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Jane Shevtsov has been at 2 events

HostFollowersTitleDateGuestsLinks
Science on Google+650,163Join us for a @105917944266111687812  Hangout on Air as we speak to Professor @116255230904882614629 and Dr @107413067341871105647 about the recent Ebola outbreak. We will discuss the basics of Ebola, why the epidemic has spread, how it might be curtailed, and debunk some of the myths surrounding this outbreak. Please leave your questions on the Event page. Vincent is a professor of virology at the University of Columbia and is a fantastic science communicator. Tara is an epidemiologist at Kent State University who has written numerous articles debunking some of the myths surrounding Ebola. This HOA will be hosted by Dr @108510686109338749229  and Dr @110756968351492254645. You can tune in on *Sunday August 10th at 2.30 PM Pacific, 5.30 PM Eastern*. The hangout will be available for viewing on our YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/ScienceHangouts) after the event.Science HOAs2014-08-10 23:30:0088  
Dawn Mission Education and Communications (E/C)1,880Update: Video here! http://www.youtube.com/user/NoisyAstronomer?v=SqIszii4H0c and here: https://plus.google.com/b/114633249213698877766/114633249213698877766/posts/Qq2jowbYN5h After an awesome year exploring asteroid Vesta, NASA’s Dawn Mission cruises on to Ceres 2015! Celebrate at a Dawn Mission Team Hangout!. Moderated by Dawn’s education and public outreach (E/PO) liaison, Dr. Britney Schmidt, and CosmoQuest, we'll talk about the results, the spacecraft, and our hopes for Ceres in 2015. You'll have a chance to ask questions and get involved. Stars of the show so far?  • Dr. Tom Prettyman, Science Team and GRaND lead, Planetary Science Institute • Drs. Tim Weise and Charles Gardner, NASA JPL Flight Operations Team • Drs. Lucille Le Corre and Vishnu Reddy, Framing Camera Team, Max Plank       Institute for Solar System Research • Dr. Debra Buczkowski, Participating Scientist, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory Submit your questions for the Dawn team by leaving them in the comments section below, on Dawn’s Facebook page, or by using the hashtag #HastaLaVesta on Twitter. Visit this event page on September 8, 2012 to watch the _Hangout On Air_, and to chime in on the conversation. Official website: http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/hasta_la_vesta.asp Twitter: https://twitter.com/nasa_dawn Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dawn.mission As the schedule and guest list is secured, we'll continue updating this page. Stay tuned for additional details.Dawn Mission Google+ Hangout with CosmoQuest2012-09-08 21:00:00110  

Shared Circles including Jane Shevtsov

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The Google+ Collections of Jane Shevtsov

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Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 20

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2015-08-03 04:49:34 (20 comments, 3 reshares, 36 +1s)Open 

Lab-grown meat sounds a lot less gross than eating animals.

Most reshares: 34

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2015-08-02 06:47:42 (3 comments, 34 reshares, 66 +1s)Open 

Jan knew she had to find creative ways of changing people’s minds. She came up with an idea: During the first week of school, each girl would learn to write her father’s name.

For the fathers, that changed everything. Jan, who spent more than 30 years in the United States, remembers their reactions. “I swear to God, the guy was crying. He said, ‘I don’t know how to write my name. I put my thumb on everything. And my 4-year-old girl knows how to write my name.’”

Most plusones: 71

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2015-07-05 21:50:58 (9 comments, 15 reshares, 71 +1s)Open 

Latest 50 posts

2015-08-16 21:59:51 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

+The Atlantic If you want me to disable my ad blocker on your site (a reasonable request), don't bombard me with animated ads when I do it!

+The Atlantic If you want me to disable my ad blocker on your site (a reasonable request), don't bombard me with animated ads when I do it!___

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2015-08-16 06:55:26 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

I don't see how requiring that positive information about Down syndrome be included in genetic counseling challenges neutrality. Quite the opposite! If families receive more balanced information (given, of course, that what they are told is true), they become better equipped to make decisions and counseling becomes more neutral.

I don't see how requiring that positive information about Down syndrome be included in genetic counseling challenges neutrality. Quite the opposite! If families receive more balanced information (given, of course, that what they are told is true), they become better equipped to make decisions and counseling becomes more neutral.___

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2015-08-16 06:47:31 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

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2015-08-13 17:37:43 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Among the biggest surprises contained within the genome—eliciting exclamation point–ridden e-mails from cephalopod researchers—is that octopuses possess a large group of familiar genes that are involved in developing a complex neural network and have been found to be enriched in other animals, such as mammals, with substantial processing power. Known as protocadherin genes, they "were previously thought to be expanded only in vertebrates," says Clifton Ragsdale, an associate professor of neurobiology at the University of Chicago and a co-author of the new paper. Such genes join the list of independently evolved features we share with octopuses—including camera-type eyes (with a lens, iris and retina), closed circulatory systems and large brains.

Among the biggest surprises contained within the genome—eliciting exclamation point–ridden e-mails from cephalopod researchers—is that octopuses possess a large group of familiar genes that are involved in developing a complex neural network and have been found to be enriched in other animals, such as mammals, with substantial processing power. Known as protocadherin genes, they "were previously thought to be expanded only in vertebrates," says Clifton Ragsdale, an associate professor of neurobiology at the University of Chicago and a co-author of the new paper. Such genes join the list of independently evolved features we share with octopuses—including camera-type eyes (with a lens, iris and retina), closed circulatory systems and large brains.___

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2015-08-11 19:10:51 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 24 +1s)Open 

Let's do this together. Give $1 and I will match it for 'Plant A Billion Trees'. https://onetoday.google.com/m/xnluj_fd

Let's do this together. Give $1 and I will match it for 'Plant A Billion Trees'. https://onetoday.google.com/m/xnluj_fd___

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2015-08-03 04:49:34 (20 comments, 3 reshares, 36 +1s)Open 

Lab-grown meat sounds a lot less gross than eating animals.

Lab-grown meat sounds a lot less gross than eating animals.___

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2015-08-03 03:41:43 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

“Mauna Kea is our temple,” said Kealoha Pisciotta, one of a half-dozen plaintiffs suing to stop the project. “It’s not a question that we’re against astronomy. We’re just for Mauna Kea.”

But for astronomers like Coleman, the colossal telescope is also a temple. With a mirror nearly three times larger than any other on Earth, it will see deeper into the universe than any other ground-based telescope. And built with phenomenal optics in such a pristine location, it will produce sharper pictures than even the Hubble Space Telescope.

“Mauna Kea is our temple,” said Kealoha Pisciotta, one of a half-dozen plaintiffs suing to stop the project. “It’s not a question that we’re against astronomy. We’re just for Mauna Kea.”

But for astronomers like Coleman, the colossal telescope is also a temple. With a mirror nearly three times larger than any other on Earth, it will see deeper into the universe than any other ground-based telescope. And built with phenomenal optics in such a pristine location, it will produce sharper pictures than even the Hubble Space Telescope.___

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2015-08-03 02:24:44 (1 comments, 6 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

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2015-08-03 01:54:19 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

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2015-08-03 01:49:18 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

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2015-08-03 01:47:22 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

We don't often think about the infrastructure of getting away with murder. It's one thing for one person to kill with impunity, but if you want to do it regularly and on a large scale, you'll need to build a system to assist you. And there are few groups that need this more often than America's larger police departments, who are on track to kill nearly 1,200 people this year alone. (Beating last year's high of 1,106) 

Contrary to rumors of complete impunity, police officers who kill people – especially in more overt "bad shoots," such as when someone unarmed was running away from them, or when their victim was a small child – frequently do end up facing a day in court, seeing civil charges if not criminal, even despite the legal structures (such as LEOBOR) designed to prevent that. And as with any good infrastructure practice, the solution is defense in depth.That... more »

We don't often think about the infrastructure of getting away with murder. It's one thing for one person to kill with impunity, but if you want to do it regularly and on a large scale, you'll need to build a system to assist you. And there are few groups that need this more often than America's larger police departments, who are on track to kill nearly 1,200 people this year alone. (Beating last year's high of 1,106) 

Contrary to rumors of complete impunity, police officers who kill people – especially in more overt "bad shoots," such as when someone unarmed was running away from them, or when their victim was a small child – frequently do end up facing a day in court, seeing civil charges if not criminal, even despite the legal structures (such as LEOBOR) designed to prevent that. And as with any good infrastructure practice, the solution is defense in depth. That second layer of protection is provided by people like Dr. William J. Lewinski, who provides expert testimony that virtually any shooting was justified. 

Wait, you say that having an infrastructure to guarantee murder with impunity isn't a major social need? Huh. I guess neither he, nor any of the departments who routinely pay him quite well for his testimony, got the message.

But it just goes to show how far you can go in the world if you are unencumbered by things like professionalism or morals. In this case, he is a man who provides "expert" scientific testimony on things like the time it takes someone to fire, the psychology of human perception and memory, and anything else which may prove relevant to the case, despite being roundly castigated by everyone from professional organizations of psychologists to the Justice Department as an outright fraud.

If you ever wondered what someone looks like who has literally made a career out of operating the infrastructure of institutional racism and ethnic violence, take a look.___

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2015-08-03 01:35:15 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

Once commercial human spaceflight is established, international negotiations should be held in space.

Once commercial human spaceflight is established, international negotiations should be held in space.___

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2015-08-02 17:49:54 (2 comments, 4 reshares, 26 +1s)Open 

Just donated to 'Solar Power for Orphanages'. Give $1. Change a lot. https://onetoday.google.com/p/5T22V3Xf

Just donated to 'Solar Power for Orphanages'. Give $1. Change a lot. https://onetoday.google.com/p/5T22V3Xf___

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2015-08-02 07:16:06 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Global greenhouse gas emissions have to fall to net zero between 2055 and 2070 to keep global warming below the 2C level governments have agreed to avoid.

If they are serious, that means a sharp correction in the value of unburnable fossil fuels, with ‘stranded assets’ set to rock the world economy.

Global greenhouse gas emissions have to fall to net zero between 2055 and 2070 to keep global warming below the 2C level governments have agreed to avoid.

If they are serious, that means a sharp correction in the value of unburnable fossil fuels, with ‘stranded assets’ set to rock the world economy.___

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2015-08-02 06:47:42 (3 comments, 34 reshares, 66 +1s)Open 

Jan knew she had to find creative ways of changing people’s minds. She came up with an idea: During the first week of school, each girl would learn to write her father’s name.

For the fathers, that changed everything. Jan, who spent more than 30 years in the United States, remembers their reactions. “I swear to God, the guy was crying. He said, ‘I don’t know how to write my name. I put my thumb on everything. And my 4-year-old girl knows how to write my name.’”

Jan knew she had to find creative ways of changing people’s minds. She came up with an idea: During the first week of school, each girl would learn to write her father’s name.

For the fathers, that changed everything. Jan, who spent more than 30 years in the United States, remembers their reactions. “I swear to God, the guy was crying. He said, ‘I don’t know how to write my name. I put my thumb on everything. And my 4-year-old girl knows how to write my name.’”___

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2015-08-02 06:46:14 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

The short answer: fundamentalist religion and corruption.

The short answer: fundamentalist religion and corruption.___

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2015-08-02 06:44:46 (9 comments, 2 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

This won't solve the problems of factory farms, but anything that reduces animal suffering is good.

This won't solve the problems of factory farms, but anything that reduces animal suffering is good.___

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2015-08-02 06:40:21 (6 comments, 5 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

A wonderfully nerdy piece on farming, crop choices, and what will actually help California's drought.

A wonderfully nerdy piece on farming, crop choices, and what will actually help California's drought.___

2015-07-31 20:50:57 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Who has taught a class using +The SageMathCloud?  I'm about to start teaching a class that uses +Sage Mathematical Software System , which we hosted on our own server but want to switch to SMC because of the syntax highlighting and pull-down menus that are available. (Also, if we switch, we won't have to administer the server.) However, the course management features in SMC seem really awkward. And there's the project thing...

Our past workflow has been to give students an assignment in UCLA's course management system and have them complete the assignment in Sage (usually individually but sometimes in groups), make a copy of their worksheet, and then share the copy with a TA or grader. Using copies means the student can still open their worksheet without creating confusion about when the assignment was submitted.

I'm considering having the students create a single... more »

Who has taught a class using +The SageMathCloud?  I'm about to start teaching a class that uses +Sage Mathematical Software System , which we hosted on our own server but want to switch to SMC because of the syntax highlighting and pull-down menus that are available. (Also, if we switch, we won't have to administer the server.) However, the course management features in SMC seem really awkward. And there's the project thing...

Our past workflow has been to give students an assignment in UCLA's course management system and have them complete the assignment in Sage (usually individually but sometimes in groups), make a copy of their worksheet, and then share the copy with a TA or grader. Using copies means the student can still open their worksheet without creating confusion about when the assignment was submitted.

I'm considering having the students create a single project for the course and having each assignment be a single file in the project. Any thoughts? My class will have ~20 students, but the fall offering of the same course will have ~240, so anything I use should be workable for a very large class.___

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2015-07-27 18:34:13 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 34 +1s)Open 

Just donated to 'Plant 10,000 trees in El Salvador'. Give $1. Change a lot. https://onetoday.google.com/p/qQDBtiha

Just donated to 'Plant 10,000 trees in El Salvador'. Give $1. Change a lot. https://onetoday.google.com/p/qQDBtiha___

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2015-07-27 05:36:17 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 21 +1s)Open 

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2015-07-27 05:34:03 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Yes, it's a bit pop, but there's a kind of perfection about this song. The word pictures are evocative and I love the ending.

Yes, it's a bit pop, but there's a kind of perfection about this song. The word pictures are evocative and I love the ending.___

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2015-07-22 23:54:10 (4 comments, 2 reshares, 37 +1s)Open 

Let's do this together. Give $1 and I will match it for 'Reforestation for Rural Nicaragua'. https://onetoday.google.com/m/salcagmh

Let's do this together. Give $1 and I will match it for 'Reforestation for Rural Nicaragua'. https://onetoday.google.com/m/salcagmh___

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2015-07-19 20:20:43 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

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2015-07-18 22:36:31 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

According to the industry itself, each hen in a battery cage is given less than 9 inches by 9 inches in which to live her entire life, crammed into a cage about the size of a file drawer with four or more other hens...

Make no mistake about it: Battery cages torment animals. Physically, the animals’ muscles and bones waste away from lack of use, just as yours would if you were unable to move around for two years.

That’s why multiple investigations into battery cages document animals with deteriorated spinal cords, some who have become paralyzed and then mummified in their cages. It’s so common that the industry has a name for it: cage layer fatigue. It doesn’t happen to animals that are allowed to move.

According to the industry itself, each hen in a battery cage is given less than 9 inches by 9 inches in which to live her entire life, crammed into a cage about the size of a file drawer with four or more other hens...

Make no mistake about it: Battery cages torment animals. Physically, the animals’ muscles and bones waste away from lack of use, just as yours would if you were unable to move around for two years.

That’s why multiple investigations into battery cages document animals with deteriorated spinal cords, some who have become paralyzed and then mummified in their cages. It’s so common that the industry has a name for it: cage layer fatigue. It doesn’t happen to animals that are allowed to move.___

2015-07-18 20:59:09 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Why in the world is it raining in LA in the summertime? And thunderstorms, no less!

Why in the world is it raining in LA in the summertime? And thunderstorms, no less!___

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2015-07-17 07:42:42 (2 comments, 14 reshares, 34 +1s)Open 

No longer around is not the same as ancient.

No longer around is not the same as ancient.___

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2015-07-17 07:26:32 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

Absolutely amazing, but not unique.

Absolutely amazing, but not unique.___

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2015-07-17 03:52:12 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

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2015-07-13 06:13:21 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

h/t +Scot Waring 

Are canopies really like deserts? -- "And yes, we are finding that the canopy is hotter, and more variable in terms of both temperature and RH, but the desert comparison seem to be exaggerated. Still, compared to the tropical litter is saturated with water, I predict that an RH under 60% found regularly in the tropical canopy should still be stressful to its ants. One way to avoid this stress is to be desiccation resistant." (via Kaspari lab)

[ #ecology #BCI #rainforest #Panama #STRI +Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute​ #science #biology #ants #tropics ]___h/t +Scot Waring 

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2015-07-13 02:04:21 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

Are people planning to read Go Set a Watchman? I'm now inclined to give it a pass, although if it had been the second book and To Kill a Mockingbird the first, my feelings would be different.

Are people planning to read Go Set a Watchman? I'm now inclined to give it a pass, although if it had been the second book and To Kill a Mockingbird the first, my feelings would be different.___

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2015-07-13 00:14:44 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Take four minutes and watch this.

Take four minutes and watch this.___

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2015-07-08 05:28:13 (3 comments, 3 reshares, 22 +1s)Open 

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2015-07-08 05:11:21 (2 comments, 5 reshares, 19 +1s)Open 

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2015-07-05 22:30:38 (3 comments, 19 reshares, 29 +1s)Open 

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2015-07-05 22:11:41 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Hallucigenia has lost much of its mystery. Scientists have worked out the creature’s anatomy, and they have figured out a lot about how Hallucigenia and its relatives thrived in the Cambrian oceans. And despite its odd appearance, Hallucigenia isn’t an incomprehensible zoological experiment. Paleontologists have been able to place it comfortably on the evolutionary branch that led to a group of invertebrates alive today called velvet worms.

Hallucigenia has lost much of its mystery. Scientists have worked out the creature’s anatomy, and they have figured out a lot about how Hallucigenia and its relatives thrived in the Cambrian oceans. And despite its odd appearance, Hallucigenia isn’t an incomprehensible zoological experiment. Paleontologists have been able to place it comfortably on the evolutionary branch that led to a group of invertebrates alive today called velvet worms.___

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2015-07-05 21:50:58 (9 comments, 15 reshares, 71 +1s)Open 

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2015-07-05 21:44:54 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

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2015-06-29 06:05:12 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 33 +1s)Open 

Ah, the Valley.

___Ah, the Valley.

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2015-06-28 01:00:46 (1 comments, 5 reshares, 31 +1s)Open 

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2015-06-28 00:31:04 (4 comments, 3 reshares, 36 +1s)Open 

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2015-06-28 00:29:35 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Can anyone help me out here?

Can anyone help me out here?___

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2015-06-28 00:09:23 (0 comments, 6 reshares, 31 +1s)Open 

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2015-06-27 23:35:55 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

An interesting approach, albeit one more likely to help with adaptation than emission reductions. (We need both.)

For the first time a court has ordered the government to protect its citizens from climate change.

An interesting approach, albeit one more likely to help with adaptation than emission reductions. (We need both.)

For the first time a court has ordered the government to protect its citizens from climate change.___

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2015-06-27 22:53:36 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Oh, this is great: +Susan Strickland and I just connected here at Google+... Susan, I was going to send you an email tonight! You really got me thinking about growth mindset cats!!! Do you think your students will make some growth cats in Latin??? Here's one I just made using a motto I saw go by in the #growthmindset  stream at Twitter! :-)
http://growthmindsetmemes.blogspot.com/2015/06/english-sometimes-you-win-sometimes-you.html

Oh, this is great: +Susan Strickland and I just connected here at Google+... Susan, I was going to send you an email tonight! You really got me thinking about growth mindset cats!!! Do you think your students will make some growth cats in Latin??? Here's one I just made using a motto I saw go by in the #growthmindset  stream at Twitter! :-)
http://growthmindsetmemes.blogspot.com/2015/06/english-sometimes-you-win-sometimes-you.html___

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2015-06-27 21:31:19 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

The time in college spent learning the practical knowledge that might lead to a first job, such as the latest health-care regulations, comes at the expense of learning other things that have a much longer shelf life. How do we get the knowledge or ability to reinvent ourselves or even change fields if all we've ever been taught is the practical skills in one field? Interesting evidence from the UK compares Scottish graduates, who typically have a broad education, to English graduates, who specialize in one field. They found that the former seem to do better making transitions in careers later in life.

The time in college spent learning the practical knowledge that might lead to a first job, such as the latest health-care regulations, comes at the expense of learning other things that have a much longer shelf life. How do we get the knowledge or ability to reinvent ourselves or even change fields if all we've ever been taught is the practical skills in one field? Interesting evidence from the UK compares Scottish graduates, who typically have a broad education, to English graduates, who specialize in one field. They found that the former seem to do better making transitions in careers later in life.___

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2015-06-27 21:16:19 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

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2015-06-26 17:27:22 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

via +Andreas Schou 

Immediately after the Civil War, slavery was held, by the South, to have been peripheral to the conflict. Remember, slavery actually was the central question, appearing repeatedly in articles of secession and writings by Confederate officials. Slavery had been consolidating from 1840 on, transitioning from practicality to ideology. The 18th century had found it difficult to justify philosophically except as some kind of transitional state and even that seemed tenuous. The innovation in the mid-19th century was white supremacy: the idea that blacks were inherently inferior coupled with the notion that domination of them was the rightful order of the world. You can detect in it traces of many different ideologies agglomerating into it and perhaps someone will lay those out elsewhere. But shortly after the Civil War ended, slavery was abandoned as a justification, replaced with comparatively minor political and economic disputes.

This wasn't a churn, either, with slavery's defenders retreating from view while those who'd never seen slavery as central becoming more prominent. It was a widespread, nearly uniform revision of history throughout the South. Even Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens, who'd said in 1861 that "[o]ur new Government is founded ... upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery, subordination to the superior race, is his natural and normal condition" would later argue that this wasn't the case. Rather, the Civil War was held to be about personal and local interests in the face of depersonalizing industrialization and national centralization. It's a powerful theme which draws on a deeper, older tension in American life developed by Thoreau and the other transcendentalists. It was genuinely difficult for America to industrialize and the reimagination of the Republic in its face was a leading concern until it was finally overtaken by imperial* questions after World War II.

What motivated Southern revision of Civil War history was the genuine shock of their loss. As the ideology of slavery was consolidating, it was held to be a great strength of the South. While the laws passed suggest, rather, that it presented a constant risk of insurrection and was a source of existential fear, within the ideology of slavery it was an expression of natural order which ensured white equality and civilization. That was coupled to the notion of aristocracy and feudalism. For the South, their military leaders were men of immense virtue, modern knights whose command of battle and sense of honor fated them for victory.

But they lost and they lost badly. After the Civil War, the South was a smoking ruin under occupation. How to explain this defeat? Quickly, an interlocking narrative developed: Northern industrial might coupled with local backstabbing destroyed the Confederate cause of states rights. In this narrative, the Union represented the depersonalizing and centralizing forces of 19th century America pitted against the personal and local. To put the full rhetorical flourish on it, to give insight into the power of this mythology, I would say "it was a war of steel and steam against blood and bravery". That phrasing conjures well the romance of this narrative, even though it was entirely false. For the revisionist South, the Confederacy faced off against implacable, inhuman forces and lost.**

There are other elements as well, like downplaying the cruelty of slavery and characterizing Jim Crow as a solution to racial tension rather than a systematic oppression, which add up to a myth known as the Lost Cause. That myth would become central to the great disappointment of the 19th century, the end of Reconstruction to facilitate white reconciliation. As I demonstrated before, it's a narrative with power. If you can sweep aside the question of slavery, you can frame the Civil War in way sympathetic to the Confederacy. As it happens, this is what education in the South tends to do, presenting the Civil War as arising from complex economic, cultural, and political causes in which slavery is only just one issue. Other components make their appearances as well, like the idea that Southern generals were superior and Grant simply fought a war of attrition.

While the Confederate battle flag at South Carolina's state capitol went up specifically as a response to the civil rights movement, it had been used prior mostly for honoring Confederate veterans. Within the history, this seems as fraught and perverse as honoring German soldiers in World War II. While it is true that many acted bravely and sought only to serve their country or were simply conscripted and had no choice, the manifest evil of the enterprise they fought for corrupts any virtues they might possess. That is in the nature of evil, under its banner our saving graces become our damning faults. But within the revisionist history advanced immediately after the Civil War, it makes sense. Within it, the Civil War was stupid and should never have been fought. In the coloring most favorable to the Union, Southerners were hot-headed rebels who should have thought it through a little better. The trope "brother against brother" carries, through this revision, the implication that they remain brothers at the end.

But why downplay slavery specifically? Because it was a manifest evil. Downplaying slavery creates a sense of moral equivalence. Even if you thought slavery was right, decentralizing slavery halted the great question and tossed the war's causes into murkier details, robbing the North of moral ammunition. Thus, over time, the Confederate flag was sapped of its original meaning in the eyes of whites throughout the country. The Lost Cause became America's main structural idea of the Civil War, facilitating white reconciliation even as newly freed Americans were crushed under an essentially totalitarian state.

For the current debate, the relevant effect is smaller: the deracialization of the Confederate battle flag. Think back to the revisionist narrative and ask what, to a person believing it, that flag represents. It's obvious that, for them, it represents what they earnestly say it does: heritage, history, a sense of old-fashioned rebellion. And its use, in context, bears that out. It's largely used as a sort of rural punk emblem, as if to say "fuck y'all, I'm going to have my own fun". A look through the most common representations shows that side every time it's not about an Arcadian idyl. When people say that whites using the Confederate battle flag are being disingenuous or dissembling, I cringe. I come from a place where it was common growing up and I rarely saw it used as a consciously racial symbol; it was about rural pride, localism and naturalism against the great forces set against them. Perhaps one time in a hundred was someone intending a racial message and that person never got any acceptance. For whites, the deracialization of the Confederate battle flag was all but total, the symbol of a New South, rural and industrial, authentic and modern.

That totality is recent, however. The current plethora of Confederate flags in the South actually dates to the Civil Rights Movement. They're explicit protests of black equality. You could be forgiven, thanks to the revision, if you didn't realize that, however. After all, if you are not old enough to remember the Movement or the fights following the Civil Rights Act well, the revision is all you really know about it as a white Southerner. Thus my sympathy for the flag's defenders declines as they come from ever elder generations; they know better, they quite likely waved that flag as an explicit symbol of white supremacy.

That totality arises from a new revision, that racism was defeated with the Civil Rights Act. Contrary to the view advanced so often, the Civil Rights Act was extremely controversial. The mobilization of segregationists wasn't simply a last ditch effort, it was a massive movement throughout the South. So hot was Southern fury that they kept supporters of the Act off ballots and five states went for George Wallace in 1968.† This opposition has not yet totally played out, but it's not my focus here. Just as there was a seed of disingenuousness which kicked off the Lost Cause and the New South, so too is there one for the new mythology in which the Civil Rights Act ended racism. It is often presented as dying of natural causes or, by my school years, as if it were something whites hadn't really given a lot of thought to imposed by unknown actors in government or, perhaps, nefarious actual racists who held everyone in terror, black and white alike. That sounds nearly insane, but less so when the alternative is to admit complicity in the nation's gravest evils. Deracialized and desegregated, the South stands for its noblest ideals of courage, independence, loyalty, and honor. That's still not quite true, but the steady stripping of racial components is a good thing.

I've been writing about all this because I'm surprised by the speed at which opinion has shifted against the Confederate battle flag. Stores are pulling it from shelves and governments are pulling it from state houses. The flag's remaining defenders seem largely exhausted rather than adamant, resigned to the reality of the flag's meaning for the nation's 42 million black people and a growing number of its whites. I read in so many defenses of the flag simply defenses of what they had wanted it to mean. There is nothing wrong in the desired meaning, it would have been a far better reality if slavery had been a dying and largely benign institution, Jim Crow some mutual oppression imposed by racial busybodies, and the cause of the Confederacy as home-and-hearth against implacable economic forces. It would be, as I take pains to conjure, authentic, meaningful, and ennobling. It would be, it simply wasn't.

But gripping the truth firmly can be hard. There's always an undercurrent of disgust when the rest of the nation discusses the South. A characterization of its people as rednecks and yokels. Certainly, there have always been a few in the South as everywhere and we each have occasionally donned that identity in rebellion or fun. However, as it plays out in the real world we often feel put upon. Years ago a professor of mine from Louisiana and I were discussing how people immediately perceived us differently, how to be taken seriously we often had to take care and cover accents or avoid certain turns of phrase. That sense of being a second class citizen is profound and depends on a mischaracterization of how white Southerners perceive themselves and their heritage. I grew up in the foothills of the Ozarks, my father's family come that generation from Arkansas. I carried my gun down through the bottoms and have been to Branson more times than I care to recount -- or, in certain company, even admit. I've unloaded on people for calling my home state flyover country or disparaging the South. I feel I can do that, and they can't, irrational as that sounds. There's nothing up my sleeve, no secret coastal liberal condescension.††

I've taken pains here to balance reality with myth, to give my historical and visceral insight into this debate. So I arrive at my hoped explanation for this sudden turn: the realization that the truth  never lived up to the revision, a desire to live out the nobler ideals in Southern heritage under a banner they deserve.

*Whether this was the right empire or the wrong one is not an opinion I've been able to keep for long on either side.

**And who can't sympathize with that narrative after losing out to an enemy zerg? Don't you feel like the noble player who did everything right only to be overwhelmed by mistakes of game design?

†Of "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever" fame.

††Or wider audience, as some may have figured out, that my journal entries are often essays doesn't actually make them anything other than journal entries.___via +Andreas Schou 

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2015-06-26 06:59:40 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Junonium, Victorium, Occultum, Hibernium, etc. 

"In the popular imagination, science proceeds with great leaps of discovery — new planets, new cures, new elements. In reality, though, science is a long, grueling process of trial and error, in which tantalizing false discoveries constantly arise and vanish on further examination. These failures can teach us as much — or more — than its successes. The field of chemistry is littered with them. Today only 118 elements have been documented, but hundreds more have been “discovered” over the years — named, publicly trumpeted, and sometimes even included in textbooks — only to be exposed as bogus with better tools, or when a fraud was sniffed out. Their stories, sprinkled with stubborn pride, analytical incompetency, precipitate haste, amateurish error, and even practical joking, read like a catalog of the ways science can goawry, and how it... more »

Junonium, Victorium, Occultum, Hibernium, etc. 

"In the popular imagination, science proceeds with great leaps of discovery — new planets, new cures, new elements. In reality, though, science is a long, grueling process of trial and error, in which tantalizing false discoveries constantly arise and vanish on further examination. These failures can teach us as much — or more — than its successes. The field of chemistry is littered with them. Today only 118 elements have been documented, but hundreds more have been “discovered” over the years — named, publicly trumpeted, and sometimes even included in textbooks — only to be exposed as bogus with better tools, or when a fraud was sniffed out. Their stories, sprinkled with stubborn pride, analytical incompetency, precipitate haste, amateurish error, and even practical joking, read like a catalog of the ways science can go awry, and how it moves forward nonetheless. Here are some illustrative “lost element” stories and their discoverers — and what we can learn in spite of them"

See more at: http://blog.oup.com/2015/03/false-discoveries-chemistry-progress-science/#sthash.Qa3ii68v.dpuf___

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2015-06-26 06:15:45 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Thinking about food as a way of thinking about nature.

My hunch is that you see in these young chefs a reflection of your own philosophy. They show that it’s possible to be in love with wilderness and awestruck by non-human life while physically playing with it, rather than taking only memories and leaving only footprints. For me that’s the most exciting idea — that we could maintain the romantic relationship with nature, while also engaging it practically.

Side note: I do wish the author hadn't applied the word "mansplaining" to himself.

Thinking about food as a way of thinking about nature.

My hunch is that you see in these young chefs a reflection of your own philosophy. They show that it’s possible to be in love with wilderness and awestruck by non-human life while physically playing with it, rather than taking only memories and leaving only footprints. For me that’s the most exciting idea — that we could maintain the romantic relationship with nature, while also engaging it practically.

Side note: I do wish the author hadn't applied the word "mansplaining" to himself.___

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