Login now

Not your profile? Login and get free access to your reports and analysis.

Tags

Sign in

No tag added here yet.
You can login on CircleCount to add some tags here.

Are you missing a tag in the list of available tags? You can suggest new tags here.

Login now

Do you want to see a more detailed chart? Check your settings and define your favorite chart type.

Or click here to get the detailed chart only once.

Shared Circles including Bryan Jones

Shared Circles are not available on Google+ anymore, but you can find them still here.

The Google+ Collections of Bryan Jones

115230695084310626614 has no public Google+ Collections yet.

Activity

Average numbers for the latest posts (max. 50 posts, posted within the last 4 weeks)

3
comments per post
0
reshares per post
4
+1's per post

1,556
characters per posting

Top posts in the last 50 posts

Most comments: 35

posted image

2012-04-09 04:25:48 (35 comments, 1 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

What's politics got to do with it?

My first post ever on a social network was last August when I joined G+. And it was my political compass...then. For reasons unknown to me, my good friend, +barqzr davi, recently canoed all the way down through the whitewaters of my stream until he found that me of yesteryear.

I urged him to do his own political compass test, which he did and then shared with me. So, out of mild curiosity, I took the test again (http://politicalcompass.org/) just to see if my political bent has changed in less than one year.

Turns out I'm bent more to the left and more libertarian than before. (Previously, I was roughly two squares to the east and one to the north.) If I lean any more to the left, I'll fall off the frickin' planet.

What's your bent?

Please +mention me if you share your particular bent,... more »

Most reshares: 5

posted image

2012-02-01 00:41:54 (4 comments, 5 reshares, 30 +1s)Open 

Chinese Art

As indicated, here is the more colorful work of Foshan artist Hua Tunan...

#chineseart

Most plusones: 30

posted image

2012-02-01 00:41:54 (4 comments, 5 reshares, 30 +1s)Open 

Chinese Art

As indicated, here is the more colorful work of Foshan artist Hua Tunan...

#chineseart

Latest 50 posts

posted image

2015-08-30 01:33:18 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
Absolutely nothing to do with China...for a change

The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
Absolutely nothing to do with China...for a change___

posted image

2015-08-25 02:23:24 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

For Chinese Only

Recently, as were e-scootin' our way to the morning market...

Me: "It's almost cool today. Seems like the worst of summer is over."

Wife: "I told you a couple of weeks ago about the first day of fall in the Chinese lunar calendar."

Me: "Yeah, but in my hometown (Austin, Texas) we'd still be toodling around in triple-digit weather."

Wife: "Well, it's the Chinese lunar calendar. It's only good for Chinese."

Me: "Oh..."

I know, I know. The art is the Chinese zodiac. Just couldn't snag anything sexy for the lunar calendar.

#china   #chineselunarcalendar  

For Chinese Only

Recently, as were e-scootin' our way to the morning market...

Me: "It's almost cool today. Seems like the worst of summer is over."

Wife: "I told you a couple of weeks ago about the first day of fall in the Chinese lunar calendar."

Me: "Yeah, but in my hometown (Austin, Texas) we'd still be toodling around in triple-digit weather."

Wife: "Well, it's the Chinese lunar calendar. It's only good for Chinese."

Me: "Oh..."

I know, I know. The art is the Chinese zodiac. Just couldn't snag anything sexy for the lunar calendar.

#china   #chineselunarcalendar  ___

posted image

2015-08-25 01:22:21 (9 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Keeping priorities straight
Defense budgets worldwide...nuff said...

Keeping priorities straight
Defense budgets worldwide...nuff said...___

posted image

2015-08-23 04:23:14 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Breakfast in Hubei

Noodles are a common breakfast staple in China. Though they aren't my idea of a truly satisfying breakfast, they are filling and can be tasty, if you chance upon the right dive.

This is a bowl of suan cai rou si mian, essentially rice noodles with pork and pickled veggies. Mix in a little dollop of hot pepper paste/jam and you're good to go.

The black bowl on the right is filled with huang jiu, known as yellow wine. A lovely, if a tad sweet alcohol made from sticky rice. You can get a bowl of 6-8% huang jiu for 1RMB, about 15¢ (and refills are commonly free, kinda like coffee only with more buzz), or a bowl of 12% for 5RMB, about 78¢. Me, I prefer the stronger, even though they charge and I usually have two bowls. The noodles are 5RMB, so this breakfast cost roughly $2.35.

What does your typical breakfast cost you?
more »

Breakfast in Hubei

Noodles are a common breakfast staple in China. Though they aren't my idea of a truly satisfying breakfast, they are filling and can be tasty, if you chance upon the right dive.

This is a bowl of suan cai rou si mian, essentially rice noodles with pork and pickled veggies. Mix in a little dollop of hot pepper paste/jam and you're good to go.

The black bowl on the right is filled with huang jiu, known as yellow wine. A lovely, if a tad sweet alcohol made from sticky rice. You can get a bowl of 6-8% huang jiu for 1RMB, about 15¢ (and refills are commonly free, kinda like coffee only with more buzz), or a bowl of 12% for 5RMB, about 78¢. Me, I prefer the stronger, even though they charge and I usually have two bowls. The noodles are 5RMB, so this breakfast cost roughly $2.35.

What does your typical breakfast cost you?

BTW, huang jiu and having it with breakfast is most definitely a regional thing. I've lived in four provinces now and it seems only Hubei people make and enjoy huang jiu with breakfast. I'm going to have a go at it and I'll let you know whether it pans out.

#chinesefood   #iphone6   #iphoneography  ___

posted image

2015-08-22 02:12:39 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Europeans...according to Chinese people

Based on Baidu (China's take on Google) auto-complete search queries, this map compiled by Foreign Policy offers a little insight into what Chinese people think, or wonder, about their neighbors to the west. You can read the complete article here: https://goo.gl/nY3r7H

Conversely, I'm curious how your Google search about China would read?

Europeans...according to Chinese people

Based on Baidu (China's take on Google) auto-complete search queries, this map compiled by Foreign Policy offers a little insight into what Chinese people think, or wonder, about their neighbors to the west. You can read the complete article here: https://goo.gl/nY3r7H

Conversely, I'm curious how your Google search about China would read?___

posted image

2015-08-17 03:23:37 (7 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Drunken Crawfish
If one bowl doesn't get your buzz on...

When I landed in China back in September of 2005, the first city I lived in was Xiangfan (since renamed Xiangyang) in the Hubei province. One of the local specialties is da xia, or crawfish. A fabulously hot and spicy take on one of my favorite crustaceans. And, IMHO, better than any Cajun crawfish I've ever had.

The crawfish are cooked in oil (not boiled) and the whole dish is infused with a palette of spices and flavorings designed to tickle the palate...mainly including garlic, ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, salt and a generous helping of Sichuan peppers for the requisite numbingly hot and spicy overtone.

We returned for a visit recently and...having lived in northeast China (Dalian) for the past five years where the local fare is astoundingly bland and boring...you can imagine that our mouths were... more »

Drunken Crawfish
If one bowl doesn't get your buzz on...

When I landed in China back in September of 2005, the first city I lived in was Xiangfan (since renamed Xiangyang) in the Hubei province. One of the local specialties is da xia, or crawfish. A fabulously hot and spicy take on one of my favorite crustaceans. And, IMHO, better than any Cajun crawfish I've ever had.

The crawfish are cooked in oil (not boiled) and the whole dish is infused with a palette of spices and flavorings designed to tickle the palate...mainly including garlic, ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, salt and a generous helping of Sichuan peppers for the requisite numbingly hot and spicy overtone.

We returned for a visit recently and...having lived in northeast China (Dalian) for the past five years where the local fare is astoundingly bland and boring...you can imagine that our mouths were watering in anticipation. However, to our dismay, our former crawfish mainstay, a true dive yet long on flavor, was long gone.

That first night we tried a place on the same street dishing out bowls for 68RMB, roughly $10. And left hugely disappointed. The next morning we went out for breakfast to a spot famous for its beef noodles. When two men sat down next to us and began busily slurping away at their bowls of noodles, we asked if they could recommend a good place.

Turned out that one was a government official, the other his driver. Our good fortune because government officials always know the best places for currying favor, or flavor as it were. As we all finished our noodles, the official offered to drive us to his favorite restaurant...a place where he said they set up 100 tables each night in an open courtyard at the corner of an intersection next to the Hanjiang River.

Since he said the place was always packed, even more so from 10pm to midnight with late night diners, we chose to arrive early, around 5:30pm, just as an army of 20 workers was setting up tables. Yes, all 100 of them, so he wasn't lying. And the kitchen wasn't open yet. Sigh.

Not to fear though...because in China, if there is one kind of business on a street, it's always surrounded by at least a dozen of the same ilk. A slow amble 20 meters down the block and we were seated and had ordered a bowl for 98RMB, or $15. Which turned out to be no better than the previous night flavor-wise and even worse since most of the crawfish were dead before they were cooked. Mealy, crumbling, disappointing.

Still hungry and by now more than a little worried about the fate of our crawfish expedition, we went back up the street to the place on the corner where the tables were now all set and the kitchen was open for business. Plopped ourselves down and ordered their 198RMB, $25 bowl of crawfish!! Opened the standard issue, plastic-wrapped set of dish, rice bowl, spoon and cup and sat there with kuaizi (chopsticks) in hand.

Twenty minutes later the bowl arrives. Cautiously, tentatively, hopefully...we suck the juices from the body, pluck out a plump tail and pop into our mouths. Gleefully, blissfully, gratefully...we beam at each other and greedily dive back into the bowl of crawfish.

We had truly arrived at crawfish heaven. Uber crawfish. Tebie hao da xia. Especially good crawfish. Our only complaint when the crawfish ran out was that we had already blunted our appetites at the previous total fail.

So, since one bowl wasn't enough that night. We went back the next night and ordered two bowls. Ate 'em all up. And again the next night. And the next. And the next. Yes, we went there five nights in a row. (I'll leave it up to you to tot up our crawfish tab for all six nights.)

That first night the army of waiters...because I'm laowai, a foreigner...alternately beamed and/or shyly smiled at us. The second night they all nudged each other, laughing and giggling. The rest of the nights they simply stared at us in utter amazement. One waiter, a girl, even came up to us the last night to ask if we weren't worried about getting doudou, pimples...from all the hot and spicy food.

To round this up and harking back to the title of my post, any specialty is going to be slightly different from place to place. We rarely go out since we both like to cook, but when we do and especially when we're traveling we both enjoy picking out, trying to detect the subtleties of flavor.

In pecking through the dregs of the bowls at this wonderful pai dang, or al fresco establishment, as well as smacking our numb lips and sucking on our hot tongues to wring out the final, lingering tones of flavor...it was obvious this place had its own signature ingredients.

One thing we puzzled over was what my wife called a poppy nut in Chinese, not seeds. Definitely nut looking. We took one with us, but I can't find it in order to show you. Yet she had a strong feeling it was somehow related to the poppy plant and, hence, perhaps some side effects. IDK.

As for the boozy crawfish, there was no doubt the chef was using bai jiu, which translates as white wine, yet it's no wine at all. Rather it's a strong liquor typically made from sorghum or maize, which tastes like an apocalyptic combination of kerosene and jet fuel. And I'm not exaggerating.

Drinking bai jiu (and smoking) drives all male encounters in China. And when they say gan bei, bottoms up, they mean it. Picture a common restaurant juice glass, say maybe 3-4 ounces. Bottoms up. Over and over. I used to participate (when in China...) out of respect and courtesy, but haven't touched a drop in, oh, 6-7 years. It's that bad.

Anywaaay, when we finished that first night, my wife said she was feeling tipsy. Like the majority of women here she doesn't really drink (or smoke) and we'd both been sucking every drop of juice out of every crawfish. I was feeling tipsy, too. As if I'd had two quick shots of tequila.

My wife's personal take on crawfish is just as good (lucky me, she hails from Hubei), but different. She's looking to tinker with her recipe now, so maybe I'll report back later before they go out of season.

In the meantime, if by chance you ever find yourself in Xiangyang, definitely go for the drunken crawfish.

#chinesefood   #iphone6   #iphoneography  ___

posted image

2015-08-16 01:32:28 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 4 +1s)Open 

Chinese countryside at 200kph
In slo-mo [240fps]

My first stab at using the slo-mo setting with my iPhone 6 during a return trip on a fast train from Xiangyan city in the Hubei province of central China to Nanjing in the Jiangsu province near the eastern seaboard.

I stitched 4-5 clips together and the final part is as you cross the Yangtse River just before entering Nanjing.

#iphone6    #iphoneography   #videography   #china  

Chinese countryside at 200kph
In slo-mo [240fps]

My first stab at using the slo-mo setting with my iPhone 6 during a return trip on a fast train from Xiangyan city in the Hubei province of central China to Nanjing in the Jiangsu province near the eastern seaboard.

I stitched 4-5 clips together and the final part is as you cross the Yangtse River just before entering Nanjing.

#iphone6    #iphoneography   #videography   #china  ___

posted image

2014-04-28 02:35:25 (9 comments, 1 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

Big Bang Theory falls afoul in China

The Chinese internet is abuzz after some American TV shows have apparently been axed (since yesterday) by a stricter content policy by the government. The Big Bang Theory, The Good Wife, The Practice and NCIS are four of the shows I've seen mentioned so far. Numerous video websites now show “due to [government] policy reasons, this video is unable to be viewed.”

I'm a little surprised House of Cards, which is hugely popular over here, hasn't been axed, too. Especially the second season which has a fairly negative Chinese presence.

The second photo is a still from a Chinese TV series showing a Chinese kungfu master ripping a Japanese soldier in half with his bare hands. Every day, pretty much all day, you can watch the Japanese devils getting their due at the hands of avenging Chinese.

Following are someof t... more »

Big Bang Theory falls afoul in China

The Chinese internet is abuzz after some American TV shows have apparently been axed (since yesterday) by a stricter content policy by the government. The Big Bang Theory, The Good Wife, The Practice and NCIS are four of the shows I've seen mentioned so far. Numerous video websites now show “due to [government] policy reasons, this video is unable to be viewed.”

I'm a little surprised House of Cards, which is hugely popular over here, hasn't been axed, too. Especially the second season which has a fairly negative Chinese presence.

The second photo is a still from a Chinese TV series showing a Chinese kungfu master ripping a Japanese soldier in half with his bare hands. Every day, pretty much all day, you can watch the Japanese devils getting their due at the hands of avenging Chinese.

Following are some of the comments I've run into on the internet...

I suggest they just broadcast Japanese devils being ripped in half with bare hands epics everyday!

What content is in The Big Bang Theory? Is it very yellow, very violent? If it isn’t, then why take it down? Learning from North Korea?

In 1987, China’s first email marked China’s entry into the Internet Age, and the content of that email was “Across the Great Wall we can reach every corner in the world. (越过长城,走向世界)”. Just how much of a joke that looks today.

Even if all foreign shows are taken down, I still won’t watch [domestic] brainwashing TV shows and garbage TV shows!

Are we only allowed to watch various ridiculous TV shows about abusing Little Japan?

I thank the government and thank the Party! For truly going through a lot of trouble for the people!

Even The Big Bang Theory…are you serious?

Sheldon sometimes mentions China, and does so in ridicule or as a joke. If this were to come from the mouths of politicians, then I think I would not be comfortable hearing it. But this is from the mouth of Sheldon, whose emotional quotient is 0. Americans making fun of you means China is constantly expanding its influence in America. This is the mentality of amusement of Americans, and China instead pettily refuses to be made fun of. May I ask, where is the self-confidence and charisma of China as a large country/major power? I don’t see it. I’m very disappointed.

BTW, one of the comments asked if The Big Bang Theory is very yellow. What we (used to) call blue movies in the West are called huang pian, or yellow movies in China...because, if you watch yellow movies, then you're seeing a lot of yellow skin.___

posted image

2014-04-21 04:02:31 (0 comments, 1 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Battling Myopia

Students at a primary school in Wuhan (Hubei province) returned to school after the winter holiday and found a little extra added to their desks. School officials say the bars will help the students form better reading habits and reduce near-sightedness. (Numbers vary, but I've seen reports citing as high as 80% of high school graduates suffering from myopia.)

BTW, this particular class is comprised of "left-behind" children whose parents are migrant workers in far-flung corners of China.

Battling Myopia

Students at a primary school in Wuhan (Hubei province) returned to school after the winter holiday and found a little extra added to their desks. School officials say the bars will help the students form better reading habits and reduce near-sightedness. (Numbers vary, but I've seen reports citing as high as 80% of high school graduates suffering from myopia.)

BTW, this particular class is comprised of "left-behind" children whose parents are migrant workers in far-flung corners of China.___

posted image

2014-04-17 03:28:50 (3 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

China Vagina Monologues

The Gender Activism Club at the Beijing Foreign Studies University has been actively, ah, prodding local vaginas to speak up...

China Vagina Monologues

The Gender Activism Club at the Beijing Foreign Studies University has been actively, ah, prodding local vaginas to speak up...___

posted image

2013-03-26 04:26:56 (5 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Analyst...at your service

I'm snagging a tip from +Marc Jansen today. Instead of posting more Chinese art, or some quirky Sino-related tidbit, I found something interesting three degrees removed from me in my stream. And appropriated it. You may, or may not, find it interesting, too.

This post resonated with me because I'm newly returned to G+ after an almost one year hiatus. I had contemplated abandoning the Google social ship altogether, but one aspect of being an expatriate (eight years now) drew me back onboard.

Isolation...

My wife jokes with me at times that I'm more yellow than she is...meaning more Chinese than her. And I have assimilated a great deal. I know, I understand a lot more about Chinese culture and Chinese people, and even the language, than I did before I came here. However long I live here though, I simply livewi... more »

Analyst...at your service

I'm snagging a tip from +Marc Jansen today. Instead of posting more Chinese art, or some quirky Sino-related tidbit, I found something interesting three degrees removed from me in my stream. And appropriated it. You may, or may not, find it interesting, too.

This post resonated with me because I'm newly returned to G+ after an almost one year hiatus. I had contemplated abandoning the Google social ship altogether, but one aspect of being an expatriate (eight years now) drew me back onboard.

Isolation...

My wife jokes with me at times that I'm more yellow than she is...meaning more Chinese than her. And I have assimilated a great deal. I know, I understand a lot more about Chinese culture and Chinese people, and even the language, than I did before I came here. However long I live here though, I simply live within the culture, not in it. I'm not Chinese and never will be, even if they were interested in expanding their population via immigration/naturalization.

I do have Chinese friends, yet the reality is that these relationships don't provide the same scope, the depth and breadth friendship requires so that you feel connected to another human being. As much as I enjoy my life here, I need that kind of connection. And interaction.

I need that Na'vi, I see you. I get you. I know where you're coming from. Which I can tell you from a great deal of experience doesn't grow on the tea bushes here in China. And it's not in the grains of sand on the beach 500 meters from my door.

But it just might be in the grains of sand in this virtual sandbox. It was here before...before I abandoned ship, before I needed to deal with the barnacles dragging my life down into murky water. I've only been back a few days but it's still here.

You are still here. So thank you.

I'm still evaluating how to get the most out of my time online. Which is why the original post about leadORS profiles, or personalities, caught my attention. And why I followed up by taking the quick profile indicator.

It says I'm an Analyst. Closed. Selective. Supportive.

Maybe this post even supports that diagnosis. I don't know. You tell me. But I do know that it's one more data point to help me analyze how to maximize my online time so I can See You.
_____________________________________________________________

You can find +martin shervington's OP here: http://goo.gl/MsqZT
And the leadORS short questionnaire here: http://www.leadors.co

Note: you do have to register with leadORS in order to take the questionnaire, but I didn't personally find that too threatening.

Found via +Marcelo Almeida via +Max Huijgen ___

posted image

2013-03-25 08:04:26 (3 comments, 2 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

I See You!

Here's an album of paintings by Chinese artist Guo Jin. This series has a particular focus on children. Some people interpret these as an expression, maybe even a juxtaposition, of youth and China's relatively youthful entrance into the global scheme of things. I don't know. Just telling you what I hear.

Personally, while I do enjoy the tones and textures of his work. And the expressive nature of them, I find many of them rather eery and unsettling...as if they are some adolescent character leaping out of the page of a Stephen King tome. No?

Born in Chengdu, Sichuan in 1964, Guo Jin graduated from the Sichuan Academy of Fine Arts in 1990 and is now a professor there.

#chineseart  

I See You!

Here's an album of paintings by Chinese artist Guo Jin. This series has a particular focus on children. Some people interpret these as an expression, maybe even a juxtaposition, of youth and China's relatively youthful entrance into the global scheme of things. I don't know. Just telling you what I hear.

Personally, while I do enjoy the tones and textures of his work. And the expressive nature of them, I find many of them rather eery and unsettling...as if they are some adolescent character leaping out of the page of a Stephen King tome. No?

Born in Chengdu, Sichuan in 1964, Guo Jin graduated from the Sichuan Academy of Fine Arts in 1990 and is now a professor there.

#chineseart  ___

posted image

2013-03-24 03:53:49 (17 comments, 0 reshares, 10 +1s)Open 

Bend...but don't break

This painting by Chinese artist Guo Jin pretty much sums it up. I haven't been active on G+ for about a year now. I got bent. But didn't break. Life goes on.

I may not be as active as before, but I'll be around...looking to reconnect with old friends and maybe discovering and making new ones.

Bend...but don't break

This painting by Chinese artist Guo Jin pretty much sums it up. I haven't been active on G+ for about a year now. I got bent. But didn't break. Life goes on.

I may not be as active as before, but I'll be around...looking to reconnect with old friends and maybe discovering and making new ones.___

posted image

2012-04-16 01:38:33 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

People are People
Depeche Mode (circa 1984)

People are people
So why should it be
You and I should get
Along so awfully
People are people
So why should it be
You and I should get
Along so awfully

So we're different colors
And we're different creeds
And different people have different needs
It's obvious you hate me
Though I've done nothing wrong
I've never even met you so what could I have done

I can't understand
What makes a man
Hate another man
Help me understand

People are people...

Help me understand
Help me understand

Now you're punching
And you're kicking
And you're shouting at me
I'm relying on your common decency
So far it hasn't surfaced
But I'm sure it exists
It just... more »

People are People
Depeche Mode (circa 1984)

People are people
So why should it be
You and I should get
Along so awfully
People are people
So why should it be
You and I should get
Along so awfully

So we're different colors
And we're different creeds
And different people have different needs
It's obvious you hate me
Though I've done nothing wrong
I've never even met you so what could I have done

I can't understand
What makes a man
Hate another man
Help me understand

People are people...

Help me understand
Help me understand

Now you're punching
And you're kicking
And you're shouting at me
I'm relying on your common decency
So far it hasn't surfaced
But I'm sure it exists
It just takes a while to travel
From your head to your fists

I can't understand
What makes a man
Hate another man
Help me understand

My first born, +Brad Jones, has apparently been paying attention to my recent People are People thread and thoughtfully provided the lyrics and the link in a comment on one of my posts. Definitely worth passing along. Kind of gives one a warm, gooey feeling when your child knows how to keep things in perspective. Thanks, guy!___

posted image

2012-04-11 01:47:49 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 17 +1s)Open 

People are people
From fields of rice…to fields of concrete

Under the Gaoqiao overpass of Changsha, capital city of the Hunan province, 13 year old Yang Qing lies on a mat, asleep. Over the past few days, he has been suffering from an unrelenting high fever. His mother depends on shining other people’s shoes to make a living. Knowing it is very expensive to go to the hospital, he sleeps in the cool shadow of the overpass.

Shoeshine ladies are about as ubiquitous as sidewalk snack vendors in most of China, though, for reasons unknown to me, Dalian has far fewer of both. When I first came to China seven years ago, a shoeshine cost yi kuai qian, little more than a dime at yesteryear's exchange rate. Today, a shoeshine will set you back liang kuai qian (2RMB), or a little more than 30 cents. As well, bear in mind that there is no tipping in China for any kind ofser... more »

People are people
From fields of rice…to fields of concrete

Under the Gaoqiao overpass of Changsha, capital city of the Hunan province, 13 year old Yang Qing lies on a mat, asleep. Over the past few days, he has been suffering from an unrelenting high fever. His mother depends on shining other people’s shoes to make a living. Knowing it is very expensive to go to the hospital, he sleeps in the cool shadow of the overpass.

Shoeshine ladies are about as ubiquitous as sidewalk snack vendors in most of China, though, for reasons unknown to me, Dalian has far fewer of both. When I first came to China seven years ago, a shoeshine cost yi kuai qian, little more than a dime at yesteryear's exchange rate. Today, a shoeshine will set you back liang kuai qian (2RMB), or a little more than 30 cents. As well, bear in mind that there is no tipping in China for any kind of service.

I'd always shined my own shoes back in the states, but I gave this a try a few times simply as part of my initial cross-cultural experience. Although it was invariably provided with a warm smile and giggles at being so near a laowai, I always walked away vaguely uneasy. I imagine it's been well over five years since I last sat down in front of a shoeshine lady.

After I saw this photo and read the background, I found myself, again, feeling uneasy. By way of a perhaps misplaced sense of respect, have I rather chosen to deprive some caring, honest and hard-working mother the ability to provide for her child?

You tell me...

No matter where we come from...people are people.___

posted image

2012-04-09 04:25:48 (35 comments, 1 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

What's politics got to do with it?

My first post ever on a social network was last August when I joined G+. And it was my political compass...then. For reasons unknown to me, my good friend, +barqzr davi, recently canoed all the way down through the whitewaters of my stream until he found that me of yesteryear.

I urged him to do his own political compass test, which he did and then shared with me. So, out of mild curiosity, I took the test again (http://politicalcompass.org/) just to see if my political bent has changed in less than one year.

Turns out I'm bent more to the left and more libertarian than before. (Previously, I was roughly two squares to the east and one to the north.) If I lean any more to the left, I'll fall off the frickin' planet.

What's your bent?

Please +mention me if you share your particular bent,... more »

What's politics got to do with it?

My first post ever on a social network was last August when I joined G+. And it was my political compass...then. For reasons unknown to me, my good friend, +barqzr davi, recently canoed all the way down through the whitewaters of my stream until he found that me of yesteryear.

I urged him to do his own political compass test, which he did and then shared with me. So, out of mild curiosity, I took the test again (http://politicalcompass.org/) just to see if my political bent has changed in less than one year.

Turns out I'm bent more to the left and more libertarian than before. (Previously, I was roughly two squares to the east and one to the north.) If I lean any more to the left, I'll fall off the frickin' planet.

What's your bent?

Please +mention me if you share your particular bent, so that I'll be sure to see it!___

posted image

2012-04-06 03:05:37 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 12 +1s)Open 

People are people

Zhong Rujiu holds her older sister, Zhong Ruqin, in the ward of a Beijing hospital. Zhong Rujiu said that her big sister used to hold her warmly like this when she was little. In September of 2010, the Zhong family had a conflict with relocation and demolition personnel about being forced out of their home. Zhong Rujiu's sister, mother and uncle poured gasoline on themselves and set themselves on fire to protest the relocation.

No matter where they come from, people are people

People are people

Zhong Rujiu holds her older sister, Zhong Ruqin, in the ward of a Beijing hospital. Zhong Rujiu said that her big sister used to hold her warmly like this when she was little. In September of 2010, the Zhong family had a conflict with relocation and demolition personnel about being forced out of their home. Zhong Rujiu's sister, mother and uncle poured gasoline on themselves and set themselves on fire to protest the relocation.

No matter where they come from, people are people___

posted image

2012-04-04 23:02:28 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 13 +1s)Open 

People are people

To stand out in a crowd in China is not a good thing. Being unconventional is to defy tradition and tradition is the cornerstone of Chinese harmony.

“My life is unconventional, licentious...like a dog. When I sing, it is to sing my own life."

No matter where they come from, people are people.

People are people

To stand out in a crowd in China is not a good thing. Being unconventional is to defy tradition and tradition is the cornerstone of Chinese harmony.

“My life is unconventional, licentious...like a dog. When I sing, it is to sing my own life."

No matter where they come from, people are people.___

posted image

2012-04-04 02:16:36 (4 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

People are people

Lu Yongming, 17 years old, is just one of literally millions of a younger generation of Chinese who are fleeing the country and flocking to the cities in search of a better life.

“I work as an apprentice in an auto repair shop. Being an apprentice is very hard. Sometimes I even have to work outside when it rains and snows. In this city, I have a 'white collar' big sister, who works in a clean and bright office building. She often buys things for me when she comes to see me. To see my big sister being so refined, while I am covered from head to toe in grease, my buddies often joke about me being a 'black collar.' I don’t like farming, so black collar is still better than 'mud collar.' The rural life, in one word, boring; in two words, very boring."

No matter where you come from...people are people.

People are people

Lu Yongming, 17 years old, is just one of literally millions of a younger generation of Chinese who are fleeing the country and flocking to the cities in search of a better life.

“I work as an apprentice in an auto repair shop. Being an apprentice is very hard. Sometimes I even have to work outside when it rains and snows. In this city, I have a 'white collar' big sister, who works in a clean and bright office building. She often buys things for me when she comes to see me. To see my big sister being so refined, while I am covered from head to toe in grease, my buddies often joke about me being a 'black collar.' I don’t like farming, so black collar is still better than 'mud collar.' The rural life, in one word, boring; in two words, very boring."

No matter where you come from...people are people.___

posted image

2012-04-03 01:18:43 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 8 +1s)Open 

Chinese Expressionism

Those who are familiar with Zeng Fanzhi likely know of him because of his Mask series, one of which (the first in this album) sold for $9.7 million, a record for contemporary Asian art. Zeng was born in Wuhan in 1964, a rather large city in the central province of Hubei, but now lives and works out of Beijing.

The album includes a fair sampling of Zeng's Mask series, a few from his also well-known Hospital series and a couple of paintings of Chairman Mao for good measure.

Hope you enjoy!

#chineseart

Chinese Expressionism

Those who are familiar with Zeng Fanzhi likely know of him because of his Mask series, one of which (the first in this album) sold for $9.7 million, a record for contemporary Asian art. Zeng was born in Wuhan in 1964, a rather large city in the central province of Hubei, but now lives and works out of Beijing.

The album includes a fair sampling of Zeng's Mask series, a few from his also well-known Hospital series and a couple of paintings of Chairman Mao for good measure.

Hope you enjoy!

#chineseart___

posted image

2012-04-03 01:09:02 (3 comments, 1 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

___

2012-04-01 05:43:43 (11 comments, 0 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Winter holiday and online hibernation
Not some April Fool's tomfoolery

Two months to the day...not that very many people appeared to notice...I'm back online and on G+. I had nine weeks of winter holiday to fritter away this year and I spent the first month of it habitually and merrily doing my G+ thang. We then got a bit of a wild hair and spent the bulk of February traveling, partly due to Spring Festival family obligations, but mostly because we enjoy exploring new horizons.

After we returned to Dalian, I was out of the habit of getting online, or keeping up with G+. As well, I felt like I had been spending a rather inordinate amount of my free time online. So, for the most of March, I opted out of virtual reality and camped out in my real life for some R&R.

The funny thing is, when I decided to opt back in, I discovered my VPN service had expired.... more »

Winter holiday and online hibernation
Not some April Fool's tomfoolery

Two months to the day...not that very many people appeared to notice...I'm back online and on G+. I had nine weeks of winter holiday to fritter away this year and I spent the first month of it habitually and merrily doing my G+ thang. We then got a bit of a wild hair and spent the bulk of February traveling, partly due to Spring Festival family obligations, but mostly because we enjoy exploring new horizons.

After we returned to Dalian, I was out of the habit of getting online, or keeping up with G+. As well, I felt like I had been spending a rather inordinate amount of my free time online. So, for the most of March, I opted out of virtual reality and camped out in my real life for some R&R.

The funny thing is, when I decided to opt back in, I discovered my VPN service had expired. And that my VPN service provider had gone out of business. Then, I also discovered that China blocks most all websites leading to VPN providers. It took a bit of virtual contortion, but I finally managed to nail down a new VPN service.

I'm back. For whatever that's worth to whomever. I do appreciate the oh so few of you who noticed and mused here and there whatever happened to that guy in China. I may not maintain as constant a presence as I did before my hibernation, but I'll be here and look forward to reconnecting with old friends.___

posted image

2012-02-01 00:41:54 (4 comments, 5 reshares, 30 +1s)Open 

Chinese Art

As indicated, here is the more colorful work of Foshan artist Hua Tunan...

#chineseart

Chinese Art

As indicated, here is the more colorful work of Foshan artist Hua Tunan...

#chineseart___

posted image

2012-02-01 00:39:50 (0 comments, 2 reshares, 6 +1s)Open 

Art | Hua Tunan

Art | Hua Tunan___

posted image

2012-02-01 00:39:28 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 3 +1s)Open 

___

posted image

2012-02-01 00:37:45 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

___

posted image

2012-02-01 00:34:30 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 5 +1s)Open 

Chinese Art

This work titled One Sperm, Whole Universe is by Foshan-based artist Hua Tunan. Most of his work is wildly colorful, so I thought I'd start here with the more muted tones.

#chineseart

Chinese Art

This work titled One Sperm, Whole Universe is by Foshan-based artist Hua Tunan. Most of his work is wildly colorful, so I thought I'd start here with the more muted tones.

#chineseart___

posted image

2012-01-31 23:59:31 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Chinese Art

I took a week off from G+, the longest breather in the six months I've been here, so here's some art to break the ice and get back in the swing of sharing. I've posted some art by Song Qina before, but these two paintings have a very different feel to them. Also, I failed to make the album public before, but it should be available now so you can look back at her previous works.

#chineseart

Chinese Art

I took a week off from G+, the longest breather in the six months I've been here, so here's some art to break the ice and get back in the swing of sharing. I've posted some art by Song Qina before, but these two paintings have a very different feel to them. Also, I failed to make the album public before, but it should be available now so you can look back at her previous works.

#chineseart___

posted image

2012-01-31 23:53:40 (1 comments, 1 reshares, 9 +1s)Open 

___

posted image

2012-01-24 22:54:16 (5 comments, 1 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

G+ nonplusser

Is anyone else experiencing the same weirdness lately – receiving a lot of notifications of posts from G+ers whom you do not have circled? Instead of being relegated to incoming, the posts for some rather random group of uncircled users are showing up in my notifications...and without any direct +mentions of me.

It's annoying and clutters up finding content that's actually related to my activity on G+, but I suppose it can be a good thing now and then or I would never have seen this clever post.

I've been to your lovely island nation three times, +Angelo Topacio, and just about everything there is more fun, except perhaps security checks and armed guards at shopping malls, coffee shops and fast food joints.

Anyway, was just wondering if anyone else is catching the same unexpected content and thought I'd do my part top... more »

Things That Are More Fun in the Philippines___G+ nonplusser

Is anyone else experiencing the same weirdness lately – receiving a lot of notifications of posts from G+ers whom you do not have circled? Instead of being relegated to incoming, the posts for some rather random group of uncircled users are showing up in my notifications...and without any direct +mentions of me.

It's annoying and clutters up finding content that's actually related to my activity on G+, but I suppose it can be a good thing now and then or I would never have seen this clever post.

I've been to your lovely island nation three times, +Angelo Topacio, and just about everything there is more fun, except perhaps security checks and armed guards at shopping malls, coffee shops and fast food joints.

Anyway, was just wondering if anyone else is catching the same unexpected content and thought I'd do my part to promote tourism in the Philippines while I was at it.

posted image

2012-01-24 01:27:58 (11 comments, 2 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

"Dragon" baby boom expected in China

As well as many other Asian countries because the dragon, quite unlike Western dragon mythology, is the most auspicious of the zodiac signs in Chinese culture, often associated with intelligence, strength, good fortune and those destined for success. According to the Xinhua state news agency, the country is expecting a five percent rise in babies born in 2012. And a recent poll conducted in Hong Kong revealed that 70% of couples desire "dragon babies."

Even in Taiwan, a country with one of the world's lowest birth rates, government officials appear to be tickled baby pink in anticipation. Although some expectant parents fret that the influx of babies will result in stressful competition for their children's future education and employment. Which might just mean more "Tiger Moms" will be raising Dragon... more »

"Dragon" baby boom expected in China

As well as many other Asian countries because the dragon, quite unlike Western dragon mythology, is the most auspicious of the zodiac signs in Chinese culture, often associated with intelligence, strength, good fortune and those destined for success. According to the Xinhua state news agency, the country is expecting a five percent rise in babies born in 2012. And a recent poll conducted in Hong Kong revealed that 70% of couples desire "dragon babies."

Even in Taiwan, a country with one of the world's lowest birth rates, government officials appear to be tickled baby pink in anticipation. Although some expectant parents fret that the influx of babies will result in stressful competition for their children's future education and employment. Which might just mean more "Tiger Moms" will be raising Dragon Babies.

Some famous dragon babies include Bruce Lee (often affectionately called Xiao Long, or little dragon, by the Chinese), Salvadore Dali and Bill Clinton.

I happen to be a Horse... [nicker nicker]___

posted image

2012-01-22 02:58:24 (1 comments, 2 reshares, 16 +1s)Open 

Xin Nian Kuai le!

Happy Chinese New Year! Folks all over the world are preparing to ring in the Year of the Dragon, while here in Dalian (and most of China) they are booming it in with fireworks. Pretty much nonstop as I write and for the next week or so.

One of the more popular customs, especially for children, is the giving of hong bao (red envelopes), more colloquially known as lucky money. Even on up through college years, children eagerly look forward to this time of year and receiving their lucky money.

This shot is from an album by photographer Jason Lee, who must have two of the most precious little daughters anywhere on the planet and I imagine this is pretty much how they look just about now. Or, real soon...

Wishing everyone peace, prosperity and good health!

Xin Nian Kuai le!

Happy Chinese New Year! Folks all over the world are preparing to ring in the Year of the Dragon, while here in Dalian (and most of China) they are booming it in with fireworks. Pretty much nonstop as I write and for the next week or so.

One of the more popular customs, especially for children, is the giving of hong bao (red envelopes), more colloquially known as lucky money. Even on up through college years, children eagerly look forward to this time of year and receiving their lucky money.

This shot is from an album by photographer Jason Lee, who must have two of the most precious little daughters anywhere on the planet and I imagine this is pretty much how they look just about now. Or, real soon...

Wishing everyone peace, prosperity and good health!___

posted image

2012-01-22 02:04:56 (5 comments, 2 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

G+ follower heat map

I wish I could remember who shared their map a few days ago, but it's lost in the shuffle so I can't give them credit for turning me on to this feature on CircleCount.com. Only about a third of the nearly 5,000 people following me are shown on the map, but I imagine it's fairly representative.

I wasn't too surprised to see that the largest percentage from one country (40%) hail from my native land, but I really had no idea I had so many followers from Europe. Or that I have twice as many followers from India (6%) than from China. (Although I suspect this particular data point is skewed since I've noticed that many Chinese don't set a location or make their location public.)

The gender breakdown, 4:1 male to female, doesn't surprise me either, although it doesn't necessarily jive with my real time interaction here.... more »

G+ follower heat map

I wish I could remember who shared their map a few days ago, but it's lost in the shuffle so I can't give them credit for turning me on to this feature on CircleCount.com. Only about a third of the nearly 5,000 people following me are shown on the map, but I imagine it's fairly representative.

I wasn't too surprised to see that the largest percentage from one country (40%) hail from my native land, but I really had no idea I had so many followers from Europe. Or that I have twice as many followers from India (6%) than from China. (Although I suspect this particular data point is skewed since I've noticed that many Chinese don't set a location or make their location public.)

The gender breakdown, 4:1 male to female, doesn't surprise me either, although it doesn't necessarily jive with my real time interaction here. At least half of the engagement I've experienced is with the fairest of G+ers.

The only sad note I can conclude from this map is that no one from Greenland even has a clue that I exist. Can anyone help?___

posted image

2012-01-18 01:16:50 (1 comments, 4 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Standard programming for this stream has been suspended to support the global protest against internet censorship.

That is all...

Standard programming for this stream has been suspended to support the global protest against internet censorship.

That is all...___

posted image

2012-01-18 00:59:24 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 7 +1s)Open 

SOPA sucks life out of the internet

SOPA sucks life out of the internet___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:58:41 (34 comments, 4 reshares, 11 +1s)Open 

Transformation – Before and After

China might still be considered a developing nation, but some Chinese girls have certainly developed a knack for make-up. And here are some before and after shots that make me wonder whether they're even the same girl.

I've never been a fan of make-up and much prefer a natural look. And the overwhelming majority of Chinese girls do not use cosmetics, so don't be fooled by these posers as they are not representative.

BTW, it's the same girl in the last five images and apparently Luan Ling Nini is rather well known for her transformations. She has more posted on her blog (goo.gl/CZonX), if you're interested.

Here are a few of the comments by Chinese netizens...

Fuck, and to think I’ve YY‘d before to those pretty online MM! [YY'd means, ah, pleased himself and MM means"... more »

Transformation – Before and After

China might still be considered a developing nation, but some Chinese girls have certainly developed a knack for make-up. And here are some before and after shots that make me wonder whether they're even the same girl.

I've never been a fan of make-up and much prefer a natural look. And the overwhelming majority of Chinese girls do not use cosmetics, so don't be fooled by these posers as they are not representative.

BTW, it's the same girl in the last five images and apparently Luan Ling Nini is rather well known for her transformations. She has more posted on her blog (goo.gl/CZonX), if you're interested.

Here are a few of the comments by Chinese netizens...

Fuck, and to think I’ve YY‘d before to those pretty online MM! [YY'd means, ah, pleased himself and MM means "meimei," or girl.]

How pretty someone is after make-up is directly proportional to how frightening they are after removing make-up. Those with thick make-up I normally pass on, as I’m scared.

Motherfucking, I’m never going to talk to young women with heavy make-up ever again, this is too frightening.

Women these days are either too ghastly to look at, or they’ll scare you to death when they take off their make-up.

Ling Luan Ni Ni is too disgusting. The others weren’t bad originally.

These days, it is the Chinese who are the best at make-up.

Some guy got married and discovered that night that his wife had changed into another person!!!___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:52 (1 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:50 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 2 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:49 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:48 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:47 (2 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:46 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:45 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:44 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:43 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:42 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:40 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:39 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:38 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 1 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

posted image

2012-01-16 03:41:37 (0 comments, 0 reshares, 0 +1s)Open 

Before and After

Before and After___

Buttons

A special service of CircleCount.com is the following button.

The button shows the number of followers you have directly in a small button. You can add this button to your website, like the +1-Button of Google or the Like-Button of Facebook.






You can add this button directly in your website. For more information about the CircleCount Buttons and the description how to add them to another page click here.

Bryan JonesCircloscope