside, glowing with charm, wearing a bright periwinkle sweater and she asked me if I would join her for a cup of tea. We sat at the table in her kitchen and talked about my father's family...about her family...and she told me what it was like to live in that physically beautiful place, a place that was so remote and so hard to get to in Winter that during the War a letter could take six months to arrive from Parma.

Chickens and roosters pecked at the grass growing outside her door, wind chimes tinkled on the porch and homemade weathervanes spun atop the mailboxes.

She talked about the harshness of the times, the lack of food, sitting around the wood burning stoves for warmth, waiting for Spring and the roads to thaw and for life to begin again, and I asked, "Was there no where else you could have gone?" and she replied, "Life was not about choice, it was about surviving."

And so my memory of sitting with this lovely and kind woman, who was almost 90 when I met her...survives...and I am grateful that I made the choice that day to pull over and take pictures.

How well do we know the lives of our parents? Our grandparents? 

How we came to be who we are today?

The trajectory and stories of our lives...connecting the past to the present...___

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2016-02-09 17:50:07 (13 comments; 4 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Too bad it takes a study to 'prove' what many people have known all along - that having women in senior management increases a company's profitability. But I'll happily take it. The entire Abstract from Peterson Institute for International Economics appears below and is worth reading, but I have pulled a few quotes from the Times review to pique your interest:

Is Gender Diversity Profitable? Evidence From a Global Survey:
http://www.iie.com/publications/wp/wp16-3.pdf

Almost 60 percent of the companies reviewed had no female board members, and more than 50 percent had no female executives. Just under 5 percent had a female chief executive.

But the data was clear about women in top management positions. An increase in the share of women from zero to 30 percent would be associated with a 15 percent rise in profitability. more »

Too bad it takes a study to 'prove' what many people have known all along - that having women in senior management increases a company's profitability. But I'll happily take it. The entire Abstract from Peterson Institute for International Economics appears below and is worth reading, but I have pulled a few quotes from the Times review to pique your interest:

Is Gender Diversity Profitable? Evidence From a Global Survey:
http://www.iie.com/publications/wp/wp16-3.pdf

Almost 60 percent of the companies reviewed had no female board members, and more than 50 percent had no female executives. Just under 5 percent had a female chief executive.

But the data was clear about women in top management positions. An increase in the share of women from zero to 30 percent would be associated with a 15 percent rise in profitability. 

Four in 10 survey respondents attributed the gender gap in leadership positions to women having to do more to prove themselves than their male counterparts.

The study found that mandated maternity leave was not correlated with more female leadership, but stronger paternity leave policies were. Mr. Noland said that could be because the policies spread the burden of child care more evenly, freeing women to return to work and ease back into their professional roles.

#WomenandWork   #PEWResearchCenter  ___

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2016-02-07 15:08:56 (52 comments; 1 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

When did The Youth Vote start competing with The Baby Boomer Vote, or any other vote for that matter? The Youth Vote and The Baby Boomer Vote are not two opposing political parties, like the Democrats and Republicans, or two antagonistic countries, like China and Tibet, who don't see eye-to-eye on anything and have two essentially different view points of what it means to be alive, what it means to be human.

I'm disturbed by the way the issue is being discussed, reported and presented, not only as a media discussion leading up to caucuses and primaries, but up the general election as well.

Youth in our country have genuine concerns about the cost of getting the education they want. Student debt is a serious problem. But so is the cost of their Boomer parents' mortgages, particularly if they were interest-bombed after the 2008 financial crisis and may be... more »

When did The Youth Vote start competing with The Baby Boomer Vote, or any other vote for that matter? The Youth Vote and The Baby Boomer Vote are not two opposing political parties, like the Democrats and Republicans, or two antagonistic countries, like China and Tibet, who don't see eye-to-eye on anything and have two essentially different view points of what it means to be alive, what it means to be human.

I'm disturbed by the way the issue is being discussed, reported and presented, not only as a media discussion leading up to caucuses and primaries, but up the general election as well.

Youth in our country have genuine concerns about the cost of getting the education they want. Student debt is a serious problem. But so is the cost of their Boomer parents' mortgages, particularly if they were interest-bombed after the 2008 financial crisis and may be either upside down on their home or unable to refinance at a lower interest rate. 

Youth in our country have legitimate concerns about long-term employment opportunities, as so many jobs have been shipped abroad, so many companies are only offering limited contract employment with long hours, low pay and no benefits. Not everyone  is entrepreneur-minded and can start their own business. But so do Boomers have exactly the same concerns, many of whom are being let go prematurely from their jobs, well before retirement age, many of whom (particularly women over the age of 50) cannot find even temporary employment once they have left the work force, and, if they are able to find a job, it is offered under the same terms and conditions as those being offered to their younger Americans - low pay, long hours, no benefits. These older Americans have exactly the same concerns as their younger counterparts. They want to contribute, to make a difference, to be productive, to remain vital. And their ongoing continuing education should they need to retrain for the job market comes at a financial price that is often unaffordable at an older age.

Youth in our country have understandable concerns about what is happening to Mother Earth, wondering if they are going to have a livable planet and what their long term survival and health issues are going to be. But so do Boomers, many of whom have a deep love of and commitment to Mother Earth in an agricultural spirit - as farmers, gardeners, artisanal food producers, who have homes to protect from floods, the ravages of an increasing number of tornados, storms, hurricanes...tempests. The horrid Zika Virus comes to the United States, affecting parents....and children alike.

Youth in our country have on-going concerns about the quality of their medical care, worries that even if they have their own coverage outside of a job that provides benefits, what will happen to them if they become seriously ill and have no disability insurance. So, too, their aging Boomer parents, whose lives can be turned upside down as a result of long-term cancer treatment, a serious surgery, a fall down a flight of stairs, or, heaven forbid, a detour from life down the Long Road to Alzheimer's, from which one never escapes.

Youth in our country are frightened of on-going wars around the world, of terrorism, of ISIS, of the increasing lack of a sense of safety and security, of guns and getting shot while walking from the student center to the gym on campus, or going to the movies, or, heaven forbid, just sitting at one's desk at work and, well...working. So, too, Boomers, who don't want to get the call, ever, that their child has been shot on campus, or or at the movies, or while they were innocently sitting at their desks at work and, well...working.

Youth in America are concerned about transparency issues regarding mental health, sexual orientation, the ability to be freely expressed and not discriminated against as a result of being fully oneself. Yet many Boomers did not grow up themselves in an era when there was such acceptance and freedom as there currently is, and lived much of their lives in the shadows for fear of discrimination, or the victims of outright discrimination should they choose not to live in the shadows.

Youth in America are frightened of gun violence, police violence, racial discrimination and profiling - a hoodie on a black youth at night can signal the accusation of impending criminal activity, while a hoodie on a white youth is an expression of fashion hipness. But...So...Too...Baby Boomers who marched with their black brothers and sisters in the Civil Rights Movement arm in arm, hand in hand.

The issues that face Youth in America are the same, to one degree or another, as the issues that face Boomers and the aging population. The phase or stage of that issue may differ, but the issues are the same - a concern for Mother Earth, a need for employment, a dream to have a life that includes a place to live, a social network, the ability to afford to work out, to play, to progress and contribute, a desire for our country to be safe, to get along with countries around the world, to stop this seemingly never-ending cycle of war, strife, nuclear threat and destruction.

I don't know any parents and grandparents who aren't deeply concerned about the futures of their children and grandchildren. Yet recently, in all that has been written about this issue and plenty has been, I often wonder whether younger voters are thinking about the issues that face their aging parents, their older colleagues, their grandparents, homeless older men and women. Yes...it is heartbreaking to see homeless children and young people living on the street, but they are often there in the company of their Boomer parents, or living in a car or a house with several other families.

I'm concerned that history is being forgotten and that some younger voters (women) have forgotten how long it took the Women's Suffrage Movement to win them the Right to Rock the Vote, that some young voters (women) have forgotten how long it took their aging sisters (not their aging brothers or fathers or grandfathers) to fight for the right to control their bodies, a right that Republicans want to take away from them every single election cycle, that some young voters have forgotten the closeted lives their older gay, lesbian and transgendered sisters and brothers lived in order to bring us to the more inclusive and accepting place that we are all in now.

And while I write "America," in fact these issues that Americans face are felt all over the world.

We are all one. And when we vote we need to vote as much to heal the wounds of others, as much to positively affect the lives of others, as much to solve the problems that other people have, even if it isn't a problem in our own lives.

For we are all one, and we need to walk this road, arm-in-arm, hand-in-hand, for one another, not against one another.

#POTUS     #RockTheVote   #Boomers   #HillaryforPresident   #FeelTheBern  ___

2016-01-31 21:17:21 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s)Open 

Does anyone know how it is possible for an entire Public post to be removed...when the poster didn't delete it? I had an active post going on this morning and suddenly it is not there. I had to block a nasty commenter who had made racist comments, but that is not the same thing as deleting an entire post. I've been on G+ since the get-go and this is the very first time this has ever happened to me...

What a mystery...

Does anyone know how it is possible for an entire Public post to be removed...when the poster didn't delete it? I had an active post going on this morning and suddenly it is not there. I had to block a nasty commenter who had made racist comments, but that is not the same thing as deleting an entire post. I've been on G+ since the get-go and this is the very first time this has ever happened to me...

What a mystery...___

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2016-01-31 13:47:40 (22 comments; 0 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

A thoughtful review on which of the Republicans candidates could most likely shift the conversation in that party in a non-extremist, non-nasty and non-brutish direction heading up to the election.

As a veteran of partisan fights and bipartisan deals during nearly two decades in the House, he has been capable of compromise and believes in the ability of government to improve lives. He favors a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, and he speaks of government’s duty to protect the poor, the mentally ill and others “in the shadows.” While Republicans in Congress tried more than 60 times to kill Obamacare, Mr. Kasich did an end-run around Ohio’s Republican Legislature to secure a $13 billion Medicaid expansion to cover more people in his state.

#POTUS     #JohnKasich  

A thoughtful review on which of the Republicans candidates could most likely shift the conversation in that party in a non-extremist, non-nasty and non-brutish direction heading up to the election.

As a veteran of partisan fights and bipartisan deals during nearly two decades in the House, he has been capable of compromise and believes in the ability of government to improve lives. He favors a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, and he speaks of government’s duty to protect the poor, the mentally ill and others “in the shadows.” While Republicans in Congress tried more than 60 times to kill Obamacare, Mr. Kasich did an end-run around Ohio’s Republican Legislature to secure a $13 billion Medicaid expansion to cover more people in his state.

#POTUS     #JohnKasich  ___

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2016-01-30 18:11:36 (29 comments; 2 reshares; 14 +1s)Open 

A thoughtful, balanced, critical analysis of why the NY Times has endorsed Hillary Clinton for President over Bernie Sanders. It is respectful of all three candidates, while also questioning certain policies with which the Times Editorial Board disagrees. The conclusion:

Hillary Clinton is the right choice for the Democrats to present a vision for America that is radically different from the one that leading Republican candidates offer — a vision in which middle-class Americans have a real shot at prosperity, women’s rights are enhanced, undocumented immigrants are given a chance at legitimacy, international alliances are nurtured and the country is kept safe.

#POTUS #HillaryClinton

A thoughtful, balanced, critical analysis of why the NY Times has endorsed Hillary Clinton for President over Bernie Sanders. It is respectful of all three candidates, while also questioning certain policies with which the Times Editorial Board disagrees. The conclusion:

Hillary Clinton is the right choice for the Democrats to present a vision for America that is radically different from the one that leading Republican candidates offer — a vision in which middle-class Americans have a real shot at prosperity, women’s rights are enhanced, undocumented immigrants are given a chance at legitimacy, international alliances are nurtured and the country is kept safe.

#POTUS #HillaryClinton___

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2016-01-26 16:28:46 (23 comments; 4 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

How many times will this be featured on G+ today?

How many times will this be featured on G+ today?___

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2016-01-23 15:39:53 (43 comments; 3 reshares; 22 +1s)Open 

This would be a decided game-changer for Trump. Bloomberg was the three-time Mayor New York City. He actually cared about the city, unlike Trump. If he decides to enter the race on a Third-Party ticket, I venture to say all bets are off. All those disgruntled GOPers who don't like Donald, and there are untold scores of them, will flock to Bloomberg.

A life-long Democrat, he left the party to run for Mayor of NYC as a Republican...then he left the Republican Party and changed his status to Independent. A true non-partisan politician. 

The Donald wouldn't have a chance against Bloomberg.

Not even a sliver.

He'd have to find another way of building a Trump Wall between the States and Mexico...because he would not be able to do it as POTUS.

#POTUS   #Bloomberg  

This would be a decided game-changer for Trump. Bloomberg was the three-time Mayor New York City. He actually cared about the city, unlike Trump. If he decides to enter the race on a Third-Party ticket, I venture to say all bets are off. All those disgruntled GOPers who don't like Donald, and there are untold scores of them, will flock to Bloomberg.

A life-long Democrat, he left the party to run for Mayor of NYC as a Republican...then he left the Republican Party and changed his status to Independent. A true non-partisan politician. 

The Donald wouldn't have a chance against Bloomberg.

Not even a sliver.

He'd have to find another way of building a Trump Wall between the States and Mexico...because he would not be able to do it as POTUS.

#POTUS   #Bloomberg  ___

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2016-01-19 19:28:12 (4 comments; 1 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

Get a ticket for an After Hours Tour of the Picasso Sculpture Exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art, Sunday, January 24th

Make Art, not War. This is a philosophy that I grew up with. My parents were surrounded by artists, artists who worked obscurely at their crafts in the deserts of Northern New Mexico, artists who took a long time to make names for themselves, because things taking a long time is rather part and parcel of working in obscurity.

It was not my destiny to become a fine artist, but it was my destiny to make sure that my life was filled with its various forms - dance, music, theatre, photography, graphic design, writing, fine art, to name only a few.

In order to be sure I could fill my life with the energy of art, I aspired, conspired, schemed and planned to move to New York so that I could have endless choices of what to see, what to read, what to be... more »

Get a ticket for an After Hours Tour of the Picasso Sculpture Exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art, Sunday, January 24th

Make Art, not War. This is a philosophy that I grew up with. My parents were surrounded by artists, artists who worked obscurely at their crafts in the deserts of Northern New Mexico, artists who took a long time to make names for themselves, because things taking a long time is rather part and parcel of working in obscurity.

It was not my destiny to become a fine artist, but it was my destiny to make sure that my life was filled with its various forms - dance, music, theatre, photography, graphic design, writing, fine art, to name only a few.

In order to be sure I could fill my life with the energy of art, I aspired, conspired, schemed and planned to move to New York so that I could have endless choices of what to see, what to read, what to be influenced by.

I have met people who think that participating in the arts is a luxury, why does one need it after all? Aren't our basic needs food, shelter, water, clothing, a way to make a living? Maybe Yes. Maybe No.

I would say that education is also a basic need, and having access to the arts is part of that education. Reading a book can make us think about something we either hadn't thought of before, or don't want to think about now, but may nonetheless be important for our growth.

A dance performance can enhance our sense of space, expand our sense of human interaction, give physical expression to emotions we feel but don't have the physical graces to put into movement. Maybe we have two left feet. Maybe we're a wee tad klutzy.

Music can express what we experience, but don't have the lyrics or the voice to express in song ourselves.

And fine art can make us see the world, think about the world in ways we haven't considered, can make us look at something we see every day in a completely new light. How does this impact us? If it does, is it a direct impact? Do we use this impact, absorb it, incorporate it into our lives? Does it filter in and make us better, more observant, more feelingful...perhaps better at our jobs, our relationships? 

Only if we let it. Only if we nourish it. Only if we encourage it and coax it out of its hiding place.

Such is how I have always felt about the work of Pablo Picasso, his habit of 'rearranging' the human body (frequently women), his habit of taking a bull, for instance, or a goat, or a chicken, and making you see the bull, the goat, the chicken in a way you'd never seen it before. Picasso disrupts our perception, shakes up of what we know, what we think we see or are used to seeing.

So...get a ticket for After Hours Access to the Picasso Sculpture Exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, lead by a museum curator and organized by Peer Platform for Art, which was formed in October 2014. This Sunday, January 24th, from 5:15-6:30, the Museum of Modern Art will close to the public and offer a private tour to Peer Platform participants.

When I saw the Picasso Sculpture show in December people were sitting around on the benches in the exhibition rooms listening to a talk about the exhibit on their headsets, and using the printed brochure as a guide to the works of art featured.

You can do the same or join up with Peer Platform and have an entirely different experience of Picasso. This is what Peer Platform does...every month at a museum, gallery, artist's studio, or private institution and/or private collection. It costs a bit more money than just standing in line and getting a regular/student/senior ticket, but it's worth it.

And you can take photographs. And post them. And share the experience with your friends. Museums are loosening up and sharing the love, which is important because so many people do not live in cities where they can experience something like this themselves. But there is the Internet. And social media...and, well, um...posting your favorite art shots.

Here is the Peer Platform FB page for more information:
https://www.facebook.com/peerplatform/?fref=nf

And here is a video of the group's tour of the Jeff Koons' show at the Whitney Museum:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Coc_1hkWK-I

And here is the link to MoMA:
http://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/1505

If you are in New York this Sunday, go. Do something you haven't done before. Be inspired by something out of the normal. See this mind-blowing exhibition and the She-Goat, about which Picasso himself said:

"She's more like a goat than a real goat, don't you think?"

But...may I ask...what is real anyway?

#PicassoSculpture   #MuseumofModernArt   #PeerPlatformforArt  ___

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2016-01-16 23:00:06 (11 comments; 2 reshares; 41 +1s)Open 

The Revanant is stunning. It reminded me of the filmmaking of the late great Akira Kurosawa, particularly his film Dersu Uzala, which was seen by so few people (at least that I have met) that I wish I could shut down Google+ for 6 hours and play Dersu and The Revenant back-to-back, forcing you all to watch them so that you can tell me what you think.

I love the filmmaking of Director Alelandro Iñárritu, because he works in that magic realism sort of way that, well, American directors seem to be unfamiliar with. Maybe American directors don't dream...or think people should float or levitate or fight with tigers in dreamlike sequences in the movies. No matter...I'm awful glad that these two filmmakers do.

The first time I learned of Iñárritu's work was when I saw 21 Grams (can't think of a single American Director who would havetak... more »

The Revanant is stunning. It reminded me of the filmmaking of the late great Akira Kurosawa, particularly his film Dersu Uzala, which was seen by so few people (at least that I have met) that I wish I could shut down Google+ for 6 hours and play Dersu and The Revenant back-to-back, forcing you all to watch them so that you can tell me what you think.

I love the filmmaking of Director Alelandro Iñárritu, because he works in that magic realism sort of way that, well, American directors seem to be unfamiliar with. Maybe American directors don't dream...or think people should float or levitate or fight with tigers in dreamlike sequences in the movies. No matter...I'm awful glad that these two filmmakers do.

The first time I learned of Iñárritu's work was when I saw 21 Grams (can't think of a single American Director who would have taken that subject on) and then I was completely hooked with Birdman. 

I would love to ask Iñárritu if he was a fan of Kurosawa and particularly of Dersu Uzala. If anyone has a direct line to him would you ask him for me? I've got money down that I'm right.

But, alas, I can't shut G+ down for 6 hours, so you'll just have to watch these three videos of Dersu that I found, which comprise the entire film, and then you'll have to get yourselves to the the-ah-tah to see The Revenant.  

I've never watched films posted on Daily Motion before, so I hope this works (incrocio le dita!) Ping me if it doesn't and I'll see what I can do. Or there's Netflix. Or Movies on Demand. Or the dreaded Amazon. Take your pick!

Derzu Uzala Part I:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xzmn4n_dersu-uzala-1975-pt-1_creation

Derzu Uzala Part II:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xznana_dersu-uzala-1975-pt-2_creation

Derzu Uzala Part III:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xzmbh6_dersu-uzala-1975-pt-3_creation

Let's go to...the movies....tra la la....la lahhhhhhhh!___

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2016-01-06 16:03:59 (8 comments; 0 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

Morning Ladies, Single or Partnered, Wives, Mothers, Stepmothers, Entrepreneurs, Enchantresses and Sorceresses, 

The many labels of me chronicles reflections on my life as an owner of more than a few of the above 'titles' that from time-to-time, if not every day, apply to women.

In case it should resonate, I thought I would share it with the women of Google+, who I am sure wear many assorted hats of different colors throughout their own days.

Thank you for reading, as always,

Giselle

Morning Ladies, Single or Partnered, Wives, Mothers, Stepmothers, Entrepreneurs, Enchantresses and Sorceresses, 

The many labels of me chronicles reflections on my life as an owner of more than a few of the above 'titles' that from time-to-time, if not every day, apply to women.

In case it should resonate, I thought I would share it with the women of Google+, who I am sure wear many assorted hats of different colors throughout their own days.

Thank you for reading, as always,

Giselle___

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2016-01-05 12:54:27 (31 comments; 1 reshares; 56 +1s)Open 

Ummmm....So no, the Eagles have not played like they were wearing tutus. If they had, Chip Kelly would still be a head coach and we'd all be looking forward to the playoffs. Happy New Year!" - The Pennsylvania Ballet (Thank you very much.)

Compelled to share the full text, in case there's anybody out there who doubts the athleticism, grace under fire, and sheer physical awesomeness of ballerinas:

A Facebook user recently commented that the Eagles had "played like they were wearing tutus!!!" (No one on G+ would dare say anything that ignorant and arrogant, right? Right? Right!)

Our response:

*"With all due respect to the Eagles, let's take a minute to look at what our tutu wearing women have done this month:
By tomorrow afternoon, the ballerinas that wear tutus at Pennsylvania Ballet will have performed The Nutcracker 27... more »

Ummmm....So no, the Eagles have not played like they were wearing tutus. If they had, Chip Kelly would still be a head coach and we'd all be looking forward to the playoffs. Happy New Year!" - The Pennsylvania Ballet (Thank you very much.)

Compelled to share the full text, in case there's anybody out there who doubts the athleticism, grace under fire, and sheer physical awesomeness of ballerinas:

A Facebook user recently commented that the Eagles had "played like they were wearing tutus!!!" (No one on G+ would dare say anything that ignorant and arrogant, right? Right? Right!)

Our response:

*"With all due respect to the Eagles, let's take a minute to look at what our tutu wearing women have done this month:
By tomorrow afternoon, the ballerinas that wear tutus at Pennsylvania Ballet will have performed The Nutcracker 27 times in 21 days. Some of those women have performed the Snow scene and the Waltz of the Flowers without an understudy or second cast. No 'second string' to come in and spell them when they needed a break. When they have been sick they have come to the theater, put on make up and costume, smiled and performed. When they have felt an injury in the middle of a show there have been no injury timeouts. They have kept smiling, finished their job, bowed, left the stage, and then dealt with what hurts. Some of these tutu wearers have been tossed into a new position with only a moments notice. That's like a cornerback being told at halftime that they're going to play wide receiver for the second half, but they need to make sure that no one can tell they've never played wide receiver before. They have done all of this with such artistry and grace that audience after audience has clapped and cheered (no Boo Birds at the Academy) and the Philadelphia Inquirer has said this production looks "better than ever".*

So no, the Eagles have not played like they were wearing tutus. If they had, Chip Kelly would still be a head coach and we'd all be looking forward to the playoffs."

Happy New Year! - The Philadelphia Ballet

GET THINE OWN SELF TO THE BALLET IN 2016. Give a shout out to a woman in a tutu. Football players ain't got nothin' on these babes!

Indeed. Happy New Year...again.

#PennsylvaniaBallet   #WomeninTutus   #Ballet   #Dance   #GoogleCulturalInstitute   ___

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2015-12-24 20:18:19 (24 comments; 3 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

My (mostly) Navajo Folk Art Tree Ornaments and I wish you all Happy Holidays.

When I was a child my mother would take us to Santo Domingo Pueblo for the Indian Christmas dances. Our tree was decorated with Red and Green Chile Pepper lights and cranberries and popcorn and tinsel. Lots of tinsel. I loved tinsel. Still do for some reason.

But that was long, long ago and now I decorate our tree with carved balsa wood ornaments made by Navajo artisans.

Flying pigs...because pigs can fly, too.

And feathered red horses, because what other color should a horse be? Go ahead. Think about it.

And blue sparkly bumblebees, because those of you who think bumblebees are black and brown and yellow are crazy.

And roadrunners with shoes and hats...because it's hard to run barefooted if you're a Roadrunner. And hats make life more civilized for... more »

My (mostly) Navajo Folk Art Tree Ornaments and I wish you all Happy Holidays.

When I was a child my mother would take us to Santo Domingo Pueblo for the Indian Christmas dances. Our tree was decorated with Red and Green Chile Pepper lights and cranberries and popcorn and tinsel. Lots of tinsel. I loved tinsel. Still do for some reason.

But that was long, long ago and now I decorate our tree with carved balsa wood ornaments made by Navajo artisans.

Flying pigs...because pigs can fly, too.

And feathered red horses, because what other color should a horse be? Go ahead. Think about it.

And blue sparkly bumblebees, because those of you who think bumblebees are black and brown and yellow are crazy.

And roadrunners with shoes and hats...because it's hard to run barefooted if you're a Roadrunner. And hats make life more civilized for everyone. Including Roadrunners.

And Navajos on airplanes, because Navajos love to fly as much as I do. And because Navajos on airplanes make me smile. And I like to smile. And did I tell you I love to fly?

And black crows, and pink cows (really, is there any other color for a cow?), and polka dot horses with wings (because pigs who fly need horse friends who fly...). And polka dots make all right with the world.

And orange Hummingbirds, because with all the greenery to compete with, and the red of the flowers that HBirds are so attracted to, orange is a much better color after all, don't you think? There ought to be a campaign to change all HBirds to brilliant orange...

And a bird's nest for birds who fly. Some, like Roadrunners, walk, but who's noticing???

And let's not forget the Roswell Alien, because there was a Roswell alien, and anyone who doesn't believe that hasn't been to New Mexico, is too old to remember, or doesn't have a vivid enough imagination (or all three). And I like believing that there was a Roswell Alien...and that it was wearing a green T-Shirt.

Oh...and there is the Nutcracker, and the Mouse and a Ballerina from the Nutcracker...because Ballet, and Christmas, and the Nutcracker.

And because I love dance. But you all know that.

And I digress.

Because it's Christmas.

Peace on Earth. That is what I wish for. There is nothing more important.

Giselle

P.S. For those of you who are curious about Native American Indian dances in the Pueblos of the Southwest, here is a link specifically to the Santo Domino Pueblo, a place of beauty and mystery:

http://www.indianpueblo.org/19pueblos/santodomingo.html

And a lovely video of Santo Domingo Flute Player, Isaac Coriz, talking about his art:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_052k00UbA

Sorry that there are no videos of the dances that I have attended in my life. They are sacred performances and cameras and videos are not allowed.

#SantoDomingoPueblo   #DelbertBuck   #MarvinJim  ___

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2015-12-22 01:01:14 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

The Year in Pictures 2015
To photographers everywhere, and to the stories that need to be told, and seen and understood through their art.

The Year in Pictures 2015
To photographers everywhere, and to the stories that need to be told, and seen and understood through their art.___

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2015-12-17 13:05:16 (34 comments; 8 reshares; 43 +1s)Open 

My Gorgeous New York
Taken in Central Park on Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Walked south through Central Park from 99th and Fifth all the way down to 59th Street.

Too beautiful not to walk, although I hadn't planned on it. There was a feeling of eerie bliss in the air.

Excitement that the weather was so beautiful joggers were running in shorts. Dismay that in fact the weather was so downright balmy the week before Christmas. Not a sign of Winter.

The sky was an intense blue, dotted with puff clouds and helicopters, the nutty noisiness of the Avenues and cross-streets, their sirens and blaring horns all but obliterated by the breeze, honking geese, leaves rustling across pathways, children playing, people walking panting dogs, eager to be off lease, tugging their owners behind them. 

Central Park.

Children, weddedc... more »

My Gorgeous New York
Taken in Central Park on Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Walked south through Central Park from 99th and Fifth all the way down to 59th Street.

Too beautiful not to walk, although I hadn't planned on it. There was a feeling of eerie bliss in the air.

Excitement that the weather was so beautiful joggers were running in shorts. Dismay that in fact the weather was so downright balmy the week before Christmas. Not a sign of Winter.

The sky was an intense blue, dotted with puff clouds and helicopters, the nutty noisiness of the Avenues and cross-streets, their sirens and blaring horns all but obliterated by the breeze, honking geese, leaves rustling across pathways, children playing, people walking panting dogs, eager to be off lease, tugging their owners behind them. 

Central Park.

Children, wedded couples, landmark buildings peaking through the trees, museums, reflections, reservoirs, parks, lakes, outdoor theaters.

Over the Ramble
And through the Woods
To the Sheep's Meadow we go...

La la la la la la lahhhhhhhhhh!

Yes, it's my beautiful New York...

For those of you who are interested, New York City's Central Park was designed by the famous landscape architect, Frederick Law Olmstead. Here is the Wiki on him. It's worth reading because there is every chance that the city you are living in, has a piece of his creative legacy and you might not even know it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Law_Olmsted

#CentralParkConservancy   #FederickLawOlmstead  ___

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2015-12-11 18:27:52 (30 comments; 6 reshares; 42 +1s)Open 

Bless you +Justin Trudeau. And may your warm welcome of Syrian refugees be a beacon of humanitarian light all over the world.

#JustinTrudeau   #SyrianRefugees   #Canada  

Bless you +Justin Trudeau. And may your warm welcome of Syrian refugees be a beacon of humanitarian light all over the world.

#JustinTrudeau   #SyrianRefugees   #Canada  ___

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2015-12-10 01:12:02 (9 comments; 20 reshares; 43 +1s)Open 

A Shout Out to all of the Photographers on Google+ - Might one of you be the next Ansel Adams?

If you think you might be, the National Park Service is accepting applications for the position of parks photographer, a post once held by the legendary Adams. You've got to be proficient in B&W and large format, and Okay, landscape photography would be good, too.

If interested, you have another week to apply as the Deadline for applications is December 15th. Job is based in D.C. and understandably involves quite a bit of travel. But traveling our glorious land...who could complain about that????

Since G+ is a photog's medium perhaps more than anything else, I thought I'd give a shout out to the community of photographers here.

Apply!

What have you got to lose?

$100,000 a year is all.

And the possibility of landing... more »

A Shout Out to all of the Photographers on Google+ - Might one of you be the next Ansel Adams?

If you think you might be, the National Park Service is accepting applications for the position of parks photographer, a post once held by the legendary Adams. You've got to be proficient in B&W and large format, and Okay, landscape photography would be good, too.

If interested, you have another week to apply as the Deadline for applications is December 15th. Job is based in D.C. and understandably involves quite a bit of travel. But traveling our glorious land...who could complain about that????

Since G+ is a photog's medium perhaps more than anything else, I thought I'd give a shout out to the community of photographers here.

Apply!

What have you got to lose?

$100,000 a year is all.

And the possibility of landing what would be a one-of-a-kind superb gig.

Good luck!___

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2015-12-03 14:52:30 (82 comments; 5 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 

HUMAN BEINGS AGAINST GUN VIOLENCE - Moms & Dads, StepMoms & StepDads, Grandmothers & Grandfathers, Granddaughters & Grandsons, Sons & Daughters, StepSons & Stepdaughters, Aunts & Uncles, Nieces & Nephews, Sisters & Brothers, Neighbors, Friends, Colleagues & Strangers...anyone with a beating heart and a soul who knows, deep down inside, that we cannot sit here and tell ourselves that these mass shootings are just the way life is now.

No. It is not!

We cannot allow this to become the new normal. We have allowed this.

It is time to fix it. 

Saying prayers for the families of the victims doesn't meaning anything.

HUMAN BEINGS AGAINST GUN VIOLENCE - Moms & Dads, StepMoms & StepDads, Grandmothers & Grandfathers, Granddaughters & Grandsons, Sons & Daughters, StepSons & Stepdaughters, Aunts & Uncles, Nieces & Nephews, Sisters & Brothers, Neighbors, Friends, Colleagues & Strangers...anyone with a beating heart and a soul who knows, deep down inside, that we cannot sit here and tell ourselves that these mass shootings are just the way life is now.

No. It is not!

We cannot allow this to become the new normal. We have allowed this.

It is time to fix it. 

Saying prayers for the families of the victims doesn't meaning anything.___

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2015-12-01 19:27:46 (13 comments; 6 reshares; 28 +1s)Open 

Hurray for the +Google Cultural Institute!

I moved to New York City so that I could spend my life immersed in the arts - dance, theatre, music, museums, site specific installations, street performances, all of it. I am fortunate to have been able to work professionally in the music business, the theatre and in the world of fine art. But...

...unless a musician, or artist, or dance troupe works out an arrangement to perform for free in public, there are so very many people around the world who will never have access to great works of performance, visual and audio art.

As a performer, I certainly understand the (theoretical, practical and philosophical) issues involved with filming performances and allowing them to be put up on YouTube or Vimeo and/or on private websites. Performers and directors need to make a living, too, you know, and they also have a... more »

Hurray for the +Google Cultural Institute!

I moved to New York City so that I could spend my life immersed in the arts - dance, theatre, music, museums, site specific installations, street performances, all of it. I am fortunate to have been able to work professionally in the music business, the theatre and in the world of fine art. But...

...unless a musician, or artist, or dance troupe works out an arrangement to perform for free in public, there are so very many people around the world who will never have access to great works of performance, visual and audio art.

As a performer, I certainly understand the (theoretical, practical and philosophical) issues involved with filming performances and allowing them to be put up on YouTube or Vimeo and/or on private websites. Performers and directors need to make a living, too, you know, and they also have a right to have some sort of protection for their work and to have it executed and presented in a professional way.

Not easy to done unless there is expertise and financial backing behind such an effort.

But now the +Google Cultural Institute is making it possible for more and more people to be affected by the various arts in a very compelling way:

“What I’m hoping is that they will realize that there’s much more to being on the Internet than just capturing a video and uploading it to YouTube. That’s important, for sure, but the idea here is to provide narrative, to provide behind the scenes, to provide context,” Amit Sood, the director of the +Google Cultural Institute said in a recent video interview from London (via Google Hangouts, naturally).

I love this, because music, theatre, art, dance, opera are each and all emotional experiences, and it is possible to be affected by them even though one cannot be there to experience whatever artistic medium it is in person. The technology that Google is using to bring these experiences into our homes is fabulous and I hope it is expanded upon so that we feel like we are there in the theatre, at the museum, standing before the painting.

For so many years I have heard people say ridiculous things like, 'No one reads between the covers books anymore,' or 'Who goes to the ballet?' or 'The theatre is too expensive,' or 'Museums are dead...you can see every painting online...' But those statements are made by people who either cannot afford the price of a ticket to a museum, or to go the theatre or the opera or to a musical concert. It is easy to criticize therefore what someone cannot afford to participate in, or does not have access to. And it is also easy to assume that the arts are dead.

Far from it. I can't get a ticket to Hamilton on Broadway. The last time I walked the High Line in NY City it was jammed with people, so was The Whitney downtown, and heaven forbid there is a major exhibition at one of NY City's Museums. You'd be lucky to see 3 square inches of any given painting there are so many people waiting in line.

The Smithsonian, where admission is free, is the only exception to this crowding problem that I know of in the United States. Thus the draw of seeing art of all kinds on line.

I love technology. And I particularly love this use of technology - to bring art, artistry and artistic expression to anyone who can connect to the internet.

As far as I can tell, it is still primarily photographic in nature, but the photographs are stunning. While there are no full-length dance performances that I can find, there are many videos and some of interesting art exhibitions, such as this one, of blind Helen Keller visiting Martha Graham's dance studio, which raised the goosebumps on my arms:

https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/asset-viewer/helen-keller-visits-martha-graham-s-dance-studio/hQG-J0zY3TyfYQ?projectId=performing-arts

So here you go...join me on the +Google Cultural Institute at:
https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/home

And...MAKE ART...NOT WAR!

I think it's only the beginning and, well, I want more...more....MORE!

What is wrong that I cannot find Amit Sood on Google+????

About Amit Sood, Google's Cultural Director, on The Guardian:
http://www.theguardian.com/culture-professionals-network/culture-professionals-blog/2013/dec/03/amit-sood-google-cultural-institute-art-project

#GoogleCulturalInstitute   #AmitSoodGoogle   #Dance   #Music   #Art   #Theatre   #Photography  ___

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2015-11-26 15:48:02 (6 comments; 0 reshares; 14 +1s)Open 

Happy Thanksgiving everyone, from the United States where we have much to be grateful for. The biggest hit on Broadway is Hamilton- Lin-Manuel Miranda's musical Hip Hop version of the story of Alexander Hamilton, a brilliant (young) man who immigrated to the United States and became one of our Founding Fathers.

Miranda's inspired musical version of the life story of Alexander Hamilton was based on the best-selling biography, “Alexander Hamilton,” by historian Ron Chernow.

Miranda's influences were everything musical theatre, from Oklahoma and West Side Story and A Chorus Line to Stephen Sondheim and Kander & Ebb. He loved the entire genre and form of artistic and musical and dance expression.

'Cept that as the son of Puerto Rican parents, his neighborhood and street scene growing up were steeped in a much widermis... more »

Happy Thanksgiving everyone, from the United States where we have much to be grateful for. The biggest hit on Broadway is Hamilton- Lin-Manuel Miranda's musical Hip Hop version of the story of Alexander Hamilton, a brilliant (young) man who immigrated to the United States and became one of our Founding Fathers.

Miranda's inspired musical version of the life story of Alexander Hamilton was based on the best-selling biography, “Alexander Hamilton,” by historian Ron Chernow.

Miranda's influences were everything musical theatre, from Oklahoma and West Side Story and A Chorus Line to Stephen Sondheim and Kander & Ebb. He loved the entire genre and form of artistic and musical and dance expression.

'Cept that as the son of Puerto Rican parents, his neighborhood and street scene growing up were steeped in a much wider mishmash of cultures, musical tastes, poetry, dance and other artistic and intellectual influences.

He infused them all with his own almost indescribable energy, distilled those influences like he was making a fine brew, mixing them up and combining them with everything musical that had gotten under his skin, ultimately envisioning a Latino Hip Hop retelling of the Hamilton story because he thought "_hip-hop was the perfect musical style for describing the American Revolution, because it is “the language of youth and energy and of rebellion."_

On this Thanksgiving Day, when there are so many people all over the world struggling to find freedom, a place to call home, a place safe from political strife, I thought I would share with you a fabulous poetry rap Miranda did at The White House Poetry Jam several years ago when he was putting together what has become the smash Hamilton on Broadway.

I dig it. I thought you would dig it. We all came from someplace else to get to where we are now.

Including one of our Founding Forefathers and a great champion of the Constitution of the United States...Alexander Hamilton. We need to keep our hearts open. We need to listen. To see. To take in what is around us...and turn it into something inspiring.

Check it out...and Happy Thanksgiving Lin-Manuel Miranda.

About Lin-Manuel Miranda:
http://www.linmanuel.com/

Lin-Manuel Miranda grew up on Hip Hop:
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/16/theater/lin-manuel-miranda-creator-and-star-of-hamilton-grew-up-on-hip-hop-and-show-tunes.html

The Making of the Hamilton Cast Album:
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-making-of-the-hamilton-cast-album/

Hamilton: An American Musical:
http://www.hamiltonbroadway.com/

Lin-Manuel Miranda freestyling Jimmy Fallon's outgoing VM:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkWR59-VRFI

Lin-Manuel Miranda freestyle rapping on the Tonight Show:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w31jboLYcH4

MacAarthur Fellow, Lin-Manuel Miranda:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r69-fohpJ3o

#Hamilton   #LinManuelMiranda   #AlexanderHamilton  ___

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2015-11-25 20:30:04 (113 comments; 0 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

So. Yet another inconvenient truth comes out. Which is that "half of the attacks since 2001 were committed by men born in the United States." And that "Since 2001 hardly any foreign-born have committed (or tried to commit) terrorism in (or on the way to) the U.S."  (John Mueller, political scientist at Ohio State and the Cato Institute who tracks terrorism in the United States)

On the eve of Thanksgiving in the United States, where we have so much to be thankful for, some people want our country (and its citizens) to turn its back on refugees who are escaping political brutality in their homelands because somehow we have convinced ourselves that "terrorism" is not an American problem, is not an American issue.

"Since then (9/11), most of the attackers in the United States claiming or appearing to be motivated by extremist Islam were... more »

So. Yet another inconvenient truth comes out. Which is that "half of the attacks since 2001 were committed by men born in the United States." And that "Since 2001 hardly any foreign-born have committed (or tried to commit) terrorism in (or on the way to) the U.S."  (John Mueller, political scientist at Ohio State and the Cato Institute who tracks terrorism in the United States)

On the eve of Thanksgiving in the United States, where we have so much to be thankful for, some people want our country (and its citizens) to turn its back on refugees who are escaping political brutality in their homelands because somehow we have convinced ourselves that "terrorism" is not an American problem, is not an American issue.

"Since then (9/11), most of the attackers in the United States claiming or appearing to be motivated by extremist Islam were born in this country or were naturalized citizens. None were refugees." 

We cannot put an end to terrorism unless we are willing to open our eyes...and confront an inconvenient truth.___

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2015-11-24 20:42:40 (17 comments; 0 reshares; 18 +1s)Open 

Man-made airbirds, as seen through the eyes of Marvin Jim and Delbert Buck, two Navajo Folk Artists.

I collect things aviation - books, toys, all sorts of flying creatures and things, including an assortment of Christmas tree ornaments most of which are animals, but some of which are icons from popular culture (photo of that collection to come nearer to Christmas).

Years ago I found among papers my mother had given me an old sectional from the Northeast that she inscribed on the Upper Left hand corner, In 1947, landed at Syracuse airport, (you can't see it in the picture because the map is huge and I couldn't photograph the entire thing).

The map is so simple compared to current sectionals and there is so something beautiful and elegant about it, and of course sentimental because of my mother's inscription, that I have always wanted to frame it and... more »

Man-made airbirds, as seen through the eyes of Marvin Jim and Delbert Buck, two Navajo Folk Artists.

I collect things aviation - books, toys, all sorts of flying creatures and things, including an assortment of Christmas tree ornaments most of which are animals, but some of which are icons from popular culture (photo of that collection to come nearer to Christmas).

Years ago I found among papers my mother had given me an old sectional from the Northeast that she inscribed on the Upper Left hand corner, In 1947, landed at Syracuse airport, (you can't see it in the picture because the map is huge and I couldn't photograph the entire thing).

The map is so simple compared to current sectionals and there is so something beautiful and elegant about it, and of course sentimental because of my mother's inscription, that I have always wanted to frame it and recently did.

It hangs in my bedroom over an old chest of drawers on which I've put two of my favorite pieces of folk art - a small wooden airplane (the prop spins) with a donkey as pilot (there is significance in that!) by Navajo artist Marvin Jim, and another much bigger wooden airplane with a cowboy pilot and a Dalmatian dog (with a hat, of course) as his co-pilot.

While I don't know whether donkeys can fly (okay...I do and they don't, at least none that I know of, but I digress...), our curious cowboy straddles the plane like it's a bronco and heaven only knows how he keeps his seat. The prop spins on his plane as well, but I gather they're not going anywhere anytime soon, even though Coca Cola has signed on as a sponsor, thus the cheeky smile on our cowboy's face.

I love Navajo folk art and I love the imagination of the artists, taking elements of imagery that comes across their various fields of vision and marrying them to other, far-fetched yet Hollywood-esque elements.

I wouldn't have put a donkey in an airplane. But if I had a donkey in my backyard and I saw a plane flying overhead and I was a folk artist, then I probably would.

I think Walt Disney would dig 'em. I do.

The framed photo in the back was taken by a friend as I was landing in Winchester, West Virginia a few years back. I have a photo of my parents at that very same airfield decades ago.
I loved discovering that the airport was the same, although it was completely unrecognizable.

And I love Navajo folk art.
And Donkeys and Dalmatians that take to the skies.
And good friends who waiting for us to land safely.

Could someone please tell Coca-Cola that I wouldn't mind them sponsoring me? (But don't tell them I don't every drink the stuff!)

Fly safe if you are traveling for Thanksgiving.

And raise a glass to our imaginative and amusing Navajo artist friends wherever you are.

About Marvin Jim, Navajo Folk Artist:
http://www.twinrocks.com/artists/50-southwest-baskets-navajo-native-american-art-jewelry-pottery-weaving-rug-blanket-manta-necklace-turquoise-twin-rocks-zuni-santo-domingo-fetish-hopi-biography.html

About Delbert Buck, Navajo Folk Artist:
http://www.twinrocks.com/artists/47-delbert-buck-biography.html___

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2015-11-24 13:18:29 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 

"Einstein thought his theory of gravity so beautiful, that he once told a student that if it didn't work out, he would feel sorry for the Lord. He didn't have to worry. Einstein would have been 136 this month. The stars keep lighting candles for him. Happy Birthday, Albert..."

"Einstein thought his theory of gravity so beautiful, that he once told a student that if it didn't work out, he would feel sorry for the Lord. He didn't have to worry. Einstein would have been 136 this month. The stars keep lighting candles for him. Happy Birthday, Albert..."___

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2015-11-22 17:01:51 (9 comments; 0 reshares; 16 +1s)Open 

“Truly creative things happen when one thinks differently, yet nobody wants to think differently.” - Shonda Rhimes, creator, founder and producer (Grey’s Anatomy and Scandal, ShondaLand production company)

“I can’t stand most of the movies marketed to women. They are all about finding guys and weddings, weddings, weddings. I don’t care about weddings.” - Amy Heckerling, writer and director (Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Clueless)

‘‘It’s white men hiring white men to tell stories about white men.’’ - Frankie Shaw, writer, director and actress (SMILF)

“They keep pointing to a few female action heroes and saying they love strong women. But digging Lara Croft doesn’t mean you’re a feminist. It means you’re a straight guy.” - Dana Calvo, writer and producer (Narcos and Good Girls Revolt)

“You’dhave to go to forklifters to find a l... more »

“Truly creative things happen when one thinks differently, yet nobody wants to think differently.” - Shonda Rhimes, creator, founder and producer (Grey’s Anatomy and Scandal, ShondaLand production company)

“I can’t stand most of the movies marketed to women. They are all about finding guys and weddings, weddings, weddings. I don’t care about weddings.” - Amy Heckerling, writer and director (Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Clueless)

‘‘It’s white men hiring white men to tell stories about white men.’’ - Frankie Shaw, writer, director and actress (SMILF)

“They keep pointing to a few female action heroes and saying they love strong women. But digging Lara Croft doesn’t mean you’re a feminist. It means you’re a straight guy.” - Dana Calvo, writer and producer (Narcos and Good Girls Revolt)

“You’d have to go to forklifters to find a lower percentage of females — 99 percent of people on my crew have never worked with a female director. A woman who’d been working as an extra for 30 years was on my set and told me: ‘I just want to tell you, right on, sister. Do you know how nice it is just to see a woman in charge?’ I kind of got teary.” - Denise Di Novi, producer and director (Heathers and Edward Scissorhands and Unforgettable) 

‘‘I’m so fatigued by this superhero mythology and the notion that one guy with a cape who can fly is going to save the world. It’s so completely juvenile.’’ - Karyn Kusama, director and writer (Girlfight, Aeon Flux, Jennifer’s Body, The Man in the High Castle)

‘‘A big part of getting a ‘shot’ is about studio execs seeing themselves in you. As a woman and a black filmmaker, I’m often not that person.” - Dee Rees, writer, director and producer (Pariah and Bessie)

“Maybe even to the great men, a woman directing is like a dog playing the piano: at best, a novelty or fad; at worst, an aberration.” - Leslye Headland, writer and director (Bachelorette and Sleeping With Other People)

“I used to assume that Hollywood would let anyone who could make them money get behind the wheel. But now I think there is some deep-seated aversion to letting women drive.” - Lucy Fisher, producer (Divergent, The Great Gatsby’)

“The thing that’s so hard is, most of the female directors I know are spending a significant amount of their lives waiting around.” - Lena Dunham, writer, director, producer, actress
(Tiny Furniture and Girls)___

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2015-11-20 13:20:16 (3 comments; 3 reshares; 15 +1s)Open 

‘‘It’s kind of like the church,’’ notes the actress Anjelica Huston, whose father, John Huston, helped set the template for macho directors. ‘‘They don’t want us to be priests. They want us to be obedient nuns.’’

As a woman, and former actor and theatre director, and as a curious person who reads and lives a real life and loves the movies and art and music and dance and creative endeavors that are reflective of all life - which includes men AND women - I am very picky about what I watch, because, in my view, there isn't much that comes out of Hollywood that interests me.

Movies?

Wild. Because Cheryl Strayed is a woman with a relatable life.

Boyhood. Because not only is Patricia Arquette an actress who is relatable, she played a mother on screen anyone not living under a rock can understand.

BlueJasmine. Becaus... more »

‘‘It’s kind of like the church,’’ notes the actress Anjelica Huston, whose father, John Huston, helped set the template for macho directors. ‘‘They don’t want us to be priests. They want us to be obedient nuns.’’

As a woman, and former actor and theatre director, and as a curious person who reads and lives a real life and loves the movies and art and music and dance and creative endeavors that are reflective of all life - which includes men AND women - I am very picky about what I watch, because, in my view, there isn't much that comes out of Hollywood that interests me.

Movies?

Wild. Because Cheryl Strayed is a woman with a relatable life.

Boyhood. Because not only is Patricia Arquette an actress who is relatable, she played a mother on screen anyone not living under a rock can understand.

Blue Jasmine. Because women like Jasmine are everywhere. Sadly. 

Zero Dark Thirty and The Hurt Locker, because they are war films directed by a woman, and that is unheard of in HWood.

Because:

That kind of leap — from indie to blockbuster — is almost exclusively reserved for young guys in baseball caps who remind older guys in baseball caps of themselves. Kathryn Bigelow, a unique figure in Hollywood, got a big budget for ‘‘K-19: The Widowmaker.’’ The director Patty Jenkins’s ‘‘Wonder Woman’’ will arrive in 2017. No other woman in Hollywood has directed a $100 million live-action film.

TV?

Homeland. Because Carrie Mathison is much more than a blue-jeaned baby queen, as David Essex would say.

Madam Secretary. Ditto. And because Téa Leoni isn't Botox'd to within an inch of her life. And because Yes, we've had two female Secretaries of State. And because it's time for more political drama on film and in television that reflect the work of women in politics. Because Barbara Hall created it.

60 Minutes. Because Leslie Stahl is still there.

TV shows I can't watch?

Suits. Because the women are reduced to being, essentially, pretty clothes hangers.

TV shows that make me angry?

House of Cards. Because even though the story is good, they still had to make the talented Robin Wright look like a clothes hanger. No one wears tighter clothes on screen than Claire Underwood.

Big Bang Theory. Because the female lead started out as a waitress wanna be actress and she failed at that? Seriously? And the three males leads are scientists? Seriously? Yes. Seriously.

The Good Wife. Because yet another man cheats on his wife and this is the basis for good television? Seriously? Yes. Seriously.

Rather than being either half the output of Hollywood or the norm in 2015, movies and television shows that are either created by or directed by women, or that star and feature female characters and female story lines, are still extremely rare, and when they do occur, unless they are nitty gritty like the films of Kathryn Bigelow, or the character is drenched in political drama like Carrie Mathison or Beth McCord, women's films and television shows often get characterized as chick flicks...

...the dreaded counterpart to something called chicklit (I have never read any. Have you?). Which must be a cousin to chickart, which of course is a cousin to chickdance, which is a distant relative of chickmusic, which is sometimes discussed in the same paragraph as chickfood and chickcercise and chickcars and chickarchitecture and chickscience and chickfinances and chicksports and chickaviation.

You know what I mean. But I digress...

‘‘Not that many women have succeeded in the movie business,’’ one top entertainment boss told me, while insisting on anonymity. ‘‘A lot of ’em haven’t tried hard enough. We’re tough about it. It’s a hundred-year-old business, founded by a bunch of old Jewish European men who did not hire anybody of color, no women agents or executives. We’re still slow at anything but white guys.’’

However, it is finally changing. Partly because more women in positions of power are writing, producing, directing or green lighting films that are built around interesting and compelling female characters, partly because there are men who get it and are supportive of this because they too are sick of how boring and one-sided moves have become and these men want to be a part of this change, and partly because after decades of silence imposed by an industry that prefers Priests to Nuns, the lack of gender diversity in Hollywood is now being talked about by virtually everyone in Hollywood with any character, with any integrity, with any sense of ethics.

The Women of Hollywood Speak Out to Maureen Dowd of the New York Times.

Finally.

#TheWomenofHollywood   #MaureenDowd  ___

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2015-11-18 15:38:08 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

*There is a place in New York City
called The High Line*

Where Lady Liberty lifts her flame to France
Stay strong, our hearts are with you, she says...

Where Albert Einstein thinks Love
not Physics,
is the answer

Where a girl sits silently and reads in public
yet seems entirely within herself

Where Gehry's crackled ICA building rises in the distance
adorned by the Sun,
glistening against its crisp glass skin like a faceted diamond on a Lady's ear lobe

Where the old railroad tracks beckon
The young
The old
The foreign
The familiar

To walk
To stroll
To hold hands
And kiss

To sit
and people watch,
hiding behind sunglasses,
eating ice cream cones
as Summer fades to Fall

Where people come from all over the world
To mingle... more »

*There is a place in New York City
called The High Line*

Where Lady Liberty lifts her flame to France
Stay strong, our hearts are with you, she says...

Where Albert Einstein thinks Love
not Physics,
is the answer

Where a girl sits silently and reads in public
yet seems entirely within herself

Where Gehry's crackled ICA building rises in the distance
adorned by the Sun,
glistening against its crisp glass skin like a faceted diamond on a Lady's ear lobe

Where the old railroad tracks beckon
The young
The old
The foreign
The familiar

To walk
To stroll
To hold hands
And kiss

To sit
and people watch,
hiding behind sunglasses,
eating ice cream cones
as Summer fades to Fall

Where people come from all over the world
To mingle together in peace
Their nationalities and religions and habits and histories
flowing together in wonder

At the intersection of past and future
of nature and architecture
of cityscape and landscape
of city noise and nature silence

Atop the city
Beside the Hudson
Under the clouds
In our beloved Manhattan

Where the music that people make
Sings harmoniously with the music the wind makes
Looking out onto Our New Colossus
From the High Line

The New Colossus, by Emma Lazarus

Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
"Keep ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

Ellis Island Foundation: Statue of Liberty History:
http://www.libertyellisfoundation.org/statue-history

Lady Liberty: An Unauthorized Biography:
http://fee.org/freeman/lady-liberty-an-unauthorized-biography/

#TheHighLine   #NewYorkCity   #NewColossus  ___

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2015-11-18 11:20:14 (1 comments; 0 reshares; 14 +1s)Open 

RUTH & GLORIA...DOWN BY THE SCHOOL YARD...
(as Paul Simon might have written...)

Who are the women you admire, the women you respect
And consider your friends, your comrades, your collaborators?
Perhaps your mother, or your grandmother?
A sister,
A friend...

Are you equals,
Different, yet similar?
Do you think alike, or do you spar vigorously?
Are you complements, or are you Night and Day,
Oil and Vinegar, White and Red wine?

Do you value the same things,
Or is your friendship founded in your differences?
Was she born rich, is she self-made,
or uninterested in money?
Is she an artist, a bohemian, an entrepreneur, a philosopher?

Is she generous,
Stingy,
Polite,
Stoic,
Playful,
...or perfect?

Is she a woman for whom you work?
Or someone you employ?... more »

RUTH & GLORIA...DOWN BY THE SCHOOL YARD...
(as Paul Simon might have written...)

Who are the women you admire, the women you respect
And consider your friends, your comrades, your collaborators?
Perhaps your mother, or your grandmother?
A sister,
A friend...

Are you equals,
Different, yet similar?
Do you think alike, or do you spar vigorously?
Are you complements, or are you Night and Day,
Oil and Vinegar, White and Red wine?

Do you value the same things,
Or is your friendship founded in your differences?
Was she born rich, is she self-made,
or uninterested in money?
Is she an artist, a bohemian, an entrepreneur, a philosopher?

Is she generous,
Stingy,
Polite,
Stoic,
Playful,
...or perfect?

Is she a woman for whom you work?
Or someone you employ?
Do you share a cubicle?
Are you partners in business,
Or is she the lady you sit next to on your morning commute?
Perhaps the bus driver who gets you there safely?

Does she dress up,
Or down,
Is she demure 
Or does she show off?
Does she wear a hat?

Someone who took a chance on you,
And woke you up to your talent.
Unafraid to be tough,
Unafraid to be kind.
Unafraid to be.

Someone who pushed when you wanted to sit down,
Someone who pulled you back down onto the park bench when you got ahead of yourself.

Is she older?
Wiser?
Younger?
More adventurous?
Smarter?
More creative?
The thinker?
The poet?
The scientist?
The doctor?

Single?
A wife?
A mother?
LGTB?
The same religion, or none at all?
Do you have the same skin color,
Or do you stand proud in contrast side-by-side in the sun?

Do you like the same music
Or play one another tunes?
Do you speak the same language,
Or do you sign away into the early morning light?
Do you walk arm and arm down the street together?

Do you laugh together,
Cry,
Sit in silence?

Do you cook for one another?
Or eat out and raise a glass to life?

Is it her brain that you like,
Or her humor,
Her energy,
Her accomplishments?
Or the chocolates she serves you at tea?

Do you like her because she's like you?
Or would you like her no matter what?
And she you,
Like two peas in a pod,
Or birds on a wire?

#GloriaSteinem   #RuthBaderGinsburg  ___

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2015-11-17 14:38:13 (10 comments; 1 reshares; 21 +1s)Open 

Barbara Corcoran, the Shark Tank judge, says women often "devalue themselves and initially don't price themselves properly." I beg to differ. This has not been my personal and professional experience, nor has it been the experience of many (most?) of the women with whom I have worked professionally over the course of many decades.

This is a slippery slope, and while it has a logical ring to it that people want to believe and want to buy into, it is unfortunately fashioned on the same theory that for decades has placed women in the role of having to be experts at self breast examination in order to discover any life threatening cancer cells lurking in their tissues.

In other words, if a woman doesn't get the raise and promotion she wants, it's her fault for not asking, or not asking in the right way, or not presenting herself correctly, or not being... more »

Barbara Corcoran, the Shark Tank judge, says women often "devalue themselves and initially don't price themselves properly." I beg to differ. This has not been my personal and professional experience, nor has it been the experience of many (most?) of the women with whom I have worked professionally over the course of many decades.

This is a slippery slope, and while it has a logical ring to it that people want to believe and want to buy into, it is unfortunately fashioned on the same theory that for decades has placed women in the role of having to be experts at self breast examination in order to discover any life threatening cancer cells lurking in their tissues.

In other words, if a woman doesn't get the raise and promotion she wants, it's her fault for not asking, or not asking in the right way, or not presenting herself correctly, or not being assertive or confident enough.

So, too, if a woman doesn't do a proper self exam, at the right time of the month, every month, and fails to notice what could potentially be a malignancy, then it's her fault if a cancer goes unnoticed and untreated.

I do understand the belief system that blames women for lack of opportunity, for not getting the promotions they want and deserve and for significantly lower wages - this phenomenon known as unequal pay for equal work. Culturally that belief system manages to neatly sweep under the rug what has become a stark cultural acceptance of this status quo and many people like it that way and benefit from it.

In A Woman's De-Liberation: There Never Was a Sexual Revolution, I wrote about my own experiences as a young executive at CBS Records in New York and what happened when I confronted management about my salary after discovering that the man who had been fired so I could replace him had been making significantly more money than I was offered. (http://giselleminoli.com/writing/?p=1644)

The reasons were varied, infuriating and amusing all at once: He is married, he has a mortgage and a family, being the more luminous of the reasons I was offered.

I was also told not to make an issue of it, that when I proved my worth (I had already proved my worth, having won a boatload of awards, which is the reason I had been offered the job) my salary would be increased and that, and I love this one, "Money isn't everything."

No, it isn't. If you are a rich woman. Or financially independent by virtue of a trust fund or family money. Or you are happy being supported by a sugar daddy.

But if you work hard, are good at what you do, have something to offer the organization for which you work, are honorable, dedicated, trustworthy and add value, then money matters a great deal, particularly if the organization is for profit.

There are many times I, and many men and women I know, have chosen to work for less, or for free, for causes and organizations we believe in that are non-profit. That is a different matter.

But when it comes to being paid...and paying an employee...each of us has a choice.

If you are a woman and you ask for what you want and what you are worth, don't let anyone tell you that if you don't get it then it is because you weren't assertive enough, didn't ask in the right tone of voice, weren't confident enough, or didn't lay out in a convincing enough manner the bona fide reasons for getting the promotion or raise that you have set your sights on.

And if you are an employer, you can make sure that when you hire a woman that she is paid what she is worth for the job that she is doing and that she is properly awarded for her accomplishments. Don't let yourself off the hook by thinking, "Hey, I know deep down inside this is wrong, she deserves it, but, I'm going to play the game and make her beg and then I'll still say No." Don't be that person. Because Karma.

Patricia Arquette discussed this in her live interview on Huff Post:

"The demographics changed in America. We have only 30 percent of families living in the traditional 'dad is the breadwinner, mom stays home' mode. Right now, we have 66 million women and children living in poverty. Half of those ... would not be living in poverty if their moms were paid a full dollar [to a man's dollar]. So the number one thing we could at this moment for child poverty ... is to make sure their moms get paid a full dollar."

Getting equal pay for equal work in the United States of America is similar to getting the populace to acknowledge global warming. Or that we have a racism problem. Or that we have a gun "issue." Or a student debt issue.

However, I do agree with Barbara Corcoran on the process and procedure for asking for a raise and/or a promotion:

* Walk in knowing exactly what you have done for the business, for the team, for your boss.

* In your current job description, know what more responsibility you have taken on that you assumed and grabbed for yourself.

* Cite every little detail (of why you are asking for what your are asking for) and then say, "I'd like to get a raise..." and then name the price. As in say exactly what you want.

* If you are turned down, come right back at them and ask again, "When can I get a raise?"

Just know that if you are turned down again and again and again, it isn't because you aren't necessarily leaning in to the table far enough or with enough fortitude, or because you aren't stepping up to the plate with enough confidence, or because you aren't speaking up for yourself in the right tone of voice. This is a cultural problem and you are only one of the cogs in the unequal pay for equal work wheel.

Know that it is because it takes thick waders to walk through thousands of years of sludge and get to the other side of the pond without being covered in muck.

Know that it is because the wheels of change turn very slowly whenever someone or some group is suggesting the balance be forever changed.

And one more thing: Always be good at what you do. No matter what the outcome of asking for a raise or a promotion, always be good at what you do. At the end of the day you will have your self-respect and your dignity in tact, and you will be able to sleep well at night.

It matters. Too many people begin to feel defeated if they ask and don't get, and then they say to themselves "Why should I bother when I am never recognized and can't get ahead?"

And then they start phoning it in.
Never phone in your performance.

The reason is because you have to set your own standard no matter what the rest of the world is doing.

So set it high. Always set it high.

Both segments of Patricia Arquette's live interview about Women and Work and Women and Pay can be watched at the below links. It is worth taking the time to listen to this articulate, accomplished, thoughtful and experienced woman, who has worked her way up the ladder, talk about how difficult it is to be paid "under the same structure" (which is not the same thing as the same amount), as her co-actors.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/patricia-arquette-reflects-on-being-a-single-mom-at-20_56460f8be4b045bf3deec7a8

http://live.huffingtonpost.com/r/highlight/patricia-arquette-was-once-denied-the-same-pay-structure-as-male-co-star/564507cc6f753a5ba0000330

#BarbaraCorcoran   #SharkTankWomen   #EqualPayforEqualWork   #GetARaiseToday   #PatriciaArquette  ___

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2015-11-08 15:22:29 (6 comments; 1 reshares; 28 +1s)Open 

Sunday Morning Racine Cubique and Sylvie Guillem

What does it mean to be free? What is your definition of freedom? Is there really any such thing as freedom? Or are we, perhaps, sometimes free and sometimes not?

Is it even possible to be free? Or are we compelled to somehow continually bind ourselves to whatever is external to us - houses, communities, groups, environments? Or do those constraints exist purely within our imaginations?

If we have the 'right' to speak freely, and we exercise that right, does that mean that we are truly free? If we have the 'right' to own a gun, and we purchase one, does that purchase and ownership therefore make us free?

Or does being free and having freedom have more to do with what we choose not to say, not to express, not to do, not to own?

What are the differences between freedom and liberty?... more »

Sunday Morning Racine Cubique and Sylvie Guillem

What does it mean to be free? What is your definition of freedom? Is there really any such thing as freedom? Or are we, perhaps, sometimes free and sometimes not?

Is it even possible to be free? Or are we compelled to somehow continually bind ourselves to whatever is external to us - houses, communities, groups, environments? Or do those constraints exist purely within our imaginations?

If we have the 'right' to speak freely, and we exercise that right, does that mean that we are truly free? If we have the 'right' to own a gun, and we purchase one, does that purchase and ownership therefore make us free?

Or does being free and having freedom have more to do with what we choose not to say, not to express, not to do, not to own?

What are the differences between freedom and liberty? And how do we exercise those differences in our personal lives? Or do we? Do we even think about the difference? Or do we assume they are the same? Or perhaps mutually exclusive? Or perhaps that any difference that does exist doesn't really matter? Which do we, as individuals, choose to live by?

Are we conscious of any of it? Or are we all moving from the womb to the tomb, on automatic pilot, avoiding the exploration of self and space?

Is freedom a state of mind? Or is it a state of physical being? Why is it that some people seem able to remain 'free' even though confined, while others without any restraints or constraints at all seem to be so imprisoned?

Do we feel free only when our freedom is recognized by others? Or is our own sense of freedom enough? Is it public? Or private? Is it expressible only in words? In art? Silently?

Or in movement accompanied by music and one prop?

When I first saw a video of Sylvie Guillem perform Racine Cubique, which was created for her in 1997 by renowned French choreographer Maurice Béjart, all of these questions, and many, many more raced through my head, all of them competing for space, for attention, demanding to be asked, contemplated, answered and debated, in tandem with the movements of her body, her footwork, the expression of every muscle, sinew, tendon.

I thought you might like Racine Cubique. Or enjoying having the freedom to Click on the Play Arrow.

Or not.

And then sharing what you think or feel or don't think or don't feel.

Or exercising your freedom not to share. Or not to care. Or not to feel. Or for it not to matter.

Or does it matter if you share it with me? Because then I will have the freedom to respond. 

Or not.

Or perhaps we will have the freedom to know that even if there is no response, there is still Racine's Cubique existing out there somewhere in that Maurice Béjartian and Sylvie Guillemish way, whether we choose to explore its meaning...or not.

Yesterday was a Smoky one.

Today is more Blue Cubique.

Tell me what you think. Or not.

Sylvie Guillem Prepares to End Her Ballet Career:
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/08/arts/dance/sylvie-guillem-prepares-to-end-her-ballet-career.html

#SylvieGuillem   #RacineCubique   #MauriceBejart   #Dance  ___

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2015-11-07 13:12:19 (23 comments; 8 reshares; 53 +1s)Open 

This is the way I feel this morning. Smoky.

A bit of Smoke danced by the divine Sylvie Guillem, choreographed for her by Mats Ek, the longer version of which can be see here (also on YouTube), danced with Niklas Ek:

Smoke, choreographed by Mats Ek:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KA0TMA5tQP4

For those of you who prefer Vimeo, the entire Series is here:

Smoke, by Mats Ek, Part I
https://vimeo.com/19464542

Smoke, choreographed by Mats Ek, Part II
https://vimeo.com/19464616

Smoke, choreographed by Mats Ek, Part III
https://vimeo.com/19464783

#SylvieGuillem   #MatsEk   #SadlersWells   #Smoke   #ContemporaryDance   #Dance  

This is the way I feel this morning. Smoky.

A bit of Smoke danced by the divine Sylvie Guillem, choreographed for her by Mats Ek, the longer version of which can be see here (also on YouTube), danced with Niklas Ek:

Smoke, choreographed by Mats Ek:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KA0TMA5tQP4

For those of you who prefer Vimeo, the entire Series is here:

Smoke, by Mats Ek, Part I
https://vimeo.com/19464542

Smoke, choreographed by Mats Ek, Part II
https://vimeo.com/19464616

Smoke, choreographed by Mats Ek, Part III
https://vimeo.com/19464783

#SylvieGuillem   #MatsEk   #SadlersWells   #Smoke   #ContemporaryDance   #Dance  ___

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2015-11-06 17:12:05 (40 comments; 2 reshares; 24 +1s)Open 

First President George Bush Swings at Son’s Aides, Rattling Clan 

At 91 and in the twilight of a long and storied public life, the first President Bush evidently felt free to express views he had long suppressed in the interest of family harmony. Mr. Cheney, he said, was “very hard-line” and too eager to “use force to get our way”; Mr. Rumsfeld was an “arrogant fellow” full of “swagger.” He used the same phrase, “iron-ass,” to describe both men.

Well, this has been A Long Time Comin', as The Electric Flag would have said. But, when it comes to rattling one's clan, best wait until as much damage as possible has been done before one speaks up and out publicly and states:

“I do worry about some of the rhetoric that was out there — some of it his, maybe, and some of it the people around him,” Mr. Bush told Mr.Meacham. “Hot rhetoric is pr... more »

First President George Bush Swings at Son’s Aides, Rattling Clan 

At 91 and in the twilight of a long and storied public life, the first President Bush evidently felt free to express views he had long suppressed in the interest of family harmony. Mr. Cheney, he said, was “very hard-line” and too eager to “use force to get our way”; Mr. Rumsfeld was an “arrogant fellow” full of “swagger.” He used the same phrase, “iron-ass,” to describe both men.

Well, this has been A Long Time Comin', as The Electric Flag would have said. But, when it comes to rattling one's clan, best wait until as much damage as possible has been done before one speaks up and out publicly and states:

“I do worry about some of the rhetoric that was out there — some of it his, maybe, and some of it the people around him,” Mr. Bush told Mr. Meacham. “Hot rhetoric is pretty easy to get headlines, but it doesn’t necessarily solve the diplomatic problem.” Asked for specifics, Mr. Bush cited his son’s State of the Union address in 2002, when he described an “axis of evil” that included Iraq, Iran and North Korea. “You go back to the ‘axis of evil’ and these things and I think that might be historically proved to be not benefiting anything,” he said. - Elder Bush Says His Son Was Served Badly by Aides, November 4, 2015, The NY Times (link below)

Papa Bush wasn't the hothead his son was and remains. He had more experience and a perspective of the bigger picture.

But frankly, I don't think even if Papa Bush had spoken up his son would have listened. If one is the listening sort, one doesn't have Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld as wingmen.

Is this called a Crisis of Conscious? Of the sort that Robert McNamara had about Viet Nam? McNamara was the subject of documentarian Errol Morris's great film 2003 The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara.

But hindsight is great isn't it? So is the courage to speak up before havoc is wreaked on the world. I was in New York City for 9/11 and my head still spins at the wave of anger fear, panic and paranoia that Bush Fils used and manipulated to haul our country off into a mess from which we may never be able to extract ourselves.

Maybe someone could design an App to test whether one's ideas will be good or bad for the world. I won't hold my breath.

Meanwhile, I'll bet quite a chilly frisson has settled over the various Bush camps this week. Would love to be a fly on the wall...

For what it's worth, if you don't know The Electric Flag, released in 1968, it is a work of musical art. One song, Killing Floor, applies nicely to this revelation of Papa Bush, and I have copied the lyrics below.

Have a lovely weekend, everyone.

Killing Floor, by The Electric Flag

I should have quit you,
A long time ago
Yes I should have quit you, babe,
A long time ago
I wouldn't be here now people,
Down on the killing floor

If I'd have listened to my second mind
Yes if I'd have listened to my second mind
You know I wouldn't be here now people,
Down on the killing floor

If I'd have listened to my second mind
Yes if I'd have listened to my second mind
You know I wouldn't be here now people,
Down on the killing floor

I should have gone on,
When my friend said come to Mexico with me
I should have gone on,
When my friend said come to Mexico with me
Well I wouldn't be here now people,
Down on the killing floor

Yes I should have quit you,
A long time ago
Yes I should have quit you, babe,
A long time ago
I wouldn't be here now people,
Down on the killing floor

Elder Bush Says His Son Was Served Badly By Aides:
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/05/us/politics/elder-bush-says-his-son-was-served-badly-by-aides.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=first-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0

#TheFogofWar   #BushPapa   #BushFils   #AxisofEvil___

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2015-11-05 02:19:22 (26 comments; 1 reshares; 56 +1s)Open 

Melissa Mathison, brilliant screenwriter, leaves us...

One day in New York City years ago I was walking up Madison Avenue around 61st and I saw this tall striking woman coming toward me. I was an actor and I was always interested in screenwriters and playwrights - you know, that old If It Ain't On the Page It Ain't on the Stage thing - and I recognized her instantly. It was Melissa Mathison, screenwriter of Spielberg's ET and Scorscese's Kundun, which I had just seen.

I have never been celebrity-smitten, but I am writer-smitten to a certain degree, and I thought, 'Say something. Say Hello. No. She'll think you're a nut. Be respectful.' And I let her pass by me, and I instantly felt 'What a mistake...'

I walked about another 20 feet and thought, 'You fool. Go back and tell her how great you think she is,'... more »

Melissa Mathison, brilliant screenwriter, leaves us...

One day in New York City years ago I was walking up Madison Avenue around 61st and I saw this tall striking woman coming toward me. I was an actor and I was always interested in screenwriters and playwrights - you know, that old If It Ain't On the Page It Ain't on the Stage thing - and I recognized her instantly. It was Melissa Mathison, screenwriter of Spielberg's ET and Scorscese's Kundun, which I had just seen.

I have never been celebrity-smitten, but I am writer-smitten to a certain degree, and I thought, 'Say something. Say Hello. No. She'll think you're a nut. Be respectful.' And I let her pass by me, and I instantly felt 'What a mistake...'

I walked about another 20 feet and thought, 'You fool. Go back and tell her how great you think she is,' and I gathered up my courage and turned around and practically ran back after this elegant woman, who was just getting ready to step off the curb and cross the street.

Then I did something uncharacteristic, even unthinkable for me, particularly since I was an actor and lived in New York and was sensitive to crossing that boundary with well known people. When I got close enough to her (I was still behind her), I said loudly, 'Melissa. Melissa Mathison..." And she stopped cold. She stopped, and she turned around just as I reached her, and I literally (I still can't believe I did this...) grabbed her arm. Yes. I grabbed her arm.

She was wearing this butter soft caramel-colored lamb suede jacket and I still remember the feel of it on my fingers. She looked at me, not at all frightened, but more confused, like she was trying to figure out if she knew me. I suppose I didn't look like a stalker or look like I was dangerous. I don't have that air about me.

And then I blurted out something about how sorry I was to grab her, but how great I thought she was, and that I just had to tell her that I had followed her career ever since she wrote ET. And then I said something really ridiculous, and I told her that I knew how famous her husband was but that to me she was the bomb. The bomb. The bomb.

And she smiled. And she grabbed my hand. And she looked me in the eye and said, "Thank you so much. No one has ever recognized me on the street before in my entire career. I'm really flattered. You made my day."

I do not get star struck, but I was mesmerized, like a teenager. And I have never forgotten her. Tall. Elegant. Classy. Warm. And what a writer.

In a statement, Spielberg, who worked closely with Mathison on ET, said: “Melissa had a heart that shined with generosity and love and burned as bright as the heart she gave ET.”

My Close Encounter With Melissa Mathison. May she fly off somewhere with ET and have a wonderful time in the Al Di La watching movies.

#MelissaMathison   #ET   #Kundun   #TheBlackStallion  ___

2015-11-04 01:25:16 (24 comments; 1 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

THE DREADED PHARMA VIRUS

Has anyone else out there with a WordPress site been infected with this nasty virus? I can't even post a screen shot of what my site says because the post will be rejected.

But I do know, because I have been dealing with this for four weeks now, that Google has identified approximately 40,000 WordPress sites such as mine that have been invaded by aliens.

Curious to know how you are going about cleansing your site and re-registering with Google to let them know you are safe.

This is the drag of all drags.

I saw Matt Damon in The Martian.

Great movie.

It feels like that.

Alone. 

Minimal Food.

No warm bath in sight.

But I digress.

For what it is worth, what the hackers have done is essentially 'dump' hundreds of files into the files... more »

THE DREADED PHARMA VIRUS

Has anyone else out there with a WordPress site been infected with this nasty virus? I can't even post a screen shot of what my site says because the post will be rejected.

But I do know, because I have been dealing with this for four weeks now, that Google has identified approximately 40,000 WordPress sites such as mine that have been invaded by aliens.

Curious to know how you are going about cleansing your site and re-registering with Google to let them know you are safe.

This is the drag of all drags.

I saw Matt Damon in The Martian.

Great movie.

It feels like that.

Alone. 

Minimal Food.

No warm bath in sight.

But I digress.

For what it is worth, what the hackers have done is essentially 'dump' hundreds of files into the files that contain the files that comprise my site. The reason it is called the Pharma Virus is that anytime I copy a link from my website to send to an editor, a magazine...a friend...or anyone else and paste that link into an email or a post, the person clicking on it will be directed to a Pharmacy site that sells Viagra or Cialis or some other such pharmaceutical delicacy.

Yes. Eons upon eons of sexual pleasure to be had on the backs of we hard working creative folks.

'Tis true. Some people actually get up in the morning and spend their time messing with people's websites. Others get up in the morning and be doctors, school teachers, cooks, architects, entertainers, dancers, scientists, florists, all making an honest hard earned wage.

Other people practice the fine art of being Malware shape shifters. Virus grifters. Web site hackers.

I can think of better ways to make a living. 'Twould be easier to look oneself in the eye at the end of the day.

Perhaps when the entire world is fully erect 24/7/365 I can have my website back...

But I digress...again...___

2015-10-27 12:44:46 (9 comments; 1 reshares; 26 +1s)Open 

There are places on Mother Earth I would love to go. Remote places, the Arctic, Antarctica...Greenland. Locations so far away they exist in the nooks and crannies of the imagination, preserved in their magnificence by professional photographers, their crystal ice shelfs, pristine expanses of snow, pure waters and chilled surfaces inhabited by creatures we capture and put in zoos - penguins and polar bears - all the better to preserve them, too, until we have time to visit them on a Sunday afternoon.

To take pictures.

Because most of us will never get to visit the remote places that are their natural homes. We go about our days making a living and paying bills and washing our dishes and our cars and our clothes, and fix our dinner, and take our kids to school, and go to the gym to stay in shape, and we think somehow that these majestic places are so vast, so ancient, so... more »

There are places on Mother Earth I would love to go. Remote places, the Arctic, Antarctica...Greenland. Locations so far away they exist in the nooks and crannies of the imagination, preserved in their magnificence by professional photographers, their crystal ice shelfs, pristine expanses of snow, pure waters and chilled surfaces inhabited by creatures we capture and put in zoos - penguins and polar bears - all the better to preserve them, too, until we have time to visit them on a Sunday afternoon.

To take pictures.

Because most of us will never get to visit the remote places that are their natural homes. We go about our days making a living and paying bills and washing our dishes and our cars and our clothes, and fix our dinner, and take our kids to school, and go to the gym to stay in shape, and we think somehow that these majestic places are so vast, so ancient, so there-before-we-were that we cannot imagine them gone-before-we-are.

And so we would like to continue to think.

But we are melting away. We know this. We have known this for a long time.

Nature's beauty is deceptive. And fragile. And at the mercy, sadly, of human preservatory intervention.

The scientific data he and a team of six other researchers collect here could yield groundbreaking information on the rate at which the melting of Greenland ice sheet, one of the biggest and fastest-melting chunks of ice on Earth, will drive up sea levels in the coming decades. The full melting of Greenland’s ice sheet could increase sea levels by about 20 feet. - By Coral Davenport, Josh Haner, Larry Buchanan and Derek Watkins, the NY Times

But...

The agency officials who receive that money from Congress, including the directors of the National Science Foundation, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, say the research is essential for understanding the changes that will affect the world’s population and economies for more than a century. But the research is under increasing fire by some Republican leaders in Congress, who deny or question the scientific consensus that human activities contribute to climate change. - By Coral Davenport, Josh Haner, Larry Buchanan and Derek Watkins, the NY Times

It's easy to think 'Why should we spend this money to preserve Mother Earth when we won't be around to see it all collapse?' 

Or is it merely humancentric not to want to preserve something that was here long before we were...and could remain long after we are gone...if only we would work toward that?

Why do we think it's all about us?

#GreenlandIsMelting  ___

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2015-10-25 15:47:47 (0 comments; 2 reshares; 27 +1s)Open 

On Women, Work, Marriage, Babies and Making Bread...as in Greenbacks

At a quarterly meeting of the New York Speechwriters Roundtable early last year, Lissa Muscatine, who served as Hillary Clinton's speechwriter for 20 years, told our group the interesting story of how she was hired by Clinton.

Muscatine had been a successful journalist (she was a Harvard graduate and Rhodes Scholar), but after years of 'reporting' on politics and the news in the traditional sense, she longed to use her words for a cause that mattered to her, which comprised, in great part, issues central to the Democratic party. So she applied for a position as a speechwriter for the Clintons, never having written a speech in her life.

Soon enough Muscatine learned she was pregnant, and immediately told her prospective employers' staff that she would be out on maternity leave... more »

On Women, Work, Marriage, Babies and Making Bread...as in Greenbacks

At a quarterly meeting of the New York Speechwriters Roundtable early last year, Lissa Muscatine, who served as Hillary Clinton's speechwriter for 20 years, told our group the interesting story of how she was hired by Clinton.

Muscatine had been a successful journalist (she was a Harvard graduate and Rhodes Scholar), but after years of 'reporting' on politics and the news in the traditional sense, she longed to use her words for a cause that mattered to her, which comprised, in great part, issues central to the Democratic party. So she applied for a position as a speechwriter for the Clintons, never having written a speech in her life.

Soon enough Muscatine learned she was pregnant, and immediately told her prospective employers' staff that she would be out on maternity leave for a few months once the baby was born. But when she discovered she was pregnant with twins, Muscatine felt her chances for full time work at the White House were completely dashed. What employer would want to deal with a new staff member with twins who would have to be on maternity leave for much longer than expected and working from home?

Much to her surprise, Muscatine was hired anyway. She had risen to the top of a pool of speechwriters from whom the Clintons were making their selection and her talent was evident and she was offered the job, eventually becoming speechwriter to Hillary Clinton, First Lady, rather than just President Clinton.

But Muscatine did not learn until much later the conversation between Hillary Clinton's staff members about the wisdom of hiring her - pregnant with twins as she was - and the undeniable stresses and strains of being a working mother. The back room convo was that Muscatine wouldn't be able to handle the demands of the job and therefore might not be, in spite of her evident talents, the best choice for chief speechwriter.

Apparently Mrs. Clinton felt differently. One day she overheard a conversation about the downside of hiring Muscatine, given the demands of her soon to be doubled-in-size-family, and Hillary told her staff, in so many words, that this is America, and the White House needed to be a role model for employers, companies, families, women, men and children - not just in the United States, but around the world - about hiring women...that being married, a mother and running a family could not be allowed to be viewed as an impediment to employment.

Lissa Muscatine was hired and went on to work for Hillary Clinton, while being married, a wife and a mother, for the next twenty years. Sadly, despite Hillary's support of Lissa Muscatine, women elsewhere are not so championed by their employers when it comes to work/life balance. Far too many women end up leaving their careers altogether, working part time, or are not promoted if their family lives are seen as detrimental to, or in conflict with, their commitment to their professional work.

Work/Life balance is a huge issue, and one that Anne-Marie Slaughter, the former Director of Policy Planning at the State Department is on record for discussing in emails with Hillary Clinton when they worked together at the State House. Slaughter herself ultimately chose to return to teaching at Princeton, rather than to extend her term at the White House...because she didn't feel there was any other way to make it work for herself and for her family.

How unfortunate that the United States of America, which considers itself the greatest democracy in the world, cannot find a way to champion women leaders so that their talents, their education, their life experiences - and their wisdom as mothers - is made use of in business, in education and in politics.

I personally believe that the issue of Women and Work is going to tip the balance in favor of Clinton as POTUS 2016. For while it may appear that it is female/feminist issue, it most certainly is not. It is rather a family issue. It is a marriage issue. It is an issue of productivity and contribution, by women and men for the betterment of our country.

And it is an issue that encompasses the definition of 'family' in its diverse forms, whether heterosexual or same-sex, whether the family is a biological one, a step, a blended or an adoptive one.

This is not a women's issue. It is an issue that is of a concern not just to families, but to single people as well, who are also significantly impacted by the difficulties women with families face when it comes to choosing a career. For, unfortunately, young women frequently give up on having high powered careers because, observing the generations of women who come before them, they often cannot figure out how to make it work.

I have included below links to several interesting articles about Anne-Marie Slaughter,  and Lissa Muscatine as well as Gail Collin's recent Op-Ed in the Times about the presence of women in the workforce.

Thank you for reading...as always.

And thank you very much +Leland LeCuyer for telling me about the article on Anne-Marie Slaughter in Tech Republic.

Giselle

Hillary Clinton and Lissa Muscatine, From First Lady and Speechwriter to Author and Bookseller:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/hillary-clinton-and-lissa-muscatine-from-first-lady-and-speechwriter-to-author-and-bookseller/2014/06/15/c820ec18-f3ed-11e3-bf76-447a5df6411f_story.html

Why Women Still Can't Have it All, by Anne-Marie Slaughter:
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/07/why-women-still-cant-have-it-all/309020/

What Happened to Working Women, by Gail Collins:
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/17/opinion/what-happened-to-working-women.html?ribbon-ad-idx=3&src=me&module=Ribbon&version=origin&region=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Most%20Emailed&pgtype=article&_r=0

​The New Hillary Clinton Emails Reveal a Woman with Work/Life Balance on the Brain:
http://www.marieclaire.com/politics/news/a15749/new-hillary-clinton-emails/

#HillaryClinton   #POTUS2016   #AnneMarieSlaugher   #LissaMuscatine   #WomenandWork   #WhyWomenStillCantHaveItAll  ___

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2015-10-14 02:00:15 (108 comments; 2 reshares; 29 +1s)Open 

Hillary has knocked it out of the Park tonight. To start off with, she is the only one of the Democratic candidates who, when she introduced herself, looked at the audience instead of at the monitor.

She's straight forward and direct and her stone cold grasp on the facts, history, where we've been and where we are going is making it very difficult for anyone to come even close to her knowledge, her experience and her ability to think on her feet.

Win for The Hill.

Sorry fellas, but I'm calling it early.

Hillary has knocked it out of the Park tonight. To start off with, she is the only one of the Democratic candidates who, when she introduced herself, looked at the audience instead of at the monitor.

She's straight forward and direct and her stone cold grasp on the facts, history, where we've been and where we are going is making it very difficult for anyone to come even close to her knowledge, her experience and her ability to think on her feet.

Win for The Hill.

Sorry fellas, but I'm calling it early.___

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2015-10-11 16:28:56 (24 comments; 17 reshares; 37 +1s)Open 

To the Women of Google+, and the Men who champion, employ...and Love them:

McKinsey & Company has published the results of their joint survey with LeanIn.org on Women in the Workplace, which shows graphically (literally) that:

From entry level to the C-suite, women are underrepresented at US corporations, less likely to advance than men, and face more barriers to senior leadership. In fact, at the rate of progress of the past three years, it will take more than 100 years for the upper reaches of US corporations to achieve gender parity.

These are the principal findings of Women in the Workplace, a study undertaken by LeanIn.Org and McKinsey to encourage female leadership and gender equality in the workforce. Some 118 companies and nearly 30,000 employees participated in the study, building on a similar effort conducted by McKinsey in 2012.1 The new... more »

To the Women of Google+, and the Men who champion, employ...and Love them:

McKinsey & Company has published the results of their joint survey with LeanIn.org on Women in the Workplace, which shows graphically (literally) that:

From entry level to the C-suite, women are underrepresented at US corporations, less likely to advance than men, and face more barriers to senior leadership. In fact, at the rate of progress of the past three years, it will take more than 100 years for the upper reaches of US corporations to achieve gender parity.

These are the principal findings of Women in the Workplace, a study undertaken by LeanIn.Org and McKinsey to encourage female leadership and gender equality in the workforce. Some 118 companies and nearly 30,000 employees participated in the study, building on a similar effort conducted by McKinsey in 2012.1 The new study revealed that despite modest improvements, the overarching findings were similar: women remain underrepresented at every level of the corporate pipeline, with the disparity greatest at senior levels of leadership (exhibit). - McKinsey & Co., Women in the Workplace

For those of you who may not be familiar with the firm, which was formed in 1926 by James McKinsey, a University of Chicago Professor, McKinsey & Co. studies markets, trends, and emerging best practices, in every industry and region, locally and globally. All consultants contribute time and expertise to developing these insights, because they are integral to our ability to help clients achieve their goals.

"McKinsey is a global firm, comprising more than 9,000 consultants and nearly 2,000 research and information professionals. We have offices in more than 60 countries, speak more than 120 languages, and represent over 100 nationalities. Our clients reflect our global nature. Around 40% are in Europe, 35% in the Americas, 15% in Asia Pacific and 10% in the Middle East and Africa. We serve a broad mix of private-, public-, and social-sector organizations." - McKinsey & Co.

Which essentially means that McKinsey takes its work seriously and, with regard to the results of the research done on Women in the Workplace, they have turned a spotlight on their own organization, seeking to find ways to improve their own track record with regard to hiring, training, promoting and advancing women, so as to be a global leader for change.

The sobering result of this survey resonates in the conclusion that advancing women's equality can add $12 trillion to the global growth, which underscores the underrepresentation of women in the workplace as something that negatively impacts the global economy and, therefore, families and individuals.

Since I can only copy one link from the McKinsey website, I've attached the main one that leads to the survey. But that page includes a multitude of links to other articles on the McKinsey site, all of which are worth reading, and so I have copied them below for ease of reference:

Dominic Barton: Unlocking the Full Potential of Women at Work (a video):
http://www.mckinsey.com/client_service/organization/latest_thinking/women_at_work

How advancing women's equality can add $12 trillion to global growth:
http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/growth/how_advancing_womens_equality_can_add_12_trillion_to_global_growth

Gender Equality: Taking stock of where we are:
http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/organization/gender_equality_taking_stock_of_where_we_are

Addressing Unconscious Bias:
http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/organization/addressing_unconscious_bias

Fostering Women Leaders: A fitness test for your Top Team:
http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/organization/fostering_women_leaders_a_fitness_test_for_your_top_team

Why Diversity Matters:
http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/organization/why_diversity_matters

Promoting Gender Diversity in the Gulf:
http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/organization/promoting_gender_diversity_in_the_gulf

I encourage every woman on G+ to share this information with your sisters, daughters, mothers and colleagues, and every man on G+ to share this information with other men who respect women, who take this issue seriously and who want to see a professional world that provides equal opportunity for their sons, their daughters, their wives and the women with whom they interact in their lives.

Why wouldn't anyone want a world in which there is no gender bias? It will be a healthier, happier, more productive and economically stronger world if this becomes the commitment of every man and woman in a position with the power and ability to make change.

Thank you very much for reading.

Have a lovely Sunday.

Giselle

+Mary T  #LeanIn   #McKinseyandCompany   #WomenMatter   #GenderEquality   #DiversityMatters #WomenintheWorkplace  ___

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2015-10-10 17:28:26 (36 comments; 2 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

They are overwhelmingly white, rich, older and male, in a nation that is being remade by the young, by women, and by black and brown voters.

Across a sprawling country, they reside in an archipelago of wealth, exclusive neighborhoods dotting a handful of cities and towns. And in an economy that has minted billionaires in a dizzying array of industries, most made their fortunes in just two: finance and energy. - The NY Times

Funny how Hillary Clinton, once accused of living under the protective umbrella of a political dynasty (No...the Bushes, and Kennedys are members of family political dynasties, not Bill and Hillary Clinton, who made their own money in their own generation...), and also accused of being too well off to understand the average American, looks like a mere pauper compared to the Republican POTUS candidates.

Now that the reality of wealth behind... more »

They are overwhelmingly white, rich, older and male, in a nation that is being remade by the young, by women, and by black and brown voters.

Across a sprawling country, they reside in an archipelago of wealth, exclusive neighborhoods dotting a handful of cities and towns. And in an economy that has minted billionaires in a dizzying array of industries, most made their fortunes in just two: finance and energy. - The NY Times

Funny how Hillary Clinton, once accused of living under the protective umbrella of a political dynasty (No...the Bushes, and Kennedys are members of family political dynasties, not Bill and Hillary Clinton, who made their own money in their own generation...), and also accused of being too well off to understand the average American, looks like a mere pauper compared to the Republican POTUS candidates.

Now that the reality of wealth behind the Republican candidates has been exposed, and the facts about just who the people are who are really driving the political culture in America has come to light, I'm putting my own two cents on Camp Pauper, just across the cow pasture from Camp David.

But I digress!

The fact that there are 138 Republican families driving the political election, as opposed to only 20 Democratic families, should have every voting and non-voting American on high alert, bolt upright and sitting at the edge of their seats.

Essential weekend reading, IMHO.___

2015-10-09 20:50:24 (30 comments; 0 reshares; 20 +1s)Open 

Yes. Get out while the gettin's good, Donald. Before your supporters discover what the rest of us know...how deeply cynical you are and how terrible you would be for the United States of America. Before people realize that this isn't a reality TV show and it's not so funny and entertaining after all to watch you call everyone, from other candidates to journalists to women to immigrants, losers. Before anyone with a modicum of integrity refuses to invest in anything with which you are affiliated because it would be a blight on their reputation.

I have referred to Trump before as the Silvio Berlusconi of the US...and I repeat that because it's accurate. FWIW...

Yes. Get out while the gettin's good, Donald. Before your supporters discover what the rest of us know...how deeply cynical you are and how terrible you would be for the United States of America. Before people realize that this isn't a reality TV show and it's not so funny and entertaining after all to watch you call everyone, from other candidates to journalists to women to immigrants, losers. Before anyone with a modicum of integrity refuses to invest in anything with which you are affiliated because it would be a blight on their reputation.

I have referred to Trump before as the Silvio Berlusconi of the US...and I repeat that because it's accurate. FWIW...___

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2015-10-08 12:50:29 (5 comments; 11 reshares; 63 +1s)Open 

Fang-Yi Sheu" rehearsing *All Will Be Still. Every muscle, cell, sinew, tendon, ligament, vein, digit in motion.

The dance floor a canvas on which she paints movement.
Composes a paen to the human body in motion.
Creates the wind, waves...

All will be still...

#FangYiSheu   #AllWillBeStill  

Fang-Yi Sheu" rehearsing *All Will Be Still. Every muscle, cell, sinew, tendon, ligament, vein, digit in motion.

The dance floor a canvas on which she paints movement.
Composes a paen to the human body in motion.
Creates the wind, waves...

All will be still...

#FangYiSheu   #AllWillBeStill  ___

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2015-10-07 16:31:50 (28 comments; 2 reshares; 41 +1s)Open 

My stepson sent me this Will McPhail cartoon from the New Yorker. We were together in Albany this weekend with the rest of our extended family for the wedding of his sister (and my stepdaughter). Because we are a political, social, cultural gang (and intellectually a wee tad competitive, I might add), there were conversations galore about virtually everything social, cultural, historical, religious, and, Yes, political.

So how could we not talk about the Trumpster? Impossible not to. But the drive back to New York City post Hurricane Joaquin's wet and windy shenanigans? Ah, yes, that drive...

...cruising down I87 mid-Monday morning, the sun was out, the sky was a beautiful crisp celadon, brushed occasionally with white clouds. The leaves are slowly turning, the famous Hudson River Valley Fall foliage not yet in full swing, but coming on taking its sweet time.

I swung... more »

My stepson sent me this Will McPhail cartoon from the New Yorker. We were together in Albany this weekend with the rest of our extended family for the wedding of his sister (and my stepdaughter). Because we are a political, social, cultural gang (and intellectually a wee tad competitive, I might add), there were conversations galore about virtually everything social, cultural, historical, religious, and, Yes, political.

So how could we not talk about the Trumpster? Impossible not to. But the drive back to New York City post Hurricane Joaquin's wet and windy shenanigans? Ah, yes, that drive...

...cruising down I87 mid-Monday morning, the sun was out, the sky was a beautiful crisp celadon, brushed occasionally with white clouds. The leaves are slowly turning, the famous Hudson River Valley Fall foliage not yet in full swing, but coming on taking its sweet time.

I swung onto the Palisades Parkway, eager for a peak of the Hudson through the still-leaved trees, then merged onto I95 North to take the upper level of the George Washington Bridge into the City, its always glorious view of the Hudson going South to the Statue of Liberty one of my favorite things aside from the view I get driving into the City from the South and cruising over the bridge leading to the Holland Tunnel.

Every single time I cross the GWB, going either direction, I think of Captain Sully Sullenberger landing his US Air plane on the Hudson so skillfully it would make an Eagle proud. But I digress!

I pulled into the right lane, the beautiful skyline of New York City getting bigger and bigger until the merge was suddenly upon me. I swung onto 9W South, officially the West Side Highway, the sun gleaming and reflecting off the Hudson River, swaying with the flow of the traffic, and then...there they all were, popping up on the West Side of New York City like monoliths, completely obscuring the view of the skyline behind them.

One after another after another after another Trump Place Trump Tower Trump Place Trump Tower! You say Po-Tay-Toe I say Po-Tah-Toe.

No Me! I'm Trump Tower! You're not Trump Tower... I'm Trump Tower! No I'm Trump Tower you rat, you'll NEVER be Trump Tower.

Oh yeah?
Yeah!
OH YEAH?
YEAHHHH!
WHADDAYAGONNADOABOUTIT HUH?

Me Me Me. All gold and shiny like so much building bling. All that money spend on buildings so architecturally sleek, Yes, and modern, Yes...but, dare I say it? Spiritless. Boring. Lumbering. Lonely. And there's something mean about them blocking out everyone else's view.

I couldn't imagine living in any of them, and I couldn't wait to get past them, and to see once again the fabulous character of New York City's diverse, old and new, rich and poor, high and low Skyscape once again.

People are showering in glass towers in the Sky you know. See for yourself:

http://www.businessinsider.com/view-from-top-of-432-park-avenue-2014-10

This cartoon made me laugh.out.loud. Thank you, Kevin.

#WillMcPhail   #TheNewYorker  ___

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2015-10-03 17:14:54 (13 comments; 7 reshares; 53 +1s)Open 

THE POWER OF DANCE TAKES ON FOCAL DYSTONIA

For all of my Google+ dance and music lovers, I share with you the story of +Federico Bitti an Italian journalist who suffers from Focal Dystonia, a neurological condition that makes it difficult for him to control the muscular expression of his own body...until that is, he discovered the healing power of DANCE.

Bitti discovered the work of Dr. +Joaquin Farias a leading specialist treating dystonia with movement therapy. Dr. Farias has a doctorate in biomechanics, along with master’s degrees in neuropsychological rehabilitation, psychosociology and ergonomics.

Yes, we would all like a pill or simple surgery to fix what ails us. Sometimes, however, neither of those options are available, or, if they are available, they are not necessarily advisable.

Enter movement, dance, music and art therapies, modalities thatare... more »

THE POWER OF DANCE TAKES ON FOCAL DYSTONIA

For all of my Google+ dance and music lovers, I share with you the story of +Federico Bitti an Italian journalist who suffers from Focal Dystonia, a neurological condition that makes it difficult for him to control the muscular expression of his own body...until that is, he discovered the healing power of DANCE.

Bitti discovered the work of Dr. +Joaquin Farias a leading specialist treating dystonia with movement therapy. Dr. Farias has a doctorate in biomechanics, along with master’s degrees in neuropsychological rehabilitation, psychosociology and ergonomics.

Yes, we would all like a pill or simple surgery to fix what ails us. Sometimes, however, neither of those options are available, or, if they are available, they are not necessarily advisable.

Enter movement, dance, music and art therapies, modalities that are increasingly being studied, practiced and sought out by people with ailments, both physical and psychological, that defy traditional treatment.

Enter Dr. Farias and +Federico Bitti. Watch what happens when Bitti uses Farias's techniques to retrain Bitti's brain's signals to his muscles. Watch what happens when movement and music are used to free up Bitti's body from his own muscles, which have been controlling his movements for years.

Those of us who are dance practitioners know these techniques work somewhat instinctively I think, in that we are inspired, often from very young ages, to move, to dance and to use these forms of expression to free ourselves up. There is something inherent in the dance language that speaks to the brain and soul in ways that other 'languages' cannot, and the expression that comes out through ones limbs therefore is a kind of freedom unlike any other that I personally have ever experienced in my life.

I do not have Focal Dystopia like +Federico Bitti. But last year I did suffer two serious injuries, back-to-back, both of which combined landed me quite literally flat on my back for months. I had to learn to walk again and had to effectively rebuild myself muscle by muscle from the ground up.

I used music therapy. I used dance therapy. I did ballet. I did Yoga. I did Pilates. I used self massage. I talked to my body day in and day out for months and months, retraining my own brain, so to speak, to think of itself as injury-free, rather than as injured. I had some help in this process from experts to be sure, but much of it was instinctual. Wanting to do the work itself, was instinctual and I knew that I would not get back anywhere near the mobility I used to have if I didn't trust the healing power of movement.

Because, quite simply, I have known since I started dancing at six years old the power of movement, and the power of music.

Please watch this lovely and short video, which will have you smiling and dancing with Federico at the end. +Federico Bitti I would dance with you anywhere any day of the week!

Luckily for us, Bitti and Dr. Farias are both here on G+ and Dr. Farias has a website, on which you can read all about his work on Focal Dystonia and Parkinsons, and his work with Writers and Musicians and Athletes and Dancers and Children...and anyone else fortunate enough to discover his work.

http://www.fariastechnique.com/

Thank you +Jack C Crawford for turning me onto +Federico Bitti and Dr. +Joaquin Farias on FB! And pinging +pio dal cin because I thought you would love this.

Cheers from chilly Albany, New York!

#DrJoaquinFarias   #FedericoBitti   #DanceTherapy   #NeuroplasticMovementTherapy   #FariasTechnique  ___

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2015-09-27 13:49:02 (38 comments; 3 reshares; 35 +1s)Open 

Moon Songs in honor of today's Super Blood Moon, the last time this will happen until 2033!

The appearance of a Rare Super Blood Moon (appearing tonight EST around 10:11), which coincides with a lunar eclipse, has me going through a list of all the songs I know with lyrics that contain a reference to the Moon.

My all time favorite is Dean Martin singing When the Moon hits your eye, like a big pizza pie, sheet lyrics for which I passed out to all of the guests at our wedding reception - much to my husband's surprise - the commanded group singing of which was led by my friends David Renshaw and Fred Schroeder (both in fabulous full voice)! And a grand time was had by all.

Heaven, I was in heaven, and my heart beats so that I can hardly speak....

Oops.
Digressing (shhhh....)

So, here is my list, in honor of our beautiful Moon,... more »

Moon Songs in honor of today's Super Blood Moon, the last time this will happen until 2033!

The appearance of a Rare Super Blood Moon (appearing tonight EST around 10:11), which coincides with a lunar eclipse, has me going through a list of all the songs I know with lyrics that contain a reference to the Moon.

My all time favorite is Dean Martin singing When the Moon hits your eye, like a big pizza pie, sheet lyrics for which I passed out to all of the guests at our wedding reception - much to my husband's surprise - the commanded group singing of which was led by my friends David Renshaw and Fred Schroeder (both in fabulous full voice)! And a grand time was had by all.

Heaven, I was in heaven, and my heart beats so that I can hardly speak....

Oops.
Digressing (shhhh....)

So, here is my list, in honor of our beautiful Moon, which needs to be painted, drawn, written about, sung about, danced under. There are many, many more than I've listed here, but some I don't care for (shhhh....)

What is your list?

When the Moon hits your eye, like a big pizza pie, that’s amore, Harry Warren and Jack Brooks

Well, it’s a marvelous night for a Moondance, Van Morrison

Because I'm still in love with you, on this Harvest Moon, Neil Young

Moonshadow, Cat Stevens

Fly me to the Moon and let me play upon the Stars, Bart Howard

Blue Moon, you saw me standing alone, Rodgers and Hart

It’s only a Paper Moon sailing over a cardboard sea, Arlen, Harburg and Rose

There’s a Moon over Bourbon Street tonight, Sting

Everybody was dancin’ in the Moonlight, King Harvest

Everyone’s gone to the Moon, Johnathan King

The Moon's a Harsh Mistress, the Moon can be so cold, Jimmy Webb

Moon River, Henri Mancini

Bad Moon Rising, Credence Clearwater Revival

If you want to write a song about the Moon, Paul Simon

It seems as thought I’ve lived my life on the bad side of the Moon, Elton John, Bernie Taupin

Get outside tonight and soak it all up.
Wishing you a cloud free evening.

11 Facts About the September 27/ 28, 2015 Blood Moon Eclipse
http://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/facts-lunar-eclipse.html*___

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2015-09-26 18:42:12 (10 comments; 7 reshares; 28 +1s)Open 

Sakena Yacoobi: How I stopped the Taliban from shutting down my school

"But at that moment, I knew that education changed my life. It transformed me. It gave me status. It gave me confidence. It gave me a career. It helped me to support my family, to bring my family to another country, to be safe. And I knew that at that moment that what I should give to my people is education and health, and that's what I went after."

***

"But do you think it was easy? No, because at that time, education was banned for girls, completely. And also, by Russia invading Afghanistan, people were not trusting anyone. It was very hard to come and say, "I want to do this." Who am I? Somebody who comes from the United States. Somebody who got educated here. Did they trust me? Of course not."

***

"I dress from head to... more »

Sakena Yacoobi: How I stopped the Taliban from shutting down my school

"But at that moment, I knew that education changed my life. It transformed me. It gave me status. It gave me confidence. It gave me a career. It helped me to support my family, to bring my family to another country, to be safe. And I knew that at that moment that what I should give to my people is education and health, and that's what I went after."

***

"But do you think it was easy? No, because at that time, education was banned for girls, completely. And also, by Russia invading Afghanistan, people were not trusting anyone. It was very hard to come and say, "I want to do this." Who am I? Somebody who comes from the United States. Somebody who got educated here. Did they trust me? Of course not."

***

"I dress from head to toe in a black hijab. The only thing you could see, my eyes. They asked me, "What are you doing? Don't you know that school is banned for girls? What are you doing here?" And you know, I just looked at them, and I said, "What school? Where is the school?""

***

"And they look at my face, and they said, "You are teaching girls here." I said, "This is a house of somebody. We have some students coming, and they are all learning Koran, Holy Book. And you know, Koran says that if you learn the Holy Book, the woman, they can be a good wife, and they can obey their husband."

I often think that we Westerners have too many privileges, too many gifts, too many riches. That we have it too easy. That we do not suffer enough on a day-to-day basis. Women understandably have a difficult time being called 'activists,' 'feminists,' as if those are bad words, bad things to be.

It never occurred to me when I was a little girl and carrying my books a mile to school that in other parts of the world little girls were not allowed to have books. I had to grow up and read about what is going on in the rest of the world to understand the privilege of being born in America.

But I have had the freedom of reading books and educating myself for my entire life. Which is the reason that it was so shocking when, in 2012, a fifteen year old girl named Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by people in her native Pakistan who don't think little girls should be educated...or that they should ever speak out.

Even the Dalai Lama and the Pope have spoken out recently on the importance of women's rights. The Dalai Lama has said that the world will be saved by Western women.

I'm not so sure. Young Malala won the Nobel Peace Prize for her work on behalf of educating boys and girls all over the world. Fear and threats did not silence or kill, her thankfully.

Now there is a TEDTalk by Sakena Yacoobi, a woman from Afghanistan, Professor, Educator, committed to changing the future of her country. One student, one day at a time. Threatened, afraid, it matters not.

Perhaps it is Western women who will learn how to be unafraid of speaking out, of taking action, no matter the cost, from our sisters around the world, who have so much less than we do, and who have to fight every so much more hard to have a faction of what we take for granted.

Watch.

And listen.

P.S. Since I wrote this post, Nicholas Kristof has written about Malala Yousafzai's continuing fight for girl's eduction in the Times:

"No world leader would want nine years of education for their children,” she told me. “Every world leader wants quality education for their children. They need to think of the rest of the world’s children as their own children.” - Malala Yousafzai

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/27/opinion/sunday/nicholas-kristof-malala-yousafzais-fight-continues.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=opinion-c-col-right-region&region=opinion-c-col-right-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-right-region

#SakenaYacoobi    #MalalaYousafzai   #Education  ___

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2015-09-25 12:31:30 (22 comments; 3 reshares; 23 +1s)Open 

Love this Mathematician, Arthur Benjamin. Had he been my Math teacher when I was a kid, I could have skipped the whole Not So Crazy About Math stage that a lot of kids go through.

I didn't start liking Math until I became a pilot, and I wish that I had had The Magic of Math: Solving for x and Figuring Out Why when I started. Sometimes you have to wait for the good stuff.

I have never believed that there are subject matters kids just can't ever understand. Rather I think we have natural aptitudes, and when we are in school sitting next to someone who 'gets' languages instantly, or who 'gets' Math instantly when we ourselves don't, then we start programming our brains to believe we don't have an aptitude for something and then we are off and running in what can be a lifelong battle with a lack of confidence in a certain area.

I see this... more »

Love this Mathematician, Arthur Benjamin. Had he been my Math teacher when I was a kid, I could have skipped the whole Not So Crazy About Math stage that a lot of kids go through.

I didn't start liking Math until I became a pilot, and I wish that I had had The Magic of Math: Solving for x and Figuring Out Why when I started. Sometimes you have to wait for the good stuff.

I have never believed that there are subject matters kids just can't ever understand. Rather I think we have natural aptitudes, and when we are in school sitting next to someone who 'gets' languages instantly, or who 'gets' Math instantly when we ourselves don't, then we start programming our brains to believe we don't have an aptitude for something and then we are off and running in what can be a lifelong battle with a lack of confidence in a certain area.

I see this happen with kids who think they can't sing, or can't dance, or aren't artistic.

With me I think what happened is that my father, who was an architect and engineer and very good at Math, died when I was young. I was never therefore infected with, or affected by, his love of numbers and equations and all things mathematical and figured. And I think that part...falling in love with the beauty of something, whether its words or numbers or poems or paintings, is absolutely essential for kids.

Externally I was afraid of Math. Internally I wanted to understand it, so I went to St. John's College where, instead of memorizing equations in text books, we actually read Euclid's geometry. It still was not enough to allow me to let go of fear and fall in love with Math. Physics? Same thing.

Perhaps Benjamin's greater message is about falling in love with learning. Teachers like Arthur Benjamin can change a kid's life.

Benjamin has done a couple of TEDTalks,

A Performance of Math Magic: 
(http://www.ted.com/talks/arthur_benjamin_does_mathemagic?language=en),

and:

The Magic of Fibonacci Numbers: 
https://www.ted.com/talks/arthur_benjamin_the_magic_of_fibonacci_numbers?language=en

Doesn't he sort of look like the John Denver of Mathematics. Give me some Rocky Mountain High....in Colorado....la la la la la, dah dee dum dah dah in Colorado...

"Rocky Mountain High,* by John Denver

He was born in the summer of his 27th year,
coming home to a place he'd never been before.
He left yesterday behind him,
you might say he was born again,
you might say he found a key for every door.

When he first came to the mountains,
his life was far away on the road and hanging by a song.
But the strings already broken and he doesn't really care,
it keeps changing fast, and it don't last for long.

And the Colorado Rocky Mountain high,
I've seen it raining fire in the sky.
The shadows from the starlight are softer than a lullaby.
Rocky Mountain high, Colorado.
Rocky Mountain high.

He climbed cathedral mountains,
he saw silver clouds below,
he saw everything as far as you can see.

And they say that he got crazy once and he tried to touch the sun,
and he lost a friend,
but kept the memory.

Now he walks in quiet solitude,
the forest and the streams,
seeking grace in every step he takes.
His sight is turned inside himself, to try and understand
the serenity of a clear blue mountain lake.

And the Colorado Rocky Mountain high,
I've seen it raining fire in the sky.
You can talk to God and listen to the casual reply.
Rocky Mountain high, Colorado. Rocky Mountain high.

Now his life is full of wonder,
but his heart still knows some fear,
of a simple thing he can not comprehend.
Why they try to tear the mountains down to bring in a couple more,
more people, more scars upon the land.

And the Colorado Rocky Mountain high,
I've seen it raining fire in the sky.

I know he'd be a poor man if he never saw an eagle fly,
Rocky Mountain high,
the Colorado Rocky Mountain high,
I've seen it raining fire in the sky.

Friends around the campfire and everybody's high
Rocky Mountain high, Colorado. Rocky Mountain high.
Rocky Mountain high, Colorado. Rocky Mountain high.

Oh to fall in love with numbers and language and poems and lyrics and...

Oops...free-associating and digressing again! 

I have to stop doing that.

Have a lovely weekend everyone.

Giselle___

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2015-09-23 23:07:04 (16 comments; 2 reshares; 41 +1s)Open 

The Autumn Equinox, Wednesday, September 23, 2015: Let the Hummingbird Departure Commence

Do Hummingbirds know on which day the Autumn Equinox falls? They must, otherwise explain why this is the first day since early May that they have not come to say Hello. I took this video late yesterday, when there were only a couple of hold-outs left, fattening up one last day for the flight South, as is their light birded wont.

But today? Not a one. They are gone, all of them, as suddenly as they arrived in the Spring. As though a memorandum had been distributed late last night telling tell all to suit up.

The past few days, while I sit outside and write, rather than fighting one another over which one really owns the feeder, they have been flying close to me, hovering a while before darting off, as if to say...

Thank you for a plentiful supply of the sauce.... more »

The Autumn Equinox, Wednesday, September 23, 2015: Let the Hummingbird Departure Commence

Do Hummingbirds know on which day the Autumn Equinox falls? They must, otherwise explain why this is the first day since early May that they have not come to say Hello. I took this video late yesterday, when there were only a couple of hold-outs left, fattening up one last day for the flight South, as is their light birded wont.

But today? Not a one. They are gone, all of them, as suddenly as they arrived in the Spring. As though a memorandum had been distributed late last night telling tell all to suit up.

The past few days, while I sit outside and write, rather than fighting one another over which one really owns the feeder, they have been flying close to me, hovering a while before darting off, as if to say...

Thank you for a plentiful supply of the sauce. Wasn't crazy about the commercial stuff, the kind you made yourself is ever so much more flowerlike. Might we put in a reservation for a four-month long repast next year? Same time same place? What's that you say? Same Time Next Year is the title of a play by Bernard Slade? Never heard of him. Don't you know that Hummingbirds don't attend the theatre? Why would we? Is there any better site specific theatre piece than Nature? We collectively think not. Anyway, we all hate goodbyes and won't come 'round in the morning when the sun comes up to greet you as usual. 'Tis the Equinox and time to be off. Save a spot for us in the Sun, and we'll see you Missus Owner Lady Same Time Next Year. BTW...love your hair. Ciao.

Pay attention to second 00:14. I think they figured they would let the wasps win for once. I mean, really, what is better, a Hummingbird sun-tanning on the Gulf Coast or a frozen wasp...too stupid to get out while the getting's good?___

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2015-09-20 16:40:11 (10 comments; 1 reshares; 32 +1s)Open 

Whorl Wedding Rings

If you are an artist, inspiration can be found everywhere you turn. I designed these 18k rose gold weddings rings for pastry chefs, well known in Brooklyn (Dumbo and Cobble Hill) for their incredible cookies. Their store is called One Girl Cookies.

One of them, I won't say which, lost their ring in a batch of butter and flour and I had to make another, but no matter, that's the benefit of knowing the designer!

The pattern of their rings was inspired by an exhibition of Australian aboriginal art at Christie's in New York many years ago.

The paintings reminded me of everything in the natural world...

The wind, the surf and the dunes at the seashore.
The mountain mesas in the Southwest where I grew up.

The rolling hills of Tuscany, and the farmlands spread out across the United States that tie... more »

Whorl Wedding Rings

If you are an artist, inspiration can be found everywhere you turn. I designed these 18k rose gold weddings rings for pastry chefs, well known in Brooklyn (Dumbo and Cobble Hill) for their incredible cookies. Their store is called One Girl Cookies.

One of them, I won't say which, lost their ring in a batch of butter and flour and I had to make another, but no matter, that's the benefit of knowing the designer!

The pattern of their rings was inspired by an exhibition of Australian aboriginal art at Christie's in New York many years ago.

The paintings reminded me of everything in the natural world...

The wind, the surf and the dunes at the seashore.
The mountain mesas in the Southwest where I grew up.

The rolling hills of Tuscany, and the farmlands spread out across the United States that tie our cities together.

Rivers that twist and wind their way to ocean shores and deltas and bays to the East and West and South.

The red clay hills of Northern New Mexico.
Crop circles.
Hidden horse thief meadows high in the Sandia Mountains.
Lakes and oceans and sea tides.

The Sun.
The Moon.
The Stars.

Designing wedding rings is one of the greatest honors and pleasures of my creative life. It is a collaboration and therefore a lot of trust is invoked. Not unlike a relationship between lovers themselves. If you have that trust, much beauty can emerge from it.

Yet, underneath it all, there is the original inspiration. I remember the day I walked into Christie's galleries to see those stunningly beautiful aboriginal paintings, many of them by elderly artists who had begun their careers late in their lives, hanging on walls of white, the whorls and whirls and circles and lines and patterns of the paintings blending into one another and becoming etched forever into my brain.

I went home and designed these Whorl Wedding rings and they make me happy.

I love being reminded about the past about artistry, about the birthplace of personal creative inspiration, and this morning I woke up to an article in the Times about an aboriginal artist named Warlimpirrnga Tjapaltjarri, whose work is currently featured in an exhibition at Salon 54.

I wish that I could have included not only a photographic link to the article, alongside of which I would have shown my rings, which would not now exist had I not been wowed, inspired, humbled and compelled by the artistry of men and women who live in a country I long to visit, whose painterly expressions are unlike any other that I am aware of around the world.

I had to debate which to include as a photograph - my rings or the article - the rings won (forgive me!) but below is the link about Mr. Tiapaltjarri's work for those of you who would like to see his splendid work.

Isn't he fabulous looking? I want to sit with him under the Australian stars and contemplate being alive. If you know him, would you kindly pass that message along?

An Aborginal Artist's Dizzying New York Moment:
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/19/arts/design/an-aboriginal-artists-dizzying-new-york-moment.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=photo-spot-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news

Thank you for reading, as always.

Giselle

#WarlimpirrngaTjapaltjarri   #AboriginalArt  ___

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2015-09-14 18:32:39 (9 comments; 7 reshares; 32 +1s)Open 

What really matters at the end of life

I spent the weekend at the Kentucky Women Writers Conference in Lexington, Kentucky. In its 37th year, it is the longest running conference for women writers in the United States.

In what frequently seems to be a youth-obsessed culture, in which the art, films, lives, creativity, poetry...jobs...of older Americans are marginalized, or at least not exactly perceived to be at the core of our culturally energetic souls, it was the 81 year-old legendary poet Sonia Sanchez who began the weekend on Friday morning by giving the plenary talk. 

She asked us to stand and then delivered an impromptu 'poem' about honoring those who died on 9/11 by renewing our commitment to live fully at the same time that we recognize and pay homage to lives lost on that day.
 
After watching Sanchez speak - because it wasa... more »

What really matters at the end of life

I spent the weekend at the Kentucky Women Writers Conference in Lexington, Kentucky. In its 37th year, it is the longest running conference for women writers in the United States.

In what frequently seems to be a youth-obsessed culture, in which the art, films, lives, creativity, poetry...jobs...of older Americans are marginalized, or at least not exactly perceived to be at the core of our culturally energetic souls, it was the 81 year-old legendary poet Sonia Sanchez who began the weekend on Friday morning by giving the plenary talk. 

She asked us to stand and then delivered an impromptu 'poem' about honoring those who died on 9/11 by renewing our commitment to live fully at the same time that we recognize and pay homage to lives lost on that day.
 
After watching Sanchez speak - because it was as physical a presentation as it was an intellectual and creative one - I found myself throughout the course of the weekend reflecting on her words about death and life, only to return home late last night to a notice about BJ Miller's TEDTalk What really matters at the end of life.

Sometimes themes repeat themselves everywhere you turn when there is something important to pay attention to.

BJ Miller is a physician, who lost his legs and much of his left arm as a result of an ill-advised (or, rather, not thought out at all) decision when he went out one evening with friends when he was in college. His was a journey of recovery and reflection that led him to spend his life as a doctor working with people at the end of their lives, helping them to discover ways in which to continue to be fully alive however they can, until they are, well, no longer alive.

It is not maudlin or depressing, nor in any way sad. Quite the opposite. Miller's connection with his own sense of aliveness is crisp, and more than a little mischievous in the imagery he conjures to describe what he has learned about himself and his patients over the years at the Zen Hospice Project he runs in San Francisco.

Give it a watch. I can't think of anyone, including myself, who cannot use a reminder to carefully consider this issue, if not to help ourselves, then, perhaps, to help someone else in the circle of our lives.

It seems only fitting to include a poem of Miss Sanchez's, entitled dance haiku, which is about the dance of death. I hope it is alright for me to copy it here. At the very least, I will have turned you all onto a wonderful book, which you should all have by your bedside tables.

morning haiku, by Sonia Sanchez (published by Beacon Press)

1.
do we dance
death in a fast lane
of salsa

2.
or minuet
death with an aristocrat's
pointed toe?

3.
do we ease 
into death with
working class abandon

4.
or position our
legs in middleclass
laughter

5.
do we swallow
death in a fast gulp
of morning pills

6.
or factor death
into prime years 
in our throats?

Speaking personally, I think we would all have a greater appreciation of how extraordinary it is to be alive if we were to "factor death into prime years in our throats."

Thank you for reading...as always.

Giselle

#TEDTalks   #BJMiller   #ZenHospiceSanFrancisco   #SoniaSanchez   #morninghaiku   #KentuckyWomenWritersConference  #___

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2015-09-11 12:43:53 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

At the Kentucky Women Writers Conference in Lexington, Kentucky.

Any other writers attending I might say Hello to?

Ann Beattie is here, and Sonia Sanchez and Jacinda Townsend and Megham Daum and so, so many others...

At the Kentucky Women Writers Conference in Lexington, Kentucky.

Any other writers attending I might say Hello to?

Ann Beattie is here, and Sonia Sanchez and Jacinda Townsend and Megham Daum and so, so many others...___

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