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John Hardy not a Turnbull fan has been at 1 events

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John Blossom126,352End of the Mayan calendar got you down? Celebrate the destruction of the universe on this On-Air Hangout! What are your predictions for the end of time? What will you do with all that spare time? Come join us - if we're all still here...Celebrate the Apocalypse on 12-21-12!2012-12-21 18:30:0010  

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Most comments: 28

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2016-02-05 11:00:01 (28 comments; 4 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

The United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention – the international tribunal that adjudicates and decides whether governments comply with their human rights obligations – has ruled that Julian Assange has been detained unlawfully by Britain and Sweden.

Most reshares: 9

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2016-02-10 12:22:35 (2 comments; 9 reshares; 31 +1s)Open 

Most plusones: 46

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2016-02-08 23:57:40 (2 comments; 7 reshares; 46 +1s)Open 

OOOOOOOOOHHHH

Latest 50 posts

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2016-02-13 23:52:55 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s)Open 

Shit fight: forces assembling for year long battle.



Shit fight: forces assembling for year long battle.

___

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2016-02-13 23:46:58 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 0 +1s)Open 

Shit fight: engaged.

Via +Nora Qudus​

Shit fight: engaged.

Via +Nora Qudus​___

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2016-02-13 23:42:08 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

Shit fight!

Whoa.  Did not expect that.___Shit fight!

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2016-02-13 23:30:10 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

http://m.xkcd.com/1642/

http://m.xkcd.com/1642/___

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2016-02-13 23:22:49 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

More on Sci-Hub, the Pirate Bay of scientific papers.

Ultimately this is a challenge to the legitimacy of journals to control the peer review process. These publisher do add value but for that they charge very high fees. Elsevier makes profits in the order of 39%.
http://poeticeconomics.blogspot.com.au/2014/03/elsevier-stm-publishing-profits-rise-to.html?m=1

These companies are charging the bedgets of research institutions literally billions of dollars so you can see why they desperately want Sci-Hub shut down. It is doing them "irreparable harm".

Via +Tom Higgins​​

More on Sci-Hub, the Pirate Bay of scientific papers.

Ultimately this is a challenge to the legitimacy of journals to control the peer review process. These publisher do add value but for that they charge very high fees. Elsevier makes profits in the order of 39%.
http://poeticeconomics.blogspot.com.au/2014/03/elsevier-stm-publishing-profits-rise-to.html?m=1

These companies are charging the bedgets of research institutions literally billions of dollars so you can see why they desperately want Sci-Hub shut down. It is doing them "irreparable harm".

Via +Tom Higgins​​___

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2016-02-13 13:12:48 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

Pris Stratton "basic pleasure model"
Model NEXUS-6 N6FAB21416
Incept date: 14 FEB 2016

Pris Stratton "basic pleasure model"
Model NEXUS-6 N6FAB21416
Incept date: 14 FEB 2016___

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2016-02-13 13:09:30 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

Pris Stratton

Pris Stratton___

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2016-02-13 09:40:42 (5 comments; 3 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

Ignore the superdelegates: 

Ignore the superdelegates: ___

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2016-02-13 09:39:44 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

This guy really is as stupid as he looks.

Background:
http://www.smh.com.au/comment/class-clown-barnaby-joyce-has-centre-stage-to-prove-himself-20160212-gmsujp.html

#australia   #auspol   #barnabyjoyce  ___This guy really is as stupid as he looks.

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2016-02-13 09:39:07 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 2 +1s)Open 

Now confirmed.

Likely to be the next deputy prime minister. Malcolm must be so pleased.

https://www.laborherald.com.au/politics/five-strange-things-about-australias-next-deputy-prime-minister/

via +Kerry Wright___Now confirmed.

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2016-02-12 22:33:33 (2 comments; 1 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

Via +Geoffrey Swenson​

Via +Geoffrey Swenson​___

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2016-02-12 21:30:33 (3 comments; 2 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

Doesn't involve copper.

Via +Glenn Reilly​

Doesn't involve copper.

Via +Glenn Reilly​___

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2016-02-12 06:25:14 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 1 +1s)Open 

LIGO Livingston

https://goo.gl/maps/1ui32V81sCH2

LIGO Livingston

https://goo.gl/maps/1ui32V81sCH2___

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2016-02-12 06:00:28 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

One more.

One more.___

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2016-02-12 05:37:43 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 6 +1s)Open 

More details in Nature.

More details in Nature.___

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2016-02-12 02:40:50 (4 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Amazing what a history of slavery can do.

Four US cities feature in an otherwise—almost exclusively—Latin American list of the world’s most murderous___Amazing what a history of slavery can do.

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2016-02-12 02:10:17 (2 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

Reason #23325 why Tony Abbott cannot be prime minister of this country. He is, however, in demand as a speaker to the very worst people in the world.

...listed on the Washington Speakers Bureau as one of the “world’s greatest minds”. His speakers fee is listed as more than $40,000.

One of the groups he addressed has been active in the courts supporting the criminalisation of gay sex. His sister must be so proud.

Reason #23325 why Tony Abbott cannot be prime minister of this country. He is, however, in demand as a speaker to the very worst people in the world.

...listed on the Washington Speakers Bureau as one of the “world’s greatest minds”. His speakers fee is listed as more than $40,000.

One of the groups he addressed has been active in the courts supporting the criminalisation of gay sex. His sister must be so proud.___

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2016-02-11 20:56:21 (0 comments; 3 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

+Yonatan Zunger​​ once again provides the best, most accessible explanation of the science behind this monumentally important achievement: the detection of gravitational waves.

This is the final confirmation of Einstein's general theory of relativity which was published a century ago. A nice centenary present for the entire field of physics.

We have observed gravitational waves!

This morning, the LIGO observatory announced a historic event: for the very first time in history, we have observed a pair of black holes colliding, not by light (which they don't emit), but by the waves in spacetime itself that they form. This is a tremendously big deal, so let me try to explain why.

What's a gravitational wave?

The easiest way to understand General Relativity is to imagine that the universe is a big trampoline. Imagine a star as a bowling ball, sitting in the middle of it, and a spaceship as a small marble that you're shooting along the trampoline. As the marble approaches the bowling ball, it starts to fall along the stretched surface of the trampoline, and curve towards the ball; depending on how close it passes to the ball and how fast, it might fall and hit it. 

If you looked at this from above, you wouldn't see the stretching of the trampoline; it would just look black, and like the marble was "attracted" towards the bowling ball.

This is basically how gravity works: mass (or energy) stretches out space (and time), and as objects just move in what looks like a straight path to them, they curve towards heavy things, because spacetime itself is bent. That's Einstein's theory of Relativity, first published in 1916, and (prior to today) almost every aspect of it had been verified by experiment.

Now imagine that you pick up a bowling ball and drop it, or do something else similarly violent on the trampoline. Not only is the trampoline going to be stretched, but it's going to bounce -- and if you look at it in slow-motion, you'll see ripples flowing along the surface of the trampoline, just like you would if you dropped a bowling ball into a lake. Relativity predicts ripples like that as well, and these are gravitational waves. Until today, they had only been predicted, never seen.

(The real math of relativity is a bit more complicated than that of trampolines, and for example gravitational waves stretch space and time in very distinctive patterns: if you held a T-square up and a gravitational wave hit it head-on,  you would see first one leg compress and the other stretch, then the other way round)

The challenge with seeing gravitational waves is that gravity is very weak (after all, it takes the entire mass of the Earth to hold you down!) and so you need a really large event to emit enough gravity waves to see it. Say, two black holes colliding off-center with each other.

So how do we see them?

We use a trick called laser interferometry, which is basically a fancy T-square. What you do is you take a laser beam, split it in two, and let each beam fly down the length of a large L. At the end of the leg, it hits a mirror and bounces back, and you recombine the two beams.

The trick is this: lasers (unlike other forms of light) form very neat wave patterns, where the light is just a single, perfectly regular, wave. When the two beams recombine, you therefore have two overlapping waves -- and if you've ever watched two ripples collide, you'll notice that when waves overlap, they cancel in spots and reinforce each other in spots. As a result, if the relative length of the legs of the L changes, the amount of cancellation will change -- and so, by monitoring the brightness of the re-merged light, you can see if something changed the length of one leg and not the other.

LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) consists of a pair of these, one in Livingston, Louisiana, and one in Hartford, Washington, three thousand kilometers apart. Each leg of each L is four kilometers long, and they are isolated from ambient ground motion and vibration by a truly impressive set of systems.

If a gravitational wave were to strike LIGO, it would create a very characteristic compression and expansion pattern first in one L, then the other. By comparing the difference between the two, and looking for that very distinctive pattern, you could spot gravity waves.

How sensitive is this? If you change the relative length of the legs of an L by a fraction of the wavelength of the light, you change the brightness of the merged light by a predictable amount. Since measuring the brightness of light is something we're really good at (think high-quality photo-sensors), we can spot very small fractions of a wavelength. In fact, the LIGO detector can currently spot changes of one attometer (10⁻¹⁸ of a meter), or about one-thousandth the size of an atomic nucleus. (Or one hundred-millionth the size of an atom!) It's expected that we'll be able to improve that by a factor of three in the next few years.

With a four-kilometer leg, this means that LIGO can spot changes in length of about one-quarter of a part in 10²¹. That's the resolution you need to spot events like this: despite the tremendous violence of the collision (as I'll explain in a second), it was so far away -- really, on the other end of the universe -- that it only created vibrations of about five parts in 10²¹ on Earth.

So what did LIGO see?

About 1.5 billion light years away, two black holes -- one weighing about 29 times as much as the Sun, the other 36 -- collided with  each other. As they drew closer, their gravity caused them to start to spiral inwards towards each other, so that in the final moments before the collision they started spinning around each other more and more quickly, up to a peak speed of 250 orbits per second. This started to fling gravity waves in all directions with great vigor, and when they finally collided, they formed a single black hole, 62 times the mass of the Sun. The difference -- three solar masses -- was all released in the form of pure energy.

Within those final few milliseconds, the collision was 50 times brighter than the entire rest of the universe combined. All of that energy was emitted in the form of gravitational waves: something to which we were completely blind until today.

Are we sure about that?

High-energy physics has become known for extreme paranoia about the quality of its data. The confidence level required to declare a "discovery" in this field is technically known as 5σ, translating to a confidence level of 99.99994%. That takes into account statistical anomalies and so on, but you should take much more care when dealing with big-deal discoveries; LIGO does all sorts of things for that. For example, their computers are set up to routinely inject false signals into the data, and they don't "open up the box" to reveal whether a signal was real or faked until after the entire team has finished analyzing the data. (This lets you know that your system would detect a real signal, and it has the added benefit that the people doing the data analysis never know if it's the real thing or not when they're doing the analysis -- helping to counter any unconscious tendency to bias the data towards "yes, it's really real!")

There are all sorts of other tricks like that, and generally LIGO is known for the best practices of data analysis basically anywhere. From the analysis, they found a confidence level of 5.1σ -- enough to count as a confirmed discovery of a new physical phenomenon.

(That's equal to a p-value of 3.4*10⁻⁷, for those of you from fields that use those)

So why is this important?

Well, first of all, we just observed a new physical phenomenon for the first time, and confirmed the last major part of Einstein's theory. Which is pretty cool in its own right.

But as of today, LIGO is no longer just a physics experiment: it is now an astronomical observatory. This is the first gravity-wave telescope, and it's going to let us answer questions that we could only dream about before.

Consider that the collision we saw emitted a tremendous amount of energy, brighter than everything else in the sky combined, and yet we were blind to it. How many more such collisions are happening? How does the flow of energy via gravitational wave shape the structure of galaxies, of galactic clusters, of the universe as a whole? How often do black holes collide, and how do they do it? Are there ultramassive black holes which shape the movement of entire galactic clusters, the way that supermassive ones shape the movement of galaxies, but which we can't see using ordinary light at all, because they aren't closely surrounded by stars?

Today's discovery is more than just a milestone in physics: it's the opening act of a much bigger step forward.

What's next?

LIGO is going to keep observing! We may also revisit an old plan (scrapped when the politics broke down) for another observatory called LISA, which instead of using two four-kilometer L's on the Earth, consists of a big triangle of lasers, with their vertices on three satellites orbiting the Sun. The LISA observatory (and yes, this is actually possible with modern technology) would be able to observe motions of roughly the same size as LIGO -- one attometer -- but as a fraction of a leg five million kilometers long. That gives us, shall we say, one hell of a lot better resolution. And because it doesn't have to be shielded from things like the vibrations of passing trucks, in many ways it's actually simpler than LIGO.

(The LISA Pathfinder mission, a test satellite to debug many of these things, was launched on December 3rd)

The next twenty years are likely to lead to a steady stream of discoveries from these observatories: it's the first time we've had a fundamentally new kind of telescope in quite a while. (The last major shift in this was probably Hubble, our first optical telescope in space, above all the problems of the atmosphere)

The one catch is that LIGO and LISA don't produce pretty pictures; you can think of LIGO as a gravity-wave camera that has exactly two pixels. If the wave hits Louisiana first, it came from the south; if it hits Washington first, it came from the north. (This one came from the south, incidentally; it hit Louisiana seven milliseconds before Washington) It's the shift in the pixels over time that lets us see things, but it's not going to look very visually dramatic. We'll have to wait quite some time until we can figure out how to build a gravitational wave telescope that can show us a clear image of the sky in these waves; but even before that, we'll be able to tease out the details of distant events of a scale hard to imagine.

You can read the full paper at http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.061102 , including all of the technical details. Many congratulations to the entire LIGO team: you've really done it. Amazing.

Incidentally, Physical Review Letters normally has a strict four-page max; the fact that they were willing to give this article sixteen pages shows just how big a deal this is.___+Yonatan Zunger​​ once again provides the best, most accessible explanation of the science behind this monumentally important achievement: the detection of gravitational waves.

This is the final confirmation of Einstein's general theory of relativity which was published a century ago. A nice centenary present for the entire field of physics.

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2016-02-11 20:51:41 (5 comments; 1 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

This is huge:
We report on two major scientific breakthroughs involving key predictions of Einstein's theory: the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of the collision and merger of a pair of black holes.

Graviational waves

The rumors are true: LIGO has seen gravitational waves! Based on the details of the signal detected, the LIGO team estimates that 1.3 billion years ago. two black holes spiralled into each other and collided. One was 29 times the mass of the Sun, the other 36 times. When they merged, 3 times the mass of the Sun was converted directly to energy and released as gravitational waves.

For a very short time, this event produced over 10 times more power than all the stars in the Universe!

We knew these things happened. We just weren't good enough at detecting gravitational waves to see them - until now.

I'll open comments on this breaking news item so we can all learn more. LIGO now has a page on this event, which is called GW150914 because it was seen on September 14th, 2015:

http://www.ligo.org/science/Publication-GW150914/index.php

You can see the gravitational waveforms here:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Ca8dpleUAAALI2n.jpg

At left in blue is the wave detected in Livingston, Louisiana. At right in red is the wave detected in Hanford Washington. The detector in Hanford saw the wave a few milliseconds later, so it must have come from the sky in the Southern hemisphere.

#LIGO #astronomy___This is huge:
We report on two major scientific breakthroughs involving key predictions of Einstein's theory: the first direct detection of gravitational waves and the first observation of the collision and merger of a pair of black holes.

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2016-02-11 20:23:13 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

Johnny Depp is Donald Trump.

You probably definitely must watch this.

Donald Trump's The Art Of The Deal: The Movie
Featuring Johnny Depp, Ron Howard, Alfred Molina, Robert Morse, Patton Oswalt, Jack McBrayer, Michaela Watkins,Henry Winkler, Stephen Merchant, Christopher Lloyd,Kristen Schaal, Andy Richter, Paul Scheer, Rob Huebel,Tymberlee Hill, Alf, Jordan Coleman, Joe Nuñez, Jeremy Konner, Kenny Loggins,___Johnny Depp is Donald Trump.

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2016-02-11 12:37:54 (9 comments; 0 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

The old system of L.S.D. was pretty hallucinogenic.

This coming Sunday is the 50th anniversary of the introduction of decimal currency to Australia. Who among you remembers this?
___The old system of L.S.D. was pretty hallucinogenic.

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2016-02-11 12:27:48 (0 comments; 5 reshares; 24 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-02-11 09:21:00 (1 comments; 3 reshares; 3 +1s)Open 

You probably definitely must watch this.

Donald Trump's The Art Of The Deal: The Movie
Featuring Johnny Depp, Ron Howard, Alfred Molina, Robert Morse, Patton Oswalt, Jack McBrayer, Michaela Watkins,Henry Winkler, Stephen Merchant, Christopher Lloyd,Kristen Schaal, Andy Richter, Paul Scheer, Rob Huebel,Tymberlee Hill, Alf, Jordan Coleman, Joe Nuñez, Jeremy Konner, Kenny Loggins,

You probably definitely must watch this.

Donald Trump's The Art Of The Deal: The Movie
Featuring Johnny Depp, Ron Howard, Alfred Molina, Robert Morse, Patton Oswalt, Jack McBrayer, Michaela Watkins,Henry Winkler, Stephen Merchant, Christopher Lloyd,Kristen Schaal, Andy Richter, Paul Scheer, Rob Huebel,Tymberlee Hill, Alf, Jordan Coleman, Joe Nuñez, Jeremy Konner, Kenny Loggins,___

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2016-02-11 09:02:18 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

This buffoon now heads the CSIRO and is firing climate scientists left and right.

Dr Larry Marshall:
“Something that has always fascinated me, I don’t know if you’ve ever seen farmers find water, and as a scientist I can’t explain how they do this, but there’s a number of tricks when people dowse for water, and I can tell you, I’ve seen people do this with close to 80 per cent accuracy.

“I’ve always wondered whether there is something in the electromagnetic field or in gravitation anomaly, whether there’s something that would enable you to more efficiently detect water.”

This buffoon now heads the CSIRO and is firing climate scientists left and right.

Dr Larry Marshall:
“Something that has always fascinated me, I don’t know if you’ve ever seen farmers find water, and as a scientist I can’t explain how they do this, but there’s a number of tricks when people dowse for water, and I can tell you, I’ve seen people do this with close to 80 per cent accuracy.

“I’ve always wondered whether there is something in the electromagnetic field or in gravitation anomaly, whether there’s something that would enable you to more efficiently detect water.”___

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2016-02-11 06:43:57 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

This donkey is out of his depth. 

This donkey is out of his depth. ___

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2016-02-10 12:22:35 (2 comments; 9 reshares; 31 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-02-10 12:19:28 (2 comments; 2 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

This government has to go.

Oh, for fuck's sake!

I assume Greg "The Best Oil Minister in the World, as voted by Dubai" Hunt was behind this adhorrent decision.

This government is reaching cartoon mustache-twirling levels of villainy.___This government has to go.

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2016-02-10 12:18:04 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

Likely to be the next deputy prime minister. Malcolm must be so pleased.

https://www.laborherald.com.au/politics/five-strange-things-about-australias-next-deputy-prime-minister/

via +Kerry Wright

Likely to be the next deputy prime minister. Malcolm must be so pleased.

https://www.laborherald.com.au/politics/five-strange-things-about-australias-next-deputy-prime-minister/

via +Kerry Wright___

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2016-02-10 09:53:15 (8 comments; 1 reshares; 40 +1s)Open 

Clinton still frames issues in centrist terms that suited the triangulating 1990s better than the more liberal party of Obama’s last year in office. In making her chief arguments based on electability, pragmatism, and the lack of realism in Sanders’s policies, Clinton only reminded voters of the frustrations of the era when Bill Clinton often tried to split the difference between his own party and the hard right of Newt Gingrich’s congressional Republicans.

To be sure, Sanders is older than Clinton, and he’s been an elected official for a long time. But his brand of democratic socialism was marginal in the party until now, and he’s been able to time his ascension to the national stage to the moment when the party’s base is most receptive to it. Sanders is the person of the hour in large part because he waited for the hour to emerge. 

Clinton still frames issues in centrist terms that suited the triangulating 1990s better than the more liberal party of Obama’s last year in office. In making her chief arguments based on electability, pragmatism, and the lack of realism in Sanders’s policies, Clinton only reminded voters of the frustrations of the era when Bill Clinton often tried to split the difference between his own party and the hard right of Newt Gingrich’s congressional Republicans.

To be sure, Sanders is older than Clinton, and he’s been an elected official for a long time. But his brand of democratic socialism was marginal in the party until now, and he’s been able to time his ascension to the national stage to the moment when the party’s base is most receptive to it. Sanders is the person of the hour in large part because he waited for the hour to emerge. ___

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2016-02-10 00:08:08 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

Greg Hunt wins 'World's best minister' for ministering to the fossil fuel industry. Almost single-handed he set back Australia's response to climate change* by ten years. With a bit of luck, we may fail to respond at all.

* you can read about it in Wikipedia

Hahaha surely a pisstake___Greg Hunt wins 'World's best minister' for ministering to the fossil fuel industry. Almost single-handed he set back Australia's response to climate change* by ten years. With a bit of luck, we may fail to respond at all.

* you can read about it in Wikipedia

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2016-02-09 22:36:32 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

The elite, of course, knows best and thinks that we should sign this thing without reading it. The future of their salary growth depends on it.

#AU Trade Minister criticised for seeking #TPP ratification without independent analysis - http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/trade-minister-andrew-robb-criticised-for-seeking-tpp-ratification-without-independent-analysis-20160209-gmpmwf.html no business would do this___The elite, of course, knows best and thinks that we should sign this thing without reading it. The future of their salary growth depends on it.

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2016-02-09 05:13:07 (5 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

Via +Cindy Brown​

Is feminism progressive? Why is this question even needing to be asked? Does supporting feminism increase or decrease hierarchy and traditional power structures?

Decrease? Well, then there's your answer. Of course it is.

This is what it looks like when a woman stops smiling.

This is incredible.___Via +Cindy Brown​

Is feminism progressive? Why is this question even needing to be asked? Does supporting feminism increase or decrease hierarchy and traditional power structures?

Decrease? Well, then there's your answer. Of course it is.

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2016-02-09 02:33:50 (1 comments; 1 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Don't expect any comprehension from the National party. The farmers are being shafted by their own representatives.

"I am a country member"

"We remember"

Don't expect any comprehension from the National party. The farmers are being shafted by their own representatives.

"I am a country member"

"We remember"___

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2016-02-09 00:06:26 (6 comments; 1 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

https://www.facebook.com/TheCartoonsOfChristopherDownes/

https://www.facebook.com/TheCartoonsOfChristopherDownes/___

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2016-02-08 23:57:40 (2 comments; 7 reshares; 46 +1s)Open 

via +Ben Lloyd 

OOOOOOOOOHHHH___via +Ben Lloyd 

2016-02-08 21:39:39 (12 comments; 0 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

1992 called. It wants its White House back.

1992 called. It wants its White House back.___

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2016-02-08 10:14:18 (5 comments; 0 reshares; 8 +1s)Open 

Forbes publishes a list of the 10 wealthiest Australians. Of the top eight, four inherited their wealth. The other four range in age from 75 to 85. The Atlassian boys are only young ones who didn't have it all handed to them by mummy and daddy.

Australia abolished inheritance taxes in 1979. 

Forbes publishes a list of the 10 wealthiest Australians. Of the top eight, four inherited their wealth. The other four range in age from 75 to 85. The Atlassian boys are only young ones who didn't have it all handed to them by mummy and daddy.

Australia abolished inheritance taxes in 1979. ___

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2016-02-08 09:33:54 (0 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

Least. Effective. PM. Ever.

The honeymoon is over. Time to start putting the boot into Turnbull's refusal to dismantle Abbott's evil policies.
#australia   #auspol  ___Least. Effective. PM. Ever.

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2016-02-08 09:26:05 (4 comments; 1 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

There's something wrong with this man's heart.

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-08/george-pell-excused-from-giving-evidence-in-person/7149012

There's something wrong with this man's heart.

http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-08/george-pell-excused-from-giving-evidence-in-person/7149012___

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2016-02-08 09:19:10 (7 comments; 0 reshares; 10 +1s)Open 

___

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2016-02-08 09:16:08 (0 comments; 1 reshares; 5 +1s)Open 

Malcolm Turnbull, running neck and neck with Tony Abbott for the title of Worst Prime Minister Ever.

More than 600 international experts have condemned the ‘illogical’ plans to restructure CSIRO, which one described as Australia’s ‘national treasure’___Malcolm Turnbull, running neck and neck with Tony Abbott for the title of Worst Prime Minister Ever.

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2016-02-08 09:01:52 (12 comments; 2 reshares; 9 +1s)Open 

Oh, when will this beastliness end?

Oh, when will this beastliness end?___

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2016-02-08 08:24:47 (3 comments; 0 reshares; 4 +1s)Open 

Trump catching some of the Bernie vibe. 

Trump catching some of the Bernie vibe. ___

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2016-02-07 23:53:21 (9 comments; 3 reshares; 13 +1s)Open 

It's called shifting the "Overton Window" and regardless of what you think about the sincerity of Clinton, its important that politicians like her are now speaking to progressives about issues that concern them. As recently as 2012 these issues were completely off the agenda.

Another way of looking at this is as a complete failure of the political right to continue setting the agenda as they've successfully done for the previous thirty years. This is a notable departure from the era when the Republican party was strong and highly disciplined and on-message. They've become accustomed to winning and have grown lazy and dumb as the more thoughtful minds have gradually left the party.

Their past successes have led them up a political cul de sac where every candidate now has to sign up to a gauntlet of "litmus tests" dating from the Culture Wars of the 1980s... more »

It's called shifting the "Overton Window" and regardless of what you think about the sincerity of Clinton, its important that politicians like her are now speaking to progressives about issues that concern them. As recently as 2012 these issues were completely off the agenda.

Another way of looking at this is as a complete failure of the political right to continue setting the agenda as they've successfully done for the previous thirty years. This is a notable departure from the era when the Republican party was strong and highly disciplined and on-message. They've become accustomed to winning and have grown lazy and dumb as the more thoughtful minds have gradually left the party.

Their past successes have led them up a political cul de sac where every candidate now has to sign up to a gauntlet of "litmus tests" dating from the Culture Wars of the 1980s and 90s. They have their hands tied and are forced to swear allegiance to the shibboleths of a narrower and narrower political base.

In this context and with the current economic climate, it is not hard to see why leftish social-democratic populism is doing well. Long may it continue.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overton_window
___

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2016-02-07 11:02:24 (23 comments; 0 reshares; 7 +1s)Open 

Man, you guys sure dislike Hillary. It's going be strange around here if she actually gets the gig.

Man, you guys sure dislike Hillary. It's going be strange around here if she actually gets the gig.___

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2016-02-07 08:30:08 (5 comments; 1 reshares; 11 +1s)Open 

Could be a good thing.

P2P for android hangouts... ___Could be a good thing.

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2016-02-06 09:53:56 (7 comments; 1 reshares; 17 +1s)Open 

No argument from me.

Senator Dastyari names his Corporate Club 10 of unhinged power and influence.___No argument from me.

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2016-02-05 11:00:01 (28 comments; 4 reshares; 12 +1s)Open 

The United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention – the international tribunal that adjudicates and decides whether governments comply with their human rights obligations – has ruled that Julian Assange has been detained unlawfully by Britain and Sweden.

The United Nations Working Group on Arbitrary Detention – the international tribunal that adjudicates and decides whether governments comply with their human rights obligations – has ruled that Julian Assange has been detained unlawfully by Britain and Sweden.___

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