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Ethan Siegel has been shared in 122 public circles

You can see here the 50 latest shared circles.
If this is your profile, you can check your dashboard to see all shared circles you have been included.

AuthorFollowersDateUsers in CircleCommentsReshares+1Links
Becky Collins16,609Science Circle :Circle of very #social #engagerspeople and companiesTo be included in my shares (#sharedcircle), be so kind to:1 - Do +1 t the post2 - Comment the post and specify your "category" (job or interest) Ex: Fashion, SEO, Companies, Social Media Marketing, Sailing, Photography, Bloggers/Writers, Web graphics and design, Italy, Artists, Sport, Finance/Economy ...3 - include the circle among your circles4 - share the circle (include yourself)Improve your popularity, be social be cool !Keep yourself updated, enjoy the Shared Circles Hellenic Alliance, you can share your shared circles inside the upcoming Community:https://plus.google.com/communities/112552559573595396104  #socialmedia  #media  #circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing  #circlecircle   #beckyscircle   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles  #sharedcircleoftheday  +Becky Collins ?2014-09-16 05:24:00459102
Becky Collins15,192Recipes and Cooking Circle : Circle of very #social #engagerspeople and companiesTo be included in my shares (#sharedcircle), be so kind to:1 - Do +1 t the post2 - Comment the post and specify your "category" (job or interest) Ex: Fashion, SEO, Companies, Social Media Marketing, Sailing, Photography, Bloggers/Writers, Web graphics and design, Italy, Artists, Sport, Finance/Economy ...3 - include the circle among your circles4 - share the circle (include yourself)Improve your popularity, be social be cool !Keep yourself updated, enjoy the Shared Circles Hellenic Alliance, you can share your shared circles inside the upcoming Community:https://plus.google.com/communities/112552559573595396104  #socialmedia  #media  #circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing  #circlecircle   #beckyscircle   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles  #sharedcircleoftheday  +Becky Collins ?2014-08-18 05:14:394770210
Becky Collins13,270Space Circle :Circle of very #social #engagerspeople and companiesTo be included in my shares (#sharedcircle), be so kind to:1 - Do +1 t the post2 - Comment the post and specify your "category" (job or interest) Ex: Fashion, SEO, Companies, Social Media Marketing, Sailing, Photography, Bloggers/Writers, Web graphics and design, Italy, Artists, Sport, Finance/Economy ...3 - include the circle among your circles4 - share the circle (include yourself)Improve your popularity, be social be cool !Keep yourself updated, enjoy the Shared Circles Hellenic Alliance, you can share your shared circles inside the upcoming Community:https://plus.google.com/communities/112552559573595396104  #socialmedia  #media  #circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing  #circlecircle   #beckyscircle   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles  #sharedcircleoftheday  +Becky Collins ?2014-07-17 07:18:063893010
Aman Singh2,014Circle of the dayYour re-share is appreciatedPlease re-share this circle in your stream.To be added:1- Add +Circles Circles Circles to your circles2- Write the URL of your blog in the comments section below3- Your blog must be an active blog (posts must be current)2014-07-16 12:15:324990617
Ryan Johnson9,485Hi friends! This is a great circle created with an important selection from all circles. The most important engagers are reshared because only that way can we grow our circle and have the people of google circle us.To get in, and to ensure you stay in this circle you need to do the following:1. Add me to your circles, if you haven't done so already!2. +1 this circle!3. Publicly share this circle to public, your circles and extended circles.4. If possible, leave a comment on this circle so I know you have done the three steps above!#circleshare #circlesharing #circleoftheday #wanttobecircled #addmetoyourcircles #public #publiccircle #sharedcircles #Britain #sharedcircle #morefollowers #sharingcircles #sharedpubliccircles #sharedpublicircles #sharedcircle #photography #uk  #nottingham #Holland #Netherlands #Duch2014-07-16 10:40:014918812
Dina Tika0Here is a group of Active Engagers, Circle Sharers, Awesome Plus Oners, and Cool People on Google Plus!   Circle Sharing is an awesome way to increase your followers and active engagers on your profile. Some of my favorite people that I've met here on Google + through Circle Sharing.    Want to be in the next Circle of Awesomeness? Follow the Steps Below!  ☛ Add the circle ☛ Share in the Public ☛ Plus 1 the Post. ☛ Comment. 2014-06-10 05:53:52479001
Lư Thăng15,488Chia sẻ vòng kết nối chất lượng cho mọi người <3 #sharedcircles  2014-04-23 16:24:5447717223
John Nuntiatio29,767#circles #sharedcircles #circlesharing #circle #circleoftheday #bestofcircles #bestcircleshare #share #tech #business #sport2014-03-14 06:27:36393014
John Nuntiatio29,767#circles #sharedcircles #circlesharing #circle #circleoftheday #bestofcircles #bestcircleshare #share #tech #business #sport2014-03-14 06:26:50393033
John Nuntiatio29,767#circles #sharedcircles #circlesharing #circle #circleoftheday #bestofcircles #bestcircleshare #share #tech #business #sport2014-03-14 06:26:17393011
John Nuntiatio29,767#circles #sharedcircles #circlesharing #circle #circleoftheday #bestofcircles #bestcircleshare #share #tech #business #sport2014-03-14 06:25:52393011
John Nuntiatio29,767#circles #sharedcircles #circlesharing #circle #circleoftheday #bestofcircles #bestcircleshare #share #tech #business #sport2014-03-14 06:25:16393203
Becky Collins3,213Baseball circle #Baseball  #circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlecircle   #beckyscircle   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday  +Becky Collins 2014-02-26 10:30:413883216
Becky Collins2,634Marketing Circle : Feb 22#circles   #circleshare   #circlesharing   #circlecircle   #beckyscircle   #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday +Becky Collins2014-02-22 06:29:4945517724
Mikhail Petrovsky77,388Good morning / evening to all.This is a Social Circle of interesting people with an active lifestyle in Google+Это социальный круг общения интересных людей с активной жизненной позицией в Google+You'll love this circle. Photographers, artists and other interesting people!Вам понравится этот круг, добавьте его себе. Фотографы, художники и другие интересные люди!#EarthMyMother #ForFriends #photo2014-01-24 03:20:19483572882
B.A. TruthWarrior1,260These are some verified unusual characters....in general.#circleshare  #circlesharing #sharedcircles #sharedpubliccircles #sharedcircleoftheday  #sharedcircleday #circleshared   #variety  2014-01-16 03:45:1647527826
Artur Mashnich43,843A Very Social CircleCircle of the Most Active Users of Google+Круг наиболее активных пользователей Google+Если вы поделились этим кругом вчера, вы находитесь в нем сегодня. Если вы разделяете его с друзьями сегодня, вы будете в нем и завтра.If you shared this circle yesterday, you are in it today. If you share today, you'll be in tomorrow.#Forfriends  2014-01-10 16:01:13493331764
Artur Mashnich40,712A Very Social CircleКруг людей с активной жизненной позицией в Гугле+circle of people, with active life position in Google+Если вы поделились этим кругом вчера, вы находитесь в нем сегодня. Если вы разделяете его с друзьями сегодня, вы будете в нем и завтра.If you shared this circle yesterday, you are in it today. If you share today, you'll be in tomorrow.2013-12-18 11:08:35494443264
Claudiu Narita3,3332013-11-20 02:26:27501817
Lo Sauer2,493This is a great circle combined of active engagers, creative folks and  some of the best and brightest people on google+. A thank you in this circle-inclusion-shoutout to: +Peter Terren +Michael Műller +Carlos Esteban +Justin Chung +Malthus John +Marta Rauch +Rajini Rao +Katherine Vucicevic +Jonathan Eisen +Mike Allton +Scott Buehler +Mario Falcetti +Zvonimir Fras +Krithika Rangarajan +sridhar krishnan +Joanna Ortynska +Seamus Smyth +Chuck Croll +Michael Schobel +2013-11-19 18:19:4843218317
Justin Fournier1,722Social & SEO CircleIt's been awhile since I've shared circles with the general public.  In this Circle I've labeled it as my Social/SEO circle.  Users within this circle generally gave me insight, tips, and tricks into G+ and social branding.Add and follow their posts to increase your own branding in this now digital world!Share and enjoy all! #SEO   #googleplus   #socialmediamarketing   #sharedcircles   #googleplustips  2013-11-03 01:00:37143215
Rank Kemeng0This is a group of individuals that has personally shared four of my best circle sharing circles in the last month (or so).  They also include a mix of new circle sharers and some that are just trying to learn it for the first time. :) :) :0)They are individuals, to a large degree, that are very interested in not just circle sharing (which is great), but also engaging with you in a meaningful way (which is awesome)!!!Guidelines for Core Multipliers- Share the circle to stay in the circle- Have some fun!- If you are new and want in the circle, share the circle.This is a great group.  Enjoy this circle and have an awesome Thursday!*if you were somehow missed/ not included in the circle, please let me know and it will be corrected on the next share. My apologies ahead of time! :)**For those coming from multiplying circle, we are not inviting new folks here, you can privately message them or ping them when you share the circle on your public feed. Thanks!#corecircle #multiplyingcircle #coremultipliers #sharedcircles #circleshare #bestsharedcircle   #circleshare   #sharedcircles   #circleoftheday   #CircleQueen   #CircleMaster   #GPlusList   #Circle   #Circleshare   #Circlesharing   #PublicSharedCircles2013-11-01 15:53:38426115
Coyeb Sundel02013-10-24 10:04:35425202
Tiberiu Igrisan448Science (part 1)#science #sciencecircle #sharedcircles  2013-10-14 18:53:04257123
Fabian Weiland393#sharedcircle #sharedcircles #health #wellness  2013-10-14 15:30:25243000
James Steward1,112These are awesome scientist friends who comment my posts#scientistcirle #circle #circleshared #sharedcircle #circleoftheday #followfriday2013-10-10 16:30:23414103
James Steward1,112These are awesome scientist friends who comment my posts#scientistcirle #circle #circleshared #sharedcircle #circleoftheday #followfriday2013-10-10 16:29:39414003
James Steward1,112These are awesome scientist friends who comment my posts#scientistcirle #circle #circleshared #sharedcircle #circleoftheday #followfriday2013-10-10 16:29:27414002
James Steward1,112These are awesome scientist friends who comment my posts#scientistcirle #circle #circleshared #sharedcircle #circleoftheday #followfriday2013-10-10 16:29:04414002
James Steward1,112These are awesome scientist friends who comment my posts#scientistcirle #circle #circleshared #sharedcircle #circleoftheday #followfriday2013-10-10 16:27:59414004
James Steward1,112These are awesome scientist friends who comment my posts#scientistcirle #circle #circleshared #sharedcircle #circleoftheday #followfriday2013-10-10 16:27:16414002
James Steward1,112These are my awesome scientist friends who comment my posts#scientistcirle #circle #circleshared #sharedcircle #circleoftheday #followfriday2013-10-10 16:25:57414103
Fraser Cain824,747Super Science Circle for October, 2013I know it's been a while, so it's time for a new Super Science Circle - the October 2013 edition.In case you weren't aware, the Super Science Circle is a list of more than 400 people who are actively engaged on Google+ and regularly post about science and education. We've got journalists, scientists, even a few astronauts. The Super Science Circle should be your best response to anyone who tells you that Google+ is just a ghost town. If you love science, this circle will deliver the goods.If you know anyone who actively posts about science, please let me know and I'll add them to the list.2013-10-04 20:14:53415304682
Fabian Weiland145#sharedcircles #science #health2013-09-05 07:24:12497214
Cyrus Khan14,028Active Engager's CircleAttention:  Please reshare and comment if you want to be a part of next weeks edition, instead of messaging me individually.If you've received a notification, it means you are a part of the circle.Thanks for interacting : )  This is the next edition of my weekly Engagers circle, where I highlight and share the people who've interacted with me this week.I will share this circle to all my followers for exposure as an personally approved group.The criteria to be added are:1)You have commented on and publicly shared one or more of my posts;2) You have re-shared this weeks circle;As this circle grows, I may have difficulty accommodating everyone, so if you add and re-share this week's circle, you'll be guaranteed a spot in next week's edition.Cheers! #circleshare   #active   #engagerscircle   #circle #circleoftheweek   #sciencecircles  2013-08-26 17:27:32477574284
Cyrus Khan13,678Active Engager's CircleAttention: This circle has been filled this week, and will start again from scratch next week. Please reshare and comment if you want to be a part of next weeks edition.If you've received a notification, it means you are a part of the circle.If you want to be added, simply add the circle, reshare and comment saying so.Thanks for interacting : )  This is the next edition of my weekly Engagers circle, where I highlight and share the people who've interacted with me this week.I will share this circle to all my followers for exposure as an especially active group.The only criteria to be added are:1)You have commented on and publicly shared one or more of my posts;2) You have re-shared this weeks circle;As this circle grows, I may have difficulty accommodating everyone, so if you add and re-share this week's circle, you'll be guaranteed a spot in next week's edition.Cheers! #circleshare   #circleoftheweek   #active   #engagerscircle   #science   #sciencecircles   #circlesharesunday  2013-08-18 17:07:30490452363
Science on Google+69,339Applied and Mathematical SciencesThis circle will give you exposure to Computer Science, Engineering, Mathematics, and Physics. Science on Google+ Database: http://goo.gl/Yz8KRScience on Google+ Community: http://goo.gl/uhJCNIf you have a science related degree, you are a science journalist, you are a K-12 science teacher, or you curate a science page, then add your profile/page to the database by filling out this form (http://goo.gl/yEg7M). Active profiles and pages will be included in the next shared circle.2013-08-15 23:58:07292202753
Cyrus Khan13,309Active Engager's CircleIf you've received a notification, it means you are a part of the circle.If you want to be added, simply add the circle, reshare and comment saying so.Thanks for interacting : )  This is the next edition of my weekly Engagers circle, where I highlight and share the people who've interacted with me this week.I will share this circle to all my 13,000 odd followers for exposure as an active bunch among others.The only criteria to be added are:1)You have +1, or publicly shared one or more of my posts;2) You have re-shared this weeks circle.3) If you're not already in the circle, and want to be, simply comment so below.As this circle grows, I may have difficulty accommodating everyone, so if you add and re-share this week's circle, you'll be guaranteed a spot in next week's edition. #sharedcircles   #circleoftheweek   #active   #engagerscircle  2013-08-12 16:03:13488432073
B.A. TruthWarrior0A little on the unusual side #sharedcircles   #circleshare  2013-08-10 23:49:534811115
Vũ Đăng7322013-07-28 19:07:46485109
Richard Green19,150Here's my latest Engagers Showcase circle. If you received a notification, that means that you are in the circle.“Showcase” means that you are invited to leave a comment (on the original post) with a link to one of your own posts, which ideally should be one of your best recent posts. This circle consists of people who have engaged with one of my recent posts in the form of +1s, comments and reshares.For reasons of space, I wasn't able to include people whose engagement was limited to +1s on circle shares, and I may have missed other people due to limitations of the G+ interface. I also had no room to include all the engagers on four of my recent non-circle share posts. Because of this, I will be sharing this circle again next week. If you reshare this version of the circle, you are guaranteed a spot in next week's circle. Thanks for reading my posts!2013-07-21 04:25:38464353147248
Lư Thăng1,723Vòng kết nối nè mấy bạn :D2013-07-19 08:53:50487371041
Zbynek Kysela9,954HOT Circle !!! - Summer 2013 edition===============================This is a public circle of awesome plussers on G+! If would like to be included here in next update please follow these easy steps:HOW TO BE PART OF IT===================1. Add this circle to your circles (Click Add circle)2. Re-Share This Post Publicly (Click Share Button Next To +1 Button)3. Click +1 and Comment to support the circle!Done ツMy entire social presence:http://xeeme.com/bouchacFeel free to connect.=====================#Circle   #Circles   #Public   #PublicCircle   #CircleShare   #CircleSharing #SharePublicCircle   #QSC   #querosercirculado   #circleoftheday #publicsharedcircles   #publiccirclesproject   #sharedcircleoftheday #fullcircleshare   #addmetoyourcircles   #awesomeness   #awesomepeople   #awesomecircle   #awesome     #awesomesauce #awesomeness   #awesomepeople   #bouchac #sharedcircles   #sharedpubliccircles #xeeme  #awesomesauce  #snowball #hot  #круг   #círculo     2013-07-16 20:34:30491562869
Fraser Cain798,034Super Science Circle, July 2013 EditionNeed more science in your streams? Want to convince a friend that Google+ is a thriving place of science and rational thinking? Then import my Super Science Circle and be amazed at the awesomeness.PLEASE RESHARE THIS CIRCLE... FOR SCIENCE!Every single person in this circle is active on Google+ and regularly contributes high quality posts about science. You've got my personal guarantee.As always, I recommend you import this group into a temporary circle and look for people who match your interests. Then pull them over into more permanent locations in your circles. Or just wait for me to give you an update next month.If you want to be included in this circle, just make a post in the comments and I'll check out your profile.I'm looking for people who:1. Are active on Google+ (but not too active)2. Regularly post about science3. Provide context and additional information, and not just bare links or annoying memes.2013-07-16 18:35:56415255986
Richard Green18,334For my approximately-weekly circle share this week, I've chosen my "Not Just the Usual Suspects" circle. If you received a notification, it means that you are in the circle. As always with my shared circles, this is a "Showcase" circle, which means that you are invited to leave a comment (on the original post) with a link to one of your own posts, which ideally should be one of your best recent posts.Some of the profiles in this circle are people who engaged with recent hit circle shares by +Scott Buehler and +Christine DeGraff, but most of the profiles here are people I selected myself, usually because I liked their profiles for various reasons. As the name of the circle suggests, there are interesting people included here who don't often appear in circle shares.2013-07-14 21:42:0348426891207
Paul Christen113If you want to be TOTALLY freaked out, follow this science circle. Its not mine, it was shared by (I think) +Fraser Cain .Man, a  day does not go by that I'm not amazed by the advances in science and technology.2013-06-11 13:54:194095310
Science on Google+62,910Smokin' Science CircleWe took 500 active profiles from the  +Science on Google+: A Public Database and put them into this circle.  Be careful, this circle is smokin' hot! #scienceeveryday    Don't forget to check out the Science on Google+ Community: http://goo.gl/mTTxXDatabaseSearch Communities: http://goo.gl/RvyezSearch Pages: http://goo.gl/WCohTSearch Profiles: http://goo.gl/Yz8KRAdd Profile or Page to Database: http://goo.gl/yEg7MAdd Community to Database: http://goo.gl/zh0xJ2013-06-06 00:17:11500388175
Fraser Cain779,548Super Science Circle - May 2013 EditionNeed more science in your Google+? Well, here's all the science you can handle! Enjoy my latest, heavily curated edition of the Super Science Circle.Please share this circle... for Science!For the uninitiated, I maintain a circle of 450+ people who are active on Google+ and regularly post on Google+. In this circle you'll find scientists, journalists, astronauts, educators, and science enthusiasts. By importing this circle into your own circles, you'll immediately gain a vibrant and fascinating feed of amazing science stories.I recognize that it might be too much science, so I suggest you create a brand new temporary circle and evaluate the people in the circle. Only transfer the keepers to your permanent circles. Then, when I update the circle next month, rinse and repeat.Are you active on G+ and regularly post about science? +mention me and I'll check out your profile.Remember, please share this post2013-05-22 19:26:51456348290
Fraser Cain770,050Super Science Circle - April 2013 EditionIt's time for another sharing of my Super Science Circle. This is a collection of 400+ active people on Google+ who often post about science. If anyone tells you G+ is a ghost town (not that anyone does any more), get them to import this circle. PLEASE SHARE THIS CIRCLE... FOR SCIENCE!I have personally reviewed each and every person on this list, to make sure that they:1. Are active and engaged on Google+2. Regularly post science-related stories on Google+In this list you'll find scientists, journalists, researchers, professors, astronauts and general science enthusiasts. Not everyone in this list is going to be to your personal liking. So what you'll want to do is import the list into a temporary circle. Then move people over one by one into more permanent locations in your circles.I'm always looking for more people to add to the list, so if you know people who meet my criteria, feel free to nominate them.Again, please share the circle. Every little bit helps2013-04-26 21:02:03419226277
David Fuchs43,026Circle Name : What Hot And Recommended - 4-22-2012Date :  4-22-2013This Circle  :  Contains people on What's Hot And Recommended on Google+. It is started from scratch every week.Please Enjoy This Circle and Feel Free To Share.=================================================#circleshare    #sharedcircles    #sharedpubliccircles   #sharedcircleoftheday    #circlesharing    #circleoftheday    #Circle   #Circles      #Public    #PublicCircle    #CircleShare   #CircleSharing  #SharePublicCircle    #QSC    #querosercirculado   #circleoftheday    #publicsharedcircles    #publiccirclesproject   #sharedcircleoftheday  #fullcircleshare    #addmetoyourcircles   #awesomeness      #awesomepeople    #awesomecircle   #awesome      #awesomesauce  #awesomeness   #awesomepeople    #sharedcircles    #sharedpubliccircles     #awesomesauce    #круг    #círculo      2013-04-22 17:37:1494726

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

1
comments per post
3
reshares per post
15
+1's per post

852
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Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 10

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2014-09-15 20:00:45 (10 comments, 1 reshares, 25 +1s) 

"To those of you who read Starts With A Bang regularly, you probably noticed that I didn’t write my regular Ask Ethan column this week, I didn’t respond to your Comments of the Week and I didn’t have a diversion for you this weekend. I didn’t want another day to go by without you having an explanation, but I also don’t think I could’ve written this before today. I hope you understand. And I hope that when you think about anyone you ever loved who’s gone, you remember them at their happiest, when they were the most full-of-joy and life that you ever saw them."

Goodbye, Cordelia. I miss you like hell.

Most reshares: 17

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2014-08-05 15:48:43 (0 comments, 17 reshares, 33 +1s) 

"“Lovelace’s paper was quite a shock to everyone,” Caltech physicist John Schwarz, who was then at Princeton,” recalled during a talk in 2000, “since until then nobody considered allowing the dimension of spacetime to be anything but four. We were doing hadron physics, after all, and four was certainly the right answer.”"

Meet the man who brought physics out of our simple 3-space-and-1-time dimensions and into the physically real possibility of many more! Thanks to our new writer Paul Halpern for a great piece!

Most plusones: 33

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2014-08-05 15:48:43 (0 comments, 17 reshares, 33 +1s) 

"“Lovelace’s paper was quite a shock to everyone,” Caltech physicist John Schwarz, who was then at Princeton,” recalled during a talk in 2000, “since until then nobody considered allowing the dimension of spacetime to be anything but four. We were doing hadron physics, after all, and four was certainly the right answer.”"

Meet the man who brought physics out of our simple 3-space-and-1-time dimensions and into the physically real possibility of many more! Thanks to our new writer Paul Halpern for a great piece!

Latest 50 posts

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2014-09-19 23:07:05 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 12 +1s) 

"Back when the Universe was hotter, younger and denser, neutral atoms were unstable due to the high temperatures and large kinetic energies of everything around them. Our cosmos may be some 13.8 billion years old now, and a cold, relatively empty place to boot. But back when we were only a few hundred thousand years old, it was so hot and dense that neutral atoms were unable to form! Our Universe was simply an ionized plasma of electrons, nuclei, photons and other particles."

When we look out into the Universe, we can see fainter and farther than ever before simply by building larger telescopes and having them take longer exposures: in other words, by gathering more light. But even in principle, there's a limit to what we can see, thanks to the fact that, beyond a certain point, the Universe was an ionized plasma, randomizing whatever information was contained in the light passing... more »

"Back when the Universe was hotter, younger and denser, neutral atoms were unstable due to the high temperatures and large kinetic energies of everything around them. Our cosmos may be some 13.8 billion years old now, and a cold, relatively empty place to boot. But back when we were only a few hundred thousand years old, it was so hot and dense that neutral atoms were unable to form! Our Universe was simply an ionized plasma of electrons, nuclei, photons and other particles."

When we look out into the Universe, we can see fainter and farther than ever before simply by building larger telescopes and having them take longer exposures: in other words, by gathering more light. But even in principle, there's a limit to what we can see, thanks to the fact that, beyond a certain point, the Universe was an ionized plasma, randomizing whatever information was contained in the light passing through it. But that doesn't mean we can't see beyond that point, it just means we can't use light to do it! Gravitational waves are the future of astronomy, and can even tell us how the Universe got its start! ___

posted image

2014-09-19 01:39:51 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 15 +1s) 

"In theory, extraordinarily isolated clumps of matter, whose mass totals something like only 0.0001% of our Milky Way Galaxy, may survive without forming any stars at all, and without being polluted by any nearby post-stellar mass, for well over a billion years. But if we wanted to find one, we’d have to be incredibly lucky. From the time the Big Bang first was proposed as a theory in the 1940s, we didn’t have that luck for years, and then decades, and then for generations.

But then 2011 came along, and we’ve had two strokes of luck that serendipitously have given us the luck we’ve been waiting for!"

The Big Bang has, among its predictions, three cornerstones: the Hubble Expansion of the Universe, the Cosmic Microwave Background, and the abundance of the Light Elements due to Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. The first one has been confirmed to spectacular accuracy, and withthe COB... more »

"In theory, extraordinarily isolated clumps of matter, whose mass totals something like only 0.0001% of our Milky Way Galaxy, may survive without forming any stars at all, and without being polluted by any nearby post-stellar mass, for well over a billion years. But if we wanted to find one, we’d have to be incredibly lucky. From the time the Big Bang first was proposed as a theory in the 1940s, we didn’t have that luck for years, and then decades, and then for generations.

But then 2011 came along, and we’ve had two strokes of luck that serendipitously have given us the luck we’ve been waiting for!"

The Big Bang has, among its predictions, three cornerstones: the Hubble Expansion of the Universe, the Cosmic Microwave Background, and the abundance of the Light Elements due to Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. The first one has been confirmed to spectacular accuracy, and with the COBE, WMAP and Planck satellites, the spectrum and fluctuations in the CMB rule out almost every other feasible alternative. But detecting the abundance of the light elements directly has always run into a difficulty: the formation of stars in the Universe pollutes the intergalactic medium, ruining our ability to see anything "pristine." We'd have to get incredibly lucky, to find a region of molecular gas that had never formed stars in-between our line-of-sight to a quasar or bright galaxy. For nearly 70 years, that didn't happen, and then all of a sudden, we found two. The Big Bang stands tall after all!___

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2014-09-18 03:00:05 (1 comments, 5 reshares, 18 +1s) 

"When you think about it, it should make you really, really glad that matter won out over antimatter in the Universe, and that there aren’t starships, planets, stars and galaxies made out of antimatter out there. The way the Universe is destructing — slowly and gradually — is more than sufficient as-is."

The idea of destroying an entire planet may sound like an unachievable dream of a pathological teenager, as the energy required would be tremendous. To simply overcome the gravitational potential energy binding an Earth-sized planet together would require the entire energy output of the Sun added up over more than a week! But if we could harness a relatively small amount of antimatter — just 0.00000000002% the mass of the planet in question — that would be enough to do it.

"When you think about it, it should make you really, really glad that matter won out over antimatter in the Universe, and that there aren’t starships, planets, stars and galaxies made out of antimatter out there. The way the Universe is destructing — slowly and gradually — is more than sufficient as-is."

The idea of destroying an entire planet may sound like an unachievable dream of a pathological teenager, as the energy required would be tremendous. To simply overcome the gravitational potential energy binding an Earth-sized planet together would require the entire energy output of the Sun added up over more than a week! But if we could harness a relatively small amount of antimatter — just 0.00000000002% the mass of the planet in question — that would be enough to do it.___

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2014-09-16 00:26:39 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 13 +1s) 

"This might strike you as strange: Messier 69 and Messier 70 are separated by only 1,800 light-years or so, they’re both close to the galactic center and close to the same age, but Messier 69 — which is slightly older than Messier 70 — has five times the heavy elements found in its neighbor! Why would one be so metal-rich and the other so metal-poor? Because Messier 69 always remains close to the galactic center, while Messier 70 moves in-and-out in a highly eccentric orbit!"

A member of the original catalogue of "not-a-comet" objects was where the telescope was pointed when the comet of our lifetime was discovered! Come say hello to Messier 70 this Messier Monday!

"This might strike you as strange: Messier 69 and Messier 70 are separated by only 1,800 light-years or so, they’re both close to the galactic center and close to the same age, but Messier 69 — which is slightly older than Messier 70 — has five times the heavy elements found in its neighbor! Why would one be so metal-rich and the other so metal-poor? Because Messier 69 always remains close to the galactic center, while Messier 70 moves in-and-out in a highly eccentric orbit!"

A member of the original catalogue of "not-a-comet" objects was where the telescope was pointed when the comet of our lifetime was discovered! Come say hello to Messier 70 this Messier Monday!___

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2014-09-15 20:00:45 (10 comments, 1 reshares, 25 +1s) 

"To those of you who read Starts With A Bang regularly, you probably noticed that I didn’t write my regular Ask Ethan column this week, I didn’t respond to your Comments of the Week and I didn’t have a diversion for you this weekend. I didn’t want another day to go by without you having an explanation, but I also don’t think I could’ve written this before today. I hope you understand. And I hope that when you think about anyone you ever loved who’s gone, you remember them at their happiest, when they were the most full-of-joy and life that you ever saw them."

Goodbye, Cordelia. I miss you like hell.

"To those of you who read Starts With A Bang regularly, you probably noticed that I didn’t write my regular Ask Ethan column this week, I didn’t respond to your Comments of the Week and I didn’t have a diversion for you this weekend. I didn’t want another day to go by without you having an explanation, but I also don’t think I could’ve written this before today. I hope you understand. And I hope that when you think about anyone you ever loved who’s gone, you remember them at their happiest, when they were the most full-of-joy and life that you ever saw them."

Goodbye, Cordelia. I miss you like hell.___

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2014-09-11 22:03:18 (2 comments, 4 reshares, 16 +1s) 

"Given a clear path to the horizon — such as over the ocean — this means that there’s a slight region of space just above the reddened Sun where only the shorter wavelength light is visible!

And when that happens, in addition to the normal color gradient that comes with a sunset, you can also get a small, separate region above the disk of the Sun that appears yellow, green, or even blue! (And much fainter than the rest of the Sun!)"

During sunset, the Sun appears to redden, dim, and eventually sink below the horizon. Every once in a while, a rare phenomenon emerges along with it: a green flash, where a greenish-colored beam of light appears just over the Sun. What causes it? One of the most beautiful natural phenomena our planet has to offer, explained in glorious detail.

"Given a clear path to the horizon — such as over the ocean — this means that there’s a slight region of space just above the reddened Sun where only the shorter wavelength light is visible!

And when that happens, in addition to the normal color gradient that comes with a sunset, you can also get a small, separate region above the disk of the Sun that appears yellow, green, or even blue! (And much fainter than the rest of the Sun!)"

During sunset, the Sun appears to redden, dim, and eventually sink below the horizon. Every once in a while, a rare phenomenon emerges along with it: a green flash, where a greenish-colored beam of light appears just over the Sun. What causes it? One of the most beautiful natural phenomena our planet has to offer, explained in glorious detail.___

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2014-09-11 00:26:51 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 17 +1s) 

"Surely you’ve heard the term supercluster before, where our Milky Way and local group are part of a giant cosmic structure that includes the other nearby galaxy groups and the giant, nearby Virgo cluster, making up our local (Virgo) supercluster. And our supercluster is just one of many, that themselves are arranged together, forming an even larger structure!"

You may have just heard that we’ve mapped out our supercluster of galaxies — Laniakea — to unprecedented accuracy, identifying a region 500 million light-years in diameter that’s responsible for our local group’s motion through space. While it's an amazing feat of astronomical mapping and cluster identification, calling a structure like this a “supercluster” implies that, in some way, the galaxies, galactic groups and galaxy clusters that make this up are in some way bound together. But this is in no way thecase! Come find... more »

"Surely you’ve heard the term supercluster before, where our Milky Way and local group are part of a giant cosmic structure that includes the other nearby galaxy groups and the giant, nearby Virgo cluster, making up our local (Virgo) supercluster. And our supercluster is just one of many, that themselves are arranged together, forming an even larger structure!"

You may have just heard that we’ve mapped out our supercluster of galaxies — Laniakea — to unprecedented accuracy, identifying a region 500 million light-years in diameter that’s responsible for our local group’s motion through space. While it's an amazing feat of astronomical mapping and cluster identification, calling a structure like this a “supercluster” implies that, in some way, the galaxies, galactic groups and galaxy clusters that make this up are in some way bound together. But this is in no way the case! Come find out why “superclusters” aren’t so super after all.___

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2014-09-10 22:37:26 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 15 +1s) 

___

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2014-09-09 16:08:31 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 16 +1s) 

"Before such delicate instruments were perfected, astronomers attempted a cruder approach to planet hunting called the astrometry method. It involved tracking a star’s movements through the sky, subtracting effects due to Earth’s motion, and looking for minuscule, rhythmic variations that could be chalked up to a planet’s pull."

In 1992, scientists discovered the first planets orbiting a star other than our Sun. The pulsar PSR B1257+12 was discovered to have its own planetary system, and since then, exoplanet discoveries have exploded! But before that, in 1963, decades of research led to the much-anticipated publication and announcement of the first exoplanet discovered: around Barnard's star, the second-closest star system to Earth. Unfortunately, it turned out to be spurious, and that in itself took years to uncover, an amazing story which is only now fully coming tolight... more »

"Before such delicate instruments were perfected, astronomers attempted a cruder approach to planet hunting called the astrometry method. It involved tracking a star’s movements through the sky, subtracting effects due to Earth’s motion, and looking for minuscule, rhythmic variations that could be chalked up to a planet’s pull."

In 1992, scientists discovered the first planets orbiting a star other than our Sun. The pulsar PSR B1257+12 was discovered to have its own planetary system, and since then, exoplanet discoveries have exploded! But before that, in 1963, decades of research led to the much-anticipated publication and announcement of the first exoplanet discovered: around Barnard's star, the second-closest star system to Earth. Unfortunately, it turned out to be spurious, and that in itself took years to uncover, an amazing story which is only now fully coming to light!___

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2014-09-08 22:30:53 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 13 +1s) 

"A collection of eight stars stands out in this region of the sky, not because they’re the brightest stars around, but because they have a distinctive pattern to them that we recognize as very similar to a common object here on Earth. We call such a collection of stars an asterism, and the teapot is one of the most recognizable ones. And the star at the very top of the teapot’s lid — Kaus Borealis — has a secret less than a single degree away from it."

What globular cluster is home to the first pulsar ever discovered in one? Learn about it on today's Messier Monday!

"A collection of eight stars stands out in this region of the sky, not because they’re the brightest stars around, but because they have a distinctive pattern to them that we recognize as very similar to a common object here on Earth. We call such a collection of stars an asterism, and the teapot is one of the most recognizable ones. And the star at the very top of the teapot’s lid — Kaus Borealis — has a secret less than a single degree away from it."

What globular cluster is home to the first pulsar ever discovered in one? Learn about it on today's Messier Monday!___

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2014-09-08 18:51:07 (0 comments, 6 reshares, 7 +1s) 

"My goal in explaining these lunar phenomena is not to dismiss the hype, but rather to deepen your understanding and appreciation of our celestial companion. I see the Moon as a great example of how amazingly dynamic our Universe truly is, something we can’t often comprehend as most things that change do so on such dramatically long (dare I say astronomical) timescales that they are often imperceptible to us."

Tonight might be the final Supermoon of the year, but the Moon's story -- and the science behind it -- is going to be super all year long! A great explainer by Summer Ash!

"My goal in explaining these lunar phenomena is not to dismiss the hype, but rather to deepen your understanding and appreciation of our celestial companion. I see the Moon as a great example of how amazingly dynamic our Universe truly is, something we can’t often comprehend as most things that change do so on such dramatically long (dare I say astronomical) timescales that they are often imperceptible to us."

Tonight might be the final Supermoon of the year, but the Moon's story -- and the science behind it -- is going to be super all year long! A great explainer by Summer Ash!___

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2014-09-08 00:33:23 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 8 +1s) 

"Now in September, the first Salmon Cannons (yes, they are actually called Salmon Cannons) were successfully tested this past June at Washington’s Roza Dam, and are poised to rocket salmon onto trucks where they will be taken farther upstream than they’ve naturally been in a long time. If this, too, proves to be successful, the Salmon Cannon could be exactly what’s needed to restore the fish of the Columbia River to their natural, original runs!"

Hydroelectric dams are one of the best and oldest sources of green, renewable energy, but — as the Three Gorges Dam in China exemplifies — they often cause a host of environmental and ecological problems and challenges. One of the more interesting ones is how to coax fish upstream in the face of these herculean walls that can often span more than 500 feet in height. While fish ladders might be a solution for some of the smaller dams,they'... more »

"Now in September, the first Salmon Cannons (yes, they are actually called Salmon Cannons) were successfully tested this past June at Washington’s Roza Dam, and are poised to rocket salmon onto trucks where they will be taken farther upstream than they’ve naturally been in a long time. If this, too, proves to be successful, the Salmon Cannon could be exactly what’s needed to restore the fish of the Columbia River to their natural, original runs!"

Hydroelectric dams are one of the best and oldest sources of green, renewable energy, but — as the Three Gorges Dam in China exemplifies — they often cause a host of environmental and ecological problems and challenges. One of the more interesting ones is how to coax fish upstream in the face of these herculean walls that can often span more than 500 feet in height. While fish ladders might be a solution for some of the smaller dams, they're limited in application and success. Could Whooshh Innovations' Salmon Cannon, a pneumatic tube capable of launching fish up-and-over these dams, finally restore the Columbia River salmon to their original habitats?___

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2014-09-07 17:41:43 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 9 +1s) 

"Science is amazing because it admits all possibilities in theory, but it’s the observations we make and the experiments we perform that tell us exactly what the Universe we live in is like."

Plus not everyone becomes a red giant, has the Universe been accelerating for longer, and did the atomic bombs in Japan kill more people than any other natural disaster in history?

"Science is amazing because it admits all possibilities in theory, but it’s the observations we make and the experiments we perform that tell us exactly what the Universe we live in is like."

Plus not everyone becomes a red giant, has the Universe been accelerating for longer, and did the atomic bombs in Japan kill more people than any other natural disaster in history?___

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2014-09-06 01:41:11 (2 comments, 2 reshares, 26 +1s) 

"If dark energy is only a constant, than things like our Solar System, our galaxy, and even our local group of galaxies — consisting of the Milky Way, Andromeda, the Triangulum Galaxy, the Magellanic Clouds and a few dozen small, dwarf galaxies — will remain gravitationally bound together for trillions upon trillions of years into the future. But if dark energy is increasing, or getting stronger over time, then that acceleration rate will not only drive distant galaxies away from us, but will cause these structures to become gravitationally unbound as time goes on!"

Now that dark energy is firmly in place as the dominant source of energy in the Universe, the race is on to figure out exactly what its properties are, and what that will mean for the Universe's fate. If it's truly a cosmological constant, we're in for a Big Freeze, as galaxies expand away from oneanother fas... more »

"If dark energy is only a constant, than things like our Solar System, our galaxy, and even our local group of galaxies — consisting of the Milky Way, Andromeda, the Triangulum Galaxy, the Magellanic Clouds and a few dozen small, dwarf galaxies — will remain gravitationally bound together for trillions upon trillions of years into the future. But if dark energy is increasing, or getting stronger over time, then that acceleration rate will not only drive distant galaxies away from us, but will cause these structures to become gravitationally unbound as time goes on!"

Now that dark energy is firmly in place as the dominant source of energy in the Universe, the race is on to figure out exactly what its properties are, and what that will mean for the Universe's fate. If it's truly a cosmological constant, we're in for a Big Freeze, as galaxies expand away from one another faster and faster, leaving only our gravitationally-bound local group behind. But if dark energy changes over time, we might yet see a Big Crunch or the most horrifying of all fates: a Big Rip, where galaxy-by-galaxy, star-by-star and eventually atom-by-atom, everything is torn apart!___

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2014-09-05 01:59:56 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 14 +1s) 

"When that happens, your star starts burning heavier elements, expanding into a giant star that’s cooler but much more luminous than your initial star. Even though the giant phase is much shorter-lived than the hydrogen-burning phase, its incredible brightness allows it to be seen prominently from far greater distances than the original star ever could be."

When you think of the most recognizable collections of stars: the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, the “Teapot” in Sagittarius and the Southern Cross, they might have prominent stars, but none of them crack the top 10 in terms of brightness. Who, then, are the brightest stars in the sky? Come see how many you know, and find what makes them shine so brightly, and why they're not representative of most stars in the Universe!

"When that happens, your star starts burning heavier elements, expanding into a giant star that’s cooler but much more luminous than your initial star. Even though the giant phase is much shorter-lived than the hydrogen-burning phase, its incredible brightness allows it to be seen prominently from far greater distances than the original star ever could be."

When you think of the most recognizable collections of stars: the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, the “Teapot” in Sagittarius and the Southern Cross, they might have prominent stars, but none of them crack the top 10 in terms of brightness. Who, then, are the brightest stars in the sky? Come see how many you know, and find what makes them shine so brightly, and why they're not representative of most stars in the Universe!___

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2014-09-04 00:37:52 (5 comments, 7 reshares, 26 +1s) 

"After all, it’s one of the toughest things in the world: to set your ideology aside. But if we can do it, a better world for all will be our reward. Try and think of this before you share your next piece of “scientific” information that you found on social media, and remember: humans are notoriously bad at assessing risks, but the way to address that is to quantify the benefits and detriments of what you’re looking at."

Our ideologies are what keep us from having a better world.

"After all, it’s one of the toughest things in the world: to set your ideology aside. But if we can do it, a better world for all will be our reward. Try and think of this before you share your next piece of “scientific” information that you found on social media, and remember: humans are notoriously bad at assessing risks, but the way to address that is to quantify the benefits and detriments of what you’re looking at."

Our ideologies are what keep us from having a better world.___

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2014-09-01 17:44:45 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 17 +1s) 

"Messier 69 is so old that all the O, B, A, and even F-class stars have run through their entire life cycles. Even the brightest and bluest G-stars have died; the most massive main-sequence stars left in Messier 69 are G2-stars, the same class as our humdrum Sun. That places the age of this cluster at around 13.1 billion years, meaning that the stars in here formed when the Universe was only 700 million years old!

This isn’t that strange; globular clusters are often among the oldest objects known in the Universe, and even the Messier catalogue contains some that are older than this one. But when we look at the elements present inside, that’s where Messier 69 starts to look funny."

When a star cluster has a color/magnitude diagram that says it's very old but a heavy element abundance that says it's relatively young, who wins? We all do, by learning more about how,whe... more »

"Messier 69 is so old that all the O, B, A, and even F-class stars have run through their entire life cycles. Even the brightest and bluest G-stars have died; the most massive main-sequence stars left in Messier 69 are G2-stars, the same class as our humdrum Sun. That places the age of this cluster at around 13.1 billion years, meaning that the stars in here formed when the Universe was only 700 million years old!

This isn’t that strange; globular clusters are often among the oldest objects known in the Universe, and even the Messier catalogue contains some that are older than this one. But when we look at the elements present inside, that’s where Messier 69 starts to look funny."

When a star cluster has a color/magnitude diagram that says it's very old but a heavy element abundance that says it's relatively young, who wins? We all do, by learning more about how, when and where atomic riches accumulate in galaxies!___

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2014-08-31 17:44:43 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s) 

"And from it all, here are the lessons I learned: to try not to be so rigid. Yes, some things (like my new sketchbook) are sacred, but if you let go of those chains, new and wonderful things can happen. Those things you hold so dear cannot change and grow and expand unless you loosen your grip on them a little. In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, YOU WILL ALWAYS BE DISAPPOINTED. Instead, just go with it, just ACCEPT it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it."

When you let a four-year-old into your sketchbook, you'd never expect them... more »

"And from it all, here are the lessons I learned: to try not to be so rigid. Yes, some things (like my new sketchbook) are sacred, but if you let go of those chains, new and wonderful things can happen. Those things you hold so dear cannot change and grow and expand unless you loosen your grip on them a little. In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, YOU WILL ALWAYS BE DISAPPOINTED. Instead, just go with it, just ACCEPT it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it."

When you let a four-year-old into your sketchbook, you'd never expect them to make it better, would you? That's exactly what happened to Mica Hendricks; come see her amazing collaborative artwork with her daughter, Myla!___

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2014-08-30 17:28:15 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 7 +1s) 

"I have one more thing for you. You see, as we prepare to conclude Messier Monday, I’m thinking of beginning a video series to replace it. Some of the early ideas I think might be interesting would be to pick an interesting-looking phenomenon and to break down what’s happening and why."

Come learn some fantastic science, and vote in my video idea poll! As Messier Monday nears its end, I'm thinking of replacing it with a new series, and I need your input!

"I have one more thing for you. You see, as we prepare to conclude Messier Monday, I’m thinking of beginning a video series to replace it. Some of the early ideas I think might be interesting would be to pick an interesting-looking phenomenon and to break down what’s happening and why."

Come learn some fantastic science, and vote in my video idea poll! As Messier Monday nears its end, I'm thinking of replacing it with a new series, and I need your input!___

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2014-08-30 00:58:42 (2 comments, 9 reshares, 19 +1s) 

"What it tells us is that space between galaxies — or between any structures that aren’t gravitationally bound to either one another or mutually bound to an even larger structure — is going to expand. If we want to learn how that space is going to expand, meaning at what rate, we need to know two pieces of information:

1. What the expansion rate is at any point in our cosmic history, and
2. What types and ratios of matter-and-energy are present in our Universe.

That’s it! If we can figure out those two pieces of information, we can figure out not only the fate of our Universe, but what the expansion rate was, is and will be at all times since the Big Bang."

The Universe has always had dark energy in it, but it's only started accelerating recently. Thanks to the precision measurements of Planck, we can finally know exactly when thetransition from... more »

"What it tells us is that space between galaxies — or between any structures that aren’t gravitationally bound to either one another or mutually bound to an even larger structure — is going to expand. If we want to learn how that space is going to expand, meaning at what rate, we need to know two pieces of information:

1. What the expansion rate is at any point in our cosmic history, and
2. What types and ratios of matter-and-energy are present in our Universe.

That’s it! If we can figure out those two pieces of information, we can figure out not only the fate of our Universe, but what the expansion rate was, is and will be at all times since the Big Bang."

The Universe has always had dark energy in it, but it's only started accelerating recently. Thanks to the precision measurements of Planck, we can finally know exactly when the transition from a decelerating Universe to an accelerating one happened. Come find out on this week's Ask Ethan!___

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2014-08-29 01:39:26 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 17 +1s) 

"You might hear your peers or friends grumble something like, “when am I ever going to use this?” Depending on what you grow up to do, the answer may, in fact, be never. You may never use the things you’re working hard to learn. But there is a very good reason to learn them anyway, and it’s a very simple reason: you need to challenge yourself. You need to learn new things, and you need to force your brain to learn how to solve problems it’s never had to solve before. Imagine two versions of yourself, and the brains inside these two versions: one that only learned things you needed in your adult life, and one that learned as much as you could about as many different things as you could. Which version, do you think, would have the stronger brain? Would have the better problem-solving skills? Would be better able to tackle the unknown challenges that lie ahead?

I’ll say it oncemore: learn... more »

"You might hear your peers or friends grumble something like, “when am I ever going to use this?” Depending on what you grow up to do, the answer may, in fact, be never. You may never use the things you’re working hard to learn. But there is a very good reason to learn them anyway, and it’s a very simple reason: you need to challenge yourself. You need to learn new things, and you need to force your brain to learn how to solve problems it’s never had to solve before. Imagine two versions of yourself, and the brains inside these two versions: one that only learned things you needed in your adult life, and one that learned as much as you could about as many different things as you could. Which version, do you think, would have the stronger brain? Would have the better problem-solving skills? Would be better able to tackle the unknown challenges that lie ahead?

I’ll say it once more: learn as much as you can about as many different things as you can. Challenge yourself!"

The best back-to-school advice you can give to an aspiring young student with a talent for math, science, technology or engineering!___

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2014-08-28 14:40:31 (1 comments, 8 reshares, 20 +1s) 

"[I]f we take two galaxy clusters and collide them, and we see the effects of gravitation (from gravitational lensing, in blue) and the aftermath of high-speed gaseous collisions (emitting X-rays, in pink), doesn’t their failure to match up indicate dark matter? Not necessarily; it only tells us that there isn’t enough gaseous dark matter to explain all of the gravitational effects. But you can also see that the optical matter — the collections of stars in galaxies — passed right through one another, the same way that two guns filled with birdshot and fired at one another would have all but very few pellets miss one another."

Even something as convincing as the famed bullet cluster doesn't prove the existence of non-baryonic dark matter; it takes a whole lot more. Yet, we know it's real! Come find out how.

"[I]f we take two galaxy clusters and collide them, and we see the effects of gravitation (from gravitational lensing, in blue) and the aftermath of high-speed gaseous collisions (emitting X-rays, in pink), doesn’t their failure to match up indicate dark matter? Not necessarily; it only tells us that there isn’t enough gaseous dark matter to explain all of the gravitational effects. But you can also see that the optical matter — the collections of stars in galaxies — passed right through one another, the same way that two guns filled with birdshot and fired at one another would have all but very few pellets miss one another."

Even something as convincing as the famed bullet cluster doesn't prove the existence of non-baryonic dark matter; it takes a whole lot more. Yet, we know it's real! Come find out how.___

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2014-08-26 20:46:50 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 20 +1s) 

"Each galaxy has a story. Some are small but growing rapidly. Others look bland but betray a complex, vibrant past. What’s more, most large galaxies — again like some cities — appear to be built upon the ruins of smaller, more ancient ones. Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, is not unlike Rome in this respect. Ancient stellar remains show up viscerally in the the faint, extended outer reaches of galaxies — regions of light so diffuse that they’ve been difficult to study until recently."

You've no doubt heard of dark matter halos around galaxies: vast, extended, spherical collection of mass that reach for hundreds of thousands of light-years beyond what we typically think of as a spiral or elliptical galaxy. But did you know that galaxies contain vast, extended stellar halos as well? Moreover, they look nothing like you'd expect! They're not spherical oreven ellipsoidal, but... more »

"Each galaxy has a story. Some are small but growing rapidly. Others look bland but betray a complex, vibrant past. What’s more, most large galaxies — again like some cities — appear to be built upon the ruins of smaller, more ancient ones. Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, is not unlike Rome in this respect. Ancient stellar remains show up viscerally in the the faint, extended outer reaches of galaxies — regions of light so diffuse that they’ve been difficult to study until recently."

You've no doubt heard of dark matter halos around galaxies: vast, extended, spherical collection of mass that reach for hundreds of thousands of light-years beyond what we typically think of as a spiral or elliptical galaxy. But did you know that galaxies contain vast, extended stellar halos as well? Moreover, they look nothing like you'd expect! They're not spherical or even ellipsoidal, but highly irregular, and have an awful lot to teach us about how galaxies came to be the way they are today. Galaxy evolution expert James Bullock has the story.___

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2014-08-26 16:22:58 (4 comments, 1 reshares, 14 +1s) 

"An alternative solution is that Newton’s inverse-square assumption was wrong. Astronomer Simon Newcomb, for example, demonstrated that Mercury’s anomalous precession could be accounted for by “correcting” Newton’s equation to be to the power of 2.0000001574. Most astronomers at the time thought such an idea was unlikely, and later observations of lunar motion showed that Newcomb’s correction didn’t work for the Moon. So a planet Vulcan seemed to be the likely solution.

But it turns out that Newcomb was closer to the truth. When Einstein developed the theory of general relativity, one of the predictions was that Newton’s inverse-square relation wasn’t exact. From this, Einstein was able to show that the Mercury anomaly was due to relativistic corrections."

When you make an assumption, you make an ass out of you and "umption". Also, that's howthe greatest leap... more »

"An alternative solution is that Newton’s inverse-square assumption was wrong. Astronomer Simon Newcomb, for example, demonstrated that Mercury’s anomalous precession could be accounted for by “correcting” Newton’s equation to be to the power of 2.0000001574. Most astronomers at the time thought such an idea was unlikely, and later observations of lunar motion showed that Newcomb’s correction didn’t work for the Moon. So a planet Vulcan seemed to be the likely solution.

But it turns out that Newcomb was closer to the truth. When Einstein developed the theory of general relativity, one of the predictions was that Newton’s inverse-square relation wasn’t exact. From this, Einstein was able to show that the Mercury anomaly was due to relativistic corrections."

When you make an assumption, you make an ass out of you and "umption". Also, that's how the greatest leaps forward in all of science are made! +Brian Koberlein  has the scoop.___

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2014-08-25 23:05:34 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 19 +1s) 

"In reality, what we’re looking at is a huge globular cluster, some 70 light-years in radius and containing about 1,100,000 times the mass of our Sun inside of it: one of the largest globular clusters in our galaxy! At 29,000 light-years distant, it’s slightly on the other side of the galactic center from us, and its stars are typically about 11.9 billion years old, or nearly three times the age of the Sun."

Globular clusters are almost always perfectly spherical, but this object is very clearly flattened. But is it really oblate like it appears, or is the Universe lying to us? Spoiler for this #MessierMonday: it lies!

"In reality, what we’re looking at is a huge globular cluster, some 70 light-years in radius and containing about 1,100,000 times the mass of our Sun inside of it: one of the largest globular clusters in our galaxy! At 29,000 light-years distant, it’s slightly on the other side of the galactic center from us, and its stars are typically about 11.9 billion years old, or nearly three times the age of the Sun."

Globular clusters are almost always perfectly spherical, but this object is very clearly flattened. But is it really oblate like it appears, or is the Universe lying to us? Spoiler for this #MessierMonday: it lies!___

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2014-08-24 23:27:19 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 15 +1s) 

"One of the greatest things about all NASA images is that they’re entirely public domain, which means that you are free to use them for whatever non-commercial purposes you like. Want a poster? Just have it printed out!

But what if you want to decorate your room, office, house or apartment with curtains or wallpaper of these fantastic images? This weekend, I’m super excited to introduce you to Spoonflower, a site that specializes in custom fabric, wallpaper and gift wrap."

Ever want to take the greatest NASA photos in history and turn them into fabric, curtains or wallpaper? Now you can! Come learn how, and discover the power you gain from combining NASA's greatest images with Spoonflower!

"One of the greatest things about all NASA images is that they’re entirely public domain, which means that you are free to use them for whatever non-commercial purposes you like. Want a poster? Just have it printed out!

But what if you want to decorate your room, office, house or apartment with curtains or wallpaper of these fantastic images? This weekend, I’m super excited to introduce you to Spoonflower, a site that specializes in custom fabric, wallpaper and gift wrap."

Ever want to take the greatest NASA photos in history and turn them into fabric, curtains or wallpaper? Now you can! Come learn how, and discover the power you gain from combining NASA's greatest images with Spoonflower!___

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2014-08-24 17:26:55 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 11 +1s) 

"It might seem like a remarkable coincidence, but you must remember that the bigger a black hole is, the less noticeably it’s curved near the event horizon: a counterintuitive notion! If the Earth turned into a black hole and you stood at its event horizon, the tidal forces on you would be more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000 times greater than the accelerating force due to gravity on Earth’s surface today, but at the event horizon of our galaxy’s supermassive black hole, they’d be only 0.01% as great."

So much to cover, explain, plus find out what might replace Messier Monday on this edition of comments of the week!

"It might seem like a remarkable coincidence, but you must remember that the bigger a black hole is, the less noticeably it’s curved near the event horizon: a counterintuitive notion! If the Earth turned into a black hole and you stood at its event horizon, the tidal forces on you would be more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000 times greater than the accelerating force due to gravity on Earth’s surface today, but at the event horizon of our galaxy’s supermassive black hole, they’d be only 0.01% as great."

So much to cover, explain, plus find out what might replace Messier Monday on this edition of comments of the week!___

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2014-08-23 13:54:59 (3 comments, 2 reshares, 18 +1s) 

"Before we knew about axial tilt, heliocentrism or the nature of stars themselves, much less the basics of a more complex science like biology, how were we to know what caused something like the seasons on Earth? And moreover, when you begin to observe that people behave differently year-to-year or season-to-season, or that people born at one specific time seem to have different traits, what do you attribute it to?"

It's a reasonable-sounding idea, but does it stand up to scientific scrutiny? This week's Ask Ethan takes on the idea of Astrology!

"Before we knew about axial tilt, heliocentrism or the nature of stars themselves, much less the basics of a more complex science like biology, how were we to know what caused something like the seasons on Earth? And moreover, when you begin to observe that people behave differently year-to-year or season-to-season, or that people born at one specific time seem to have different traits, what do you attribute it to?"

It's a reasonable-sounding idea, but does it stand up to scientific scrutiny? This week's Ask Ethan takes on the idea of Astrology!___

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2014-08-22 18:24:19 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 12 +1s) 

Yes, that is my dog video-bombing me. What you didn't see is her deciding that one of the ice cubes was the world's greatest toy about 15 seconds after the video ended!

Yes, that is my dog video-bombing me. What you didn't see is her deciding that one of the ice cubes was the world's greatest toy about 15 seconds after the video ended!___

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2014-08-22 01:27:57 (1 comments, 5 reshares, 28 +1s) 

"You see, every astronaut aboard the International Space Station has the opportunity to experience our world from a vantage point some 300 miles (500 km) above it, taking in sights that are alien to all but a few of us. But some people have gotten incredibly creative, and captured some wonders — both natural an artificial — that far exceed anything our imaginations could have cooked up."

Sometimes, to best view the wonders of Earth, you need to leave it. Check out this incredible gallery of some amazing phenomena originating from Earth, from a perspective most of us will never experience!

"You see, every astronaut aboard the International Space Station has the opportunity to experience our world from a vantage point some 300 miles (500 km) above it, taking in sights that are alien to all but a few of us. But some people have gotten incredibly creative, and captured some wonders — both natural an artificial — that far exceed anything our imaginations could have cooked up."

Sometimes, to best view the wonders of Earth, you need to leave it. Check out this incredible gallery of some amazing phenomena originating from Earth, from a perspective most of us will never experience!___

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2014-08-21 01:05:01 (1 comments, 8 reshares, 32 +1s) 

"What’s even better? The new Fermilab experiment, E989, should be capable of determining the magnitude of the anomaly, if it’s really a deviation from the Standard Model, to somewhere between 7 and 8σ! In other words, while all the world’s eyes have been on the Large Hadron Collider and its search for the Higgs (and potentially, new particles), the first true advance beyond the Standard Model may come from an experiment that few people pay attention to and a small group of theorists that have painstakingly calculated upwards of 12,000 corrections to the muon’s g factor."

Has particle physics taken us beyond the Standard Model at long last? For all you g-2 fans out there!

"What’s even better? The new Fermilab experiment, E989, should be capable of determining the magnitude of the anomaly, if it’s really a deviation from the Standard Model, to somewhere between 7 and 8σ! In other words, while all the world’s eyes have been on the Large Hadron Collider and its search for the Higgs (and potentially, new particles), the first true advance beyond the Standard Model may come from an experiment that few people pay attention to and a small group of theorists that have painstakingly calculated upwards of 12,000 corrections to the muon’s g factor."

Has particle physics taken us beyond the Standard Model at long last? For all you g-2 fans out there!___

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2014-08-19 17:59:33 (0 comments, 9 reshares, 20 +1s) 

"Modifying the theory of gravity is no easy game. We have fantastically precise measurements of gravity’s influence on objects throughout our solar system which fit precisely within the current understanding of gravity from General Relativity (a fact that underpins the precision of modern GPS). If you want to change the theory of gravity, you have to preserve its behavior as we’ve already measured it in the solar system."

When you hear about dark matter, you very likely put it up there with string theory in the pantheon of "well, that's a nice idea, now call me when you find it" style of scientific ideas. After all, direct detection of dark matter has proved elusive, despite many arduous experiments designed specifically to find it. Yet we continue to look, convinced that it exists. Why? Amanda Yoho has the top five reasons!

"Modifying the theory of gravity is no easy game. We have fantastically precise measurements of gravity’s influence on objects throughout our solar system which fit precisely within the current understanding of gravity from General Relativity (a fact that underpins the precision of modern GPS). If you want to change the theory of gravity, you have to preserve its behavior as we’ve already measured it in the solar system."

When you hear about dark matter, you very likely put it up there with string theory in the pantheon of "well, that's a nice idea, now call me when you find it" style of scientific ideas. After all, direct detection of dark matter has proved elusive, despite many arduous experiments designed specifically to find it. Yet we continue to look, convinced that it exists. Why? Amanda Yoho has the top five reasons!___

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2014-08-18 22:46:33 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 11 +1s) 

"The orange one may be the brightest, but even a small amount of magnification shows the others shining brilliantly alongside it.

Messier often described stars as “small,” meaning faint, indicating that they appeared small and low-in-brightness in the optics of his own telescope. But these stars are only faint as seen from Earth; in reality, they’re huge and brilliant, even compared to our own Sun!"

What's higher than a butterfly in the sky? The butterfly cluster, 1600 light-years "high"! Happy #MessierMonday, all!

"The orange one may be the brightest, but even a small amount of magnification shows the others shining brilliantly alongside it.

Messier often described stars as “small,” meaning faint, indicating that they appeared small and low-in-brightness in the optics of his own telescope. But these stars are only faint as seen from Earth; in reality, they’re huge and brilliant, even compared to our own Sun!"

What's higher than a butterfly in the sky? The butterfly cluster, 1600 light-years "high"! Happy #MessierMonday, all!___

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2014-08-18 16:43:23 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 4 +1s) 

Have you come across a piece of science writing in the past year that you feel is extraordinary, and deserved to be considered for an award? Please consider nominating it for 3 Quarks Daily's annual prize, to be judged by Frans B. M. de Waal. Deadline is later this week!

Have you come across a piece of science writing in the past year that you feel is extraordinary, and deserved to be considered for an award? Please consider nominating it for 3 Quarks Daily's annual prize, to be judged by Frans B. M. de Waal. Deadline is later this week!___

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2014-08-17 22:30:44 (4 comments, 2 reshares, 13 +1s) 

"This is one of the most bizarre signs I have ever encountered. The sign is comical in itself: stick figure rides up the escalator and bumps his head on a hanging sign, the impact causing VIOLENT RED RAYS OF PAIN. Beware! All is well and good until, armed with a newfound caution, you look around for the offending object and realize that IT’S A SIGN ABOUT THE SIGN ITSELF."

The dumbest sign in internet history: a sign warning you against hitting your head on the sign itself. WHAT?

"This is one of the most bizarre signs I have ever encountered. The sign is comical in itself: stick figure rides up the escalator and bumps his head on a hanging sign, the impact causing VIOLENT RED RAYS OF PAIN. Beware! All is well and good until, armed with a newfound caution, you look around for the offending object and realize that IT’S A SIGN ABOUT THE SIGN ITSELF."

The dumbest sign in internet history: a sign warning you against hitting your head on the sign itself. WHAT?___

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2014-08-17 07:32:14 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 11 +1s) 

"From Dean Peters on the subject of the Universe’s history: “The NASA image puts the first stars forming about 400 million years after the Big Bang, but the heavily modified Brock et al. image puts the first formations at 200 million years.“

This is a really excellent point! Is it a contradiction? Let’s examine more closely what we mean when we talk about the first stars in the Universe. Are you talking about when the Universe’s ionization fraction began to rise significantly above the epoch where all atoms were neutral? Are we talking about a time where a significant portion of the Universe — perhaps the seeds of where we now see galaxies — have for the most part began forming stars? Are we talking about a time where a typical-magnitude density fluctuation grew into a star-forming region? Or are we, perhaps, talking about the time where the very first few stars in ourobservable Un... more »

"From Dean Peters on the subject of the Universe’s history: “The NASA image puts the first stars forming about 400 million years after the Big Bang, but the heavily modified Brock et al. image puts the first formations at 200 million years.“

This is a really excellent point! Is it a contradiction? Let’s examine more closely what we mean when we talk about the first stars in the Universe. Are you talking about when the Universe’s ionization fraction began to rise significantly above the epoch where all atoms were neutral? Are we talking about a time where a significant portion of the Universe — perhaps the seeds of where we now see galaxies — have for the most part began forming stars? Are we talking about a time where a typical-magnitude density fluctuation grew into a star-forming region? Or are we, perhaps, talking about the time where the very first few stars in our observable Universe began to form: where we went from a Universe with zero stars to a Universe with more than zero?"

Some great questions, comments, and the opportunity to clear up some common misconceptions all on this edition of the comments of the week!___

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2014-08-15 23:07:19 (2 comments, 6 reshares, 23 +1s) 

"And yet, that very much describes the Universe we have, which didn’t collapse immediately and which didn’t expand too rapidly to form complex structures, and instead gave rise to all the wondrous diversity of nuclear, atomic, molecular, cellular, geologic, planetary, stellar, galactic and clustering phenomena we have today. We’re lucky enough to be around right now, to have learned all we have about it, and to engage in the enterprise of learning even more: science."

With some 10^90 particles in the observable Universe, even stretched across 92 billion light-years today, the Universe is precariously close to recollapsing. How, then, is it possible that back in the early stages after the Big Bang, when all this matter-and-energy was concentrated within a region of space no bigger than our current Solar System, the Universe didn't collapse down to a black hole? Not only do wehave ... more »

"And yet, that very much describes the Universe we have, which didn’t collapse immediately and which didn’t expand too rapidly to form complex structures, and instead gave rise to all the wondrous diversity of nuclear, atomic, molecular, cellular, geologic, planetary, stellar, galactic and clustering phenomena we have today. We’re lucky enough to be around right now, to have learned all we have about it, and to engage in the enterprise of learning even more: science."

With some 10^90 particles in the observable Universe, even stretched across 92 billion light-years today, the Universe is precariously close to recollapsing. How, then, is it possible that back in the early stages after the Big Bang, when all this matter-and-energy was concentrated within a region of space no bigger than our current Solar System, the Universe didn't collapse down to a black hole? Not only do we have the explanation, but we learn that even if the Universe did recollapse, we wouldn't get a black hole at all!___

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2014-08-15 01:53:01 (1 comments, 3 reshares, 15 +1s) 

"For a long time, we thought this event, estimated to have occurred in 1680, was the Milky Way’s most recent supernova. But remember the following:

-We’re some 25,000 light-years from the galactic center,
-Supernovae occur about once-per-century in galaxies,
-We haven’t seen a supernova since 1604, and
-We were able to find one only 11,000 light-years away that occurred since that 1604 event.

Are there others that occurred since 1680? Up until relatively recently, we would have said “quite possibly,” but we wouldn’t have been sure."

Did you know the Milky Way had a supernova go off in it as recently as the 1860s?!

"For a long time, we thought this event, estimated to have occurred in 1680, was the Milky Way’s most recent supernova. But remember the following:

-We’re some 25,000 light-years from the galactic center,
-Supernovae occur about once-per-century in galaxies,
-We haven’t seen a supernova since 1604, and
-We were able to find one only 11,000 light-years away that occurred since that 1604 event.

Are there others that occurred since 1680? Up until relatively recently, we would have said “quite possibly,” but we wouldn’t have been sure."

Did you know the Milky Way had a supernova go off in it as recently as the 1860s?!___

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2014-08-14 01:08:21 (0 comments, 4 reshares, 22 +1s) 

"You might think that this means that the overdense regions will grow unabated, while the underdense regions will shrink, giving up their matter to the denser regions, which are superior at attracting it.

But this intuition greatly oversimplifies things. In reality, when the Universe is dominated by radiation, matter tries to collapse under the force of gravity, but the photon pressure very effectively pushes back outwards with an almost identical force. In reality, the growth is very slow; so long as the radiation density is greater than the matter density, it’s practically negligible. If you have a region of space that starts out 0.001% denser than average — a fairly typical density fluctuation — it won’t become 0.002% denser than average for around 10,000 years, an eternity in the young Universe!"

There was once a time when there were no stars, no galaxies,and no groups o... more »

"You might think that this means that the overdense regions will grow unabated, while the underdense regions will shrink, giving up their matter to the denser regions, which are superior at attracting it.

But this intuition greatly oversimplifies things. In reality, when the Universe is dominated by radiation, matter tries to collapse under the force of gravity, but the photon pressure very effectively pushes back outwards with an almost identical force. In reality, the growth is very slow; so long as the radiation density is greater than the matter density, it’s practically negligible. If you have a region of space that starts out 0.001% denser than average — a fairly typical density fluctuation — it won’t become 0.002% denser than average for around 10,000 years, an eternity in the young Universe!"

There was once a time when there were no stars, no galaxies, and no groups or clusters. These all formed, so at some point, the Universe was able to build these structures where there were none before. But today, everything that isn’t already gravitationally bound to itself never will be. How did we go from a perfectly uniform Universe to an almost perfectly uniform one, to one with stars, galaxies, and clusters, to one that won't result in any new gravitationally-bound structures anymore? The physics of gravitational growth (and its end); a fascinating story.___

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2014-08-12 17:01:50 (5 comments, 8 reshares, 27 +1s) 

"It was in fact Heisenberg who first suggested that the divergences in quantum field theory might be cured by the existence of a fundamentally minimal length, and he introduced it by making position operators non-commuting among themselves. Just as the non-commutativity of momentum and position operators leads to an uncertainty principle, the non-commutativity of position operators limits how well distances can be measured."

Yes, it's true that quantum physics from measuring a property such as length or distance to an arbitrary accuracy, but does that necessarily mean that there is a fundamentally "smallest" scale to the Universe? One of physics' great open questions for millennia is still relevant, and Sabine Hossenfelder has a great exploration of it here!

"It was in fact Heisenberg who first suggested that the divergences in quantum field theory might be cured by the existence of a fundamentally minimal length, and he introduced it by making position operators non-commuting among themselves. Just as the non-commutativity of momentum and position operators leads to an uncertainty principle, the non-commutativity of position operators limits how well distances can be measured."

Yes, it's true that quantum physics from measuring a property such as length or distance to an arbitrary accuracy, but does that necessarily mean that there is a fundamentally "smallest" scale to the Universe? One of physics' great open questions for millennia is still relevant, and Sabine Hossenfelder has a great exploration of it here!___

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2014-08-12 01:30:08 (2 comments, 1 reshares, 16 +1s) 

"Traditionally, black holes are detected by using radio waves, but globular clusters are simply too dense and too noisy to have that be a reliable method. Instead, it’s X-rays from gas being accelerated and heated up by the black hole that’s the first signature, which can then be followed-up with high-resolution radio observations to provide confirmation.

The first globular cluster to house a black hole was only discovered in 2007, but that was outside our galaxy. Using that same technique, however, proved incredibly fruitful for Messier 62!"

The Milky Way's first globular cluster with a black hole! It took almost 250 years to find it, and now it's been confirmed. Happy #MessierMonday, everyone!

"Traditionally, black holes are detected by using radio waves, but globular clusters are simply too dense and too noisy to have that be a reliable method. Instead, it’s X-rays from gas being accelerated and heated up by the black hole that’s the first signature, which can then be followed-up with high-resolution radio observations to provide confirmation.

The first globular cluster to house a black hole was only discovered in 2007, but that was outside our galaxy. Using that same technique, however, proved incredibly fruitful for Messier 62!"

The Milky Way's first globular cluster with a black hole! It took almost 250 years to find it, and now it's been confirmed. Happy #MessierMonday, everyone!___

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2014-08-10 18:03:50 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s) 

"I remember I was in New York back in 1993 and every day for a week or two, I kept getting telephone calls about somebody we knew was gone — had just died — whether it was a close friend or somebody in the business. It felt like… a plague. It’s been over 25 years now since Sylvester died, but HIV/AIDS organizations still need help. I have always maintained that I wish I wasn’t doing AIDS benefits, but I will continue to do them until this nightmare will really be over."

What happens when Martha Wash -- a remarkable woman with a remarkable story and an amazing set of pipes -- goes on the game show "I've got a secret," and one of her biggest fans meets her for the first time? A heartwarming must-watch for anyone interested in seeing what pure joy looks like!

"I remember I was in New York back in 1993 and every day for a week or two, I kept getting telephone calls about somebody we knew was gone — had just died — whether it was a close friend or somebody in the business. It felt like… a plague. It’s been over 25 years now since Sylvester died, but HIV/AIDS organizations still need help. I have always maintained that I wish I wasn’t doing AIDS benefits, but I will continue to do them until this nightmare will really be over."

What happens when Martha Wash -- a remarkable woman with a remarkable story and an amazing set of pipes -- goes on the game show "I've got a secret," and one of her biggest fans meets her for the first time? A heartwarming must-watch for anyone interested in seeing what pure joy looks like!___

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2014-08-09 17:41:03 (8 comments, 1 reshares, 8 +1s) 

"[M]y intent was never to say that this is total garbage and that no one should waste their time researching devices that could surprise us.

To quite the contrary, it was to state that if you think you have an idea that pushes any sort of boundary, you have to do a lot more than validate it with a marginally competent test. You need to subject it to intense experimental rigor, and that includes careful controls, reproducibility, and robustly significant results, among other things. The N-rays results (to which Michael Richmond had an amazing comment as well) were a stellar example of where this failed, and all of those same signs are at play here. I’m not saying this device is a fraud, but I’m saying that if you want scientifically-minded people to begin giving credulity to these results, you need much better results."

Some great questions and answers about the greatnew... more »

"[M]y intent was never to say that this is total garbage and that no one should waste their time researching devices that could surprise us.

To quite the contrary, it was to state that if you think you have an idea that pushes any sort of boundary, you have to do a lot more than validate it with a marginally competent test. You need to subject it to intense experimental rigor, and that includes careful controls, reproducibility, and robustly significant results, among other things. The N-rays results (to which Michael Richmond had an amazing comment as well) were a stellar example of where this failed, and all of those same signs are at play here. I’m not saying this device is a fraud, but I’m saying that if you want scientifically-minded people to begin giving credulity to these results, you need much better results."

Some great questions and answers about the great news, from spinning galaxies to higher dimensions to how to view the Perseids from the land down under!___

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2014-08-09 15:46:13 (2 comments, 5 reshares, 25 +1s) 

"Scientists are fairly confident that they understand the evolution of the universe right back to the very instants before the big bang. They are also confident that the universe is composed largely of dark matter, whose composition is unknown, and it’s dynamics are dominated by dark energy, which is also not well understood (is it a new force?)

How is it possible to extrapolate back to the big bang, when so little of the matter and force in the universe is understood?"

Given the fact that dark matter and dark energy make up 95% of all the Universe, does that leave any wiggle room for the Big Bang to possibly be wrong? A killer question for this week's Ask Ethan!

"Scientists are fairly confident that they understand the evolution of the universe right back to the very instants before the big bang. They are also confident that the universe is composed largely of dark matter, whose composition is unknown, and it’s dynamics are dominated by dark energy, which is also not well understood (is it a new force?)

How is it possible to extrapolate back to the big bang, when so little of the matter and force in the universe is understood?"

Given the fact that dark matter and dark energy make up 95% of all the Universe, does that leave any wiggle room for the Big Bang to possibly be wrong? A killer question for this week's Ask Ethan!___

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2014-08-08 02:29:24 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 11 +1s) 

"When a comet (or asteroid) swings too close to the Sun, the radiation from the Sun causes some of the ices to melt, creating the spectacular and characteristic comet tails that have delighted skywatchers since the dawn of humanity.

When a comet (or asteroid) swings too close to the Sun, the radiation from the Sun causes some of the ices to melt, creating the spectacular and characteristic comet tails that have delighted skywatchers since the dawn of humanity."

But if that's what you think, you've only got it partially right! Tonight and every night for the next week, the Perseids will light up the night sky after sunset. Here's where to find them, where they come from and everything else you wanted to know about meteors, including some surprises you'd never expect!

"When a comet (or asteroid) swings too close to the Sun, the radiation from the Sun causes some of the ices to melt, creating the spectacular and characteristic comet tails that have delighted skywatchers since the dawn of humanity.

When a comet (or asteroid) swings too close to the Sun, the radiation from the Sun causes some of the ices to melt, creating the spectacular and characteristic comet tails that have delighted skywatchers since the dawn of humanity."

But if that's what you think, you've only got it partially right! Tonight and every night for the next week, the Perseids will light up the night sky after sunset. Here's where to find them, where they come from and everything else you wanted to know about meteors, including some surprises you'd never expect!___

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2014-08-06 23:39:34 (2 comments, 13 reshares, 29 +1s) 

"“After spending three hours or more in witnessing various experiments, I am not only unable to report a single observation which appeared to indicate the existence of the rays, but left with a very firm conviction that the few experimenters who have obtained positive results, have been in some way deluded.”"

Over 100 years ago, scientists deluded themselves with N-rays, an amazing phenomenon that simply couldn't be consistently replicated. If you've read about NASA's validated 'impossible' space engine, you might notice some eerie similarities. Here's how to avoid fooling yourself in the future!

"“After spending three hours or more in witnessing various experiments, I am not only unable to report a single observation which appeared to indicate the existence of the rays, but left with a very firm conviction that the few experimenters who have obtained positive results, have been in some way deluded.”"

Over 100 years ago, scientists deluded themselves with N-rays, an amazing phenomenon that simply couldn't be consistently replicated. If you've read about NASA's validated 'impossible' space engine, you might notice some eerie similarities. Here's how to avoid fooling yourself in the future!___

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2014-08-05 15:48:43 (0 comments, 17 reshares, 33 +1s) 

"“Lovelace’s paper was quite a shock to everyone,” Caltech physicist John Schwarz, who was then at Princeton,” recalled during a talk in 2000, “since until then nobody considered allowing the dimension of spacetime to be anything but four. We were doing hadron physics, after all, and four was certainly the right answer.”"

Meet the man who brought physics out of our simple 3-space-and-1-time dimensions and into the physically real possibility of many more! Thanks to our new writer Paul Halpern for a great piece!

"“Lovelace’s paper was quite a shock to everyone,” Caltech physicist John Schwarz, who was then at Princeton,” recalled during a talk in 2000, “since until then nobody considered allowing the dimension of spacetime to be anything but four. We were doing hadron physics, after all, and four was certainly the right answer.”"

Meet the man who brought physics out of our simple 3-space-and-1-time dimensions and into the physically real possibility of many more! Thanks to our new writer Paul Halpern for a great piece!___

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2014-08-05 02:46:14 (0 comments, 3 reshares, 14 +1s) 

"Located right in the plane of our galaxy — visible from the northern hemisphere most clearly after sunset on a summer’s night — lies the densest collection of stars the entire sky has to offer. But unlike the other stars that make up objects in the Messier catalogue, this isn’t a cluster we’re looking at, but a glimpse at one of our galaxy’s spiral arms, seen from our vantage point over 10,000 light-years away!

Today’s object is the one-of-a-kind curiosity: Messier 24, the Sagittarius Star Cloud."

Here's what we see when we look through the largest hole in our galaxy!

"Located right in the plane of our galaxy — visible from the northern hemisphere most clearly after sunset on a summer’s night — lies the densest collection of stars the entire sky has to offer. But unlike the other stars that make up objects in the Messier catalogue, this isn’t a cluster we’re looking at, but a glimpse at one of our galaxy’s spiral arms, seen from our vantage point over 10,000 light-years away!

Today’s object is the one-of-a-kind curiosity: Messier 24, the Sagittarius Star Cloud."

Here's what we see when we look through the largest hole in our galaxy!___

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2014-08-02 22:25:27 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 15 +1s) 

"As the start of August marks the 70th anniversary of the beginning of the Warsaw uprising, one of the bravest acts during one of the darkest times in recent human history, I thought it would be only fitting to highlight one of Poland’s national treasures, whose art resonates about the state of our existence in these modern times regardless of whether you understand a single word of English (or Polish) or not."

A picture is worth 1,000 words, they say, but Polish cartoonist Pawel Kuczynski nails what he does so well that his images will leave you without the need to say anything at all. Hacks like Andy Borowitz, take note: this is how satire is done.

"As the start of August marks the 70th anniversary of the beginning of the Warsaw uprising, one of the bravest acts during one of the darkest times in recent human history, I thought it would be only fitting to highlight one of Poland’s national treasures, whose art resonates about the state of our existence in these modern times regardless of whether you understand a single word of English (or Polish) or not."

A picture is worth 1,000 words, they say, but Polish cartoonist Pawel Kuczynski nails what he does so well that his images will leave you without the need to say anything at all. Hacks like Andy Borowitz, take note: this is how satire is done.___

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2014-08-02 19:16:53 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s) 

"Let’s be completely honest here about what we know to the best of our ability: scientifically, we can extrapolate back to before there were humans, before there was life, our Earth, our Sun, any stars or galaxies, or even matter-and-radiation in our Universe, and trace out our entire cosmic history without the necessity for anything other than the physical laws of nature. It’s amazing what we know!

But that same knowledge is also limited in principle. There are a finite number of particles with a finite number of interactions that have been around for a finite amount of time, and hence the information that the Universe contains is finite. In other words, if we keep asking questions, we’ll eventually run across questions that the Universe does not contain enough information to answer."

From science and religion to galaxies, lasers, the mars rovers, atoms and newwrite... more »

"Let’s be completely honest here about what we know to the best of our ability: scientifically, we can extrapolate back to before there were humans, before there was life, our Earth, our Sun, any stars or galaxies, or even matter-and-radiation in our Universe, and trace out our entire cosmic history without the necessity for anything other than the physical laws of nature. It’s amazing what we know!

But that same knowledge is also limited in principle. There are a finite number of particles with a finite number of interactions that have been around for a finite amount of time, and hence the information that the Universe contains is finite. In other words, if we keep asking questions, we’ll eventually run across questions that the Universe does not contain enough information to answer."

From science and religion to galaxies, lasers, the mars rovers, atoms and new writers, find out (and chime in) as to what you'd like to see next!___

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